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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Future Climate Engineering Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Engineering Solutions ­ A Climate call from engineers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Summaries of National Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Summary of The Climate Plan

2

US National Climate Assessment (NCA) Scenarios for Assessing Our Climate Future: Issues and Methodological Perspectives Background Whitepaper for Participants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This whitepaper is intended to provide a starting point for discussion at a workshop for the National Climate Assessment (NCA) that focuses on the use and development of scenarios. The paper will provide background needed by participants in the workshop in order to review options for developing and using scenarios in NCA. The paper briefly defines key terms and establishes a conceptual framework for developing consistent scenarios across different end uses and spatial scales. It reviews uses of scenarios in past U.S. national assessments and identifies potential users of and needs for scenarios for both the report scheduled for release in June 2013 and to support an ongoing distributed assessment process in sectors and regions around the country. Because scenarios prepared for the NCA will need to leverage existing research, the paper takes account of recent scientific advances and activities that could provide needed inputs. Finally, it considers potential approaches for providing methods, data, and other tools for assessment participants. We note that the term 'scenarios' has many meanings. An important goal of the whitepaper (and portions of the workshop agenda) is pedagogical (i.e., to compare different meanings and uses of the term and make assessment participants aware of the need to be explicit about types and uses of scenarios). In climate change research, scenarios have been used to establish bounds for future climate conditions and resulting effects on human and natural systems, given a defined level of greenhouse gas emissions. This quasi-predictive use contrasts with the way decision analysts typically use scenarios (i.e., to consider how robust alternative decisions or strategies may be to variation in key aspects of the future that are uncertain). As will be discussed, in climate change research and assessment, scenarios describe a range of aspects of the future, including major driving forces (both human activities and natural processes), changes in climate and related environmental conditions (e.g., sea level), and evolution of societal capability to respond to climate change. This wide range of scenarios is needed because the implications of climate change for the environment and society depend not only on changes in climate themselves, but also on human responses. This degree of breadth introduces and number of challenges for communication and research.

Moss, Richard H.; Engle, Nathan L.; Hall, John; Jacobs, Kathy; Lempert, Rob; Mearns, L. O.; Melillo, Jerry; Mote, Phil; O'Brien, Sheila; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruane, Alex; Sheppard, Stephen; Vallario, Robert W.; Wiek, Arnim; Wilbanks, Thomas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Climate Change and National Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

Malone, Elizabeth L.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction Richard Allan, Department of Meteorology r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk #12;Text Books and References · Henson, B., Rough Guide to Climate Change http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climate-Change-Guides-Reference- Titles/dp/1858281059 · Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2007, www

Allan, Richard P.

6

Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Future climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Future climate Climate History & Paleoclimate - December 9, 2011 1 #12;Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 IPCC 2007 4th Assessment report (AR4) More information can be found: http://www.ipcc.ch/ Remark: 5th assessment report is due in 2013/2014 2 #12;Climate

Gilli, Adrian

7

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

8

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRF ResearchersPhysicsFacility InflowClimate

9

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water Availability inClimate

10

Climate Past, Climate Present, Climate Future Douglas Nychka,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

series and an energy balance model. 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 -1.5-1.0-0.50.00.5 Year Degree. Supported by US NSF 7th World Congress Prob. and Stat., Singapore July 2008 #12;What is climate? Climate will use statistics to talk about the "known un- knowns" for the Earth's climate Statistics uses

Nychka, Douglas

11

UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE UNITED NATIONS 1992 FCCC/INFORMAL/84 GE.05-62220 (E) 200705 #12;UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE The Parties to this Convention in predictions of climate change, particularly with regard to the timing, magnitude and regional patterns thereof

Laughlin, Robert B.

12

Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant succession and environmental disturbance. Aeolian, or wind-driven, sediment transport drives soil erosion, affects biogeochemical cycles, and can lead to the transport of contaminants. Rates of aeolian sediment transport depend in large part on the type, amount, and spatial pattern of vegetation. In particular, the amount of cover from trees and shrubs, which act as roughness elements, alters rates of aeolian sediment transport. The degree to which the understory is disturbed and the associated spacing of bare soil gaps further influence sediment transport rates. Changes in vegetation structure and patterns over periods of years to centuries may have profound impacts on rates of wind-driven transport. For recently disturbed areas, succession is likely to occur through a series of vegetation communities. Area G currently exhibits a mosaic of vegetation cover, with patches of grass and forbs over closed disposal units, and bare ground in heavily used portions of the site. These areas are surrounded by less disturbed regions of shrubland and pinon-juniper woodland; some ponderosa pine forest is also visible in the canyon along the road. The successional trajectory for the disturbed portions of Area G is expected to proceed from grasses and forbs (which would be established during site closure), to shrubs such as chamisa, to a climax community of pinon-juniper woodland. Although unlikely under current conditions, a ponderosa pine forest could develop over the site if the future climate is wetter. In many ecosystems, substantial and often periodic disturbances such as fire or severe drought can rapidly alter vegetation patterns. Such disturbances are likely to increase in the southwestern US where projections call for a warmer and drier climate. With respect to Area G, the 3 most likely disturbance types are surface fire, crown fire, and drought-induced tree mortality. Each type of disturbance has a different frequency or likelihood of occurrence, but all 3 tend to reset the vegetation succession cycle to earlier stages. The Area G performance assessment and composite an

Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirchner, Thomas B. [New Mexico State University; Breshears, David D. [University of Arizona; Field, Jason P. [University of Arizona

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National on farmland, farmers and farming in the U.S. are presently creating undesirable results affecting future security of existing and potential regional and local food systems and other values by adversely affecting

Miami, University of

14

The future of energy and climate  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The talk will review some of the basic facts about the history and present status of the use of energy and its climatic consequences. It is clear that the world will have to change its way of energy production, the sooner the better. Because of the difficulty of storing electric energy, by far the best energy source for the future is thermal solar from the deserts, with overnight thermal storage. I will give some description of the present status of the technologies involved and end up with a pilot project for Europe and North Africa.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

15

Vietnam-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts)...

16

Dominican Republic-Support for the Preparation of National Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Climate Change Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Dominican Republic-Argentina-Support for the Preparation of National Climate Change Strategy AgencyCompany...

17

Climate Change in Arizona: Current Knowledge and Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's premier climate scientists discuss the impacts of climate change on Arizona's water, energy, healthClimate Change in Arizona: Current Knowledge and Future Collaborations Among the State Universities 230 Arizona State University, Tempe Campus Join us for a cross-university climate forum, as Arizona

Zhang, Junshan

18

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) National Climatic DataNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet AGRICULTURE Overview A wide

19

Global Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5/16/2014 1 Global Climate Change and National Security RADM Jon White Oceanographer and Navigator months. · Oil, gas, and mineral resource exploitation expected to continue · Production/transportatio n

Howat, Ian M.

20

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seas, droughts and fresh water shortages. ? Risk Assessmentinse- curity, water and food shortages, and climate-drivenalso struggle with shortages in fresh water, food and other

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory A multidisciplinary research fields. The Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory routinely partners simulations to improve regional modeling of climate extremes - Partners from Oak Ridge, Lawrence Berkeley

22

Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions Karen of modeling practice in the field of integrated assessment of climate change and ways forward. Past efforts assessments of climate change have concentrated on developing baseline emissions scenarios and analyzing

Wing, Ian Sue

23

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COASTAL HAZARDS OVERVIEW Global

24

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the demand for energy cause blackouts, jeopardizingpeople and trigger severe energy crises, nations with weakdrives up the demand for energy, sickens and kills people

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

How to Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level Policy and Planning in the Water Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Integrate Climate...

26

Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Idaho (UI) was asked to participate in the development of a climate change vulnerability assessment for Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This report describes the outcome of that assessment. The climate change happening now, due in large part to human activities, is expected to continue in the future. UI and INL used a common framework for assessing vulnerability that considers exposure (future climate change), sensitivity (system or component responses to climate), impact (exposure combined with sensitivity), and adaptive capacity (capability of INL to modify operations to minimize climate change impacts) to assess vulnerability. Analyses of climate change (exposure) revealed that warming that is ongoing at INL will continue in the coming decades, with increased warming in later decades and under scenarios of greater greenhouse gas emissions. Projections of precipitation are more uncertain, with multi model means exhibiting somewhat wetter conditions and more wet days per year. Additional impacts relevant to INL include estimates of more burned area and increased evaporation and transpiration, leading to reduced soil moisture and plant growth.

Christopher P. Ischay; Ernest L. Fossum; Polly C. Buotte; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Alexander Peterson

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

OUR FUTURE WITH WEATHER, CLIMATE AND WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....24 Energy and Climate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....28 Sustainable Cities

Stoffelen, Ad

28

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping WaterMonitoringClimate Security

29

COLLOQUIUM: Future Projections of Climate Change: An Update from...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 28, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Future Projections of Climate Change: An Update from IPCC AR5IPCC AR5 WG1 Report Dr. Claudia Tebaldi NCAR I will...

30

Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on...

31

National Climate Report of the Austrian Federal Government  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Third National Climate Report of the Austrian Federal Government Third National Communication in Compliance with the Obligations under the Framework Convention on Climate Change (Federal Law Gazette No. 414/1994) G.A. at UBA contributed to this Report #12;#12;Third National Climate Report of the Austrian Federal

Keeling, Stephen L.

32

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................................................19 Competitive Green Power and Renewable Energy Certificate Marketing..............................45.......................................................................................53 Selected Wholesale MarketersNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future A national laboratory

33

Future Regional Climates Jason Evans,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research, Aspendale, Australia, c School of Physics and Advanced Materials, University of Technology-Scale Climate Phenomena 224 9.2.1. Tropical Cyclones 224 9.2.2. Sea Breezes and Monsoons 226 9.2.3. Orographic Tropical Cyclones 246 9.5.3.1. High-Resolution Process Studies 247 9.5.3.2. Simple/Empirical Downscaling

Evans, Jason

34

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used most effectively. #12;NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite Insurance Litigation Marine and Coastal Ecosystems National Security TOURISM Transportation WaterNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet TOURISM Overview Tourism

35

The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change Informing Decision Makers A Symposium #12;2THE INTERSECTION OF NATIONAL SECURITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE In his May commencement speech to newly commissioned second lieutenants at West Point's grad- uation, President Obama warned that climate change is "a

36

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COAStAl HAzArDS Overview Global

37

Climate mitigation and the future of tropical landscapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use change to meet 21st Century demands for food, fuel, and fiber will occur in the context of both a changing climate as well as societal efforts to mitigate climate change. This changing natural and human environment will have large consequences for forest resources, terrestrial carbon storage and emissions, and food and energy crop production over the next century. Any climate change mitigation policies enacted will change the environment under which land-use decisions are made and alter global land use change patterns. Here we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to explore how climate mitigation policies that achieve a climate stabilization at 4.5 W m-2 radiative forcing in 2100 and value carbon in terrestrial ecosystems interact with future agricultural productivity and food and energy demands to influence land use in the tropics. The regional land use results are downscaled from GCAM regions to produce gridded maps of tropical land use change. We find that tropical forests are preserved only in cases where a climate mitigation policy that values terrestrial carbon is in place, and crop productivity growth continues throughout the century. Crop productivity growth is also necessary to avoid large scale deforestation globally and enable the production of bioenergy crops. The terrestrial carbon pricing assumptions in GCAM are effective at avoiding deforestation even when cropland must expand to meet future food demand.

Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Chini, Louise Parsons; Hurtt, George; Edmonds, James A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Frolking, Steve; Wise, Marshall A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

Climate Prediction Center Products in Support of National Security Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, Climate Prediction Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Prediction Center Products in Support of National Security Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, Climate Prediction Center 5200 Auth Rd. Camp Springs, MD 20746 301-763-8000 x7535 Mike.Halpert@noaa.gov The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) delivers climate prediction, monitoring, and diagnostic products

Miami, University of

39

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate variability and climate change effect on the potential for growing crops for biofuel in GeorgiaNOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National, miscanthus, and other, are already being evaluated due to their large biomass productivity. The local farmers

Miami, University of

40

NOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate data available from NOAA's various climate observing systems as well as the output data from state range of solar, geophysical, environmental, and human dimensions data. As an example of dataNOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Myanmar-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Myanmar-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) AgencyCompany Organization United Kingdom Department for...

42

Indonesia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References "Asia Regional" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIndonesia-SubNationalPlanningforClimateChange(cities,states,districts)&oldid700428...

43

Cambodia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References "Asia Regional" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCambodia-SubNationalPlanningforClimateChange(cities,states,districts)&oldid700434...

44

Workshop on The Nation's Needs for Isotopes: Present and Future...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Workshop on The Nation's Needs for Isotopes: Present and Future Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities...

45

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impacts on National Security Using Satellite Data Authors: Dr. Sara Graves, Todd Berendes in the state of Alabama on critical infrastructure and assets with national security implications. The changeNOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National

Miami, University of

46

Climate change scenario planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decisionmaking process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

Ernst, Kathleen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline [University of Tennessee (UT)] [University of Tennessee (UT)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Climate Change Scenario Planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder Involvement in the Decision-Making Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decision-making process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

Ernst, Kathleen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline [University of Tennessee (UT)] [University of Tennessee (UT)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Interactions Among Emissions, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate Change: Implications for Future Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions Among Emissions, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate Change: Implications for Future emissions, atmospheric chemistry, and climate, we have conducted a series of simulations on 120-year time emissions and different assumptions for chemistry and climate model parameters. To specifically identify

49

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level,civil conflict Anxiety,despair,depression Civil conflict Climate Change Health Effects Food & water Malnutrition

50

Negotiating future climates for public policy: a critical assessment of the development of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or of seasonal forecasting (a few months): Earth system models aim to simulate future climatic evolution over

Hulme, Mike

51

National Engineers Week: Future City Competition  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

2011 Future Cities Competition inspires students all across South Carolina to pursue careers in environmental protection and engineering.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

52

Future Climate Change Impacts on New Mexico's Mountain Sources of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

133 Future Climate Change Impacts on New Mexico's Mountain Sources of Water BEYONDTHEYEAROFWATER Conference. FUTURE CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON NEW MEXICO'S MOUNTAIN SOURCES OF WATER Albert Rango USDA of future climate change and how that is going to impact New Mexico's mountain sources of water. I hope

Johnson, Eric E.

53

A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future 2008 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;1 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the only federal laboratory dedicated

55

Predicting future climate change for the UK and East AngliaPredicting future climate change for the UK and East Anglia Climatic Research Unit (CRU), University of East Anglia, Norwich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting future climate change for the UK and East AngliaPredicting future climate change confidence in the following future changes in UK climate: Average temperature increases Summer temperature part in farming, so we might expect these changes to have an impact on agriculture ­ affecting both

Feigon, Brooke

56

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Partnership, Research &...

57

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future NREL's Campus of the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, energy- efficient data center #12;National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Alternative Fuel Users Facility (AFUF) #12;National Renewable Energy La · The leading efficiency and renewables research center in the world · Designed to meet the nation's crucial

58

Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing Enough Home > Blogs > Dc's blog Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(107) Contributor 5 November, 2014 - 14:49 The latest...

59

A deeper look at climate change and national security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is a long-term process that will trigger a range of multi-dimensional demographic, economic, geopolitical, and national security issues with many unknowns and significant uncertainties. At first glance, climate-change-related national security dimensions seem far removed from today's major national security threats. Yet climate change has already set in motion forces that will require U.S. attention and preparedness. The extent and uncertainty associated with these situations necessitate a move away from conventional security practices, toward a small but flexible portfolio of assets to maintain U.S. interests. Thoughtful action is required now if we are to acquire the capabilities, tools, systems, and institutions needed to meet U.S. national security requirements as they evolve with the emerging stresses and shifts of climate change.

Baker, Arnold Barry; Backus, George A.; Romig, Alton Dale, Jr.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Sandia Participated in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change Luigi climate change model outputs for two climate scenarios. Overall, a substantial number of Mediterranean in climate. For 181 terrestrial mammals (68% of all Mediterranean mammals), we used an ensemble forecasting

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

62

RESEARCH FOR OUR ENERGY FUTURE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research. Right now, we derive the bulk of the energy we use from oil, gasoline, coal, and natural gasRESEARCH FOR OUR ENERGY FUTURE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY #12;ON THE cOVER Energy research technologies and may enable completely new and vastly more efficient energy systems. One of ten national

Ohta, Shigemi

63

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance two-way power flow with communication and control. Renewable Energy Grid Integration As the market

64

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance a given location for the best technology, or a renewable energy technology for the best location, accurate

65

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% postconsumer waste #12;Acknowledgments This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) OfficeNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy NREL is operated by Midwest

66

Future scientists advance to national level  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:ComputingFusion roadmapping SubscribeFuture

67

Climate Change Modeling and Downscaling Issues and Methodological Perspectives for the U.S. National Climate Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the full workshop report for the modeling workshop we did for the National Climate Assessment, with DOE support.

Janetos, Anthony C.; Collins, William D.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah; Hayhoe, Katharine; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hurtt, George

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

National Climate Plan Published by NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the extent to which solar and earth radiation modify climatic conditions, and 4) Gathering more data probably will rely on leased aircraft, an antenna system that will mount on any type of aircraft would

69

Risk assessment of climate systems for national security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change, through drought, flooding, storms, heat waves, and melting Arctic ice, affects the production and flow of resource within and among geographical regions. The interactions among governments, populations, and sectors of the economy require integrated assessment based on risk, through uncertainty quantification (UQ). This project evaluated the capabilities with Sandia National Laboratories to perform such integrated analyses, as they relate to (inter)national security. The combining of the UQ results from climate models with hydrological and economic/infrastructure impact modeling appears to offer the best capability for national security risk assessments.

Backus, George A.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Brown, Theresa Jean; Cai, Ximing [University of Illinois-Urbana; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Constantine, Paul [Stanford University; Dalbey, Keith R.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Fields, Richard; Hart, David Blaine; Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Kerstein, Alan R.; Levy, Michael [National Center for Atmospheric Research; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Najm, Habib N.; Overfelt, James Robert; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Peplinski, William J.; Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Taylor, Mark A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Villa, Daniel L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Future projections of daily precipitation and its extremes in simulations of 21st century climate change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The current generation of climate models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) is used to assess the future changes in daily precipitation… (more)

Yin, Lei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evaluating sub-national building-energy efficiency policy options under uncertainty: Efficient sensitivity testing of alternative climate, technolgical, and socioeconomic futures in a regional intergrated-assessment model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving the energy efficiency of the building stock, commercial equipment and household appliances can have a major impact on energy use, carbon emissions, and building services. Subnational regions such as U.S. states wish to increase their energy efficiency, reduce carbon emissions or adapt to climate change. Evaluating subnational policies to reduce energy use and emissions is difficult because of the uncertainties in socioeconomic factors, technology performance and cost, and energy and climate policies. Climate change may undercut such policies. Assessing these uncertainties can be a significant modeling and computation burden. As part of this uncertainty assessment, this paper demonstrates how a decision-focused sensitivity analysis strategy using fractional factorial methods can be applied to reveal the important drivers for detailed uncertainty analysis.

Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Zhou, Yuyu; Rice, Jennie S.; Patel, Pralit L.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Kyle, G. Page; Kim, Son H.; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 429..447  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 global heterogeneity in climate-induced agricultural variability,Tanzania has the potential to substan could thus export grain to countries as climate change increases the likelihood of severe precipitation

Pittendrigh, Barry

73

Motivation Measurements EVA Results Issues/Future Work Weather and Climate Extremes: cape times shear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivation Measurements EVA Results Issues/Future Work Weather and Climate Extremes: cape times Weather/Climate Extremes 1 / 19 c University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. All rights reserved scales. E Gilleland Weather/Climate Extremes 2 / 19 c University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Gilleland, Eric

74

June 10, 2013 Canada's energy future meeting demand AND the climate change challenge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEDIA TIP June 10, 2013 Canada's energy future ­meeting demand AND the climate change challenge Energy and business reporters are welcome to attend a high-level energy experts' presentation and panel on "Seeking Common Ground on Canada's Energy Future" during the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS

Pedersen, Tom

75

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at ExploraGlobal Sandia Co-Hosts "ClimateMapping

76

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at ExploraGlobal Sandia Co-HostsTheGlobal Climate

77

United Nations Climate Change Conference Durban, South Africa 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United Nations Climate Change Conference Durban, South Africa 2011 COP17/CMP7 #12; The Conferences presents a unique opportunity for South Africa to promote and publicly initiate the transition to a green, President of South Africa Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, Minister of Foreign Affairs of South Africa President

Viola, Ronald

78

Climate Change and National Security | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporous Materials | Center for GasChemicalHanfordClimate

79

Predicting the future of forests in the Mediterranean under climate change, with niche-and process-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the future of forests in the Mediterranean under climate change, with niche- and process important future climatic changes are expected. Here, we assess and compare two commonly used modeling, 2004), and the potential response of these distributions to future climatic change (e.g. Thomas et al

Keenan, Trevor

80

Simulations of Present and Future Climates in the Western United States with Four Nested Regional Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze simulations of present and future climates in the western U.S. performed with four regional climate models (RCMs) nested within two global ocean-atmosphere climate models. Our primary goal is to assess the range of regional climate responses to increased greenhouse gases in available RCM simulations. The four RCMs used different geographical domains, different increased greenhouse gas scenarios for future-climate simulations, and (in some cases) different lateral boundary conditions. For simulations of the present climate, we compare RCM results to observations and to results of the GCM that provided lateral boundary conditions to the RCM. For future-climate (increased greenhouse gas) simulations, we compare RCM results to each other and to results of the driving GCMs. When results are spatially averaged over the western U.S., we find that the results of each RCM closely follow those of the driving GCM in the same region, in both present and future climates. This is true even though the study area is in some cases a small fraction of the RCM domain. Precipitation responses predicted by the RCMs are in many regions not statistically significant compared to interannual variability. Where the predicted precipitation responses are statistically significant, they are positive. The models agree that near-surface temperatures will increase, but do not agree on the spatial pattern of this increase. The four RCMs produce very different estimates of water content of snow in the present climate, and of the change in this water content in response to increased greenhouse gases.

Duffy, Phil; Arritt, R.; Coquard, J.; Gutowski, William; Han, J.; Iorio, J.; Kim, Jongil; Leung, Lai R.; Roads, J.; Zeledon, E.

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

Cane, Mark A.

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

MIDWESTERN REGIONAL CENTER OF THE DOE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATIC CHANGE RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of NICCR (National Institute for Climatic Change Research) was to mobilize university researchers, from all regions of the country, in support of the climatic change research objectives of DOE/BER. The NICCR Midwestern Regional Center (MRC) supported work in the following states: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio. The MRC of NICCR was able to support nearly $8 million in climatic change research, including $6,671,303 for twenty projects solicited and selected by the MRC over five requests for proposals (RFPs) and $1,051,666 for the final year of ten projects from the discontinued DOE NIGEC (National Institute for Global Environmental Change) program. The projects selected and funded by the MRC resulted in 135 peer-reviewed publications and supported the training of 25 PhD students and 23 Masters students. Another 36 publications were generated by the final year of continuing NIGEC projects supported by the MRC. The projects funded by the MRC used a variety of approaches to answer questions relevant to the DOE’s climate change research program. These included experiments that manipulated temperature, moisture and other global change factors; studies that sought to understand how the distribution of species and ecosystems might change under future climates; studies that used measurements and modeling to examine current ecosystem fluxes of energy and mass and those that would exist under future conditions; and studies that synthesized existing data sets to improve our understanding of the effects of climatic change on terrestrial ecosystems. In all of these efforts, the MRC specifically sought to identify and quantify responses of terrestrial ecosystems that were not well understood or not well modeled by current efforts. The MRC also sought to better understand and model important feedbacks between terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry, and regional and global climate systems. The broad variety of projects the MRC has supported gave us a unique opportunity to greatly improve our ability to predict the future health, composition and function of important agricultural and natural terrestrial ecosystems within the Midwestern Region.

Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

83

Modelling the future distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungus: the influence of climate and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FORUM Modelling the future distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungus: the influence of climate of amphibians are believed to be caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Hence, determining its present and future environmental suitability should help to inform management and surveillance

Rohr, Jason

84

Temperature response to future urbanization and climate change Daniel Argueso Jason P. Evans Lluis Fita  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that covers the Sydney area. The future simulation incorporates the projected changes in the urban area in regions of intense energy consumption and low net radiation. The imperviousness of urban surfaces was alsoTemperature response to future urbanization and climate change Daniel Argu¨eso · Jason P. Evans

Evans, Jason

85

PROJECTED EFFECTS OF FUTURE CLIMATES ON FRESHWATER FISHES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in California (121 native fish taxa and 43 aliens). The methodology uses expert opinions of the authors than alien species. Fifty percent of natives had critical or high baseline vulnerability versus none for aliens; 83 percent had critical or high climate change vulnerability versus 19 percent for aliens

86

Consideration of future climatic changes in three geologic settings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff at Pacific Northwest Laboratory are evaluating the potential for climatic change to affect the integrity of a nuclear waste repository at: (1) the Gibson Dome area of Utah; (2) the Palo Duro Basin of Texas; and (3) the Gulf Coast. Because a major assumption in this analysis is that a glacial age will recur, the climate of the last glacial period is examined for each location. Combining these paleoclimatic data with the current climatic data, each location is evaluated in light of the criteria given in Draft Revised General Guidelines for Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories (10 CFR 960). The results of this analysis suggest that sites located in these areas are likely to meet the climate requirements set forth in the guidelines. However, further study is needed before a definitive statement can be made. In particular, modeling the effect of sea level change on the Gulf Coast groundwater system and obtaining an improved estimation for the increase in recharge during glacier times at the Texas and Utah locations would be useful. Several stragegies are presented for accomplishing this work. 94 references, 27 figures, 5 tables.

Petrie, G.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Operational approaches to managing forests of the future in Mediterranean regions within a context of changing climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches to managing forests of the future in Mediterranean regions within a context of changing climates plans under changing climates that could be applicable to forests with Mediterranean climates. We of changing climates This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text

Stephens, Scott L.

88

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Prospects for future climate change and the reasons for early action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas, and to a lesser extent deforestation, land-cover change, and emissions of halocarbons and other greenhouse gases, are rapidly increasing the atmospheric concentrations of climate-warming gases. The global average temperature is already approximately 0.8{sup o}C above its preindustrial level, and present atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases will contribute to further warming of 0.5-1{sup o}C as equilibrium is re-established. Warming has been and will be greater in mid and high latitudes compared with low latitudes, over land compared with oceans, and at night compared with day. As emissions continue to increase, both warming and the commitment to future warming are presently increasing at a rate of approximately 0.2{sup o}C per decade, with projections that the rate of warming will further increase if emission controls are not put in place. Such warming and the associated changes are likely to result in severe impacts on key societal and environmental support systems. Present estimates are that limiting the increase in global average surface temperature to no more than 2-2.5{sup o}C above its 1750 value of approximately 15{sup o}C will be required to avoid the most catastrophic, but certainly not all, consequences of climate change. Accomplishing this will require reducing emissions sharply by 2050 and to near zero by 2100. This can only be achieved if: (1) developed nations move rapidly to demonstrate that a modem society can function without reliance on technologies that release carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases to the atmosphere; and (2) if developing nations act in the near-term to sharply limit their non-CO{sub 2} emissions while minimizing growth in CO{sub 2} emissions, and then in the long-term join with the developed nations to reduce all emissions as cost-effective technologies are developed. 183 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

MacCracken, Michael C. [Climate Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Alternative futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Task Force was asked to propose alternate futures for the Department of Energy laboratories noted in the report. The authors` intensive ten months` study revealed multiple missions and sub-missions--traditional missions and new missions--programs and projects--each with factors of merit. They respectively suggest that the essence of what the Department, and particularly the laboratories, should and do stand for: the energy agenda. Under the overarching energy agenda--the labs serving the energy opportunities--they comment on their national security role, the all important energy role, all related environmental roles, the science and engineering underpinning for all the above, a focused economic role, and conclude with governance/organization change recommendations.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Rwanda-Project to Develop a National Strategy on Climate Change...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for International Development, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Smith School for Enterprise and Environment, University of Oxford Sector Climate, Energy,...

93

Radiative forcing in the ACCMIP historical and future climate simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) examined the short-lived drivers of climate change in current climate models. Here we evaluate the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The models reproduce present-day total aerosol optical depth (AOD) relatively well, though many are biased low. Contributions from individual aerosol components are quite different, however, and most models underestimate east Asian AOD. The models capture most 1980-2000 AOD trends well, but underpredict increases over the Yellow/Eastern Sea. They strongly underestimate absorbing AOD in many regions. We examine both the direct radiative forcing (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (effective radiative forcing; ERF, including direct and indirect effects). The models’ all-sky 1850 to 2000 global mean annual average total aerosol RF is (mean; range) ?0.26Wm?2; ?0.06 to ?0.49Wm?2. Screening based on model skill in capturing observed AOD yields a best estimate of ?0.42Wm?2; ?0.33 to ?0.50Wm?2, including adjustment for missing aerosol components in some models. Many ACCMIP and CMIP5 models appear to produce substantially smaller aerosol RF than this best estimate. Climate feedbacks contribute substantially (35 to ?58 %) to modeled historical aerosol RF. The 1850 to 2000 aerosol ERF is ?1.17Wm?2; ?0.71 to ?1.44Wm?2. Thus adjustments, including clouds, typically cause greater forcing than direct RF. Despite this, the multi-model spread relative to the mean is typically the same for ERF as it is for RF, or even smaller, over areas with substantial forcing. The largest 1850 to 2000 negative aerosol RF and ERF values are over and near Europe, south and east Asia and North America. ERF, however, is positive over the Sahara, the Karakoram, high Southern latitudes and especially the Arctic. Global aerosol RF peaks in most models around 1980, declining thereafter with only weak sensitivity to the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP). One model, however, projects approximately stable RF levels, while two show increasingly negative RF due to nitrate (not included in most models). Aerosol ERF, in contrast, becomes more negative during 1980 to 2000. During this period, increased Asian emissions appear to have a larger impact on aerosol ERF than European and North American decreases due to their being upwind of the large, relatively pristine Pacific Ocean. There is no clear relationship between historical aerosol ERF and climate sensitivity in the CMIP5 subset of ACCMIP models. In the ACCMIP/CMIP5 models, historical aerosol ERF of about ?0.8 to ?1.5Wm?2 is most consistent with observed historical warming. Aerosol ERF masks a large portion of greenhouse forcing during the late 20th and early 21st century at the global scale. Regionally, aerosol ERF is so large that net forcing is negative over most industrialized and biomass burning regions through 1980, but remains strongly negative only over east and southeast Asia by 2000. Net forcing is strongly positive by 1980 over most deserts, the Arctic, Australia, and most tropical oceans. Both the magnitude of and area covered by positive forcing expand steadily thereafter.

Shindell, Drew; Lamarque, J.-F.; Schulz, M.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Chin, Mian; Young, P. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Rotstayn, Leon; Mahowald, N. M.; Milly, G.; Faluvegi, G.; Balkanski, Y.; Collins, W. J.; Conley, Andrew; Dalsoren, S.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Liu, Xiaohong; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Takemura, T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Lo, Fiona

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

"Developing Nationally Significant Infrastructure: the Future Role of Energy Planning"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the EU Emissions Trading Scheme; · a `Carbon Reduction Commitment' (enabled under the Climate Change Bill) for large commercial organisations outside both the EU Emissions Trading Scheme and current Climate Change

Martin, Ralph R.

95

Laying the Foundation for a More Energy Efficient Future: Reducing Climate Change through Green Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Andrew Turco Energy for Sustainable Development Task Force, Spring 2006 Professor Mauzerall May 3Laying the Foundation for a More Energy Efficient Future: Reducing Climate Change through Green, and Steven Pacala and Robert Socolow have developed a stabilization wedges concept to addresses how global

Mauzerall, Denise

96

ARM Best Estimate Data (ARMBE) Products for Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data set was created for the Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) model testbed project and is an extension of the hourly average ARMBE dataset to other extended facility sites and to include uncertainty estimates. Uncertainty estimates were needed in order to use uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques with the data.

Riihimaki, Laura; Gaustad, Krista; McFarlane, Sally

97

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

ARM Best Estimate Data (ARMBE) Products for Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data set was created for the Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) model testbed project and is an extension of the hourly average ARMBE dataset to other extended facility sites and to include uncertainty estimates. Uncertainty estimates were needed in order to use uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques with the data.

Riihimaki, Laura; Gaustad, Krista; McFarlane, Sally

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The uncertain future of climate uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by anthropogenic greenhouse- gas (GHG) emissions. The conclusions of the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report (AR4 difficult. In addition, the uncertainty level re- garding future climate evolution has not decreased signifi reasons motivate us to (a) revisit here a key cause for the persisting uncertainties, in order

Ghil, Michael

100

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Present and future climate resources for various types of tourism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Present and future climate resources for various types of tourism in the Bay region for beach holidays in Europe. It is based on a mass tourism model strongly modulated by seasonality and with high environmental costs. Main tourism stakeholders are currently implementing

Romero, Romu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Science for Our Nation's Energy Future | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

DOE Announcements Science for Our Nation's Energy Future Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC...

102

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

insure property and livelihoods against climate-related risks." To begin the forum, three panels gave presentations: The current state of climate research. Kate Ricke (Stanford...

103

National Aggregates of Geospatial Data Collection: Population, Landscape And Climate Estimates, Version 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 National Aggregates of Geospatial Data Collection: Population, Landscape And Climate Estimates of Geospatial Data: Population, Landscape and Climate Estimates Version 3 (PLACE III), Palisades, NY: CIESIN.............................................................................................................. 16 #12;2 I. Introduction The National Aggregates of Geospatial Data collection converts geospatial

Columbia University

104

Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Impacts of Future Climate and Emission Changes on U.S. Air Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in climate and emissions will affect future air quality. In this work, simulations of present (2001-2005) and future (2026-2030) regional air quality are conducted with the newly released CMAQ version 5.0 to examine the individual and combined impacts of simulated future climate and anthropogenic emission projections on air quality over the U.S. Current (2001-2005) meteorological and chemical predictions are evaluated against observational data to assess the model’s capability in reproducing the seasonal differences. Overall, WRF and CMAQ perform reasonably well. Increased temperatures (up to 3.18 °C) and decreased ventilation (up to 157 m in planetary boundary layer height) are found in both future winter and summer, with more prominent changes in winter. Increases in future temperatures result in increased isoprene and terpene emissions in winter and summer, driving the increase in maximum 8-h average O3 (up to 5.0 ppb) over the eastern U.S. in winter while decreases in NOx emissions drive the decrease in O3 over most of the U.S. in summer. Future concentrations of PM2.5 in winter and summer and many of its components including organic matter in winter, ammonium and nitrate in summer, and sulfate in winter and summer, decrease due to decreases in primary anthropogenic emissions and the concentrations of secondary anthropogenic pollutants and increased precipitation in winter. Future winter and summer dry and wet deposition fluxes are spatially variable and increase with increasing surface resistance and precipitation (e.g., NH4+ and NO3- dry and wet deposition fluxes increase in winter over much of the U.S.), respectively, and decrease with a decrease in ambient particulate concentrations (e.g., SO42- dry and wet deposition fluxes decrease over the eastern U.S. in summer and winter). Sensitivity simulations show that anthropogenic emission projections dominate over changes in climate in their impacts on the U.S. air quality in the near future. Changes in some regions/species, however, are dominated by climate and/or both climate and anthropogenic emissions, especially in future years that are marked by meteorological conditions conducive to poor air quality.

Penrod, Ashley; Zhang, Yang; Wang, K.; Wu, Shiang Yuh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas, heightens the need for additional weather and climate data for improved decision making. Having climate and weather- related information. Some major groups include: · Insurance and reinsurance companies to translate climate data into accessible, useful, and accurate products; and to leverage NCDC's climate

107

The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

108

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

109

U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research...

110

Video: Future STEM Leaders Compete in the National Science Bowl  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Follow four students from Washington, D.C.'s Woodrow Wilson High School as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

111

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Future STEM Leaders Prepare for the National Science Bowl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, students from across the country converge on Washington, DC, for the National Science Bowl, an intense academic competition that tests the students' knowledge in science, engineering, chemistry, math and Earth science. Follow one team, from Washington DC's Woodrow Wilson High School, as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

Benjamin, Angela

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

National Ignition Facility faces an uncertain future David Kramer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-member user group, with 22% of its members coming from host Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL at the National Ignition Facility to achieve a self-sustaining fusion reaction fell short. Now NIF stands to lose that were specified for NIF when the massive laser facility was ap- proved for construction in 1996

114

Future STEM Leaders Prepare for the National Science Bowl  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Each year, students from across the country converge on Washington, DC, for the National Science Bowl, an intense academic competition that tests the students' knowledge in science, engineering, chemistry, math and Earth science. Follow one team, from Washington DC's Woodrow Wilson High School, as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

Benjamin, Angela

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment Energy and Climate Change  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new "low carbon" and "climate resilient" energy system. It will emphasize putting ideas into action - moving forward on policy and practice.

116

University of Washington Focus the Nation Panel: Climate Change Impacts on Indigenous Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiesel and solar energy), and they have revised their commercial dredging policy so that only vacuum that because of their dependence on local resources and a life-way that is adapted to the cold arctic climateUniversity of Washington Focus the Nation Panel: Climate Change Impacts on Indigenous Populations 1

Rigor, Ignatius G.

117

The Influence on Climate Change of Differing Scenarios for Future Development Analyzed Using the MIT Integrated Global System Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wide variety of scenarios for future development have played significant roles in climate policy discussions. This paper presents projections of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, sea level rise due to thermal expansion ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

118

Globalization and the Future of the National Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many observers are concerned that the growth of globalization will undermine and destroy national economies. For the past six years, Professor Suzanne Berger, the Raphael Dorman and Helen Starbuck Professor of Political ...

Boyd, James Patrick

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

119

A new scenario framework for climate change research: background, process, and future directions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scientific community is developing new integrated global, regional, and sectoral scenarios to facilitate interdisciplinary research and assessment to explore the range of possible future climates and related physical changes could pose to human and natural systems; how these could interact with social, economic, and environmental development pathways; the degree to which mitigation and adaptation policies can avoid and reduce those risks; the costs and benefits of various policy mixes; residual impacts under alternative pathways; and the relationship with sustainable development. This paper provides the background to, and process of, developing the conceptual framework for these scenarios, described in three other papers in this Special Issue (van Vuuren et al.; O'Neill et al.; Kriegler et al.). The paper also discusses research needs to further develop and apply this framework. The goal is to encourage climate change researchers from a broad range of perspectives and disciplines to work together to develop policy-relevant scenarios and explore the implications of different possible futures for the challenges and opportunities human and natural systems could face with increasing climate change.

Ebi, Kristie L.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Kram, Tom; Arnell, Nigel; Carter, Tim; Edmonds, James A.; Kriegler, Elmar; Mathur, Ritu; O'Neill, Brian; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Zwickel, Timm

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

93 Current projects Policy related and other Staff activities Climate change is subject of both national and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Netherlands' National Communication on Climate Change Policies, published by the Ministry of Spatial Planning93 Current projects · Policy related and other Staff activities Climate change is subject of both on Climate Change (FCCC) The Climate-Policy Support Unit provides scientific support to the Netherlands

Haak, Hein

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Prospects for Future Climate Change and the Reasons for Early Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Never before in human history has the global community collectively faced an environmental issue as complex as climate change. Left unchecked, the rapidly growing concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are projected to change the world we live in to one that is likely to have longer and more severe droughts and water shortages, more intense storms, flooding of coastal communities, worsening of air pollution,migration of forests, and loss of valuable ecosystems.1 The scenario of this world presents presents a bleak future for our children and grandchildren.

Edgerton, Sylvia A.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Research on Climate Change National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Mountain building affects climate because the erosion of silicate rocks decreases the CO2 content of the Tibetan Plateau. A complementary approach to silicate weathering is provided by lithium isotopes

123

Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

updated "National Action Plan Vision for 2025: A Framework for Change." Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy Efficient Future, November 18, 2008...

124

Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop, Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Challenges: Abstract Submission Presentation Title: Real-time Energy and Climate Simulations: Tools Lynmar Ave., Asheville NC 28804, apjones@climateinteractive.org Presentation Abstract: Under the United.org. #12;Two journal articles are currently under review on this work, one (on the model) at "Climatic

Miami, University of

126

Big Thicket National Preserve: Trails to the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Addition Act did not immediately transfer ownership of the land from timber companies to the National Park Service. Funds still had to be allocated to purchase the land. Completing the acquisition of these lands will cost an estimated $15 to $20... worked closely with an energy company in the region and had plans to apply for non-profit status. However, efforts began to slip and finally failed as funding decreased. Other efforts at improving the economic development in the Big Thicket region have...

Anderson, Luke; Allen, Chris; Elrod, Leah; Forbes, Melissa; Harbin, Hannah; Stromm, Diann

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Shaping the future of nuclear detection | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclearhas 'Natitude'SecurityAdministration ranked third

128

Global Nuclear Futures Program Manager, Sandia National Laboratories |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiant ProteaseGlassNational Nuclear

129

High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

Lackmann, Gary

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

NNSA's National Laboratories Engage in Climate Modeling, Data Gathering |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclearhas 'Natitude' | National NuclearAdministrator forNational Nuclear

131

INCT FOR CLIMATE CHANGE | 2009.2010 | ACTIVITY REPORT | BRAzIL National Institute of Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INCT FOR CLIMATE CHANGE | 2009.2010 | ACTIVITY REPORT | BRAzIL National Institute of Science and Technology for Climate Change December 2010 ISSN 2179-5754 #12;2 Overall coordination Carlos Programa FAPESP de Pesquisa sobre Mudanças Climáticas Globais Executive Board of INCT for Climate Change

132

Potential Climate Change Impacts on Wind Resources in Oklahoma: a Focus on Future Energy Output.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The current study focused on the potential climate change effects on wind resources in Oklahoma. This was a quantitative study that involved Global Climate Model… (more)

Dryden, James Mack, Jr.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Mexico National Institute of Ecology and Climate Change (INECC) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanosElectric CoMeridianMetlakatla PowerS CAEnergy

134

Ethiopia-Climate Change National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplains a4 Climate ZoneEthicOhm Jump to:Energy

135

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, drought effects have gained attention. The Agricultural Reference Index for Drought (ARID) was developed in order to quantify drought and better understand its effect on agriculture. ARID values range from 0 to 1 Security Challenges: Abstract Submission Presentation Title: An AgroClimate web tool for ARID (Agricultural

Miami, University of

136

National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.3 Generalization as Academic Research 3.3 Education and Training, and Sustainable Development of Fusion Base Technology 3.3.1 Education and Training 3.3.2 Sustainable Development of Fusion Basic Technology 3National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation) 26

137

Hydropower'10 6th International Hydropower Conference, 13 February 2010, Troms, NORWAY Understanding Future Climate Impacts on Scotland's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydropower'10 ­ 6th International Hydropower Conference, 13 February 2010, Tromsø, NORWAY Understanding Future Climate Impacts on Scotland's Hydropower Resource Niall Duncan*, Gareth. P. Harrison and A energy by 2020. As hydropower currently makes up over 10% (1383 MW) of Scotland's installed generation

Harrison, Gareth

138

Singapore National Climate Change Strategy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,Pvt LtdShrubSimpsonville, SouthSingapore National

139

Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Future projection of mean and variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean Climate systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the ability of the CMIP3/5 models to simulate the Indian-Ocean monsoon systems. The PI along with post-docs investigated research issues ranging from synoptic systems to long-term trends over the Asian monsoon region. The PI applied diagnostic tools such as moist static energy (MSE) to isolate: the moist and radiative processes responsible for extended monsoon breaks over South Asia, precursors in the ENSO-monsoon association, reasons for the drying tendency over South Asia and the possible effect on tropical Indian Ocean climate anomalies influencing certain aspects of ENSO characteristics. By diagnosing various observations and coupled model simulations, we developed working hypothesis and tested them by carrying out sensitivity experiments with both linear and nonlinear models. Possible physical and dynamical reasons for model sensitivities were deduced. On the teleconnection front, the ability of CMIP5 models in representing the monsoon-desert mechanism was examined recently. Further more, we have applied a suite of diagnostics and have performed an in depth analysis on CMIP5 integrations to isolate the possible reasons for the ENSO-monsoon linkage or lack thereof. The PI has collaborated with Dr. K.R. Sperber of PCMDI and other CLIVAR Asian-Australian monsoon panel members in understanding the ability of CMIP3/5 models in capturing monsoon and its spectrum of variability. The objective and process-based diagnostics aided in selecting models that best represent the present-day monsoon and its variability that are then employed for future projections. Two major highlights were an invitation to write a review on present understanding monsoons in a changing climate in Nature Climate Change, and identification of an east-west shift in observed monsoon rainfall (more rainfall over tropical western Pacific and drying tendency over South Asia) in the last six decades and attributing that shift to SST rise over the tropical western Pacific. On the training of post-doctoral scientists: the PI spent considerable amount of time and efforts in introducing the post-docs into climate modeling and designing the numerical experiments. With training provided and knowledge gained, post-docs worked in the project obtained long term positions elsewhere. The PI also enjoyed the experience in managing the works and educating work ethics to the younger generation. Based on the research achievements and publications, the PI gave invited talks in major international monsoon conferences/workshops, and gave lectures in various research organizations in the last six years. Finally, during the project period, the PI attended all the DOE organized PIs meeting and presented the major results. Some of the major implications of the project include: (i) Sustained observational efforts are necessary to monitor the three-dimensional moisture distribution over the Asian monsoon region that would aid in better understanding, modeling and predicting severe monsoons well in advance and (ii) process-based diagnostics lead pathways for model improvements.

Annamalai, H [IPRC, University of Hawaii

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Department of Energy award DE-SC0004164 Climate and National Security: Securing Better Forecasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Climate and National Security: Securing Better Forecasts symposium was attended by senior policy makers and distinguished scientists. The juxtaposition of these communities was creative and fruitful. They acknowledged they were speaking past each other. Scientists were urged to tell policy makers about even improbable outcomes while articulating clearly the uncertainties around the outcomes. As one policy maker put it, we are accustomed to making these types of decisions. These points were captured clearly in an article that appeared on the New York Times website and can be found with other conference materials most easily on our website, www.scripps.ucsd.edu/cens/. The symposium, generously supported by the NOAA/JIMO, benefitted the public by promoting scientifically informed decision making and by the transmission of objective information regarding climate change and national security.

Reno Harnish

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

142

Climate change and climate variability affect all regions of the world. U.S. vulnerability to the changes and variations are not only dependent on changes within the U.S. but also on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OVERVIEW Climate change and climate variability affect all regions of the world. U.S. vulnerability, it is important to assess emerging threats to national security due to climate change far into the future. Having with national security establish practical responses to climate change and extreme weather events

143

Climate Change Impacts on Texas Water: A White Paper Assessment of the Past, Present and Future and Recommendations for Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Texas comprises the eastern portion of the Southwest region, where the convergence of climatological and geopolitical forces has the potential to put extreme stress on water resources. Geologic records indicate that Texas experienced large climate changes on millennial time scales in the past, and over the last thousand years, tree-ring records indicate that there were significant periods of drought in Texas. These droughts were of longer duration than the 1950s 'drought of record' that is commonly used in planning, and they occurred independently of human-induced global climate change. Although there has been a negligible net temperature increase in Texas over the past century, temperatures have increased more significantly over the past three decades. Under essentially all climate model projections, Texas is susceptible to significant climate change in the future. Most projections for the 21st century show that with increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, there will be an increase in temperatures across Texas and a shift to a more arid average climate. Studies agree that Texas will likely become significantly warmer and drier, yet the magnitude, timing, and regional distribution of these changes are uncertain. There is a large uncertainty in the projected changes in precipitation for Texas for the 21st century. In contrast, the more robust projected increase in temperature with its effect on evaporation, which is a dominant component in the region's hydrologic cycle, is consistent with model projections of frequent and extended droughts throughout the state. For these reasons, we recommend that Texas invest resources to investigate and anticipate the impacts of climate change on Texas water resources, with the goal of providing data to inform resource planning. This investment should support development of (1) research programs that provide policy-relevant science; (2) education programs to engage future researchers and policy-makers; and (3) connections between policy-makers, scientists, water resource managers, and other stakeholders. It is proposed that these goals may be achieved through the establishment of a Texas Climate Consortium, consisting of representatives from academia, industry, government agencies, water authorities, and other stakeholders. The mission of this consortium would be to develop the capacity to provide decision makers with the information needed to develop adaptation strategies in the face of future climate change and uncertainty.

Banner, Jay L.; Jackson, Charles S.; Yang, Zong-Liang; Hayhoe, Katharine; Woodhouse, Connie; Gulden, Lindsey; Jacobs, Kathy; North, Gerald; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Washington, Warren M.; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Casteel, Richard

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Adaptive Management of Water Resources in Light of Future Climate Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources managers have always had to make operational decisions in spite of a relatively high degree of uncertainty caused by changing climate, hydrologic, population, land use, socioeconomic, and other conditions. However, based on current climate change predictions and observations of current impacts of climate change or natural variability, the degree of uncertainty appears to be increasing drastically. By better understanding these uncertainties and their policy implications and by managing those uncertainties adaptively, water resources managers and policy makers can reduce the risk of not meeting their management goals and reduce the potential physical, biological and socioeconomic impacts associated with climate change/variation.

Gerald Sehlke; Mark Colosimo

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Attributing climate variations: Part of an information system for the future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: on environment, human activities and sectors such as agriculture, energy, fisheries, water resources, etc Climate Conference 3, Geneva, Sept 2009 · Ocean Obs 09, Venice, Sept 2009 #12;

Hurrell, James

146

Modeling the Uncertain Future of a Threatened Habitat: Climate Change and Urban Growth in California Sage Scrub  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under projected climate change, mediterranean-climate in theland use and climate change in mediterranean regions,TO PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE IN A THREATENED, MEDITERRANEAN-

Riordan, Erin Coulter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Introducing National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) Informatics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

John Crow from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses his organization's informatics at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Crow, John [National Center for Genome Resources

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Projecting the range of potential future climate change as an aid in the assessment of the effectiveness of the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program was organized to develop an in-place disposal capability for low-level nuclear waste for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in south-eastern Washington. Layered earthen and engineered barriers are being developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory that will function in what is presently a semiarid environment (annual precipitation 150 mm) for at least 1,000 yr by limiting the infiltration of water through the waste. The Long-Term Climate Change Task is one of several key barrier tasks. Based on the recommendation of a panel of internationally recognized climate and modeling experts, climatic data for this task is being acquired in a step-wise and multi-disciplinary manner. The specific research strategy includes literature review and specialized studies to obtain pollen-derived climatic reconstruction, documented historic weather patterns, and Global Circulation Model output of potential future climate changes related to both the greenhouse effect and the cycling into the next ice age. The specific goals of the task are to: (1) obtain defensible probabilistic projections of the long-term climate variability in the Hanford Site region at many different time scales into the future, (2) develop several test case climate scenarios that bracket the range of potential future climate, and (3) use the climate scenarios both to test and to model protective barrier performance.

Petersen, K.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

availability a b s t r a c t Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack be qualitatively defined as the lack of sufficient fresh water for domestic, agri- cultural, and/or industrial in climate and/or lack of storage capacity in areas that receive variable amounts of water through- out

Minnesota, University of

150

Natural Systems & Climate Change: Strategies for Our Future Background and Discussion Questions for Attendees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of climate change, by protecting air and water quality, fish and wildlife habitat, and many other important) emissions while also cleaning California's air and water, supporting local jobs, building resilience and what changes has that produced or are you anticipating? If not, do you have plans to? Panel Two

California at Davis, University of

151

Chu at COP-16: Building a Sustainable Energy Future  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu addresses the U.S. Center in Cancun on the need to build a sustainable energy future as part of the United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP-16. In his...

152

The future of infrastructure security : a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included ininfrastructure' problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions ofsecure and resilient' infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Changing Climate of Cooperative Federalism: The Dynamic Role of the States in a National Strategy to Combat Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and local leadership has laid the foundation for an effective, efficient, and economically beneficial American climate change and clean energy strategy.

Snyder, Jared; Binder, Jonathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Runaway Greenhouse: implications for future climate change, geoengineering and planetary atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ultimate climate emergency is a "runaway greenhouse": a hot and water vapour rich atmosphere limits the emission of thermal radiation to space, causing runaway warming. Warming ceases only once the surface reaches ~1400K and emits radiation in the near-infrared, where water is not a good greenhouse gas. This would evaporate the entire ocean and exterminate all planetary life. Venus experienced a runaway greenhouse in the past, and we expect that Earth will in around 2 billion years as solar luminosity increases. But could we bring on such a catastrophe prematurely, by our current climate-altering activities? Here we review what is known about the runaway greenhouse to answer this question, describing the various limits on outgoing radiation and how climate will evolve between these. The good news is that almost all lines of evidence lead us to believe that is unlikely to be possible, even in principle, to trigger full a runaway greenhouse by addition of non-condensible greenhouse gases such as carbon diox...

Goldblatt, Colin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 1 | APRIL 2011 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 35 n many nations, much of the public has long recognized the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 1 | APRIL 2011 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 35 I n many nations, much of the public has long recognized the potential gravity of climate change1,2 . Nonetheless, few, they should not lead climate scientists to conclude that communication is hopeless. Doing so would represent

Fischhoff, Baruch

156

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan: Conserving America's Wetlands for Future America's Wetlands for Future Generations Cover Photo: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, showing combined climate change and other impacts on wetlands, with dead or dying trees from

Gray, Matthew

157

Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Energy Information

158

Ghana-Support for Future National Climate Change Policy Framework | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Energy

159

Integrated Science and Computing Support for National Climate Service PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas J. Wilbanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-of-the-art advanced climate change modeling, beginning with im- plications of climate change for water-sector decision making as a test case, with some additional attention to decision making related to climate change risks service types of decision support by identifying climate science-related questions of interest to US water

160

National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J. [eds.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sub-national TIMES model for analyzing regional future use of Biomass and Biofuels in France and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sub-national TIMES model for analyzing regional future use of Biomass and Biofuels in France Introduction Renewable energy sources such as biomass and biofuels are increasingly being seen as important of biofuels on the final consumption of energy in transport should be 10%. The long-term target is to reduce

Boyer, Edmond

162

National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center is Helping to Facilitate the Transition to a New Energy Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center (HTSC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses a systems engineering and integration approach to hydrogen research and development to help the United States make the transition to a new energy future - a future built on diverse and abundant domestic renewable resources and integrated hydrogen systems. Research focuses on renewable hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; education; and market transformation. Hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to power vehicles and to provide electricity and heat for homes and offices. This flexibility, combined with our increasing demand for energy, opens the door for hydrogen power systems. HTSC collaborates with DOE, other government agencies, industry, communities, universities, national laboratories, and other stakeholders to promote a clean and secure energy future.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

National Nanotechnology Initiative's Signature Initiative Sustainable Nanomanufacturing: Creating the Industries of the Future  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by National Nanotechnology Coordination Office held on June 26, 2012

164

Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 5. Irrigated Agriculture and National Grain Crop Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next century global warming will lead to changes in weather patterns, affecting many aspects of our environment. In the United States, the one sector of the economy most likely to be directly impacted by the changes in climate is agriculture. We have examined potential changes in dryland agriculture (Part 2) and in water resources necessary for crop production (Part 3). Here we assess to what extent, under a set of climate change scenarios, water supplies will be sufficient to meet the irrigation requirement of major grain crops in the U.S. In addition, we assess the overall impacts of changes in water supply on national grain production. We applied 12 climate change scenarios based on the predictions of General Circulation Models to a water resources model and a crop growth simulator for the conterminous United States. We calculate national production in current crop growing regions by applying irrigation where it is necessary and water is available. Irrigation declines under all climate change scenarios employed in this study. In certain regions and scenarios, precipitation declines so much that water supplies are too limited; in other regions it plentiful enough that little value is derived from irrigation. Total crop production is greater when irrigation is applied, but corn and soybean production declines under most scenarios. Winter wheat production responds significantly to elevated atmospheric CO2 and appears likely to increase under climate change.

Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Brown, Robert A.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Remarks in the National Assembly of France The European Climate Foundation kindly helped arrange a discussion about global climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on their internal consumption of fossil fuels. Why would China agree: to avoid fossil fuel addiction, clean up its. Implications of climate re exploitation of geophysical reservoirs of carbon: (1) coal emissions must be phased-and-trade with offsets will not work. And China and India will never accept a cap ­ why should they, as long as their per

Hansen, James E.

166

Tropical coasts are highly vulnerable to climatic pressures, the future impacts of which are projected to propagate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the resilience of the whole system. Risks related to climate change are frequently examined in isolation through of illustrating the potential impacts of climate change in a holistic and systemic way. An impact chain represents the climate change impact chains in tropical coastal areas based on a literature review of 289 papers. Impact

Boyer, Edmond

167

Corporate Climate Change Adaptation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? On-going and future climate change is universally acknowledged. Climate changeincorporating global mean temperature rise, impacts on global hydrology and ecosystems willaffect human society and… (more)

Herbertsson, Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Nuclear dependence| The Russian Federation's future reliance on nuclear weapons for national security.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The Russian Federation's reliance on nuclear weapons for national security will steadily increase over time. Based on current evidence and historical data, the Russian… (more)

Lukszo, Adam J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

Stolz, C J

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

170

United States v. Jicarilla Apache Nation: Its Importance and Potential Future Ramifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This brief article considers the potential implications of the United States Supreme Court's decision in United States v. Jicarilla Apache Nation. The case differs procedurally from most cases decided by the U.S. Supreme ...

Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon Science Group of Energy and Environment (E and E) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well.

Mirin, A A

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

EA-1958: Future Development in proximity to the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with proposed future development on the South Federal Campus of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site, in Benton County, Washington.

173

s a signatory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's policy on climate change harnesses the power of markets and technological innovation, maintains eco, wind, geothermal, bioenergy, and combined heat and power. The president has proposed more than $4

174

COMPARING MODEL RESULTS TO NATIONAL CLIMATE POLICY GOALS: RESULTS FROM THE ASIA MODELING EXERCISE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the world has yet to adopt a single unified policy to limit climate change, many countries and regions have adopted energy and climate policies that have implications for global emissions. In this paper, we discuss a few key policies and how they are included in a set of 24 energy and integrated assessment models that participated in the Asia Modeling Exercise. We also compare results from these models for a small set of stylized scenarios to the pledges made as part of the Copenhagen Accord and the goals stated by the Major Economies Forum. We find that the targets outlined by the United States, the European Union, Japan, and Korea require significant policy action in most of the models analyzed. For most of the models in the study, however, the goals outlined by India are met without any climate policy. The stringency of climate policy required to meet China’s Copenhagen pledges varies across models and accounting methodologies.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Fawcett, Allen A.; Jiang, Kejun

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Climate regulation of humid tropical hydrology BHS 10th National Hydrology Symposium, Exeter, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

might influence tropical water resources. Introduction The humid tropics can be defined as the global, Bangladesh, and most of South-east Asia (Fosberg et al., 1961). Its climate contains distinctive dynamics

Chappell, Nick A

176

Assessing "Dangerous Climate Change": Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made global climate warming to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above the preindustrial level is too's species. Unabated global warming would also worsen climate extremes. In association with summer high pressure systems, warming causes stronger summer heat waves, more intense droughts, and wildfires that burn

Hansen, James E.

177

Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Electricity Futures Study Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable;Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

178

National K-12 Educator Conference; "Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate" (July 23-24, 2008)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the support of the Department of Energy, the National Science Teachers Association and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Imaginary Lines Inc. (dba Sally Ride Science) delivered a highly successful 2-day conference to 165 K-12 educators on climate change. The event took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD. The conference celebrated the 25th anniversary of Dr. Sally Ride’s first flight into space in 1983 and examined how our understanding of Earth has changed in those 25 years. One the first day of the conference, participants heard a keynote talk delivered by Dr. Sally Ride, followed by presentations by well-known climate change scientists: Dr. Richard Somerville, Dr. Inez Fung and Dr. Susan Solomon. These sessions were concurrently webcast and made available to educators who were unable to attend the conference. On the second day of the conference, participants attended breakout sessions where they performed climate change activities (e.g. “Neato Albedo!”, “Greenhouse in a Bottle”, “Shell-Shocked”) that they could take back to their classrooms. Additional break-out sessions on using remote sensing images to illustrate climate change effects on Earth’s surface and how to address the climate change debate, were also offered. During lunch, participants attended an Educator Street Fair and had the opportunity to interact with representatives from NOAA, NASA, the EPA, NEEF and the JASON project. A follow-up evaluation survey was administered to all conference attendees immediately following the conference to evaluate its effectiveness. The results of this survey were overwhelmingly positive. The conference materials: presentation Power Points, workshop handouts and activities were available for teachers to download after the conference from the Sally Ride Science website. In summary, the approximately $55K support for the Department of Energy was used to help plan, deliver and evaluate the “Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate”, conference which took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD.

Flammer, Karen; O'Shaughnessy, Tam

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Driving the Nation Toward a Clean Energy Future: Fuels Utilization Program Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transportation market in the United States is evolving. As the number of vehicles and miles traveled on American roadways continues to grow, the nation is looking toward advanced vehicles and fuels to meet the increasing demand for more energy efficient, environmentally friendly modes of transport. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems' Fuel Utilization Program is doing its part. We're developing and demonstrating engine and fuel technologies that allow alternative and advanced petroleum fuels to compete with their conventional counterparts.

Thomas, J.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Options for National Parks and Reserves for Adapting to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the transition to ecosystem-based management of the Greattransition toward sustainability. National Academy Press, Washington, DC Environmental Management (

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bioconversion and Biorefineries of the Future Linda L. Lasure, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues, waste wood and forest trimmings and dedicated energy crops such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum Laboratory Min Zhang, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contents I. Introduction a. Sources and nature-scale impacts on energy and GHG mitigation a. Example I: Ethanol from corn stover in the USA i. Energy from corn

182

New National Wind Potential Estimates for Modern and Near-Future Turbine Technologies (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

Roberts, J. O.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

Kicklighter, D W

185

Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The ...

Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Designing the Future Energy System for Cleaner Air: A National Laboratory Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responsibilities include…energy conservation, energy-related research…and domestic energy production. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National... Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 9372 287 226 155 117 82 26 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 E l e c t r i c i t y C o n s u m p t i o n ( T W h ) End Use Commercial Buildings Site Electricity Consumption (2008) Lighting MELs...

Cale, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

B&W Y-12 scholarships support local future innovators | Y-12 National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDearTechnicalAwards recognizeStatutesdonatesNationalSecurity

188

Science for Our Nation's Energy Future | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticutPhotos of AEC SiteEnvironmentalSLAC NationalSLACSLACDOE

189

The avalanche climate of Glacier National Park, B.C., Canada during 1965-2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and rising global average sea levels. It has also been found that the frequency of heavy precipitation events stated that the warming of the climate system is unequivocal, as is now evident from observations of increases in global average air temperature and ocean temperatures, widespread melting of snow and ice

Jamieson, Bruce

190

Climatic change and wetland desiccation cause amphibian decline in Yellowstone National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Amphibians are a bellwether for environmental degradation, even in natural ecosystems such as Yellowstone changes resulting from global climatic change. Pollution, pathogens, exotic species, UV irradiation (including habitat degradation and disease) will continue to be enhanced by rising global temper- atures

Hadly, Elizabeth

191

Vulnerability of national economies to the impacts of climate change on fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economies and diets, and limited societal capacity to adapt to potential impacts and opportunities. Many the world's poorest and twice as reliant on fish, which provides 27% of dietary protein compared to 13 but lack the capacity to adapt. Keywords Adaptation, climate change, fisheries, poverty, vulnerability

Reynolds, John D.

192

Fourth National Research Conference on Climate Change Indian Institute of Technology Madras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on renewable energy. This event, the fourth in the series, intends to nurture and enhance a dedicated network in the areas of climate science, impacts, mitigation, adaptation, disaster risk reduction and renewable energy is available for travel and local expenses). #12;

Srinivasan, N.

193

Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalcontext of predicted climate change. Madroño 54(3):234–248.MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to climate-change

Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Frontiers in Climate Forecasting (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Bill Collins directs Berkeley Lab's research dedicated to atmospheric and climate science. Previously, he headed the development of one of the leading climate models used in international studies of global warming. His work has confirmed that man-made greenhouse gases are probably the main culprits of recent warming and future warming poses very real challenges for the environment and society. A lead author of the most recent assessment of the science of climate change by the United Nations' Integovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Collins wants to create a new kind of climate model, one that will integrate cutting-edge climate science with accurate predictions people can use to plan their lives

Collins, Bill

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

195

USA National Phenology Network: Plant and Animal Life-Cycle Data Related to Climate Change  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Phenology refers to recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, such as leafing and flowering, maturation of agricultural plants, emergence of insects, and migration of birds. It is also the study of these recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, especially their timing and relationships with weather and climate. Phenology affects nearly all aspects of the environment, including the abundance and diversity of organisms, their interactions with one another, their functions in food webs, and their seasonable behavior, and global-scale cycles of water, carbon, and other chemical elements. Phenology records can help us understand plant and animal responses to climate change; it is a key indicator. The USA-NPN brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators, and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. The network harnesses the power of people and the Internet to collect and share information, providing researchers with far more data than they could collect alone.[Extracts copied from the USA-NPN home page and from http://www.usanpn.org/about].

196

Role of Bioenergy in the Kyoto Protocol, in the EU-ETS and in future Climate Agreements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in existing plants (co-firing) is already competitive with other fuels at a CO2 price of about 20 Euros Union implemented the European Emission Trading Scheme (EU-ETS) Some 12,000 large industrial plants, such as switching to a low emission fuel mix and investments in new climate friendly technologies are encouraged

197

Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

198

An Abrupt Climate Change Scenario and Its Implications for United States National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, South America, and southern Africa. · Drought persists for most of the decade in critical agricultural changes have been gradual so far, and are projected to be similarly gradual in the future, the effects to resource constraints such as: 1) Food shortages due to decreases in net global agricultural production 2

199

Kenya-Action Plan for National Climate Change Response Strategy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach, Florida: EnergyKeasbey, NewKennebunkCoEnergy

200

Multi-scale data visualization for computational astrophysics and climate dynamics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). We identify a dataset frontier that is shared by several Sci, these techniques will allow the visual exploration of a new generation of peta-scale datasets that cross this data frontier along all axes. Introduction: A frontier is shared by several SciDAC computational science domains

Wang, Chaoli

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Idaho National Laboratory/Nuclear Power Industry Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development An Industry-Government Partnership to Address Climate Change and Energy Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dual issues of energy security and climate change mitigation are driving a renewed debate over how to best provide safe, secure, reliable and environmentally responsible electricity to our nation. The combination of growing energy demand and aging electricity generation infrastructure suggests major new capacity additions will be required in the years ahead.

Electric Power Research

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Future climate trends from a first-difference atmospheric carbon dioxide regression model involving emissions scenarios for business as usual and for peak fossil fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the implications of the future continuation of the demonstrated past (1960-2012) strong correlation between first-difference atmospheric CO2 and global surface temperature. It does this, for the period from the present to 2050, for a comprehensive range of future global fossil fuel energy use scenarios. The results show that even for a business-as-usual (the mid-level IPCC) fossil fuel use estimate, global surface temperature will rise at a slower rate than for the recent period 1960-2000. Concerning peak fossil fuel, for the most common scenario the currently observed (1998-2013)temperature plateau will turn into a decrease. The observed trend to date for temperature is compared with that for global climate disasters: these peaked in 2005 and are notably decreasing. The temperature and disaster results taken together are consistent with either a reduced business-as-usual fossil fuel use scenario into the future, or a peak fossil fuel scenario, but not with the standard business-as-usu...

Leggett, L M W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Electricity Futures Study Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

204

Global climate change and international security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

Karas, Thomas H.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) -NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen Klein, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) - NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen ARM product, the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) dataset, is being augmented with the additional observational and model data. The CMBE dataset was created to serve the needs of climate model developers

206

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Convention on climate change. http://www.unfccc.de/resource/conv/index.html UNFCCC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectre of climate change that is unfolding now is undeniably a cumulative impact of anthropogenic interference in the climate system over the last two centuries. The science is clear and the policy community is being increasingly convinced and galvanised into action to address this emergent challenge in light of the associated economic and human dimensions. The impacts of climate change ranging from sea level rise, melting ice caps and glaciers, severe weather events, drought, flooding, warming, subtle changes in ecosystems – will impinge on every aspect of society and economic life. The costs of inaction will more than outweigh the costs of action. There is only a narrow window of opportunity to redress the situation. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in its Fourth Assessment Report has

Unfccc Unfccc

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Seasonal cycle of Precipitation over Major River Basins in South and Southeast Asia: A Review of the CMIP5 climate models data for present climate and future climate projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the skill of thirty coupled climate models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 in terms of reproducing properties of the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the major river basins of South and Southeast Asia (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for historical period (1961-2000). We also present projected changes by these models by end of century (2061-2100) under extreme scenario RCP8.5. First, we assess their ability to reproduce observed timings of the monsoon onset and the rate of rapid fractional accumulation (RFA slope) - a measure of seasonality within active monsoon period. Secondly, we apply a threshold-independent seasonality index (SI) - a multiplicative measure of precipitation and extent of its concentration relative to the uniform distribution (relative entropy - RE). We apply SI distinctly for monsoonal precipitation regime (MPR), westerly precipitation regime (WPR) and annual precipitation regime. For present climate, neither any single model nor the multi-mod...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio; Böhner, Jürgen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

Browder, Tom

209

FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

Hulme, Mike

211

IMPROVING PREDICTIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE: OBSERVATIONAL AND MODELING REQUIREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the atmosphere, largely because of emissions from fossil fuel combustion. An increase in atmospheric CO2 would, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA (ses@bnl.gov) Carbon dioxide (CO2) is building up is the extent of climate change that will result from future increases in atmospheric CO2. Confident knowledge

212

Climate and Energy-Water-Land System Interactions Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy in Support of the National Climate Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a framework to characterize and understand the important elements of climate and energy-water-land (EWL) system interactions. It identifies many of the important issues, discusses our understanding of those issues, and presents a long-term research program research needs to address the priority scientific challenges and gaps in our understanding. Much of the discussion is organized around two discrete case studies with the broad themes of (1) extreme events and (2) regional intercomparisons. These case studies help demonstrate unique ways in which energy-water-land interactions can occur and be influenced by climate.

Skaggs, Richard; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Frumhoff, Peter; Lowry, Thomas; Middleton, Richard; Pate, Ron; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Arnold, J. G.; Averyt, Kristen; Janetos, Anthony C.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Jennie S.; Rose, Steven K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Haskell Indian Nations University Roundtable: Increased Productions of Traditional and Other Foods in an Era of Abrupt Climate Change  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Hosted by the Haskell Indian University International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management and Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Working Group, this roundtable discussion will identify and...

214

Presented by Climate End Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Department of Energy Bettge_LCF Climate_SC10 CESM working groups · Application ­ Climate change, paleoclimate climate change projections for IPCC AR5 Gerald Meehl and Warren Washington, NCAR · Climate changePresented by Climate End Station Thomas Bettge National Center for Atmospheric Research James B

215

The Corn and Climate Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Science Program Office Part 2: Climate Impacts on Midwestern Agriculture: MonitoringThe Corn and Climate Report An overview of climate science in the service of Midwestern agriculture Administration National Weather Service North Central Bioeconomy Consortium US Climate Change Science Program

Debinski, Diane M.

216

Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalthe context of predicted climate change. Madroño 54(3):234–18–20. Dettinger MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to

Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

218

Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report

219

Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Electricity Futures Study Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

220

In the near future, Switzerland is predicted to be affected by climate change, that is bound to impact both water demand and water supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and agriculture increases, water supply decreases (ProClim and OcCC, 2007) as climate change alters the hydrologic of the economic impact of climate change and different adaptation strategies in the water sector is essential in Switzerland, mandated by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN). 4) Climate change and water resources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White House Tribal Nations Conference Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White House Tribal Nations...

222

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRF ResearchersPhysicsFacility

223

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergy EfficientFacilityMinisterialProtected:

224

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergy

225

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water Availability in the

226

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water Availability in

227

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water Availability

228

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water AvailabilityBureau of

229

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water AvailabilityBureau

230

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water AvailabilityBureauCarbon

231

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

Feng, Ming

232

Climate Change Technology Scenarios: Energy, Emissions, and Economic Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes three advanced technology scenarios and various illustrative cases developed by staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program. These scenarios and illustrative cases explore the energy, emissions and economic implications of using advanced energy technologies and other climate change related technologies to reduce future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The cases were modeled using the Mini Climate Assessment Model (MiniCAM) developed by PNNL. The report describes the scenarios, the specifications for the cases, and the results. The report also provides background information on current emissions of GHGs and issues associated with stabilizing GHG concentrations.

Placet, Marylynn; Humphreys, Kenneth K.; Mahasenan, N Maha

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Developing Models for Predictive Climate Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Community Climate System Model results from a multi-agency collaboration designed to construct cutting-edge climate science simulation models for a broad research community. Predictive climate simulations are currently being prepared for the petascale computers of the near future. Modeling capabilities are continuously being improved in order to provide better answers to critical questions about Earth's climate. Climate change and its implications are front page news in today's world. Could global warming be responsible for the July 2006 heat waves in Europe and the United States? Should more resources be devoted to preparing for an increase in the frequency of strong tropical storms and hurricanes like Katrina? Will coastal cities be flooded due to a rise in sea level? The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), which archives all weather data for the nation, reports that global surface temperatures have increased over the last century, and that the rate of increase is three times greater since 1976. Will temperatures continue to climb at this rate, will they decline again, or will the rate of increase become even steeper? To address such a flurry of questions, scientists must adopt a systematic approach and develop a predictive framework. With responsibility for advising on energy and technology strategies, the DOE is dedicated to advancing climate research in order to elucidate the causes of climate change, including the role of carbon loading from fossil fuel use. Thus, climate science--which by nature involves advanced computing technology and methods--has been the focus of a number of DOE's SciDAC research projects. Dr. John Drake (ORNL) and Dr. Philip Jones (LANL) served as principal investigators on the SciDAC project, 'Collaborative Design and Development of the Community Climate System Model for Terascale Computers.' The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is a fully-coupled global system that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states. The collaborative SciDAC team--including over a dozen researchers at institutions around the country--developed, validated, documented, and optimized the performance of CCSM using the latest software engineering approaches, computational technology, and scientific knowledge. Many of the factors that must be accounted for in a comprehensive model of the climate system are illustrated in figure 1.

Drake, John B [ORNL; Jones, Philip W [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

BPA prepares for a changing climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

both generally and as part of events such as El Nio. Evidence of global and regional climate change is mounting. The recently released National Climate Assessment confirmed...

235

My Amazing Future 2012  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory's My Amazing Future program gives 8th grade women the opportunity to experience careers in science and engineering.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

Advice to the New Administration and Congress: Actions to make our Nation resilient to severe weather and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, environment, transportation systems, and national security continue to be battered by billions of dollars observing system from satellite and ground-based instruments as recommended by the National Research CouncilAdvice to the New Administration and Congress: Actions to make our Nation resilient to severe

237

Energy for the future with Ris from nuclear power to sustainable energy Ris NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy for the future ­ with Risø from nuclear power to sustainable energy Risø NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy edited by MoRteN JastRup #12;Energy for the future #12;Energy for the future ­ with Risø from nuclear power to sustainable energy Translated from 'Energi til fremtiden ­ med Risø fra

238

Challenges and Recommendations for ‘Visitors’ Teaching Design in the Developing World towards Sustainable Equitable Futures: Four Divided Nations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to sustainable equitable futures; gleaning information off the world-wide web is not by itself adequate or as effective as direct contact, and development needs to occur in multitudinous beneficial directions. While sometimes challenging, teaching architecture... and their social reintegration in northern Uganda, Amsterdam, Rozenberg Publishers, 2010. Ariely, Dan and Gino Francesca, The Dark Side of Creativity: Original Thinkers Can be More Dishonest, Working Paper, http://www.hbs.edu/research/pdf/11-064.pdf, Harvard...

Jann, Marga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Climate Change Action Plan Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

Hansen, Andrew J.

240

Water Poverty in Sub-Saharan African nation: GIS based index for assessing vulnerability in relation to climate change data   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Access to safe water is currently a privilege for the citizens of many developing countries in Asia and Africa. In the last few decades changes in climate have increased concentrations of greenhouse gasses. The results of global warming have had a...

Trakosa, Anastasia

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation Plans in the Pacific Northwest: A Review Climate Change and Impacts Mitigation versus Adaptation Impacts of Climate Change: Nation & the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Planning Efforts Transportation Sector Response - Survey Recommendations Continued

Bertini, Robert L.

243

Sandia National Laboratories: Officials Turn to Sandia National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECResearch & CapabilitiesCapabilitiesOfficials Turn to Sandia National Labs for Help on Huge Sinkhole Officials Turn to Sandia National Labs for Help on Huge Sinkhole...

244

National Energy Policy (Complete)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Policy May 2001 Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound Energy for America's Future Report of the National...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding dangerous climate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dangerous climate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay Summary: Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoid dangerous climate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

avoid dangerous climate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay Summary: Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change...

247

Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications for prevention strategies interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

248

Assessing the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policy makers will most likely need to make decisions about climate policy before climate scientists have resolved all relevant uncertainties about the impacts of climate change. This study demonstrates a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts from responses to climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity from 2010 to 2050. To understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions to mitigate the course of climate change, we focus on precipitation, one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. We use results of the climate-model ensemble from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) as a proxy for representing climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, map the simulated weather from the climate models hydrologically to the county level to determine the physical consequences on economic activity at the state level, and perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. We determine the industry-level contribution to the gross domestic product and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effects on personal income, and consequences for the U.S. trade balance. We show that the mean or average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs.

Reinert, Rhonda K.; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Robinson, David B.; Backus, George A.; Fogelman, William; Cutler, Laura; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Finely, Ray; Siirola, John; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Mitchiner, John Lovorn; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Kelic, Andjelka; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Strickland, James Hassler; Weddington, Anna Neila; Warren, Drake E.; Taylor, Mark A.; Loose, Verne W.; Richards, Elizabeth H.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Horschel, Daniel S.; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Snyder, Lillian Annabelle; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Reno, Marissa Devan; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Baker, Arnold Barry; Adams, Brian M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Assessing the effects of ocean diffusivity and climate sensitivity on the rate of global climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitivity and ocean heat uptake on the rate of future climate change. We apply a range of values for climate a significant effect on the rate of transient climate change for high values of climate sensitivity, while values of climate sensitivity and low values of ocean diffusivity. Such high rates of change could

Schmittner, Andreas

250

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

251

Refining climate models  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Refining climate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

Tonn, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaffhauser, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Climate Change Major information sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.ipcc.ch/ Vital Climate Graphics, at http://www.grida.no/climate/vital/ Climate Change Impacts on US, at http://www.gcrio.org/NationalAssessment/ Greenhouse Warming Prediction #12;Energy Predictions 2 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA); International Energy Agency (IEA) 2% growth per year, or doubling in 35 years (shortcut: 70/%=doubling) Fossil

255

Bright Future NW Energy Coalition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Getting To a Bright Future 1. Cap global-warming emissions. President Obama and the U.S. Congress should Climate Initiative: 15% reduction from 1990 levels by 2020, 80% or larger reduction by 2050. While

256

Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is that knowledge produced by Future Forests will make possible an increased and yet, we envision that knowledge produced by Future Forests will contribute for biodiversity conservation, water protection, recreational needs, climate change mitigation

257

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

258

Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Quantitative implications of the secondary role of carbon dioxide climate forcing in the past glacial-interglacial cycles for the likely future climatic impacts of anthropogenic greenhouse-gas forcings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review of the recent refereed literature fails to confirm quantitatively that carbon dioxide (CO2) radiative forcing was the prime mover in the changes in temperature, ice-sheet volume, and related climatic variables in the glacial and interglacial periods of the past 650,000 years, even under the "fast response" framework where the convenient if artificial distinction between forcing and feedback is assumed. Atmospheric CO2 variations generally follow changes in temperature and other climatic variables rather than preceding them. Likewise, there is no confirmation of the often-posited significant supporting role of methane (CH4) forcing, which despite its faster atmospheric response time is simply too small, amounting to less than 0.2 W/m2 from a change of 400 ppb. We cannot quantitatively validate the numerous qualitative suggestions that the CO2 and CH4 forcings that occurred in response to the Milankovich orbital cycles accounted for more than half of the amplitude of the changes in the glacial/intergla...

Soon, Willie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

How will changes in global climate influence California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

future climate change impacts on water for agriculture andclimate change that will be important for California agriculture

Weare, B C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Executive summary for assessing the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. states.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policy makers will most likely need to make decisions about climate policy before climate scientists have resolved all relevant uncertainties about the impacts of climate change. This study demonstrates a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts of climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity from 2010 to 2050. To understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions to mitigate the course of climate change, we focus on precipitation, one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. We use results of the climate-model ensemble from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) as a proxy for representing climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, map the simulated weather from the climate models hydrologically to the county level to determine the physical consequences on economic activity at the state level, and perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. We determine the industry-level contribution to the gross domestic product and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effects on personal income, and consequences for the U.S. trade balance. We show that the mean or average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs.

Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Reinert, Rhonda K.; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The ClimaGrowing Footprint of Climate Change: Can Systems Built Today Cope with Tomorrow's Weather Extremes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how current climate conditions--with increasingly extreme storms, droughts, and heat waves and their ensuing effects on water quality and levels--are adding stress to an already aging power grid. Moreover, it explains how evaluations of said grid, built upon past weather patterns, are inaqeduate for measuring if the nation's energy systems can cope with future climate changes. The authors make the case for investing in the development of robust, integrated electricity planning tools that account for these climate change factors as a means for enhancing electricity infrastructure resilience.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Kraucunas, Ian P.

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

263

WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global Warming vs. Climate Change 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global

Haller, Gary L.

264

Watershed Academy Webcast on Climate Resilience  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Climate Resilience: What to Expect, How to Prepare, and  What you can Learn from Others." This webcast will share findings from the most recent National Climate Assessment report concerning...

265

A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century Miche`le B; accepted 30 November 2006; published 10 January 2007. [1] A Climate Change Index (CCI) is developed to a single index that is a measure for the strength of future climate change relative to today's natural

Fischlin, Andreas

266

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Fourth National Communication on Climate Change. A Reportclimate change can be assessed using data from national communicationscommunication were also reflected in the working drafts of the Spanish Climate Change

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Climatic Resources for Tourism in Europe An Application of the Tourism Climatic Index on a Daily Basis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatic Resources for Tourism in Europe An Application of the Tourism Climatic Index on a Daily - Use of the "Tourism Climatic Index" by Mieczkowski (1985) as a metric for "favourable climate" for tourism - Calculation of the potential future change in index by means of climate model projections from

Fischlin, Andreas

268

Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sub-national Planners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A Guidebook for Sub-national Planners...

269

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

270

Unit References Module 1: The Science of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

164 Unit References Module 1: The Science of Climate Change 1. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2007). Climate change 2007: synthesis report. IPCC Plenary XXVII (Valencia, Spain, 12-17 November 2007). 2. America's Climate Choices: Panel on Advancing the Science of Climate Change, National

Smith, Kate

271

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Report 2005 Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Emission Inventories Denmark's National Inventory's National Inventory Report 2005 - Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

272

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global surface warming (0C) Assumes that the GHG concentration is stabilized at 2000 levelswarming over a long period would melt all of Greenland’s ice sheet, raising the global sea level

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and advance the use of renewable energy by testing them atenergy efficiency and renewable energy, the DoD is improving

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land loss Drought and water scarcity Loss of agriculturalexpansion infrastructure of water Poverty Migration Changesdwindling access to fresh water and other consequences of

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Afghanistan with portable solar panels, and increase theon July 30, 2010. The solar panels power ra- dios, laptopduring testing of solar energy panels at Twen- tynine Palms,

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Afghanistan with portable solar panels, and increasethe number of solar-powered generators there from nine toa hole during testing of solar energy panels at Twen- tynine

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRF ResearchersPhysicsFacilitySecurity Water &

278

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRF ResearchersPhysicsFacilitySecurity Water

279

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Bachelor Thesis Future sustainable terraced houses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cardiff University August 4, 2014 #12;Colophon Title: Future sustainable residential buildings in Cardiff a first introduction about sustainability in the building sector. Collecting data about the future climateBachelor Thesis Future sustainable terraced houses in Cardiff Karin Ernst University of Twente

Vellekoop, Michel

282

8, 34053430, 2008 Climate and emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions The role of climate and emission changes in future air quality over.russell@ce.gatech.edu) 3405 #12;ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al

Boyer, Edmond

283

Advanced Review Greenland climate change: from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Review Greenland climate change: from the past to the future Val´erie Masson-Delmotte,1 cores in and around Greenland allow us to place the current trends in regional climate, ice sheet lake sediments in southern Greenland document major environmental and climatic conditions during

Bhatt, Uma

284

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

285

TSINGHUA -MIT China Energy & Climate Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project Will economic restructuring in China reduce trade to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts

286

TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators Kris Wilson Ph.D. School of Journalism University. 2012) #12;TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators On-line survey (n=571) (52% response rate change more frequently in the future #12;TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators "As a TV

287

FIRE AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRE AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN CALIFORNIA Changes in the Distribution and Frequency of Fire's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012026 Prepared for: California Energy Commission to climate change has the potential to induce alteration of future fire activity. This research presents just

288

Science and technology for a sustainable energy future: Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. Included are activities performed in the utilities, transportation, industrial, and buildings technology areas.

Brown, M.A.; Vaughan, K.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

National Energy Awareness Month  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

October is National Energy Awareness Month. It's also a chance to talk about our country’s energy security and its clean energy future.

290

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

DeMeo, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

Johannesson, G

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

292

ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT NAMAs and the Carbon Market Nationally Appropriate . . . . . . . . . . . 63 ChristianEllermann, NaMas FOr disPersed eNergy eNd-Use sectOrs: Using the building sectorDenmark,theNetherlandsMinistryofForeignAffairs,nortotherespectiveorganizationsofeachindividualauthor. CapacityDevelopmentforCDM(CD4CDM)Project UNEPRisøCentre, RisøNationalLaboratoryforSustainableEnergy The

293

N AA Knows Climate "The climate challenge before us is real. Climate change impacts will touch nearly every aspect of our lives. Meeting the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and NOAA Administrator National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service NOAA's National users. Access to these data products promote, protect, and enhance the nation's economy, security Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) provides critical climate data derived through

294

CLIMATE CHANGE: CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES S. E. Schwartz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

why quantitatively projecting future climate change in response to future emissions remains decades of intense research, climate sensitivity, the amount by which global mean temperature would with respect to energy. This talk reviews the physical basis of climate change and outlines some of the reasons

295

Microsoft PowerPoint - Pillon Climate Change and the Need for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Climate Change and the Need for Energy Resiliency Jeffrey R. Pillon, Director of Energy Assurance National Association of State Energy Officials TRIBAL ENERGY SYSTEMS: CLIMATE...

296

Future Accelerators (?)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

John Womersley

2003-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

297

According to the United Nations, universities have a vital role to play in shaping the way in which future generations cope with the complexi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are key in relation to sustainability in order to decide whether specific initiatives, for example energy future generations cope with the complexi- ties of sustainable development. Aarhus University's BSc programme in Economics and Business Administration ­ Sustainability combines classic business administration

298

The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change Marie Lynn Miranda, Douglas A. Hastings to mitigate the severe impacts of climate change predicted to occur in the twenty-first century. Many with climate change. This study investigates the varying degrees to which developing and developed nations

299

Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities Jim Crawford Trane jim.crawford@trane.com www.trane.com Abstract Atmospheric scientists tell us that mankind is changing the climate, and is setting in motion forces that can... make essentially irreversible changes in the climate of the future. Naysayers dispute whether mankind is even capable of changing the climate. Today we are hearing more from the scientists and less from the naysayers. This presentation will review...

Crawford, J. G.

300

National Aeronautics and Space Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uncertainty ! Clouds and Climate Scenarios Projected warming Climate Change Prediction #12;National of air T and CO2 -> related to intensity of ocean turbulent mixing · Exchanges of energy, water and carbon with the ocean/ land/ice surface are mediated by turbulence #12;National Aeronautics and Space

Bordoni, Simona

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

This study is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) through grant EF1049251: "Assessing Decadal Climate Change Impacts on Urban Populations in the Southwestern United States."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decadal Climate Change Impacts on Urban Populations in the Southwestern United States." Data calibrates a point-scale soil water balance model to available soil moisture data, using historical, despite its notable effects on water, energy and biomass conditions. This omission is noteworthy

Hall, Sharon J.

302

The future of defense and technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an insight into the future of national defense and the impacts of utilizing technology for improved defensive postures. (FI)

Teller, E.

1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Climate Dynamics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in several climate simulations with the ECHO-G atmosphere-ocean gen- eral circulation model (AOGCM in the ECHO-G runs. Keywords Atlantic meridional overturning circulation · Future climate change

Ortega, Pablo

304

HYDROPOWER RELICENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE1 Joshua H. Viers2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROPOWER RELICENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE1 Joshua H. Viers2 ABSTRACT: Hydropower represents impacts to natural and human communities, future long-term fixed licenses of hydropower operation. (KEY TERMS: climate change; environmental regulations; hydropower; relicensing; water law; water policy

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

305

Thomas Karl is the Director of NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, North Carolina, and leads NOAA's Climate Services. He has served and continues to serve on a variety of National Research Council Committees. Karl is a fellow of the America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Petroleum Engineering, and Economics. Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy Union Outstanding Young Scientist Award 2006. Lenton's efforts to quantify and evaluate different on the capture and storage of CO2, the technology and implications of global climate engineering, the economics

Polz, Martin

306

Perspective: The Climate-Population-Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation Fertile Area for New Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Managing the risks posed by climate change and extreme weather to energy production and delivery is a challenge to communities worldwide. As climate conditions change, populations will shift, and demand will re-locate; and networked infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers, and, hopefully, minimize vulnerability to natural disaster. Climate effects such as sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, force populations to move locations. Displaced population creates new demand for built infrastructure that in turn generates new economic activity that attracts new workers and associated households to the new locations. Infrastructures and their interdependencies will change in reaction to climate drivers as the networks expand into new population areas and as portions of the networks are abandoned as people leave. Thus, infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Forecasting the location of these vulnerabilities by combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for defining these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. By combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory it has been only recently possible to examine electricity demand response to increased climactic temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. These emerging results suggest a research agenda of coupling these disparate modelling approaches to understand the implications of climate change for protecting the nation s critical infrastructure.

Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment Energy and Climate Change National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment...

308

Sandia National Laboratories: Motivating Business to Design a...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECInfrastructure SecurityAnalysisMotivating Business to Design a More Resilient Nation, One Building at a Time Motivating Business to Design a More Resilient Nation, One...

309

Market-based mechanisms for climate change adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency) and the National Climate Change Adaptation Research FacilityMarket-based mechanisms for climate change adaptation Final Report John McAneney, Ryan Crompton FOR CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION Assessing the potential for and limits to insurance and market-based mechanisms

Colorado at Boulder, University of

310

Regional Climate Model Projections for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global climate models do not have sufficient spatial resolution to represent the atmospheric and land surface processes that determine the unique regional heterogeneity of the climate of the State of Washington. If future large-scale weather patterns interact differently with the local terrain and coastlines than current weather patterns, local changes in temperature and precipitation could be quite different from the coarse-scale changes projected by global models. Regional climate models explicitly simulate the interactions between the large-scale weather patterns simulated by a global model and the local terrain. We have performed two 100-year climate simulations using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). One simulation is forced by the NCAR Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and the second is forced by a simulation of the Max Plank Institute, Hamburg, global model (ECHAM5). The mesoscale simulations produce regional changes in snow cover, cloudiness, and circulation patterns associated with interactions between the large-scale climate change and the regional topography and land-water contrasts. These changes substantially alter the temperature and precipitation trends over the region relative to the global model result or statistical downscaling. To illustrate this effect, we analyze the changes from the current climate (1970-1999) to the mid 21st century (2030-2059). Changes in seasonal-mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack are presented. Several climatological indices of extreme daily weather are also presented: precipitation intensity, fraction of precipitation occurring in extreme daily events, heat wave frequency, growing season length, and frequency of warm nights. Despite somewhat different changes in seasonal precipitation and temperature from the two regional simulations, consistent results for changes in snowpack and extreme precipitation are found in both simulations.

Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Yongxin

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These include population density, elevation, vegetation, basic climatic characteristics, and various factors population density and annual average climatic factors. AFRIC/GRID/UNITAR Africa Database", United Nations Environmental Programme, GRID-PAC, P.O. Box 30552, Nairobi, Kenya. UNEP

California at Santa Barbara, University of

312

iRESM INITIATIVE UNDERSTANDING DECISION SUPPORT NEEDS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION --US Midwest Region—  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impacts of climate change are already affecting human and environmental systems worldwide, yet many uncertainties persist in the prediction of future climate changes and impacts due to limitations in scientific understanding of relevant causal factors. In particular, there is mounting urgency to efforts to improve models of human and environmental systems at the regional scale, and to integrate climate, ecosystem and energy-economic models to support policy, investment, and risk management decisions related to climate change mitigation (i.e., reducing greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (i.e., responding to climate change impacts). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a modeling framework, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), to address regional human-environmental system interactions in response to climate change and the uncertainties therein. The framework will consist of a suite of integrated models representing regional climate change, regional climate policy, and the regional economy, with a focus on simulating the mitigation and adaptation decisions made over time in the energy, transportation, agriculture, and natural resource management sectors.

Rice, Jennie S.; Runci, Paul J.; Moss, Richard H.; Anderson, Kate L.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Dr. Michael MacCracken, Climate Institute, Washington, DC  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Achieving International Agreement and Climate Protection by Coordinated Mitigation of Short- and Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases. Presented at the China-US Workshop on the "Climate-Energy Nexus" at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on November 11, 2009.

Dr. Michael MacCracken

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Short Communication Potential Remobilization of Belowground Permafrost Carbon under Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This is a positive feedback within the Earth System, as climate warming results in permafrost thawing that causes. This effect is not yet considered in climate model projections of future global warming. PERMAFROSTShort Communication Potential Remobilization of Belowground Permafrost Carbon under Future Global

Wagner, Diane

315

Powering the Future with LIFE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Leveraging the National Ignition Facility to meet the climate-energy challenge; (2) The journal into a new era of scientific discoveries; and (3) Safe and sustainable energy with LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy).

Moses, E I; Diaz de la Rubia, T

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

316

Workshop on the preparation of climate change action plans. Workshop summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 130 participants from more than 27 countries shared experiences of developing and transition countries in preparation and development of their climate change national action plans. International experts guided countries in preparation of their climate change national action plans.

NONE

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

317

NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop to make it a reality. This Roadmap provides a framework that can make a hydrogen economy a reality

318

Buildings of the Future  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing a vision for future buildings—at least one hundred years from today—based on the collective views of thought leaders. As part of this effort, we will explore technology and demographic trends that could revolutionize the built environment across energy, water, environment, resilient design, health, security, and productivity.

319

Future Healthcare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patients want answers, not numbers. Evidence-based medicine must have numbers to generate answers. Therefore, analysis of numbers to provide answers is the Holy Grail of healthcare professionals and its future systems. ...

Datta, Shoumen

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Greenhouse Gas Initiatives - Analysis of McCain-Lieberman Bill S.280 ‘The ClimateStewardship and Innovation Act of 2007’ Using the National Energy Modeling System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and prices, and the technologies and market mechanisms that are likely to be employed to reduce CO2 emissions. The paper also reports on the results of analysis of GHG bills performed by SAIC using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS...

Ellsworth, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Deciphering Climate from the Characterization of Ring Width, Carbon, and Oxygen Isotopes in Latewood Tree-Ring Cellulose, Big Thicket National Preserve, Texas, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for their help with the project. Dr. Mora gave me the opportunity to pursue a Ph.D. in tree-ring chemistry. Dr in Latewood Tree-Ring Cellulose, Big Thicket National Preserve, Texas, USA A Dissertation Presented. Grissino-Mayer mentored me as a new dendrochronologist, and is ultimately the reason I chose tree rings

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

322

Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates���¢��������s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI���¢��������s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M�������©t�������©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

WRF Test on IBM BG/L:Toward High Performance Application to Regional Climate Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of climate change will mostly be felt on local to regional scales (Solomon et al., 2007). To develop better forecast skill in regional climate change, an integrated multi-scale modeling capability (i.e., a pair of global and regional climate models) becomes crucially important in understanding and preparing for the impacts of climate change on the temporal and spatial scales that are critical to California's and nation's future environmental quality and economical prosperity. Accurate knowledge of detailed local impact on the water management system from climate change requires a resolution of 1km or so. To this end, a high performance computing platform at the petascale appears to be an essential tool in providing such local scale information to formulate high quality adaptation strategies for local and regional climate change. As a key component of this modeling system at LLNL, the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is implemented and tested on the IBM BG/L machine. The objective of this study is to examine the scaling feature of WRF on BG/L for the optimal performance, and to assess the numerical accuracy of WRF solution on BG/L.

Chin, H S

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geoengineering the Earth's Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

Google Tech Talks

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

Geoengineering the Earth's Climate  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

Google Tech Talks

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Climate uncertainty and implications for U.S. state-level risk assessment through 2050.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decisions for climate policy will need to take place in advance of climate science resolving all relevant uncertainties. Further, if the concern of policy is to reduce risk, then the best-estimate of climate change impacts may not be so important as the currently understood uncertainty associated with realizable conditions having high consequence. This study focuses on one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change - precipitation - to understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and the near-term justification for interventions to mitigate the course of climate change. We show that the mean risk of damage to the economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of one trillion dollars over the next 40 years, with employment impacts of nearly 7 million labor-years. At a 1% exceedance-probability, the impact is over twice the mean-risk value. Impacts at the level of individual U.S. states are then typically in the multiple tens of billions dollar range with employment losses exceeding hundreds of thousands of labor-years. We used results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) climate-model ensemble as the referent for climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, mapped the simulated weather hydrologically to the county level for determining the physical consequence to economic activity at the state level, and then performed a detailed, seventy-industry, analysis of economic impact among the interacting lower-48 states. We determined industry GDP and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effect on personal income, and the consequences for the U.S. trade balance.

Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Kelic, Andjelka; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

countries AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, -...

330

Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Name Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and Beyond AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Environment...

331

NREL Reduces Climate Control Loads in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National Nuclearover two yearsNPResults give insight

332

Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (1975–1995) and future (1995–2100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 2–3°C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Climate Change & Health: What Clinicians Need to Know  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change & Health: What Clinicians Need to Know Thomas B. Newman, MD, MPH Professor There are "co-benefits" to doing them 2 #12;1. It's real 3 #12;"Climate change is the biggest global health distant future but in our lifetimes and those of our children." --The Lancet, 11/09 Source: http://www.thelancet.com/climate-change

Yamamoto, Keith

334

Climate change and British woodland: what does the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and British woodland: what does the future hold? Mark Broadmeadow, Duncan Ray, Louise Sing and Liz Poulsom There is now convincing evidence that the climate is changing the last ice-age. The potentially serious consequences of predicted climate change for British woodland

335

Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 use to 10% below 2008 levels by 2020. Built Environment Design future projects to minimize energy and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital

Jacobs, Lucia

336

Natural Climate Variability Michael Ghil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

periodic (often called quasi-periodic) variations in Earth's orbit around the Sun affect the intensity-gas concentrations in the atmosphere, such as that of carbon dioxide (CO2), will increase surface temperatures through the greenhouse effect (see Projection of Future Changes in Climate, Volume 1). This temperature

Ghil, Michael

337

CLIMATE ACTION PLAN SEPTEMBER 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE ACTION PLAN SEPTEMBER 2009 UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO · OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY · ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO #12;#12;The University of New Mexico is committed to reducing energy usage and our d. Policy 2100 "Sustainability"............ 53 e. Policy 5100 "Energy Management" 58 B. Future

Maccabe, Barney

338

Improving the Water Component of an Agricultural Climate Change Assessment : Issues from the Standpoint of Agricultural Economists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the Water Component of an Agricultural Climate Change Assessment : Issues from The National Global Climate Change Research Program is supporting appraisals of water and agriculture among assessment. Key Terms; Economics, Climate Change Assessment, Agriculture, Irrigation, Water use tradeoffs

McCarl, Bruce A.

339

Informing Climate Policy Given Incommensurable Benefits Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The determination of long-term goals for climate policy, or of near-term mitigation effort, requires a shared conception among nations of what is at stake. Unfortunately, because of different attitudes to risk, problems ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

340

President Barack Obama at UN Climate Change Summit  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In his first address to the United Nations as Commander-in- Chief, President Obama addresses the pressing issue of climate change. The one-day UN summit brought together delegations from 90 nations. September 22, 2009 (Public Domain)

Obama, Barack

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

HYDROLOGICAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON INFLOWS TO PERTH, AUSTRALIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROLOGICAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON INFLOWS TO PERTH, AUSTRALIA JASON EVANS1 and SERGEI SCHREIDER2 1Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University, Australia 2Integrated Catchment Assessment and Management Centre, Australian National University, Australia Abstract

Evans, Jason

342

Boston University Seminar Series on Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boston University Seminar Series on Climate Change Free and open to the public Thursdays, September for Societal Change Matthew Nisbet, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, Public Policy and Urban National Assessments of Climate Change Tony Janetos, Professor of Earth and Environment and Director

Marchant, David R.

343

ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change conference. The conference will share tribal strategies, plans, and regional, national, and international policies on climate change, energy and carbon emissions as well as discuss tribal needs and funding opportunities.

344

Climate change: Update on international negotiations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the following: United Nations` framework convention on climatic change; the United States` climate change action plan; current issues to be resolved (targets/timetables, policies, advancing commitments of all parties, and compliance); and implications for clean coal technologies.

Silverman, L. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Policy

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Estimating the Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower and Power Marketing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is currently preparing an assessment of the effects of climate change on federal hydropower, as directed by Congress in Section 9505 of the Secure Water Act of 2009 (P.L. 111-11). This paper describes the assessment approach being used in a Report to Congress currently being prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The 9505 assessment will examine climate change effects on water available for hydropower operations and the future power supplies marketed from federal hydropower projects. It will also include recommendations from the Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) on potential changes in operation or contracting practices that could address these effects and risks of climate change. Potential adaption and mitigation strategies will also be identified. Federal hydropower comprises approximately half of the U.S. hydropower portfolio. The results from the 9505 assessment will promote better understanding among federal dam owners/operators of the sensitivity of their facilities to water availability, and it will provide a basis for planning future actions that will enable adaptation to climate variability and change. The end-users of information are Congressional members, their staff, the PMAs and their customers, federal dam owners/operators, and the DOE Water Power Program.

Sale, Michael J [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

Pan, Feifei

347

From Climate-change Spaghetti to Climate-change Distributions for 21st-Century California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effects of climate change on water resources in the West:U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations Reportwarming and California’s water future. UC Davis Center for

Dettinger, Michael D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Climate Threat to the Planet* Implications for Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Threat to the Planet* Implications for Energy Policy Jim Hansen 4 July 2008 United Nations's Paleoclimate History 2. On-Going Climate Changes 3. Climate Models #12;#12;Green Triangle = Volcano; Red Box;#12;Observations: Domingues, C.M. et al., Nature 453, 1090-1093, 2008. Model: Hansen, J. et al., Science 308, 1431

Hansen, James E.

350

MARS CLIMATE DATABASE v5.1 USER MANUAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MARS CLIMATE DATABASE v5.1 USER MANUAL (ESTEC Contract 11369/95/NL/JG "Mars Climate Database for version 5.1 of the Mars Climate Database (MCD) de- veloped by LMD (Paris), AOPP (Oxford), Dept. Physics and the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales. This is a database of atmospheric statistics compiled from Global Cli

Spiga, Aymeric

351

Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dixon, R.K. [U.S. Country Studies Program, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Climate Change and Indiana Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contribute to changes in global climate patterns. Global warming can occur from a variety of causes, both, rainfall or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Global Warming: An increase in the average natural and human induced. #12;7/23/2009 3 A Brief History of "Global Warming" Source: National Center

353

Colorado Climate Update Nolan Doesken  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Colorado Farm Show Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Prepared by Wendy Ryan and Zach Schwalbe #12;Topics we;Monitoring our Climate · Elements: temperature, precipitation, snow, wind, solar, evaporation, soil Average Solar Radiation National Renewal Energy Laboratory: www.nrel.gov Colorado is a part

354

Hydrogen: Fueling the Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As our dependence on foreign oil increases and concerns about global climate change rise, the need to develop sustainable energy technologies is becoming increasingly significant. Worldwide energy consumption is expected to double by the year 2050, as will carbon emissions along with it. This increase in emissions is a product of an ever-increasing demand for energy, and a corresponding rise in the combustion of carbon containing fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Undisputable scientific evidence indicates significant changes in the global climate have occurred in recent years. Impacts of climate change and the resulting atmospheric warming are extensive, and know no political or geographic boundaries. These far-reaching effects will be manifested as environmental, economic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical issues. Offsetting the projected increase in fossil energy use with renewable energy production will require large increases in renewable energy systems, as well as the ability to store and transport clean domestic fuels. Storage and transport of electricity generated from intermittent resources such as wind and solar is central to the widespread use of renewable energy technologies. Hydrogen created from water electrolysis is an option for energy storage and transport, and represents a pollution-free source of fuel when generated using renewable electricity. The conversion of chemical to electrical energy using fuel cells provides a high efficiency, carbon-free power source. Hydrogen serves to blur the line between stationary and mobile power applications, as it can be used as both a transportation fuel and for stationary electricity generation, with the possibility of a distributed generation energy infrastructure. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies will be presented as possible pollution-free solutions to present and future energy concerns. Recent hydrogen-related research at SLAC in hydrogen production, fuel cell catalysis, and hydrogen storage will be highlighted in this seminar.

Leisch, Jennifer

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

Bioenergy: America's Energy Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Bioenergy: America's Energy Future  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Climate Science and Public Policy in Iowa The productive soils and favorable climate of Iowa underpin the economy of our State.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Science and Public Policy in Iowa The productive soils and favorable climate of Iowa in our contributions to national and global food security. Changes in rainfall patterns and other climate and livelihoods. Subtle changes in climate can have large effects on agriculture, making it a sensitive indicator

Debinski, Diane M.

358

Driving the Future | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnalCommittee Draftfor $1.14 Per Gallon

359

Designing future cities | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINLNuclear262AboutDesigner Proteins

360

Sandia National Laboratories: future lignocellulosic biorefineries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia,evaluatingfull module characterization HelioVoltphysics offuture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM REPORT 2009 ­ 2010 @ 100 | PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE #12;NatioNal MuseuM of NatUral History @ 100 | Past, PreseNt & future on March 17, 1910, our doors opened of amazing advances, and the Museum's accomplishments have been no less significant. in our first century, we

Mathis, Wayne N.

362

Review: Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

Smith, Jennifer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Apportioning Climate Change Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

Farber, Daniel A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence K. Sham Bhat, Murali Haran, Adam Terando, and Klaus Keller. Abstract Projections of future climatic changes are a key input to the design of climate change mitiga- tion and adaptation strategies. Current climate change projections

Haran, Murali

365

To begin, what gave rise to this project on anticipatory learning for climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in developing countries to adapt to uncertain futures IN RECENT DECADES, the spectre of global climate change To begin, what gave rise to this project on anticipatory learning for climate change adaptation processes for climate change adaptation (CCA) whilst working on a USAID funded project, Climate Change

Giles, C. Lee

366

Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels...

Fryback, M. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Envision your future in engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or construction or to persist in your program As you read about a woman's experience of overcoming health issues and construction, and on the future of our society cannot be overstated With great pride, Heidi Sherick Assistant various national laboratories, including the Gran Sasso Laboratory. After traveling, we went to Princeton

Dyer, Bill

368

Sea-Level Rise, El Niño, And The Future Of The California Coastline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

City of Santa Barbara Sea-Level Rise Vulnerability Study.Projecting future sea level rise. California Climate Changeand responses to sea level rise. In Understanding Sea Level

Russell, Nicole Lian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

Battisti, David

370

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sandia National Laboratories: ECIS-Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECAbout ECFacilitiesCRFECIS-Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation: Hydrocarbon Membrane Fuels the Success of Future Generation Vehicles ECIS-Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation:...

372

Climate VISION: Contact Us  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of ClimateCONTACT US

373

Climate VISION: News  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of ClimateCONTACTNews

374

Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Register for Biomass 2014 today and don’t miss your chance to take part in this important event that will help move the nation to a more secure, sustainable, and economically sound future.

375

Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs Steve Howell Technical Director National Biodiesel Board ASTM Current Status ASTM D6751 is the approved standard for B100 for blending up to...

376

Our Focus is on YOUR Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) EE Degree = Secure Future An EE degree from the University of Michigan will open doors to hundreds (National Association of Colleges and Employers) Prevalence of Jobs Opportunities for electrical engineers, satellites, satellite imaging, nanotechnology & nanoelectronics, new and improved medical procedures

Eustice, Ryan

377

Changing Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Final Report for the portion performed in the University of Illinois on the project entitled "Optimizing the Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Ensemble Modeling System to Improve Future Climate Change Projections at Regional to Local Scales"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for the closure of the research tasks on the project that have performed during the entire reporting period in the University of Illinois. It contains a summary of the achievements and details of key results as well as the future plan for this project to be continued in the University of Maryland.

Liang, Xin-Zhong

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Climate change uncertainty evaluation, impacts modelling and resilience of farm scale dynamics in Scotland   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evidence of how primary production components of agriculture in Scotland may change under a future climate. The work used a generic Integrated Modelling Framework to structure the following sequence of investigations: Evaluate a Regional Climate Model...

Rivington, Michael

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

Climate Change Impacts on Extreme Events in the United States: An Uncertainty Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme weather and climate events, such as heat waves, droughts and severe precipitation events, have substantial impacts on ecosystems and the economy. However, future climate simulations display large uncertainty in ...

Monier, Erwan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Moving towards climate-smart flood management in Bangkok and Tokyo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing the impacts of climate change is no longer a concern of the future, but a significant reality of the present. Preparing for, and mitigating extreme weather events and adapting to the gradual shift in climatic ...

Takemoto, Shoko, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Global fish production and climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Uncertainty in future carbon emissions : a preliminary exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to analyze competing policy approaches for addressing global climate change, a wide variety of economic-energy models are used to project future carbon emissions under various policy scenarios. Due to uncertainties ...

Webster, Mort David.

384

Carbon dioxide and climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Climate Change and Extinctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

Sinervo, Barry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Brief History and Future Development of Earth System Models...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brief History and Future Development of Earth System Models: Resolution and Complexity Warren M. Washington National Center for Atmospheric Research NERSC Lecture Series at...

387

Preliminary Market Assessment for Cold Climate Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cold climate heat pump (HP) technology is relevant to a substantial portion of the U.S. population, especially with more than one-third of U.S. housing stock concentrated in colder regions of the country and another 31% in the mixed-humid climate region. Specifically, it is estimated that in 2010 almost 1.37 million heating equipment units were shipped to the cold/very cold climate regions and that 1.41 million were shipped to the nation s mixed-humid region. On a national level, the trend in the last decade has indicated that shipments of gas furnaces have grown at a slower rate than HPs. This indicates a potential opportunity for the cold climate HP, a technology that may be initially slow to penetrate its potential market because of the less expensive operating and first costs of gas furnaces. Anticipated implementation of regional standards could also negatively affect gas furnace shipments, especially with the higher initial cost for more efficient gas furnaces. However, as of 2011, the fact that there are more than 500 gas furnace product models that already achieve the expected efficiency standard indicates that satisfying the regional standard will be a challenge but not an obstacle. A look at the heating fuel and equipment currently being used in the housing stock provides an insight into the competing equipment that cold climate HPs hope to replace. The primary target market for the cold climate HP is the 2.6 million U.S. homes using electric furnaces and HPs in the cold/very cold region. It is estimated that 4.75% of these homeowners either replace or buy new heating equipment in a given year. Accordingly, the project team could infer that the cold climate HP primary market is composed of 123,500 replacements of electric furnaces and conventional air-to-air HPs annually. A secondary housing market for the cold climate HP comprises homes in the mixed-humid region of the country that are using electric furnaces. Homes using gas furnaces across both the cold/very cold and mixed-humid regions represent another secondary market for the cold climate HP. The cold climate HP could also target as a secondary market homes across both the cold/very cold and mixed-humid regions that use propane and fuel oil as their primary heating fuel. The combined total of homes in these three secondary markets is 46 million, and we can also infer that about 2.2 million of these systems are replaced annually. When comparing heating equipment stock in 2001, 2005, and 2009 in the cold/very cold region of the country, it appears that gas furnaces are slowly losing market share and that electric furnaces and HPs are making gains. The fact that electricity-dependent heating equipment is rising in preference among homeowners in the colder regions of the country shows that future penetration of the cold climate HP holds promise. Accordingly, cold climate HP technology could achieve an attractive position, given certain favorable market conditions such as reaching a competitive cost point, strong federal incentives, a consistent level of reliable performance, and a product rollout by a credible market leader. The project team relied on payback analysis to estimate the potential market penetration for the cold climate HP in each of its primary and secondary markets. In this analysis, we assumed a $250 price premium for the cold climate HP over the baseline HP. Electricity and gas prices and emissions were based on the 2010 Buildings Energy Data Book. The average heating load was calculated as 25.2 MMBTU per year in the cold/very cold and mixed-humid regions of the United States. Typical installed costs were obtained from the technical document supporting the U.S. Department of Energy rulemaking. The analysis showed that the cold climate HP will have a 2.2 year payback period when replacing an existing electric HP in the colder regions of the nation. The cold climate HP will have a 6 year payback period when replacing gas furnaces in the same climate regions. Accordingly, we estimated that the cold climate HP will have a penetration ratio rangin

Sikes, Karen [Sentech, Inc.; Khowailed, Gannate [Sentech, Inc.; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY Annual Report 2004 #12;2 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY · www.mnh.si.edu The revitalization of the National Museum of Natural History proceeded at a rapid pace, innovation and solid groundwork for future growth. The Museum's agenda is an active one. As with any

Mathis, Wayne N.

389

Climate-Energy Nexus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshop’s agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

391

World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

392

amarillo national resource: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

national resource management and to encourage international action toward climate change mitigation. However, carbon inventories based on field plots alone Potvin, Catherine...

393

Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazon basin climate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on ... Source: Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Collection: Renewable Energy 43 1. Carbon Cycle: overview and future 2. Questions? Summary: & climate change...

395

NGOs & climate change campaigns : understanding variations in motivations and activities of environmental and development organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unequal distribution of climate change impacts exploits the existing vulnerabilities of developing nations. This inequity, coupled with an inadequate, climate mitigation-focused response, has prompted a growing movement ...

Reeve, Kara E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

LLNL: Science in the National Interest  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. located in the Livermore Valley about 50 miles east of San Francisco, the Lab is where the nations topmost science, engineering and technology come together. National security, counter-terrorism, medical technologies, energy, climate change our researchers are working to develop solutions to these challenges. For more than 50 years, we have been keeping America strong.

George Miller

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DENMARK'S NATIONAL INVENTORY REPORT 2009 Emission Inventories 1990-2007 ­ Submitted under the United INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITYAU NERI Technical Report no. 724 2009 DENMARK'S NATIONAL INVENTORY REPORT 2009 Emission Inventories 1990-2007 ­ Submitted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

398

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

Auffhammer, Maximilian [University of California at Berkeley; Hsiang, Solomon M. [Princeton University; Schlenker, Wolfram [Columbia University; Sobel, Adam H. [Columbia University

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Trieu Berlin, Germany December 46, 2012 NREL/PR6A2057018 Renewable Electricity Futures Study (2012). Hand, M is a low carbon, low air pollutant, low fuel use, low water use, domestic, and sustainable electricity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

National Climate Assessment Indicators: Background, Development, & Examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indicators are usually thought of as measurements or calculations that represent important features of the status, trend, or performance of a system of interest (e.g. the economy, agriculture, air quality). They are often used for the most practical of reasons – one cannot measure everything important about systems of interest, so there is a practical need to identify major features that can be reported periodically and used to guide both research and decisions (NRC 2000).

Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Kenney, Melissa A.; Abbasi, Daniel; Armstrong, Tom; Bartuska, Ann; Blair, Maria; Buizer, Jim; Dietz, Tom; Easterling, Dave; Kaye, Jack; Kolian, Michael; McGeehin, Michael; O'Connor, Robert; Pulwarty, Roger; Running, Steve; Schmalensee, Dick; Webb, Robert; Weltzin, Jake; Baptista, Sandra; Enquist, Carolyn A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Hatfield, Jerry; Hayes, Mark L.; Jones, K. Burce; McNutt, Chad; Meier, Wayne R.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Svoboda, Mark

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

National Climatic Data Center DATA DOCUMENTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the NCDC Station History Database. These stations are located on all continents, but most are US sites set contains the date the report was created from the Station History database. This report Station History database - the source of this data set product. Discussion. A `station

403

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate/Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeScience SSRL ScienceCRFCareers Students

404

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy and Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeScience SSRLLibrarySandia's Biomass Program DOE

405

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy and Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeScience SSRLLibrarySandia's Biomass Program

406

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate/Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRF ResearchersPhysicsFacilitySecurity

407

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy and Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRFProvideAids EnergyUFDSunShot OnEnergy Surety

408

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRFProvideAidsCanal, Yakima,Geothermal Sandia

409

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRFProvideAidsCanal, Yakima,Geothermal SandiaGlobal

410

Sandia National Laboratories: in situ climate sensing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturing the viability offuel efficiency CRFin situ

411

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik

412

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at ExploraGlobal Sandia Co-Hosts

413

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at ExploraGlobal Sandia Co-HostsThe Energy-Water

414

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at ExploraGlobal Sandia Co-HostsThe

415

Economics, ethics, and climate policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Economics, ethics, and climate policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability? Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come? This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Tag: UT | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sign agreement to continue, expand collaborative work Partnership combines strengths to train future workforce, solve national challenges More... Category: Partnerships Hosting...

418

The Once and Future Warm Earth: A Paleoceanographic View  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Once and Future Warm Earth: A Paleoceanographic View Dr. Ted C. Moore, Jr., University of Michigan Predictions of climatic warming in the near future, if true, will approximate the very warm--and ended. In the early and mid Eocene the Arctic Ocean was ice-free and subtropical flora and fauna were

Sukop, Mike

419

Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Climate Change Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Climate change action plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

422

Climate Change Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

423

Fat Tails, Thin Tails, and Climate Change Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate policy is complicated by the considerable uncertainties concerning the benefits and costs of abatement. We do not even know the probability distributions for future temperatures and impacts, making benefit–cost ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The impact of climate change changes over time Cleo Bertelsmeier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the species' niche to future climatic sce- narios, based on different combinations of CO2 emission scenarios to a subsequent reduction or vice versa, depending on the date projected to. In some cases, these changes were

Courchamp, Franck

425

FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Future Power Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Future Power Grid Control Paradigm OBJECTIVE This project integration & exploit the potential of distributed smart grid assets » Significantly reduce the risk of advanced mathematical models, next- generation simulation and analytics capabilities for the power grid

426

`Capture ready' regulation of fossil fuel power plants Betting the UK's carbon emissions on promises of future technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-linked UK energy and climate change policies. Current climate change targets include 20% reduction of national green house gas emissions by 2010 and 80% reduction by 2050 from a 1990 baseline. However, only

Haszeldine, Stuart

427

Protecting climate with forests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Climate Code Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Microsoft PowerPoint - FNC NEPA GHG Climate Slides -- 16Jan2015...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

REVISED DRAFT GUIDANCE ON CONSIDERATION OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT REVIEWS HORST G GRECZMIEL ASSOCIATE...

430

Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Climate Change on Water, Biodiversity and Livelihoods”Dallas 5. The United Nations World Water Development Report3 (2009) “Water in a Changing World” Unesco Publishing (

Fenner, R. A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar to those predicted atmospheric CO2 concentrations (½CO2atm) during Earth's ancient greenhouse episodes is essential for accurately predicting the response of future climate to elevated CO2 levels. Empirical estimates of ½CO2atm

Ahmad, Sajjad

432

Is God Green? An Interfaith Response to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is God Green? An Interfaith Response to Climate Change Thursday, May 2, 2013 12:00 ­ 1:30 p people of faith in Arizona to reduce the causes of global climate change through education, advocacy, and others--to build an equitable and sustainable future for all. RSVP link: Download any free QR-Code reader

Hall, Sharon J.

433

Climate Change Response  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

434

Climate Action Plan (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commonwealth of Kentucky established the Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council (KCAPC) process to identify opportunities for Kentucky to respond to the challenge of global climate change while...

435

Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Mai, T.; Sandor, D.; Wiser, R.; Schneider, T.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Living a Sustainable Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solve the energy crisis through biological methods, including genetically engineering algae and cyanobacteria. Create a Sustainable Future: Living Living a Sustainable Future How...

439

Introduction to Futures Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An introduction to futures markets, this publication describes the history of the markets, defines terminology and offers advice on how to use futures effectively in farm marketing programs....

Mintert, James R.; Welch, Mark

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Active stewardship: sustainable future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Climate Change Action Pack An interactive teaching supplement designed to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The Climate Change Action Pack An interactive teaching supplement designed to: · Increase the understanding among young Nova Scotians and educators of the science and issues of climate change · Equip Nova at home and in their future workplaces. #12;Climate Change Action Pack printed Mar. 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS

Gunawardena, Arunika

443

Functional ANOVA and Regional Climate Experiments: A Statistical Analysis of Dynamic Downscaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

added an urgency to predict changes in our climate due to our future behavior. The primary tools used the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (Solomon et al., 2007, http the Earth's climate, such as natural changes in solar or volcanic activity, human-induced changes

Sain, Steve

444

JULY 10 and 11, 2012 | 6 PM | The Climate Crisis looms as the most serious  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the atmosphere in order to avoid dangerous climate change and to return the Earth to a safe-climate future? HowJULY 10 and 11, 2012 | 6 PM | The Climate Crisis looms as the most serious threat to human can the public and decision-makers cut through the spin and denial in order to do what is necessary

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

445

An Integrated Study of Avian Influenza Impacts and Associated Climate Change Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The climate change and spread of AI outbreaks study finds that the probability and expected number of AI outbreaks increases as climate change proceeds. Particularly, past climate change has contributed to the current spread of AI disease by 11% and the future...

Mu, Jianhong

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

June 14, 2011 Food security and climate change Vancouver forum starts today  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the latest climate change projections and how it will affect BC agriculture. The panel's speakers include: DrMEDIA TIP June 14, 2011 Food security and climate change ­ Vancouver forum starts today Finding out how British Columbia's climate is expected to change and how this will affect our future food supplies

Pedersen, Tom

447

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

Bern, Universität

448

The Faculty of Science and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Future Development of Climate and Earth System Models for Scientific and Policy Use Warren M. Washington of climate and Earth system models has been regarded primarily as the making of scientific tools to study, the development of climate and Earth system models became intimately linked to the need to not only improve our

449

Negotiating challenges and climate change JOYEETA GUPTA1,2,3*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Negotiating challenges and climate change JOYEETA GUPTA1,2,3* 1 Institute for Environmental Studies, and Russia on the Kyoto Protocol regime have led to pessimism about the future of the climate regime the key challenge facing the evolving long- term climate change negotiation process: the principled basis

Colorado at Boulder, University of

450

Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

Canet, Léonie

451

NOAA Webinar: The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to 2:30PM EDT Hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this webinar will demonstrate the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit. Register for this webinar...

452

Climate Service -Questions and Answers Updated: February 15, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................7 Federal Agency Coordination innovation, and to be competitive in national and global marketplaces. For example: o electricity producers office in NOAA that will bring together many of the agency's existing climate assets including research

453

UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

454

Actors, coalitions and the framework convention on climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the political processes through which the Framework Convention on Climate Change was negotiated and the initial efforts of the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan to adopt national policies and ...

Sewell, Granville C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Time varying arctic climate change amplification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The climatic and hydrologic history of southern Nevada during the late Quaternary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding climate change during the expected life span of a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires estimates of future climate boundary conditions. These climate boundary conditions are governed by changes in the Earth's orbital properties (eccentricity, obliquity, precession) that determine insolation. Subcycles of the 400,000 year insolation-controlled climate cycles last approximately 100,000 years. This report describes the changes which have occurred in the climatic history of Southern Nevada during the past 400,000 years. These changes provide a basis for understanding the changes which may occur during the long-term future in this area.

Forester, R.M.; Bradbury, J.P.; Carter, C.; Elvidge-Tuma, A.B.; Hemphill, M.L.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Mahan, S.A.; Marshall, B.D.; Neymark, L.A.; Paces, J.B.; Sharpe, S.E.; Whelan, J.F.; Wigand, P.E.

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Climate Stewardship Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Climate Stewardship Act of 2004 would establish a system of tradable allowances to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The bill includes requirements for mandatory emissions reporting by covered entities and for voluntary reporting of emissions reduction activities by noncovered entities; a national greenhouse gas database and registry of reductions; and a research program on climate change and related activities.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center: Long, D. G., M. R. Drinkwater, B. Holt, S. Saatchi, and C. Bertoia, Global ice and land climate studies

Long, David G.

459

Increasing access to the carbon market ENERGY, CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

themselves, the science of climate change continually improves, and governments continue to move towards cli- mate change, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is implementing a new climate change thematic focus within URC, the Energy and Car- bon Finance Program helps developing countries pursue

460

Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Science Board is to promote the Nation’s scientific enterprise by ensuring that the best quality science is conducted at the DOE’s User Facility known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. The goal of the User Facility is to serve scientific researchers by providing unique data and tools to facilitate scientific applications for improving understanding and prediction of climate science.

Ferrell, W

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

"Managing Department Climate Change"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

Sheridan, Jennifer

462

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

463

Global Energy Futures: With International Futures (IFs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dr. Hughes presents and discusses the results of simulations on alternative energy futures composed in collaboration with SNL's Sustainability Innovation Foundry.

Hughes, Barry

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

464

Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and NCAR in the development of a comprehensive, earth systems model. This model incorporates the most-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well. Our collaborators in climate research include the National Center

465

EA-1924: Consolidation and Relocation of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) OffSite Research Programs to a New Off-Site Location that also Allows for Future Growth, San Francisco East Bay Area, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to consolidate and relocate LBNL research programs that are currently in leased off-site buildings at various locations around the San Francisco East Bay Area in California, to a new single location that also provides room for future growth of LBNL research programs.

466

Climatic change at high elevation sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Workshop on climatic change at high elevation sites was held September 11-15, 1995 in Wengen, Switzerland. The meeting was sponsored by both U.S. (Department of Energy, National Science Foundation and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) and European (Swiss National Science Foundation, European Science Foundation, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) agencies. The goals of the workshop were to (1) focus the attention of the world climate community on the existence of unique high elevation geophysical records around the world, (2) highlight the value of these observing sites for climate change detection efforts and to help insure the continued support of governments and of relevant institutions in the maintenance of these high elevation data gathering efforts, (3) discuss and evaluate climatic trends that may be present in these records, and to compare the information with available paleoenvironmental records of glaciers, tree-rings and varved sediments from the alpine zones, and (4) discuss and evaluate information about elevational differences in current and projected greenhouse-gas induced climatic changes in coupled General Circulation Models.

Dr. Henry F. Diaz

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the world’s electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel cycles. In March of 2011, an unprecedented earthquake of 9 magnitude and ensuing tsunami off the east coast of Japan caused a severe nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan (Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 2011). The severity of the nuclear accident in Japan has brought about a reinvestigation of nuclear energy policy and deployment activities for many nations around the world, most notably in Japan and Germany (BBC, 2011; Reuter, 2011). The response to the accident has been mixed and its full impact may not be realized for many years to come. The nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan has not directly affected the significant on-going nuclear deployment activities in many countries. China, Russia, India, and South Korea, as well as others, are continuing with their deployment plans. As of October 2011, China had the most reactors under construction at 27, while Russia, India, and South Korea had 11, 6, and 5 reactors under construction, respectively (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Ten other nations have one or two reactors currently under construction. Many more reactors are planned for future deployment in China, Russia, and India, as well as in the US. Based on the World Nuclear Association’s data, the realization of China’s deployment plan implies that China will surpass the US in total nuclear capacity some time in the future.

Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

468

Climate Change What We Know and What We Need to Learn  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

How is human activity changing the climate and what are the consequences? Is global warming the cause of more frequent droughts, stronger storms and less snow in the mountains? Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Scientist Dave Bader explores what scientists know about climate change and the research tools used to study the climate. Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11544

LLNL - University of California Television

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Climate Change What We Know and What We Need to Learn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How is human activity changing the climate and what are the consequences? Is global warming the cause of more frequent droughts, stronger storms and less snow in the mountains? Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Scientist Dave Bader explores what scientists know about climate change and the research tools used to study the climate. Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11544

LLNL - University of California Television

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis 2010 CTS Research Conference Carissa ­! Environmental impact analysis methods and content ·! Next steps #12;Purpose ·! Explore the use of environmental ·! Federal and state policies govern environmental impact analysis ­!National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA

Minnesota, University of

471

IEA HPP Annex 41 Cold Climate Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Air-Source Heat Pumps Van D. Baxter Oak Ridge National Laboratory European Heat Pump Summit Nuremberg ­ Cold Climate Heat Pumps Improving low ambient temperature performance of air-source heat pumps as having large number of hours with OD temperature -7 °C (19 °F). Air-source heat pumps (ASHP

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

472

Semantic search integration to climate data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present how research projects at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using Semantic Search capabilities to help scientists perform their research. We will discuss how the Mercury metadata search system, with the help of the semantic search capability, is being used to find, retrieve, and link climate change data. DOI: 10.1109/CTS.2014.6867639

Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Palanisamy, Giri [ORNL; Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Shrestha, Biva [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to accumulating greenhouse gases "These results are very important," said A. Park Williams of Los Alamos, lead stress and mortality as climate warms LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 1, 2012--Combine the tree-ring growth record of scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Arizona

474

2nd Week of National Energy Action Month Takes Energy Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

proclamation calling on stakeholders across the country to work together to combat climate change while spurring job creation and a low-carbon energy future. Throughout...

475

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

476

Mid-Century Ensemble Regional Climate Change Scenarios for the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the impacts of climate change on water resources in the western U.S., global climate simulations were produced using the National Center for Atmospheric Research/Department of Energy (NCAR/DOE) Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) was used to downscale the PCM control (1995-2015) and three future (2040-2060) climate simulations to yield ensemble regional climate simulations at 40 km spatial resolution for the western U.S. This paper focuses on analyses of regional simulations in the Columbia River and Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basins. Results based on the regional simulations show that by mid-century, the average regional warming of 1-2.5oC strongly affects snowpack in the western U.S. Along coastal mountains, reduction in annual snowpack is about 70%. Besides changes in mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack, cold season extreme daily precipitation is found to increase by 5 to 15 mm/day (15-20%) along the Cascades and the Sierra. The warming results in increased rainfall over snowfall and reduced snow accumulation (or earlier snowmelt) during the cold season. In the Columbia River Basin, these changes are accompanied by more frequent rain-on-snow events. Overall, they induce higher likelihood of wintertime flooding and reduced runoff and soil moisture in the summer. Such changes could have serious impacts on water resources and agriculture in the western U.S. Changes in surface water and energy budgets in the Columbia River and Sacramento-San Joaquin basins are driven mainly by changes in surface temperature, which are statistically significant at the 0.95 confidence level. Changes in precipitation, however, are spatially incoherent and not statistically significant except for the drying trend during summer.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun; Bian, Xindi; Washington, Warren M.; Han, Jongil; Roads, John O.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

Polz, Martin

478

Terrestrial Water Relations & Climate ChangeTerrestrial Water Relations & Climate Change Jeffrey M Warren, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

warmermore frequent and longer lasting in a future warmer climate" "...precipitation intensity is projected Report "...very likely that heat waves will be more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in a future carbon gain. Leaf water loss Hubbard et al. 2001 #12;9 belowground processesbelowground processes

Gray, Matthew

479

FutureGen Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: • Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization • Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling • FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document • Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for dry-fed gasifier configuration • Full capital cost report and cost category analysis (CAPEX) • Full operating cost report and assumptions (OPEX) Comparative technology evaluations, value engineering exercises, and initial air permitting activities are also provided; the report concludes with schedule, risk, and cost mitigation activities as well as lessons learned such that the products of this report can be used to support future investments in utility scale gasification and carbon capture and sequestration. Collectively, the FutureGen project enabled the comprehensive site specific evaluation and determination of the economic viability of IGCC-CCS. The project report is bound at that determination when DOE formally proposed the FutureGen 2.0 project which focuses on repowering a pulverized coal power plant with oxy-combustion technology including CCS.

Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

480

A fair compromise to break the climate impasse. A major economies forum approach to emissions reductions budgeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key messages of the study are: Given the stalemate in U.N. climate negotiations, the best arena to strike a workable deal is among the members the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF); The 13 MEF members—including the EU-27 (but not double-counting the four EU countries that are also individual members of the MEF)—account for 81.3 percent of all global emissions; This proposal devises a fair compromise to break the impasse to develop a science-based approach for fairly sharing the carbon budget in order to have a 75 percent chance of avoiding dangerous climate change; To increase the likelihood of a future climate agreement, carbon accounting must shift from production-based inventories to consumption-based ones; The shares of a carbon budget to stay below 2 deg C through 2050 are calculated by cumulative emissions since 1990, i.e. according to a short-horizon polluter pays principle, and national capability (income), and allocated to MEF members through emission rights. This proposed fair compromise addresses key concerns of major emitters; According to this accounting, no countries have negative carbon budgets, there is substantial time for greening major developing economies, and some developed countries need to institute very rapid reductions in emissions; and, To provide a 'green ladder' to developing countries and to ensure a fair global deal, it will be crucial to agree how to extend sufficient and predictable financial support and the rapid transfer of technology.

Grasso, Marco [Univ. of Milan-Bicocca (Italy). International Environmental Policy; J. Roberts, Timmons [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Environmental Studies and Sociology; The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "future national climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

The climate change and energy security nexus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of the impacts of climate change on national and interna-tional security has grown as a research field, particularly in the last five years. Within this broad field, academic scholarship has concentrated primarily on whether climate change is, or may become, a driver of violent conflict. This relationship remains highly contested. However, national security policy and many non-governmental organizations have identified climate change as a threat multiplier in conflict situations. The U.S. Department of Defense and the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defense have incorporated these findings into strategic planning documents such as the Quadrennial Defense Review and the Strategic Defence and Security Review. In contrast to the climate-conflict nexus, our analysis found that academic scholarship on the climate change and energy security nexus is small and more disciplinarily focused. In fact, a search of social science litera-ture found few sources, with a significant percentage of these works attribut-able to a single journal. Assuming that policymakers are more likely to rely on broader social science literature than technical or scientific journals, this leaves a limited foundation. This then begged the question: what are these sources? We identified a body of grey literature on the nexus of climate change and energy security of a greater size than the body of peer-reviewed social science literature. We reviewed fifty-eight recent reports, issue briefs, and transcripts to better understand the nexus of climate change and energy security, as well as to gain insight about the questions policymakers need answered by those undertaking the research. In this article, we describe the nature of the sources reviewed, highlight possible climate change and energy security linkages found within those sources, identify emerging risks, and offer conclusions that can guide further research.

King, Marcus Dubois [George Washington University; Gulledge, Jay [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Improving Availability, Access and Use of Climate Information in Africa: Ethiopia's experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving Availability, Access and Use of Climate Information in Africa: Ethiopia's experience Tufa. National Meteorology Agency, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 3. Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK of climate information in development practices. The National Meteorology Agency of Ethiopia has been

Miami, University of

483

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

net impact of climate change on agriculture in California,of Climate Change on California Agriculture. ” PresentationEffects of Climate Change on California Agriculture Positive

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

Fisher, Anthony

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Review: Preparing for Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. “Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

Kunnas, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Urban Growth and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007a The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence fromGreenstone. 2007b. Climate Change, Mortality and Adaptation:and Ariel Dinar, 1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and

Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Future of Home Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Energy TechnicalFlowNationThe Facts on GasTheThe Future

490

The Value of Advanced Technologies in the U.S. Buildings Sector in Climate Change Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a wide body of research focused on the potential of advanced technologies to reduce energy consumption in buildings. How such improvements relate to global climate change, however, is less clear, due to the complexity of the climate change issue, and the implications for the energy system as a whole that need to be considered. This study uses MiniCAM, an integrated assessment model, to examine the contributions of several suites of advanced buildings technologies in meeting national carbon emissions reduction targets, as part of a global policy to mitigate climate change by stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 ppmv. Focal technology areas include building shells, heat pumps for HVAC and water heating applications, solid-state lighting, and miscellaneous electric equipment. We find that advanced heat pumps and energy-efficient miscellaneous electric equipment show the greatest potential to reduce aggregate building sector future energy consumption and policy costs, but that all focal areas are important for reducing energy consumption. Because of assumed availability of low-cost, emissions-reduced electricity generation technologies in these scenarios, heat pumps are especially important for facilitating fuel-switching towards electricity. Buildings sector energy consumption is reduced by 28% and policy costs are reduced by 17% in a scenario with advanced technologies in all focal areas.

Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Future credible precipitation occurrences in Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I have studied many factors thought to have influenced past climatic change. Because they might recur, they are possible suspects for future climatic alterations. Most of these factors are totally unpredictable; therefore, they cast a shadow on the validity of derived climatic predictions. Changes in atmospheric conditions and in continental surfaces, variations in solar radiation, and in the earth's orbit around the sun are among the influential mechanisms investigated. Even when models are set up that include the above parameters, their reliability will depend on unpredictable variables totally alien to the model (like volcanic eruptions). Based on climatic records, however, maximum precipitation amounts have been calculated for different probability levels. These seem to correspond well to past precipitation occurrences, derived from tree ring indices. The link between tree ring indices and local climate has been established through regression analysis.

Abeele, W.V.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Small Business Manager Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keith Joy Small Business Manager Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Past, Present, and Future #12;2 OAK was the world's first continuously operated nuclear reactor Oak Ridge National Laboratory evolved from the Manhattan Project 2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Overview_0604 #12;3 OAK RIDGE

498

Climate VISION: How to Participate  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of ClimateCONTACT

499

C3i: Research on climate, climatic change, and impacts at the University of Geneva  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Swiss cooperative for nuclear waste disposal · Simulations of non-linear climate processes, funded (the Swiss cooperative for nuclear waste disposal), this is an investigation of the risks posed by ice availability · The assessment of future glacier risks on nuclear waste repositories, under contract with NAGRA

Laemmli, Ulrich

500

Your Engineering Future: Discovering Your Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the nation. Some of the specialized services offered include: · Two engineering career fairs each year · JobYour Engineering Future: Discovering Your Potential INVESTING WISELY The University of Texas the entire university, the Cockrell School offers engineering students a personalized place to begin

Lightsey, Glenn