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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Fusion Test Facilities John Sheffield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flexing tests - Testing nuclear fuel assemblies to meltdown--PHEBUS reactor #12;#12;Released on February REACTOR--CADARACHE · Purpose: studies of hypothetical accidents in pressurized water reactors · Type: pool.78% · The reactor was transformed into a miniature PWR (scale 1/5000) for the program Phébus PFF, a study

2

Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses.

Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

3

Photo of the Week: The Mirror Fusion Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Mirror Fusion Test Facility The Mirror Fusion Test Facility Photo of the Week: The Mirror Fusion Test Facility July 19, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis This 1981 photo shows the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an experimental magnetic confinement fusion device built using a magnetic mirror at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The MFTF functioned as the primary research center for mirror fusion devices. The design consisted of a 64-meter-long vacuum vessel fitted with 26 coil magnets bonding the center of the vessel and two 400-ton yin-yang magnet mirrors at either end. The first magnet produced a magnetic field force equal to the weight of 30 jumbo jets hanging from the magnet coil. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This 1981 photo shows the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an

4

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)  

SciTech Connect

The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, understand, and innovate scientific and technical solutions for the challenges facing DEMO, by addressing the multi-scale synergistic interactions involving fusion plasma material interactions, tritium fuel cycle, power extraction, and the nuclear effects on materials. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of 19 MW. If and when this research operation is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and 76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate- plasmas would minimize plasma-induced disruptions, helping to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all components using extensive remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for all internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post with RH-compatible bi-directional sliding joints. Such device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum seal welds behind the internal and shielding components. If these further goals could be achieved, the FNSF would provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, at higher neutron fluence and duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF strategy would be complementary to the ITER and the Broader Approach programs, and thereby help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program. The key physics and technology research needed in the next decade to manage the potential risks of this FNSF are identified.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility-AT: A Material and Component Testing Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Technology Facilities / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials, Part A: Fusion Technology

C. P. C. Wong; V. S. Chan; A. M. Garofalo; R. Stambaugh; M. E. Sawan; R. Kurtz; B. Merrill

6

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) Before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant, Demo, and FNSF / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

Y. K. M. Peng et al.

7

Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year.

Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A spheromak ignition experiment reusing Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on available experimental results and theory, a scenario is presented to achieve ohmic ignition in a spheromak by slow ({approximately} 10 sec.) helicity injection using power from the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) substation. Some of the other parts needed (vacuum vessel, coils, power supplies, pumps, shielded building space) might also be obtained from MFTF or other salvage, as well as some components needed for intermediate experiments for additional verification of the concept (especially confinement scaling). The proposed ignition experiment would serve as proof-of-principle for the spheromak DT fusion reactor design published by Hagenson and Krakowski, with a nuclear island cost about ten times less than a tokamak of comparable power. Designs at even higher power density and lower cost might be possible using Christofilos` concept of a liquid lithium blanket. Since all structures would be protected from neutrons by the lithium blanket and the tritium inventory can be reduced by continuous removal from the liquid blanket, environmental and safety characteristics appear to be favorable.

Fowler, T.K.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

9

Remote Handling and Plasma Conditions to Enable Fusion Nuclear Science R&D Using a US Component Testing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a fusion component testing facility to study and establish, during the ITER era, the remaining scientific and technical knowledge needed by fusion Demo is considered and described in this paper. This use aims to lest components in an integrated fusion nuclear environment, for the first time, to discover and understand the underpinning physical properties, and to develop improved components for further testing, in a time-efficient manner. It requires a design with extensive modularization and remote handling of activated components, and flexible hot-cell laboratories. It further requires reliable plasma conditions to avoid disruptions and minimize their impact, and designs to reduce the divertor heat flux to the level of ITER design. As the plasma duration is extended through the planned ITER level (similar to 10(3) s) and beyond, physical properties with increasing time constants, progressively for similar to 10(4) s, similar to 10(5) s, and similar to 10(6) s, would become accessible for testing and R&D. The longest time constants of these are likely to be of the order of a week ( 106 S). Progressive stages of research operation are envisioned in deuterium, deuterium-tritium for the ITER duration, and deuterium-tritium with increasingly longer plasma durations. The fusion neutron fluence and operational duty factor anticipated for this "scientific exploration" phase of a component test facility are estimated to be up to 1 MW-yr/m(2) and up to 10%, respectively.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; Neumeyer, C. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Canik, John [ORNL; Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Dorland, W. D. [University of Maryland; Fogarty, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Kotschenreuther, M. [University of Texas, Austin; LaHaye, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Mahajan, S. [University of Texas, Austin; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Tsai, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vanlanju, P. [University of Texas, Austin; Wagner, Jill C [ORNL; Yoder, III, Graydon L [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

MISSION AND NEED FOR A FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MISSION AND NEED FOR A FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY Mission Gerald Navratil Need Mohamed Abdou and Symposium 1-2 December 2010 #12;FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY: COMMENTS ON MISSION Gerald A. Navratil Component Test Facility Theory & Simulation FESAC/Snowmass Report: ITER-Based Development Path #12;FUSION

11

Measurements of electromagnetic properties of LCT (Large Coil Task) coils in IFSMTF (International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Participants in the international Large Coil Task (LCT) have designed, built, and tested six different toroidal field coils. Each coil has a 2.5- by 3.5-m, D-shaped bore and a current between 10 and 18 kA and is designed to demonstrate stable operation at 8 T, with a superimposed averaged pulsed field of 0.14 T in 1.0 s and simulated nuclear heating. Testing of the full six-coil toroidal array began early in 1986 and was successfully completed on September 3, 1987, in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper summarizes electromagnetic properties of LCT coils measured in different modes of energization and fast dump. Effects of mutual coupling and induced eddy currents are analyzed and discussed. Measurements of the ac loss caused by the superimposed pulsed fields are summarized. Finally, the interpretation of the test results and their relevance to practical fusion are presented. 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tab.

Shen, S.S.; Baylor, L.R.; Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Wilson, C.T.; Wintenberg, R.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fusion materials irradiations at MaRIE's fission fusion facility  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory's proposed signature facility, MaRIE, will provide scientists and engineers with new capabilities for modeling, synthesizing, examining, and testing materials of the future that will enhance the USA's energy security and national security. In the area of fusion power, the development of new structural alloys with better tolerance to the harsh radiation environments expected in fusion reactors will lead to improved safety and lower operating costs. The Fission and Fusion Materials Facility (F{sup 3}), one of three pillars of the proposed MaRIE facility, will offer researchers unprecedented access to a neutron radiation environment so that the effects of radiation damage on materials can be measured in-situ, during irradiation. The calculated radiation damage conditions within the F{sup 3} match, in many respects, that of a fusion reactor first wall, making it well suited for testing fusion materials. Here we report in particular on two important characteristics of the radiation environment with relevancy to radiation damage: the primary knock-on atom spectrum and the impact of the pulse structure of the proton beam on temporal characteristics of the atomic displacement rate. With respect to both of these, analyses show the F{sup 3} has conditions that are consistent with those of a steady-state fusion reactor first wall.

Pitcher, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fusion Development Facility (A26455)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 23rd IEEE/NPSS Symposium On Fusion Engineering, San Diego, California; To Be Published In The Proceedings23rd IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering San Diego California, US, 2009999616325

Smith, J.P.

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

14

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Requirements  

SciTech Connect

This Standard identifies safety requirements for magnetic fusion facilities. Safety functions are used to define outcomes that must be achieved to ensure that exposures to radiation, hazardous materials, or other hazards are maintained within acceptable limits. Requirements applicable to magnetic fusion facilities have been derived from Federal law, policy, and other documents. In addition to specific safety requirements, broad direction is given in the form of safety principles that are to be implemented and within which safety can be achieved.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Remote Handling and Plasma Conditions to Enable Fusion Nuclear Science R&D Using a Component Testing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plants, Demo, and Next Steps / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

Y. K. M. Peng et al.

17

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Lighting Systems Test Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement equipment with light beam Lighting Systems Test Facilities NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be...

19

Operating procedures: Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility (FEAF) is a computer facility based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. It became operational in late 1982. At that time two manuals were written to aid users and staff in their interactions with the facility. This manual is designed as a reference to assist the FEAF staff in carrying out their responsibilities. It is meant to supplement equipment and software manuals supplied by the vendors. Also this manual provides the FEAF staff with a set of consistent, written guidelines for the daily operation of the facility.

Lerche, R.A.; Carey, R.W.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

BNL | Accelerator Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Test Facility Accelerator Test Facility Home Core Capabilities Photoinjector S-Band Linac Laser Systems CO2 Laser Nd:Yag Laser Beamlines Beamline Simulation Data Beamline Parameters Beam Diagnostics Detectors Beam Schedule Operations Resources Fact Sheet (.pdf) Image Library Upgrade Proposal (.pdf) Publications ES&H Experiment Start-up ATF Handbook Laser Safety Collider-Accelerator Dept. C-AD ES&H Resources Staff Users' Place Apply for Access ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo A user facility for advanced accelerator research The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is a proposal driven, steering committee reviewed facility that provides users with high-brightness electron- and laser-beams. The ATF pioneered the concept of a user facility for studying complex properties of modern accelerators and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Extensive remote handling and conservative plasma conditions to enable fusion nuclear science R&D using a component testing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FT/P3-14 Page 1 Extensive remote handling and conservative plasma conditions to enable fusion modularization and remote handling, and allow conservative plasma assumptions including an extended divertor component modularization and capability for remote handling, and estimate the replacement times of various

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

22

Requirements and Design Envelope for Volumetric Neutron Source Fusion Facilities for Fusion Nuclear Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

The paper shows that timely development of fusion nuclear technology (FNT) components, e.g. blanket, for DEMO requires the construction and operation of a fusion facility parallel to ITER. This facility, called VNS, will be dedicated to testing, developing and qualifying FNT components and material combinations. Without VNS, i.e. with ITER alone, the confidence level in achieving DEMO operating goals has been quantified and is unacceptably low (< 1 %). An attractive design envelope for VNS exists. Tokamak VNS designs with driven plasma (Q ~ 1-3), steady state plasma operation and normal copper toroidal field coils lead to small sized devices with moderate cost.

Abdou, M [University of California, Los Angeles; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Advanced Windows Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Advanced Windows Test Facility This multi-room laboratory's purpose is to test the performance and properties of advanced windows and window systems such as electrochromic windows, and automatically controlled shutters and blinds. The lab simulates real-world office spaces. Embedded instrumentation throughout the lab records solar gains and losses for specified time periods, weather conditions, energy use, and human comfort indicators. Electrochromic glazings promise to be a major advance in energy-efficient window technology, helping to achieve the goal of transforming windows and skylights from an energy liability in buildings to an energy source. The glazing can be reversibly switched from a clear to a transparent, colored

24

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

25

SEU Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Logo The SEU Test Facility Logo The SEU Test Facility 1. Introduction The uninterrupted and progressive miniaturization of microelectronic devices while resulting in more powerful computers, has also made these computers more susceptible to the effects of ionizing radiation. This is of particular concern for space applications due to the radiation fields encountered outside the protective terrestrial atmosphere and magnetosphere. Starting in 1987, a coalition of US government agencies (NSA, NASA, NRL and USASSDC ) collaborated with BNL to develop a powerful and user-friendly test facility for investigating space-radiation effects on micro-electronic devices[1]. The main type of effects studied are the so called Single Event Upsets (SEUs) where ionization caused by the passage of

26

Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas  

SciTech Connect

It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (~ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a "gas shield" may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering metmethods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

C.A.Gentile, W.R.Blanchard, T.Kozub, C.Priniski, I.Zatz, S.Obenschain

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hot Hydrogen Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellants absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

W. David Swank

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Volume 2, Guidance  

SciTech Connect

This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in Vol. 1 of this Standard. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While Vol. 1 is generally applicable in that requirements there apply to a wide range of fusion facilities, this volume is concerned mainly with large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This volume is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

LINX Test Facility at SLAC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LINX LINear collider X-ing Linear Collider Interaction Region Engineering Test Facility at SLAC The NLC collaboration is proposing to create the LINX test facility at SLAC to...

30

R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

LOFT facility and test program  

SciTech Connect

The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) test facility, program objectives, and the experiments planned are described. The LOFT facility is related to the smaller Semiscale facility and the larger commercial pressurized water reactors. The fact that LOFT is a computer model assessment tool rather than a demonstration test is emphasized. Various types of reactor safety experiments planned through 1983 are presented.

McPherson, G.D.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility - Advanced Tokamak Option  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant, Demo, and FNSF / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

C. P. C. Wong; V. S. Chan; A. M. Garofalo; J. A. Leuer; M. E. Sawan; J. P. Smith; R. D. Stambaugh

33

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Outdoor Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outdoor Test Facility Aerial photo of the Outdoor Test Facility. The Outdoor Test Facility at NREL is used to evaluate prototype, precommercial, and commercial modules. Outdoor...

34

Hawaii Fuel Cell Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Test Facility presented to DOE Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop Renaissance Hollywood Hotel by Rick Rocheleau...

35

Mission and Readiness Assessment for Fusion Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DEMO and Next-Step Facilities / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 2) Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

G. H. Neilson et al.

36

The Suitability of the Materials Test Station for Fusion Materials Irradiations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Technology Facilities / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials, Part A: Fusion Technology

E. J. Pitcher; C. T. Kelsey IV; S. A. Maloy

37

Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Robotics Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 5000 square foot) high bay, holding most of the test methods; ... to help engineers view robot performance remotely and for recording testing events. ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Radiological Dose Calculations for Fusion Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results and rationale for radiological dose calculations for the maximally exposed individual during fusion accident conditions. Early doses per unit activity (Sieverts per TeraBecquerel) are given for 535 magnetic fusion isotopes of interest for several release scenarios. These data can be used for accident assessment calculations to determine if the accident consequences exceed Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy evaluation guides. A generalized yearly dose estimate for routine releases, based on 1 Terabecquerel unit releases per radionuclide, has also been performed using averaged site parameters and assumed populations. These routine release data are useful for assessing designs against US Environmental Protection Agency yearly release limits.

Michael L. Abbott; Lee C. Cadwallader; David A. Petti

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

SunLab Test Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy maintains two major test facilities in support of its Solar Thermal Electric Program--Sandia's National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) in Golden, Colorado. Manufacturers can use the NSTTF to test new designs, ideas, and products in an outdoor environment much like the environment the equipment will be in when it is used in the field; the operational characteristics and size of NREL's 10-kilowatt HFSF make it ideal for testing prototype hardware and calibrating flux gauges, which are used to measure levels of concentrated sunlight.

Not Available

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the worlds largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

Ross, P.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Mission and Readiness Assessment for Fusion Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic fusion development toward DEMO will most likely require a number of fusion nuclear facilities (FNF), intermediate between ITER and DEMO, to test and validate plasma and nuclear technologies and to advance the level of system integration. The FNF mission space is wide, ranging from basic materials research to net electricity demonstration, so there is correspondingly a choice among machine options, scope, and risk in planning such a step. Readiness requirements to proceed with a DEMO are examined, and two FNF options are assessed in terms of the contributions they would make to closing DEMO readiness gaps, and their readiness to themselves proceed with engineering design about ten years from now. An advanced tokamak (AT) pilot plant with superconducting coils and a mission to demonstrate net electricity generation would go a long way toward DEMO. As a next step, however, a pilot plant would entail greater risk than a copper-coil FNSF-AT with its more focussed mission and technology requirements. The stellarator path to DEMO is briefly discussed. Regardless of the choice of FNF option, an accompanying science and technology development program, also aimed at DEMO readiness, is absolutely essential.

G.H. Neilson, et. al.

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

43

Evaluation of irradiation facility options for fusion materials research and development  

SciTech Connect

Successful development of fusion energy will require the design of high-performance structural materials that exhibit dimensional stability and good resistance to fusion neutron degradation of mechanical and physical properties. The high levels of gaseous (H, He) transmutation products associated with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion neutron transmutation reactions, along with displacement damage dose requirements up to 50-200 displacements per atom (dpa) for a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), pose an extraordinary challenge. The intense neutron source(s) is needed to address two complimentary missions: 1) Scientific investigations of radiation degradation phenomena and microstructural evolution under fusion-relevant irradiation conditions (to provide the foundation for designing improved radiation resistant materials), and 2) Engineering database development for design and licensing of next-step fusion energy machines such as a fusion DEMO. A wide variety of irradiation facilities have been proposed to investigate materials science phenomena and to test and qualify materials for a DEMO reactor. Currently available and proposed facilities include fission reactors (including isotopic and spectral tailoring techniques to modify the rate of H and He production per dpa), dual- and triple-ion accelerator irradiation facilities that enable greatly accelerated irradiation studies with fusion-relevant H and He production rates per dpa within microscopic volumes, D-Li stripping reaction and spallation neutron sources, and plasma-based sources. The advantages and limitations of the main proposed fusion materials irradiation facility options are reviewed. Evaluation parameters include irradiation volume, potential for performing accelerated irradiation studies, capital and operating costs, similarity of neutron irradiation spectrum to fusion reactor conditions, temperature and irradiation flux stability/control, ability to perform multiple-effect tests (e.g., irradiation in the presence of a flowing coolant, or in the presence of complex applied stress fields), and technical maturity/risk of the concept. Ultimately, it is anticipated that heavy utilization of ion beam and fission neutron irradiation facilities along with sophisticated materials models, in addition to a dedicated fusion-relevant neutron irradiation facility, will be necessary to provide a comprehensive and cost-effective understanding of anticipated materials evolution in a fusion DEMO and to therefore provide a timely and robust materials database.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Mslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Basics of Fusion-Fissison Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

FFRF, standing for the Fusion-Fission Research Facility represents an option for the next step project of ASIPP (Hefei, China) aiming to a first fusion-fission multifunctional device [1]. FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion plasma regimes, the development of which has already started in the US and China. With R/a=4/1m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, PDT=50- 100 MW, Pfission=80-4000MW, 1 m thick blanket, FFRF has a unique fusion mission of a stationary fusion neutron source. Its pioneering mission of merging fusion and fission consists in accumulation of design, experimental, and operational data for future hybrid applications.

Leonid E. Zakharov

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

45

America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home America's Wind Testing Facilities America's Wind Testing Facilities Addthis National Wind Technology...

46

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

Moses, E

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology ProgramFusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program Issues and Strategy for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Need for Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology ProgramFusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program ­Issues and Strategy for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) ­Key R&D Areas to begin NOW (modeling 12, 2010 #12;Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) FNST is the science engineering technology

Abdou, Mohamed

48

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Category:Testing Facilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facilities Facilities Jump to: navigation, search This category is defined by the form Testing Facility. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. H [×] Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type‎ 9 pages Pages in category "Testing Facilities" The following 82 pages are in this category, out of 82 total. 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility 10-ft Wave Flume Facility 11-ft Wave Flume Facility 2 2-ft Flume Facility 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility A Alden Large Flume Alden Small Flume Alden Tow Tank Alden Wave Basin B Breakwater Research Facility Bucknell Hydraulic Flume C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Carderock Circulating Water Channel

50

Fusion Energy Sciences User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

FES User Facilities FES User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 FES User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Fusion Energy Sciences program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: DIII-D Tokamak Facility: External link DIII-D, located at General Atomics in San Diego, California, is the largest magnetic fusion facility in the U.S. and is operated as a DOE national user facility. DIII-D has been a major contributor to the world fusion program

51

High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Temperature High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Six corrosion test facilities and two thermogravimetric systems for conducting corrosion tests in complex mixed gas environments, in steam and in the presence of deposits, and five facilities for metal dusting degradation Bookmark and Share The High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting include: High Pressure Test Facility for Metal Dusting Resistance:

52

Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database (Redirected from Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities) Jump to: navigation, search Facility Operators By viewing Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities in the list accompanying the map, one will be provided with data on a range of test capabilities and services available at commercial, academic, and government facilities and offshore berths within the United States. Click on a thumbnail in the adjacent map in order to view a testing facility operator's profile page. This page will include in depth information about the testing facilities that each operator oversees. Click on this link, CSV ,to download all of the information on all hydrodynamic testing facilities. Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":5000,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

53

Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

Moses, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Model year 2010 Ford Fusion Level-1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Ford Fusion was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Fusion and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Energy Systems

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

Material Science Advances Using Test Reactor Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Material Science Advances Using Test Reactor Facilities.

56

Solar Thermal Test Facility experiment manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on administrative procedures, capabilities, and requirements of experimenters using the Solar Thermal Test Facility. (MHR)

Darsey, D. M.; Holmes, J. T.; Seamons, L. O.; Kuehl, D. J.; Davis, D. B.; Stomp, J. M.; Matthews, L. K.; Otts, J. V.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database Jump to: navigation, search Facility Operators By viewing Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities in the list accompanying the map, one will be provided with data on a range of test capabilities and services available at commercial, academic, and government facilities and offshore berths within the United States. Click on a thumbnail in the adjacent map in order to view a testing facility operator's profile page. This page will include in depth information about the testing facilities that each operator oversees. Click on this link, CSV ,to download all of the information on all hydrodynamic testing facilities. Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":5000,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

58

Survey of solar thermal test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The facilities that are presently available for testing solar thermal energy collection and conversion systems are briefly described. Facilities that are known to meet ASHRAE standard 93-77 for testing flat-plate collectors are listed. The DOE programs and test needs for distributed concentrating collectors are identified. Existing and planned facilities that meet these needs are described and continued support for most of them is recommended. The needs and facilities that are suitable for testing components of central receiver systems, several of which are located overseas, are identified. The central contact point for obtaining additional details and test procedures for these facilities is the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users' Association in Albuquerque, N.M. The appendices contain data sheets and tables which give additional details on the technical capabilities of each facility. Also included is the 1975 Aerospace Corporation report on test facilities that is frequently referenced in the present work.

Masterson, K.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Power Supply Reliability Estimates for Experimental Fusion Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a task to analyze the operating experience data for large, pulsed power supplies used at the DIII-D tokamak. This activity supports the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project by giving fusion-specific reliability values for large power supplies that energize neutral beams and magnets. These failure rate data are necessary to perform system availability calculations and to make estimates of the frequency of safety-significant events (e.g., power supply arcs or fires) that might occur in other fusion facilities such as ITER. The analysis shows that the DIII-D data results compare well with the results of similar data analysis work that the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA) has performed on the JET tokamak and compare fairly with data from two accelerators.

Cadwallader, lee; Pinna, Tonio; Petersen, Peter

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

THE MOBILE WINDOW THERMAL TEST FACILITY (MoWiTT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 3-5, 1979 THE MOBILE WINDOW THERMAL TEST FACILITY (Orlando, Florida. The Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility (Press, 197 . THE NOBILE WINDOW THERMAL TEST FACILITY (

Klems, J. H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

2012 Ford Fusion V6 Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion V6 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input...

62

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility - Advanced Tokamak Option (A26932)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 19th Technology Of Fusion Energy, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2010; To Be Published In Fusion Science And Technology19th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Las Vegas Nevada, US, 2010999618795

Wong, C.P.C.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Residential Fuel Cell Performance Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Currently, the test facility is setup to deliver natural gas as the fuel, but ... A turbine and magnetic flow meter measure the flow of water for the domestic ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes NREL's Battery Thermal Test Facility and identifies test requirements and equipment and planned upgrades to the facility.

Keyser, M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development and Testing of the MIT Acoustic Levitation Test Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two acoustic levitation test facilities have been developed for cloud physics experimentation. These facilities utilize acoustic standing wave energy to suspend both solid and liquid objects in a contact-free environment. In the still-air ...

Victor D. Lupi; R. John Hansman

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

KrF laser path to high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion) laboratory microfusion facility  

SciTech Connect

The krypton-fluoride laser has many desirable features for inertial confinement fusion. Because it is a gas laser capable of operation with high efficiency, it is the only known laser candidate capable of meeting the driver requirements for inertial fusion energy (IFE) production. Los Alamos National Laboratory has defined a program plan to develop KrF lasers for IFE production. This plan develops the KrF laser and demonstrates the target performance in single-pulse facilities. A 100-kJ Laser Target Test Facility (LTTF) is proposed as the next step, to be followed by a 3 to 10-MJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The LTTF will resolve many target physics issues and accurately define the driver energy required for the LMF. It is also proposed that the technology development for IFE, such as the high-efficiency, high-reliability, repetitively pulsed driver, the reactor, mass production of targets, and the mechanism of injecting targets be developed in parallel with the single-pulse facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs.

Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A.; Figueiro, J.F.; Cartwright, D.C.; McDonald, T.E.; Hauer, A.A.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Younger, S.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Ecosystem Management Team New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation Calibration Facilities...

69

FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios. (MOW)

Abdou, M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Sun{diamond}Lab test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This country's efforts to successfully develop and commercialize concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies depend on specialized research and testing capabilities. To Support this effort, the US Department of Energy's Concentrating Solar Power Program maintains two major test facilities: the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and the High Flux Solar Furnace at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. These test facilities combine to be instrumental in the development of parabolic dishes, troughs, and solar power towers.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sun{diamond}Lab test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This country`s efforts to successfully develop and commercialize concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies depend on specialized research and testing capabilities. To Support this effort, the US Department of Energy`s Concentrating Solar Power Program maintains two major test facilities: the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and the High Flux Solar Furnace at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. These test facilities combine to be instrumental in the development of parabolic dishes, troughs, and solar power towers.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fusion Development Facility Coil Mechanical and Structural Design (A26446)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 23rd IEEE/NPSS Symposium On Fusion Engineering, San Diego, California; To Be Published In The Proceedings23rd IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering San Diego California, US, 2009999616350

Titus, P.H.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

359-06/RDS/rs A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility, ITER, Superconducting Tokamaks, and a Materials Test Facility Enable Demo 359-06/RDS/rs FDF is Viewed as a Direct Follow-on of DIII-D (50 % larger)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using conservative Advanced Tokamak physics to run steady-state and produce 100-250 MW fusion power Modest energy gain (Q<5) Continuous operation for 30 % of a year in 2 weeks periods Test materials with high neutron fluence (3-8 MW-yr/m 2) Further develop all elements of Advanced Tokamak physics, qualifying them for an advanced performance DEMO With ITER and IFMIF, provide the basis for a fusion DEMO Power Plant

R. D. Stambaugh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

TTRDC - Facilities - APRF - Environmental Test Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Powertrain Research Facility: Advanced Powertrain Research Facility: Environmental Test Cell Allows Extremes of Hot and Cold environmental test cell Environmental Test Cell showing its solar lamps on the ceiling. Inside Argonne's new Environmental Test Cell (ETC), vehicle researchers are able to simulate a range of external temperatures-from frigid cold to blistering heat-in order to study the impact of temperature on the performance of electrified vehicles (EVs). The ETC is a major upgrade to Argonne's world-class Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF). The ETC allows vehicles to be tested at a temperature range between 20°F to 95°F under simulated sunshine. Previously, Argonne researchers were only able to test from 72°F to 95°F without a solar load. In addition, in the upgraded test cell researchers can now perform the new

76

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges these issues. 2 #12;FNST is the science, engineering, technology and materials Fusion Nuclear Science & Technology (FNST) FNST is the science, engineering, technology and materials for the fusion nuclear

Abdou, Mohamed

77

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Kauai Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility P.O. Box 308 Waimea, Kauai HI 96796-0308 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time, M - F Steven Lautenschleger, Manager (505) 845-9234,...

78

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Z Research: Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Fusion Sun Plasma The ultimate energy source Fusion occurs when two atomic nuclei are joined together. To fuse the atoms, the force that repels them as they come together must be overcome. Accelerators accomplish this by forcing molecules to collide with one another at very high temperatures (high temperatures are simply molecules moving at high speeds). When light nuclei are involved, fusion can produce more energy than was required to start the reaction. This process is the force that powers the Sun, whose source of energy is an ongoing fusion chain reaction. As an unconfined event, fusion was first developed for use in nuclear weapons. Fusion's great potential as a new energy source depends on scientists' ability to harness its power in laboratory events. The Z

79

Ground test facility for nuclear testing of space reactor subsystems  

SciTech Connect

Two major reactor facilities at the INEL have been identified as easily adaptable for supporting the nuclear testing of the SP-100 reactor subsystem. They are the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) and the Loss of Fluid Test Reactor (LOFT). In addition, there are machine shops, analytical laboratories, hot cells, and the supporting services (fire protection, safety, security, medical, waste management, etc.) necessary to conducting a nuclear test program. This paper presents the conceptual approach for modifying these reactor facilities for the ground engineering test facility for the SP-100 nuclear subsystem. 4 figs.

Quapp, W.J.; Watts, K.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Category:Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Jump to: navigation, search This page contains all of the various types of technologies used in Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities for testing new...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

82

Physicist John Schmidt, designer of cutting-edge fusion facilities, dies at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physicist John Schmidt, designer of cutting-edge fusion facilities, dies at Physicist John Schmidt, designer of cutting-edge fusion facilities, dies at 72 By John Greenwald February 15, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One John Schmidt, 1940-2013 (Photo by Elle Starkman) John Schmidt, 1940-2013 Physicist John Schmidt, whose profound and wide-ranging contributions to the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) made him a highly respected leader in the worldwide quest for fusion energy, died on February 13 following a brain hemorrhage. He was 72. Schmidt won wide acclaim for heading the design of cutting-edge facilities for magnetic fusion research during a 36-year career at PPPL, from which he retired in 2005. As interim director in 1996 he led the Laboratory's successful transition from large, fusion power-producing experiments such

83

Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

84

America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Testing Facilities Wind Testing Facilities America's Wind Testing Facilities Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston 3 of 7 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

85

2012 Ford Fusion V6 Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion V6 Fusion V6 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 8/7/2013 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3744 33.84 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] -0.2066 0.02372 3.0-liter V6 FFV -6 spd standard transmission Revision Number 3 Notes: Test Fuel Information 3.0-liter V6 FFV -6 spd standard transmission Fuel type Tier II EEE HF437 3.0-liter V6 FFV -6 spd standard transmission Fuel density [g/ml] Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 0.743 18344 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S o l a r L a m

86

Integrated Geothermal Well Testing: Test Objectives and Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new and highly integrated geothermal well test program was designed for three geothermal operators in the US (MCR, RGI and Mapco Geothermal). This program required the design, construction and operation of new well test facilities. The main objectives of the test program and facilities are to investigate the critical potential and worst problems associated with the well and produced fluids in a period of approximately 30 days. Field and laboratory investigations are required to determine and quantify the problems of fluid production, utilization and reinjection. The facilities are designed to handle a flow rate from a geothermal well of one million pounds per hour at a wellhead temperature of approximately 268 C (515 F). The facilities will handle an entire spectrum of temperature and rate conditions up to these limits. All pertinent conditions for future fluid exploitations can be duplicated with these facilities, thus providing critical information at the very early stages of field development. The new well test facilities have been used to test high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley of California. The test facilities still have some problems which should be solvable. The accomplishments of this new and highly integrated geothermal well test program are described in this paper.

Nicholson, R. W.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Basics of Fusion-Fission Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Leonid E. Zakharov

88

Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility, IG-0599 |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility, IG-0599 Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility, IG-0599 The Dual...

89

DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT, supports a critical component of LANL's primary mission: to ensure...

90

Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DARHT Facility: A critical component of stockpile stewardship DARHT Facility: A critical component of stockpile stewardship A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Dominic Tafoya and Dave Honaberger prepare a refurbished DARHT (Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility) 2nd axis accelerator cell for magnetic axis alignment measurements. Contact Group Leader Terry Priestley (505) 665-1330 Email Deputy Group Leader Tim Ferris (505) 665-2179 Email Hydrotests are critical in assessing nuclear weapons in nation's stockpile Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility 4:17 How DARHT Works The weapons programs at Los Alamos have one principal mission: ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of nuclear weapons in our nation's

91

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.ig.energy.gov/documents/CalendarYear2003/ig-0632.pdf CANDU Reactors: 27 kg from over 40 years, $30M/kg (current) CANDU Supply w/o Fusion

92

Physicist John Schmidt, designer of cutting-edge fusion facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an advanced fusion device that began operating in South Korea in 2008. A native of South Dakota, Schmidt earned his bachelor's degree in physics from the University of South...

93

Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) experiment manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Central Receiver Test Facility is operated by Sandia Laboratories for the US Department of Energy. The CRTF is being used for component and subsystem evaluation within the Solar Thermal Large Power Systems Program. This experiment manual provides users of the CRTF detailed information about: (1) implementation of testing at the CRTF; (2) details of the CRTF capabilities and interfaces, and (3) requirements of experimenters.

Holmes, J. T.; Matthews, L. K.; Seamons, L. O.; Davis, D. B.; King, D. L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport Gasifier test facility at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) has operated for almost 9,150 hours, gasifying bituminous and sub-bituminous coals and lignites using air and oxygen as the oxidant. During this time plant reliability and performance has improved progressively and the high degree of process understanding developed has been used to improve designs for key equipment items, such as coal feeding and coarse and fine ash removal. Using state-of-the-art data analysis and mode...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

Net-Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NZERTF). NIST Unveils Net-Zero Energy Residential Test Facility to Improve Testing of Energy-Efficient Technologies. Welcome. ...

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

ARGONNE'S BATTERY POST-TEST FACILITY W  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing the LIFE of batteries ARGONNE'S BATTERY POST-TEST FACILITY W h a t h a p p e n s t o b a t t e r ie s a s t h e y a g e ? H o w c a n w e e n s u r e s a f e u s e o f b...

97

Modular High Current Test Facility at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the 1 MA, 225 kJ test facility in operation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The capacitor bank is constructed from three parallel 1.5 mF modules. The modules are capable of switching simultaneously or sequentially via solid dielectric puncture switches. The bank nominally operates up to 10 kV and reaches peak current with all three cabled modules in approximately 30 {micro}s. Parallel output plates from the bank allow for cable or busbar interfacing to the load. This versatile bank is currently in use for code validation experiments, railgun related activities, switch testing, and diagnostic development.

Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Speer, R D; Ferriera, T J

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process.

Elliott, D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Property:Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Property Type Page Pages using the property "Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Flume + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + A Alden Large Flume + Flume + Alden Small Flume + Flume + Alden Tow Tank + Tow Tank + Alden Wave Basin + Wave Basin + B Breakwater Research Facility + Wave Basin + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Flume + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Tunnel +

100

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AEC PHOTOVOLTAIC TEST FACILITY FIRST YEAR TEST DATA James Krumsick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Oregon Solar Radiation Lab 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1274 e-mail: fev, the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab (UO SRML) under a contract with the Energy Trust environmental conditions. The test facility consists of a 25 KW rooftop array separated into eight systems. Each

Oregon, University of

102

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 The TESLA Test Facility FEL team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 The TESLA Test Facility FEL team June 2002, TESLA-FEL 2002-01 #12;SASE FEL at the TESLA Facility, Phase 2 Abstract The last description of the TESLA Test Facility FEL has been written in 1995 (TESLA- FEL report 95-03). Since then, many changes have developed

104

Status of the US National Inertial Fusion ProgramSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for inertial fusion and high energy density physics · NIF 81% complete, first ignition experiments planned Ignition Facility is 85 % complete NIF concentrates 1.8 Mega Joules of energy into a mm3 size target -- it needs to be flush left -- keep horizontal within Title/Logo limits at the top #12;7 NIF has executed

105

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE Inspector General*) *www.ig.energy.gov/documents/CalendarYear2003/ig-0632.pdf CANDU Reactors: 27 kg from over 40 years, $30M/kg (current) CANDU Supply w/o Fusion Tritium decays at 5.47% per year

California at Los Angeles, University of

106

Fusion-Fission Research Facility (FFRF) as a Practical Step Toward Hybrids  

SciTech Connect

The project of ASIPP (with PPPL participation), called FFRF, (R/a=4/1 m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, PDT=50-100 MW, Pfission=80-4000 MW, 1 m thick blanket) is outlined. FFRF stands for the Fusion-Fission Research Facility with a unique fusion mission and a pioneering mission of merging fusion and fission for accumulation of design, experimental, and operational data for future hybrid applications. The design of FFRF will use as much as possible the EAST and ITER design experience. On the other hand, FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion plasma regimes, the development of which has already started in the US and China.

L. Zakharov, J. Li and Y. Wu

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on fusion plasma research facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys the need for Fusion Plasma Research Facilities (FPRF) in advancing research in several areas of plasma and atomic physics that are essential to the CTR program and describes several device options for FPRF's. The major conclusions of the report are that there is an urgent need to provide such facilities and that the most significant contributions to CTR that would be made through these facilities are in the development of plasma diagnostics and measurements of atomic processes. (auth)

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Review of Test Facilities for Distributed Energy Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

troughs and a Solar Furnace. Currently, the facility is testing a 10 kW grid-connected Stirling engine

109

Preliminary Nuclear Calculations for the Shield Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

To find the critical size of the proposed shield test facility based upon available data and present construction concepts.

Baucom, H.H.

1960-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development  

SciTech Connect

Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le} 200 dpa) and in-situ He generation ({le} 2000 appm) at prototypical reactor temperatures and chemical environments is still required. There is currently no experimental facility in the U.S. that can meet these requirements for macroscopic samples. The E.U. and U.S. fusion communities have recently concluded that a fusion-relevant, high-flux neutron source for accelerated characterization of the effects of radiation damage to materials is a top priority for the next decade. Data from this source will be needed to validate designs for the multi-$B next-generation fusion facilities such as the CTF, ETF, and DEMO, that are envisioned to follow ITER and NIF.

Rei, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Technology issues for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The approach for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has evolved from a conservative plan based on cutting up and burying all of the systems, to one that considers the impact tritium contamination will have on waste disposal, how large size components may be used as their own shipping containers, and even the possibility of recycling the materials of components such as the toroidal field coils and the tokamak structure. In addition, the project is more carefully assessing the requirements for using remotely operated equipment. Finally, valuable cost database is being developed for future use by the fusion community.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Startup Testing Suspended To Evaluate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Startup Testing Suspended To Evaluate System IDAHO FALLS, ID- On Saturday, June 16, startup testing was suspended at the Integrated Waste Treatment...

113

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power (CSP)National Solar Thermal Test Facility National Solar Thermal Test Facility NSTTF Interactive Tour National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility of this type in the United States. The NSTTF's primary goal is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of unique components and systems in proposed solar thermal electrical plants planned for large-scale power generation. In addition, the site was built and instrumented to provide test facilities for a variety of solar and nonsolar applications. The facility can provide

114

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inertial Confinement Fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities Facilities Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion, Facilities ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related activities. To learn about three high energy experimental facilities and two small lasers that provide ICF capabilities, select the links below. National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OMEGA and OMEGA EP, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics Z Machine, Sandia National Laboratories

115

EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation.

HALGREN DL

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

MoWiTT: The Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow schematic MoWiTT: The Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility In the MoWiTT facility, efficient window-and-frame systems are measured to understand the flow of energy through...

117

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

118

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. C. , 1978. Report on Hydrofracturing Tests for In SituStress Measurements, Near Surface Test Facility, Hole DC-11,Layout for Hanford Near-Surface Test Facility. Submitted to

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Testing Facilities - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities > Non-Destructive Facilities > Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Testing Facilities Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Testing Facilities Overview MTS Table Top Load Frame X-ray Inspection Systems Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Testing Facilities The Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Testing Facilities contain state-of-the-art NDE laboratories including microwave/millimeter wave, acoustic/ultrasonic, X-ray, thermal imaging, optics, and eddy current for health monitoring of materials and components used in aerospace, defense, and power generation (fossil and nuclear) industries as well as for medical and scientific research. Bookmark and Share

120

359-06/RDS/rs A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility, ITER, Superconducting Tokamaks, and a Materials Test Facility Enable Demo 359-06/RDS/rs FDF is Viewed as a Direct Follow-on of DIII-D (50 % larger)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using conservative Advanced Tokamak physics to run steady-state and produce 100-250 MW fusion power Modest energy gain (QTokamak physics, qualifying them for an advanced performance DEMO With ITER and IFMIF, provide the basis for a fusion DEMO Power Plant

R. D. Stambaugh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Transmutation facility for weapons grade plutonium based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft, pending eventual use as nuclear reactor fuel. A transmutation facility consisting of a fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons grade plutonium in the form of PuO2 pebbles in a lithium slurry was investigated and found to be technically feasible. A design concept/operation scenario was developed for a facility which would be able to transmute the world's estimated inventory of weapons grade plutonium to 11% Pu-240 concentration in about 25 years. The fusion neutron source would be based on tokamak plasma operating conditions and magnet technology being qualified in ongoing R D programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material needed to handle the high heat fluxes. Extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify other technologies required for the facility.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Transmutation facility for weapons-grade plutonium disposition based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons-grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft during subsequent storage, pending eventual use as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. A transmutation facility consisting of a tokamak fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons-grade plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2} pebbles in a lithium slurry is investigated. A design concept/operation scenario is developed for a facility that would be able to transmute the world`s estimated surplus inventory of weapons-grade plutonium to 11% {sup 240}Pu concentration in nearly 25 yr. The fusion neutron source would be based on plasma physics and plasma support technology being qualified in ongoing research and development (R&D) programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R&D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material that would be needed to handle the high heat fluxes; otherwise, extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R&D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify all required technologies. Such a facility might feasibly be deployed in 20 to 30 yr, or sooner with a crash program. 49 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

Stacey, W.M.; Pilger, B.L.; Mowrey, J.A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Battery Test Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Battery Test Facility Argonne researcher Lee Walker Argonne researcher Lee Walker examines a...

124

Argonne, China sign agreement to develop Zero Power Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne, China sign agreement to develop Zero Power Test Facility Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia...

125

NREL: News - New Wind Turbine Dynamometer Test Facility Dedicated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

913 New Wind Turbine Dynamometer Test Facility Dedicated at NREL November 19, 2013 Today, the Energy Department (DOE) and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) dedicated...

126

Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system response Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system response June 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Brad Bugger 208-526-0833 Danielle Miller 208-526-5709 IDAHO FALLS, ID- On Saturday, June 16, startup testing was suspended at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Site. Testing and plant heat-up was suspended to allow detailed evaluation of a system pressure event observed during testing on Saturday. Facility startup testing has been ongoing for the past month, evaluating system and component operation and response during operating conditions. No radioactive or hazardous waste has been introduced into the facility,

127

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inertial Confinement Fusion Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement...

128

Lessons learnt from ITER safety & licensing for DEMO and future nuclear fusion facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the strong motivations for pursuing the development of fusion energy is its potentially low environmental impact and very good safety performance. But this safety and environmental potential can only be fully realized by careful design choices. For DEMO and other fusion facilities that will require nuclear licensing, S&E objectives and criteria should be set at an early stage and taken into account when choosing basic design options and throughout the design process. Studies in recent decades of the safety of fusion power plant concepts give a useful basis on which to build the S&E approach and to assess the impact of design choices. The experience of licensing ITER is of particular value, even though there are some important differences between ITER and DEMO. The ITER project has developed a safety case, produced a preliminary safety report and had it examined by the French nuclear safety authorities, leading to the licence to construct the facility. The key technical issues that arose during ...

Taylor, Neill

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Battery test facility hardware, software, and system operation  

SciTech Connect

Division 2525 Battery Test Laboratory is a fully automated battery testing facility used in evaluating various battery technologies. The results of these tests are used to verify developers` claims, characterize prototypes, and assist in identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each technology. The Test Facility consists of a central computer and nine remote computer controlled battery test systems. Data acquired during the battery testing process is sent to the central computer system. The test data is then stored in a large database for future analysis. The central computer system is also used in configuring battery tests. These test configurations are then sent to their appropriate remote battery test sites. The Battery Test Facility can perform a variety of battery tests, which include the following: Life Cycle Testing; Parametric Testing at various temperature levels, cutoff parameters, charge rates, and discharge rates; Constant Power Testing at various power levels; Peak Power Testing at various State-of-Charge levels; Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule Tests (SFUDS79). The Battery Test Facility is capable of charging a battery either by constant current, constant voltage, step current levels, or any combination of them. Discharge cycles can be by constant current, constant resistance, constant power, step current levels, or also any combination of them. The Battery Test Facility has been configured to provide the flexibility to evaluate a large variety of battery technologies. These technologies include Lead-Acid, Sodium/Sulfur, Zinc/Bromine, Nickel/Hydrogen, Aluminum/Air, and Nickel/Cadmium batteries.

Rodriguez, G.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Battery test facility hardware, software, and system operation  

SciTech Connect

Division 2525 Battery Test Laboratory is a fully automated battery testing facility used in evaluating various battery technologies. The results of these tests are used to verify developers' claims, characterize prototypes, and assist in identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each technology. The Test Facility consists of a central computer and nine remote computer controlled battery test systems. Data acquired during the battery testing process is sent to the central computer system. The test data is then stored in a large database for future analysis. The central computer system is also used in configuring battery tests. These test configurations are then sent to their appropriate remote battery test sites. The Battery Test Facility can perform a variety of battery tests, which include the following: Life Cycle Testing; Parametric Testing at various temperature levels, cutoff parameters, charge rates, and discharge rates; Constant Power Testing at various power levels; Peak Power Testing at various State-of-Charge levels; Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule Tests (SFUDS79). The Battery Test Facility is capable of charging a battery either by constant current, constant voltage, step current levels, or any combination of them. Discharge cycles can be by constant current, constant resistance, constant power, step current levels, or also any combination of them. The Battery Test Facility has been configured to provide the flexibility to evaluate a large variety of battery technologies. These technologies include Lead-Acid, Sodium/Sulfur, Zinc/Bromine, Nickel/Hydrogen, Aluminum/Air, and Nickel/Cadmium batteries.

Rodriguez, G.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TOKAMAK FUSION TEST REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the techno logy was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. 10 complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D activity.

Rule, Keith; Perry, Erik; Parsells, Robert

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity.

Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These completed operational testing activities demonstrated the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

COST AND SCHEDULE FOR DRILLING AND MINING UNDERGROUND TEST FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TYPE OF ESTIMATE Cost Estimate for NUMBER CHKD KJW/RL SNTTABLE 4 CLIENT PROJECT Cost Estimate for U/G Test FacilityTABLE 4 PROJECT No. Cost Estimate for DESCRIPTION Test QUANT

Lamb, D.W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

CGI Information Technology Security Evaluation & Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [17CMH2/02] Test methods for Physical Security Level 4, in accordance with FIPS 140-2. Cryptographic Modules Software 1 Testing. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

NETL: News Release - Premier Power Plant Test Facility Achieves Milestone,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 8, 2000 May 8, 2000 Premier Power Plant Test Facility Achieves Milestone,Raises Hopes for New Clean Coal Technology The world's premier test facility for future power plants has achieved a major milestone - and in the process, raised prospects for a new class of coal technology that researchers now believe could lead to cleaner, more efficient and lower cost electric power generation. The Power System Development Facility The Power System Development Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, is the Nation's state-of-the-art test facility for 21st century power generating technologies. The U.S. Department of Energy and Southern Company today jointly announced the first successful test of a new type of technology for turning coal into gas. The gas could then be used in future turbines or fuel cells to

137

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to fulfill two major objectives. The first was to develop a gasifier able to process low-rank fuels more efficiently and cost-effectively than currently available designs. This work resulted in the Transport Gasifier for which two commercial projects have been announced. The second objective was to develop high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration to facilitate high-temperature syngas cleanup and, thereb...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) established the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to fulfill two major objectives. The first was to develop a gasifier able to process low-rank fuels more efficiently and cost-effectively than currently available designs. This work resulted in the Transport Gasifier for which two commercial projects have been announced. The second objective was to develop high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration to facilitate high-temperature syngas cleanup...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

139

Pre-test evaluation of LLTR Series II Test A-6. [Large Leak Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this report is to present pre-test predictions of pressure histories for the A6 test to be conducted in the Large Leak Test Facility (LLTF) at the Energy Technology Engineering Center. A6 is part of a test program being conducted to evaluate the effects of leaks produced by a double-ended guillotine rupture of a single tube. A6 will provide data on the CRBR prototypical double rupture disc performance.

Knittle, D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sodium Reaction Experimental Test Facility (SRETF) - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Form Modeling Departments Engineering Analysis Nuclear Systems Analysis Research & Test Reactor Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems...

143

Test facility for PLT TF coils  

SciTech Connect

Past experience with the model C stellerator and other toroidal field devices indicates that mechanical and electrical tests of a toroidal field coil prior to maximum field operation of the device is prudent and desirable. This paper describes a test program for the PLT-TF coils. The test stand consists of one test coil, two background coils and a steel supporting structure. The three coil configuration produces a 67.5 kG field at the inner conductor (38 kG at the bore center) and simulates a 1/R field distribution in the bore of the test coil. The resolution of the field force system and resultant stresses within the test structure are discussed. A test procedure is described which maximizes the information obtained from a 100,000 pulse program. (auth)

Hearney, J.; File, J.; Dreskin, S.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility (IMET) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility May 30, 2013 The Irradiated Material Examination and Testing (IMET) Facility was designed and built as a hot cell facility. It is a two-story block and brick structure with a two-story high bay that houses six heavily shielded cells and an array of sixty shielded storage wells. It includes the Specimen Prep Lab (SPL) with its associated laboratory hood and glove boxes, an Operating Area, where the control and monitoring instruments supporting the in-cell test equipment are staged, a utility corridor, a hot equipment storage area, a tank vault room, office space, a trucking area with access to the high bay, and an outside steel building for storage. The tests and examinations are conducted in six examination "hot" cells

145

NREL: News Feature - New Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines December 26, 2013 Two men stand in front of the test equipment in the dynamometer facility discussing work being done. Behind them are two large blue machines that make up the dynamometer test apparatus. A white wind turbine nacelle system is attached to these devices to their left. Enlarge image NREL engineer Scott Lambert (left) and Project Manager Mark McDade discuss calibrations being done on the new dynamometer at the 5-MW Dynamometer Test Facility at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Credit: Dennis Schroeder Premature failures of mechanical systems have a significant impact on the cost of wind turbine operations and thus the total cost of wind energy. Recently, the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory

146

Closed Loop Test Facility for hot dirty gas valves  

SciTech Connect

A design study of a closed loop test facility for eight-inch hot dirty gas valves is presented. The objective of the facility is to quality valves for use in coal gasifiers, combined cycle plants, and pressurized fluid bed combustors. Outline sketches and estimated costs are presented for the selected design.

Not Available

1980-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

147

702AZ aging waste ventilation facility year 2000 test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure was developed to determine if the 702AZ Tank Ventilation Facility system is Year 2000 Compliant. The procedure provides detailed instructions for performing the operations necessary and documenting the results. This verification procedure will document that the 702AZ Facility Systems are year 2000 compliant and will correctly meet the criteria established in this procedure.

Winkelman, W.D.

1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

148

NIST News -- Robot Test Facility 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... will use NIST-developed standard test methods for emergency response robots. ... similar to those they would encounter in an emergency or disaster. ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

149

NIST Building Facility for Hydrogen Pipeline Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... long-term exposure to hydrogen can embrittle existing pipelines, increasing the ... term service tests and apply them to study pipeline materials and ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

Terahertz- and Millimeter-Wave Test Facility  

chemicals and nuclear materials Locate and track chemical and radioactive plumes Perform medical imaging Instruments at Argonnes Terahertz Test

151

Large-Scale Structures Testing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a 13.7m-high reaction buttress equipped with a horizontal hydraulic ram. ... Another test series evaluated fracture propagation in steel plates 1 m wide ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design  

SciTech Connect

Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Property:Testing Facilities Overseen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Testing Facilities Overseen Testing Facilities Overseen Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page and uses the Testing Facility form Pages using the property "Testing Facilities Overseen" Showing 25 pages using this property. A Alden Research Laboratory, Inc + Alden Tow Tank +, Alden Wave Basin +, Alden Small Flume +, ... B Bucknell University + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + C Cornell University Hydrodynamics + DeFrees Flume 1 +, DeFrees Flume 2 +, DeFrees Flume 3 +, ... M Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hydrodynamics + MIT Tow Tank + O Ohmsett + Ohmsett Tow Tank + Oregon State University Hydrodynamics + Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 +, Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 + P Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics + Penn Reverberant Tank +, Penn Small Water Tunnel +, Penn Large Water Tunnel +

154

DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT, supports a critical component of LANL's primary mission: to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of nuclear weapons in our nation's stockpile. Los Alamos scientists built DARHT, the world's most powerful x-ray machine, to analyze mockups of nuclear weapons. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility, or DARHT, supports a critical component of LANL's primary mission: to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of nuclear weapons in our nation's stockpile. Los Alamos scientists built DARHT, the world's most powerful x-ray machine, to analyze mockups of nuclear weapons.

155

Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Hulvey, R.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

NREL: Wind Research - Five Megawatt Dynamometer Test Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy's National Wind Technology Center. We're here today in the new 5 megawatt drive train testing facility that has been developed over the last few years. This terrific new...

157

EIS-0228: Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impact of a proposal to construct and operate theDual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)...

158

Record of Decision Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8:45 am BILLING CODE 6450-01-P Record of Decision Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The...

159

5-Megawatt solar-thermal test facility: facility construction-cost analysis  

SciTech Connect

The appropriation analysis, cash flow analysis, monthly cash flow analysis and construction cost estimate are tabulated for the 1 MW And 5 MW test facilities based upon limited initial appropriations, including work sheets for the construction cost estimates. (LEW)

1975-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

160

Argonne Transportation - Advanced Powertrain Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powertrain Test Cell A hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) has both an electric motor and a fuel-using device, such as a small gasoline engine. The two power sources can work together in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Category:Testing Facility Operators | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Operators Facility Operators Jump to: navigation, search This category contains facilities for research on renewable technologies and uses the form Testing Facility Operator. Pages in category "Testing Facility Operators" The following 26 pages are in this category, out of 26 total. A Alden Research Laboratory, Inc B Bucknell University C Colorado State University Hydrodynamics Cornell University Hydrodynamics M Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hydrodynamics O Ohmsett Oregon State University Hydrodynamics P Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics S Sandia National Laboratories Hydrodynamics S cont. Stevens Institute of Technology T Texas A&M (Haynes) Texas A&M (OTRC) U United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) United States Geological Survey, HIF United States Geological Survey, LSC

162

Geothermal pump test facility. Final report, July 1977--July 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design configuration and fabrication description of a transportable geothermal pump test facility are discussed. The test facility, consisting of a test rig and data acquisition system trailer, provides the user with the unique opportunity to develop and calibrate geothermal pumps with less liability and risk, and at lower cost than would be incurred by actually installing the pump in a geothermal well. Pump tests may be performed using either domestic water, heated by pumping energy, or by using actual geothermal brines supplied directly to the test rig which would be located adjacent to the well. The geothermal pump test facility is completely self supporting and requires only an electrical supply source to become fully operational. Information and discussion presented provide substantive background, design and operational capabilities, and pertinent fabrication details.

Blakemore, R.W.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Software architecture for the ORNL large coil test facility data system  

SciTech Connect

The VAX-based data acquisition system for the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a second-generation system that evolved from a PDP-11/60-based system used during the initial phase of facility testing. The VAX-based software represents a layered implementation that provides integrated access to all of the data sources within the system, deoupling end-user data retrieval from various front-end data sources through a combination of software architecture and instrumentation data bases. Independent VAX processes manage the various front-end data sources, each being responsible for controlling, monitoring, acquiring and disposing data and control parameters for access from the data retrieval software. This paper describes the software architecture and the functionality incorporated into the various layers of the data system.

Blair, E.T.; Baylor, L.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy`s dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode.

Hulvey, R.K.

1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Convection Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) - one of the world's largest facilities for ex-vessel passive decay heat removal testing-confirms the performance of reactor cavity cooling systems (RCCS) and similar passive confinement or containment decay heat removal systems in modern Small Modular Reactors. Originally built to aid in the development of General Electric's Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS), the NSTF has a long history of providing confirmatory data for the airside of the RVACS. Argonne National Laboratory's NSTF is a state-of-the-art, large-scale facility for evaluating performance

166

WIND TURBINE DRIVETRAIN TEST FACILITY DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind Turbine Drivetrain Test Facility (WTDTF) is a state-of-the-art industrial facility used for testing wind turbine drivetrains and generators. Large power output wind turbines are primarily installed for off-shore wind power generation. The facility includes two test bays: one to accommodate turbine nacelles up to 7.5 MW and one for nacelles up to 15 MW. For each test bay, an independent data acquisition system (DAS) records signals from various sensors required for turbine testing. These signals include resistance temperature devices, current and voltage sensors, bridge/strain gauge transducers, charge amplifiers, and accelerometers. Each WTDTF DAS also interfaces with the drivetrain load applicator control system, electrical grid monitoring system and vibration analysis system.

Mcintosh, J.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

DOE-STD-6002-96; DOE Standard Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6002-96 6002-96 May 1996 DOE STANDARD SAFETY OF MAGNETIC FUSION FACILITIES: REQUIREMENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE96009495 DOE-STD-6002-96 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page FOREWORD....................................................................................................................... v

168

Road map for a modular magnetic fusion program  

SciTech Connect

During the past several decades magnetic fusion has made outstanding progress in understanding the science of fusion plasmas, the achievement of actual fusion plasmas and the development of key fusion technologies. Magnetic fusion is now technically ready to take the next step: the study of high gain fusion plasmas, the optimization of fusion plasmas and the continued development and integration of fusion technology. However, each of these objectives requires significant resources since the tests are now being done at the energy production scale. This paper describes a modular approach that addresses these objectives in specialized facilities that reduces the technical risk and lowers cost for near term facilities needed to address critical issues.

Dale M. Meade

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Data Analysis Software Tools for Enhanced Collaboration at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

SciTech Connect

Data analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility is simplified by the use of two software packages in analysis codes. The first is GAP1otObj, an IDL-based object-oriented library used in visualization tools for dynamic plotting. GAPlotObj gives users the ability to manipulate graphs directly through mouse and keyboard-driven commands. The second software package is MDSplus, which is used at DIED as a central repository for analyzed data. GAPlotObj and MDSplus reduce the effort required for a collaborator to become familiar with the DIII-D analysis environment by providing uniform interfaces for data display and retrieval. Two visualization tools at DIII-D that benefit from them are ReviewPlus and EFITviewer. ReviewPlus is capable of displaying interactive 2D and 3D graphs of raw, analyzed, and simulation code data. EFITviewer is used to display results from the EFIT analysis code together with kinetic profiles and machine geometry. Both bring new possibilities for data exploration to the user, and are able to plot data from any fusion research site with an MDSplus data server.

Schachter, J.; Peng, Q.; Schissel, D.P.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities >...

171

CURRENT TESTING ACTIVITIES AT THE ACRELAB RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS TEST FACILITY , E S Spooner2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

undertaken within this facility. Testing of PV systems in the ACRELab facilities has included Solar Home Systems and small PV systems for remote communities in Australia. The results of the development of test performance will also be addressed. Keywords: Qualification and Testing, Reliability, Performance 1

172

Fusion of hypothesis testing for nonlinearity detection in small time series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performances of parametric or non-parametric Hypothesis Testing (HT) for nonlinearity detection are fairly weak for small time series (typically between 128 and 512 samples). A natural idea to improve the results is to merge several HT to make a ... Keywords: Decision fusion, HOS methods, Hypothesis testing fusion, Mutual information, Nonlinearity detection, Signal modelling

Jean-Marc Le Caillec; Julien Montagner

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heater Experiment at Hanford. Berkeley, Lawre ;e BerkeleyTest Facility, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation. Prepared forof Gable Mountain Basalt Cores, Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities July 17, 2012 - 4:51pm Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

175

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

America's Wind Testing Facilities America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities July 17, 2012 - 4:51pm Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

176

Design and operation of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility; Counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A unique counter-rotating aspirated compressor was tested in a blowdown facility at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT. The facility expanded on experience from previous (more)

Parker, David V. (David Vickery)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025  

SciTech Connect

This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

Roscha, V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

Crane, A.F.

1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

E. I. Moses

180

The Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport Gasifier test facility at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) has operated for over 7,750 hours, gasifying bituminous and sub-bituminous coals and lignites using air and oxygen as the oxidant. During this time plant reliability and performance has improved progressively and the high degree of process understanding developed has been used to improve designs for key equipment items, such as coal feeding and ash removal. Using state-of-the-art data analysis and modeling software, the...

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

Rennich, M.J. [comp.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Final Focus Test Facility ATF2 Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometre level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European and American scientists. In this paper, the present status and performance of the recently deployed ATF2 systems are briefly described, based on the first experience with beam measurements and tuning during winter, spring and early autumn of 2009. The near and longer term plans are outlined as well. The ATF collaboration has completed the construction of ATF2 and has started its commissioning. Important experience operating the new cavity BPM and BSM instrumentation in real conditions has been gained and first beam measurements have been performed in a magnetic configuration with reduced optical demagnification. Both horizontal and vertical emittances were successfully tuned and measured in the extraction line, with values approaching the design values of 2 nm and 12 pm, respectively. First checks of the first order optics along the beam line and at the IP were also done. Hardware developments for the second ATF2 goal are being pursued in parallel with the present commissioning work for the first goal. The collaboration is also preparing several near and long terms plans for ATF2. In the next few years, information very valuable for any future collider with local chromaticity correction and tuning of very low emittance beams can be expected. In the previous experience at the FFTB, the smallest vertical beam sizes which were achieved were about 70 nanometers. The work described here continues to address this largely unexplored regime in a systematic way.

Bambade, P.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL; Seryi, A.; /SLAC; Tauchi, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

183

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

Ahlstrom, H.G. [ed.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Program for alloy development for irradiation performance in fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

The use of fission reactors as irradiation test facilities for structural materials for a fusion environment is discussed. A comparison is made of displacement damage and helium production in fast fission and fusion reactors for stainless steel. (MOW)

Stiegler, J.O.; Reuther, T.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

WCI | Cutting-Edge Facilities | Site 300 Experimental Test Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site 300 Site Access Contained Firing Facility (CFF) Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) What is Site 300? Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 is an experimental test site operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. It is situated on 7,000 acres in rural foothills approximately six miles southwest of downtown Tracy and 15 miles southeast of Livermore. Site 300 was established in 1955 as a non-nuclear explosives test facility to support Livermore Laboratory's national security mission. The site gets its name from the early days of Lawrence Livermore, when the main laboratory was called Site 200 and the test facility was Site 300 (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was Site 100). Today, work at Site 300

187

Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Argonne National Laboratory Terahertz- and Millimeter-Wave Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROFILE: PROFILE: Argonne Homeland Security Technologies APPLICATIONS A R G O N N E N A T I O N A L L A B O R A T O R Y Terahertz- and Millimeter-Wave Test Facility B E N E F I T S Detect Terrorist-Related Contraband with Terahertz Technology * Spectral "fingerprints" uniquely identify materials * Can identify the factory where explosives and other chemicals were manufactured * Detects minute amounts of chemicals from a distance * Identifies materials in seconds Companies that develop or manufacture instruments to detect terrorist contraband can benefit by using a unique facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. Called the Terahertz Test Facility, its sensitive, new instruments - developed at Argonne and available nowhere else in the world - can obtain spectral "fingerprints" that uniquely

189

Cryogenic vertical test facility for the SRF cavities at BNL  

SciTech Connect

A vertical test facility has been constructed to test SRF cavities and can be utilized for other applications. The liquid helium volume for the large vertical dewar is approximate 2.1m tall by 1m diameter with a clearance inner diameter of 0.95m after the inner cold magnetic shield installed. For radiation enclosure, the test dewar is located inside a concrete block structure. The structure is above ground, accessible from the top, and equipped with a retractable concrete roof. A second radiation concrete facility, with ground level access via a labyrinth, is also available for testing smaller cavities in 2 smaller dewars. The cryogenic transfer lines installation between the large vertical test dewar and the cryo plant's sub components is currently near completion. Controls and instrumentations wiring are also nearing completion. The Vertical Test Facility will allow onsite testing of SRF cavities with a maximum overall envelope of 0.9 m diameter and 2.1 m height in the large dewar and smaller SRF cavities and assemblies with a maximum overall envelope of 0.66 m diameter and 1.6 m height.

Than, R.; Liaw, CJ; Porqueddu, R.; Grau, M.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tallerico, T.; McIntyre, G.; Lederle, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

190

Cryogenic controls for Fermilab's SRF cavities and test facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities test facility is now operational at Fermilab's Meson Detector Building (MDB). The facility is supplied cryogens from the Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) located in a separate building 500-m away. The design incorporates ambient temperature pumping for super-fluid helium production, as well as three 0.6-kW at 4.5-K refrigerators, five screw compressors, a helium purifier, helium and nitrogen inventory, cryogenic distribution system, and a variety of test cryostats. To control and monitor the vastly distributed cryogenic system, a flexible scheme has been developed. Both commercial and experimental physics tools are used. APACS+{trademark}, a process automation control system from Siemens-Moore, is at the heart of the design. APACS+{trademark} allows engineers to configure an ever evolving test facility while maintaining control over the plant and distribution system. APACS+{trademark} nodes at CTF and MDB are coupled by a fiber optic network. DirectLogic205 PLC's by KOYO{reg_sign} are used as the field level interface to most I/O. The top layer of this system uses EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) as a SCADA/HMI. Utilities for graphical display, control loop setting, real time/historical plotting and alarming have been implemented by using the world-wide library of applications for EPICS. OPC client/server technology is used to bridge across each different platform. This paper presents this design and its successful implementation.

Norris, B.; Bossert, R.; Klebaner, A.; Lackey, S.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.; Sirotenko, V.; /Fermilab

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels Solar Thermal R-35 Rim Joist Area 5" open cell spray foam 2" mineral wool insulation blanket R-10 Basement Slab electric WH #12;NZERTF Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Array Roof Mounted South half of main roof

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

192

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

CLOSEOUT REPORT FOR HYBRID SULFUR PRESSURIZED BUTTON CELL TEST FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the Close-Out Report for design and partial fabrication of the Pressurized Button Cell Test Facility at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This facility was planned to help develop the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) that is a key component of the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for generating hydrogen. The purpose of this report is to provide as much information as possible in case the decision is made to resume research. This report satisfies DOE Milestone M3GSR10VH030107.0. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by watersplitting. The HyS Cycle utilizes the high temperature (>800 C) thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both high thermodynamic efficiency and low hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. Sulfur dioxide from the decomposer is cycled back to electrolyzers. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. Anode and cathode are formed by spraying a catalyst, typically platinized carbon, on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). SRNL has been testing SDEs for several years including an atmospheric pressure Button Cell electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2} active area) and an elevated temperature/pressure Single Cell electrolyzer (54.8 cm{sup 2} active area). SRNL tested 37 MEAs in the Single Cell electrolyzer facility from June 2005 until June 2009, when funding was discontinued. An important result of the final months of testing was the development of a method that prevents the formation of a sulfur layer previously observed in MEAs used in the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle electrolyzer. This result is very important because the sulfur layer increased cell voltage and eventually destroyed the MEA that is the heart of the cell. Steimke and Steeper [2005, 2006, 2007, 2008] reported on testing in the Single Cell Electrolyzer test facility in several periodic reports. Steimke et. al [2010] issued a final facility close-out report summarizing all the testing in the Single Cell Electrolyzer test facility. During early tests, significant deterioration of the membrane occurred in 10 hours or less; the latest tests ran for at least 200 hours with no sign of deterioration. Ironically, the success with the Single Cell electrolyzer meant that it became dedicated to long runs and not available for quick membrane evaluations. Early in this research period, the ambient pressure Button Cell Electrolyzer test facility was constructed to quickly evaluate membrane materials. Its small size allowed testing of newly developed membranes that typically were not available in sizes large enough to test in the Single Cell electrolyzer. The most promising membranes were tested in the Single Cell Electrolyzer as soon as sufficient large membranes could be obtained. However, since the concentration of SO{sub 2} gas in sulfuric acid decreases rapidly with increasing temperature, the ambient pressure Button Cell was no longer able to achieve the operating conditions needed to evaluate the newer improved high temperature membranes. Significantly higher pressure operation was required to force SO{sub 2} into the sulfuric acid to obtain meaningful concentrations at increased temperatures. A high pressure (200 psig), high temperature (120 C) Button Cell was designed and partially fabricated just before funding was discontinued in June 2009. SRNL completed the majority of the design of the test facility, including preparation of a process and instrument drawing (P&ID) and preliminary designs for the major components. SRNL intended to complete the designs and procu

Steeper, T.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility.

Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Lithium Polarization Spectroscopy: Making Precision Plasma Current Measurements in the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

SciTech Connect

Due to several favorable atomic properties (including a simple spectral structure, the existence of a visible resonance line, large excitation cross section, and ease of beam formation), beams of atomic lithium have been used for many years to diagnose various plasma parameters. Using techniques of active (beam-based) spectroscopy, lithium beams can provide localized measurements of plasma density, ion temperature and impurity concentration, plasma fluctuations, and intrinsic magnetic fields. In this paper we present recent results on polarization spectroscopy from the LIBEAM diagnostic, a 30 keV, multi-mA lithium beam system deployed on the DIII-D National Fusion Facility tokamak. In particular, by utilizing the Zeeman splitting and known polarization characteristics of the collisionally excited 670.8 nm Li resonance line we are able to measure accurately the spatio-temporal dependence of the edge current density, a parameter of basic importance to the stability of high performance tokamaks. We discuss the basic atomic beam performance, spectral lineshape filtering, and polarization analysis requirements that were necessary to attain such measurements. Observations made under a variety of plasma conditions have demonstrated the close relationship between the edge current and plasma pressure, as expected from neoclassical theory.

Thomas, D. M. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Enhanced Computational Infrastructure for Data Analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

SciTech Connect

Recently a number of enhancements to the computer hardware infrastructure have been implemented at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility. Utilizing these improvements to the hardware infrastructure, software enhancements are focusing on streamlined analysis, automation, and graphical user interface (GUI) systems to enlarge the user base. The adoption of the load balancing software package LSF Suite by Platform Computing has dramatically increased the availability of CPU cycles and the efficiency of their use. Streamlined analysis has been aided by the adoption of the MDSplus system to provide a unified interface to analyzed DIII-D data. The majority of MDSplus data is made available in between pulses giving the researcher critical information before setting up the next pulse. Work on data viewing and analysis tools focuses on efficient GUI design with object-oriented programming (OOP) for maximum code flexibility. Work to enhance the computational infrastructure at DIII-D has included a significant effort to aid the remote collaborator since the DIII-D National Team consists of scientists from 9 national laboratories, 19 foreign laboratories, 16 universities, and 5 industrial partnerships. As a result of this work, DIII-D data is available on a 24 x 7 basis from a set of viewing and analysis tools that can be run either on the collaborators' or DIII-Ds computer systems. Additionally, a Web based data and code documentation system has been created to aid the novice and expert user alike.

Schissel, D.P.; Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Terpstra, T.B.; Casper, T.A.; Freeman, J.; Jong, R.; Keith, K.M.; Meyer, W.H.; Parker, C.T.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab.

Harms, E; Chase, B; Cullerton, E; Hocker, A; Jensen, C; Joireman, P; Klebaner, A; Kubicki, T; Kucera, M; Legan, A; Leibfritz, J; Martinez, A; McGee, M; Nagaitsev, S; Nezhevenko, O; Nicklaus, D; Pfeffer, H; Pischalnikov, Y; Prieto, P; Reid, J; Schappert, W; Tupikov, V; Varghese, P; Branlard, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility, hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated includes a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer, required for conducting these tests, as well as a heavy

Lee, Dongwon

199

Hydrologic test plan for the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic tests are planned at seven wells that will be drilled at the proposed Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility (ERDF). These wells are supporting hydrologic, geologic, and hydrochemical characterization at this new facility. Hydrologic testing will consist of instantaneous slug tests, slug interference tests, step-drawdown tests, and constant rate discharge tests (generally single-well). These test results and later groundwater monitoring data will be used to determine groundwater flow directions, flow rates, and the chemical makeup of the groundwater below the proposed ERDF. The seven wells will be drilled in two phases. In Phase I four wells will be drilled and tested: Two to the top of the uppermost aquifer (water table) and two as characterization boreholes to the top of basalt. The Phase I wells are located in the northern portion of the proposed ERDF site (699-32-72, 699-SDF-6, -7 and -8) (Figure 1). If Phase II drilling proceeds, the remaining three wells will be installed and tested (two deep and one shallow). A phased approach to drilling is warranted because of current uncertainty in the land use requirements at the proposed ERDF.

Swanson, L.C.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

MoWiTT:Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 MoWiTT: Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems requires accurate measurement of the flow of energy through windows in realistic conditions, a capability provided by the Mobile Window Thermal Test facility. Consisting of a pair of outdoor, room-sized calorimeters, MoWiTT measures the net energy flow through two window samples in side-by-side tests using ambient weather conditions. MoWiTT characterizes the net energy flow as a function of time and measures the temperatures, solar fluxes, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility (EMPFT) at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment were completed. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Barber-Nichols has completed the design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below ground test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility to attract the largest number of potential users. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fast Flux Test Facility Asbestos Location Tracking Program  

SciTech Connect

Procedure Number HNF-PRO-408, revision 0, paragraph 1.0, ''Purpose,'' and paragraph 2.0, ''Requirements for Facility Management of Asbestos,'' relate building inspection and requirements for documentation of existing asbestos-containing building material (ACBM) per each building assessment. This documentation shall be available to all personnel (including contractor personnel) entering the facility at their request. Corrective action was required by 400 Area Integrated Annual Appraisal/Audit for Fiscal Year 1992 (IAA-92-0007) to provide this notification documentation. No formal method had been developed to communicate the location and nature of ACBM to maintenance personnel in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) 400 Area. The scope of this Data Package Document is to locate and evaluate any ACBM found at FFTF which constitutes a baseline. This includes all buildings within the protected area. These findings are compiled from earlier reports, numerous work packages and engineering evaluations of employee findings.

REYNOLDS, J.A.

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques.

Gray, H.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Single-Unit Unintentional Islanding Test Results at the DUIT Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of single-unit unintentional islanding tests performed at the DUIT Test Facility. These tests are the first tests to be performed in a comprehensive suite of tests to evaluate the impacts of distributed resources in a realistic test environment. The work described in this report has been sponsored by the California Energy Commission (CEC), and by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the U.S. Department of Energy.

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposers physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the users technical needs. The current NSUF partners are shown in Figure 1. This article describes the ATR as well as the expanded capabilities, partnerships, and services that allow researchers to take full advantage of this national resource.

Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

ERDA Geothermal Component Test Facility (GCTF), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California. Test operations management plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion of the operation of the Geothermal Component Test Facility (GCTF), established for testing heat extraction and energy conversion equipment and materials, is presented under the following section headings: purposes of the facility; operating policies: service, conflicts, safety and environmental, investigator activities, shops and equipment, and test certification; organization: chart; Lawrence Berkely Laboratory: organization, responsibilities, individual responsibilities, and funding; Bureau of Reclamation: organization, responsibilities, and funding; operations contractor: contract, qualifications, and personnel; Test Operations Advisory Board; experiment processing: test acceptance, scheduling and priorities, cost reimbursement, and activities flow chart.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: A Path Towards Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Arial 18 pt bold Name here Title or division here Date 00, 2008 LLNL-PRES-407907 #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 2 Two major possibilities for fusion energy #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 3 The NIF is nearing completion and will be conducting

210

HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY PREOPERATIONAL TEST COMPLETION REPORT, HOT SODIUM CIRCULATION TEST  

SciTech Connect

Tests were conducted to verify the adequacy of the design, construction, and components of the main heat transfer system of the Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF) for elevated-temperature and low-power operation. Tests revealed piping interferences, inoperative hangars, and valve difficulties. These discrepancies were rectified and rechecked. Detailed information concerning test results is included. (J.R.D.)

Shaw, P.F.; Johnson, L.L.

1962-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Status of Centralized Environmental Creep Testing Facility Preparation and Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

Because the ASME Codes do not cover environmental issues that are crucial in the design and construction of VHTR system, investigation of long-term impure helium effects on metallurgical stability and properties becomes very important. The present report describes the development of centralized environmental creep testing facility, its close collaborations with the experiments in low velocity helium recirculation loop, important lessons learned, upgrades in system design in FY06, and current status of the development.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Assembly and installation of the large coil test facility test stand  

SciTech Connect

The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) was built to test six tokamak-type superconducting coils, with three to be designed and built by US industrial teams and three provided by Japan, Switzerland, and Euratom under an international agreement. The facility is designed to test these coils in an environment which simulates that of a tokamak. The heart of this facility is the test stand, which is made up of four major assemblies: the Gravity Base Assembly, the Bucking Post Assembly, the Torque Ring Assembly, and the Pulse Coil Assembly. This paper provides a detailed review of the assembly and installation of the test stand components and the handling and installation of the first coil into the test stand.

Queen, C.C. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Personnel Dose Assessment at the PRIMA Neutral Beam Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety & Environment / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

S. Sandri; A. Coniglio; A. Daniele; M. D'Arienzo; L. Di Pace; M. Pillon

214

Design and operation of an outdoor microalgae test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project covered in this report is to establish and operate a facility in the American Southwest to test the concept of producing microalgae on a large scale. This microalgae would then be used as a feedstock for producing liquid fuels. The site chosen for this project was an existing water research station in Roswell, New Mexico; the climate and water resources are representative of those in the Southwest. For this project, researchers tested specific designs, modes of operation, and strains of microalgae; proposed and evaluated modifications to technological concepts; and assessed the progress toward meeting cost objectives.

Weissman, J.C.; Tillett, D.M.; Goebel, R.P. (Microbial Products, Inc., Vacaville, CA (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Integrated Disposal Facility FY2011 Glass Testing Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility (e.g., source term). Vitrifying the low-activity waste at Hanford is expected to generate over 1.6 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} of glass (Certa and Wells 2010). The volume of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at Hanford is the largest in the DOE complex and is one of the largest inventories (approximately 8.9 x 10{sup 14} Bq total activity) of long-lived radionuclides, principally {sup 99}Tc (t{sub 1/2} = 2.1 x 10{sup 5}), planned for disposal in a low-level waste (LLW) facility. Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, in order to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2011 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of low-activity waste glasses.

Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Windisch, Charles F.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Pyroprocessing of Fast Flux Test Facility Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electrorefined uranium products exceeded 99%.

B.R. Westphal; G.L. Fredrickson; G.G. Galbreth; D. Vaden; M.D. Elliott; J.C. Price; E.M. Honeyfield; M.N. Patterson; L. A. Wurth

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 * November 2010 8 * November 2010 The NREL hydrogen safety sensor test facility (Robert Burgess/NREL) PIX 18240 NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Team: Safety Codes & Standards Group, Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center Accomplishment: The NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Facility was recently commissioned for the quantitative assessment of hydrogen safety sensors (first reported in April 2010). Testing of sensors has started and is ongoing. Test Apparatus: The Test Facility was designed to test hydrogen sensors under precisely controlled conditions. The apparatus can simultaneously test multiple sensors and can handle all common electronic interfaces, including voltage, current, resistance,

220

IN-PILE GAS-COOLED FUEL ELEMENT TEST FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Paper presented at American Nuclear Society Meeting, June I8-21, 1962, Boston, Mass. Design and operating problems of unclad and ceramic gas-cooled reactor fuels in high temperature circulating gas systems will be studied using a test facility now nearing completion at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A shielded air-tight cell houses a closed circuit gas system equipped for dealing with fission products circulating in the gas. Experiments can be conducted on fuel element performance and stability, fission product deposition, gas clean up, activity levels, component and system performance and shielding, and decontamination and maintenance of system hardware. (auth)

Zasler, J.; Huntley, W.R.; Gnadt, P.A.; Kress, T.S.

1962-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessment of a hot hydrogen nuclear propulsion fuel test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsequent to the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), several studies and review groups have identified nuclear thermal propulsion as a high priority technology for development. To achieve the goals of SEI to place man on Mars, a nuclear rocket will operate at near 2700K and in a hydrogen environment at near 60 atmospheres. Under these conditions, the operational lifetime of the rocket will be limited by the corrosion rate at the hydrogen/fuel interface. Consequently, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been evaluating requirements and design issues for a test facility. The facility will be able to directly heat fuel samples by electrical resistance, microwave deposition, or radio frequency induction heating to temperatures near 3000K. Hydrogen gas at variable pressure and temperatures will flow through the samples. The thermal gradients, power density, and operating times envisioned for nuclear rockets will be duplicated as close as reasonable. The post-sample flow stream will then be scrubbed and cooled before reprocessing. The baseline design and timetable for the facility will be discussed. 7 refs.

Watanabe, H.H.; Howe, S.D.; Wantuck, P.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Preserving physics knowledge at the fast flux test facility  

SciTech Connect

One of the goals of the Dept. of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy, initiated under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) and continued under the Advanced Reactor Concepts Program (ARC) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) that could support the development of an environmentally and economically sound nuclear fuel cycle. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent LMR to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992, and was designed as a fully instrumented test reactor with on-line, real time test control and performance monitoring of components and tests installed in the reactor. The 10 years of operation of the FFTF provided a very useful framework for testing the advances in LMR safety technology based on passive safety features that may be of increased importance to new designs after the events at Fukushima. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, and startup of the reactor, as well as on preserving information obtained from 10 years of successful operating history and extensive irradiation testing of fuels and materials. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has sequestered reports, files, tapes, and drawings to allow for secure retrieval. A disciplined and orderly approach has been developed to respond to client's requests for documents and data in order to minimize the search effort and ensure that future requests for this information can be readily accommodated. (authors)

Wootan, D.; Omberg, R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Makenas, B. J. [Ares Corporation, M/S A3-06, 825 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Nielsen, D. L.; Nelson, J. V. [Indian Eyes, LLC, 2815 Saint Andrews Loop, Pasco, WA 99301 (United States); Polzin, D. L. [CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company, M/S S2-42, P.O. Box 1600, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

THE INTEGRATED EQUIPMENT TEST FACILITY AT OAK RIDGE AS A NONPROLIFERATION TEST LOOP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The apparent renaissance in nuclear power has resulted in a new focus on nonproliferation measures. There is a lot of activity in development of new measurement technologies and methodologies for nonproliferation assessment. A need that is evolving in the United States is for facilities and test loops for demonstration of new technologies. In the late 1970s, the Fuel Recycle Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged in advanced reprocessing technology development. As part of the program, the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was constructed as a test bed for advanced technology. The IET was a full-scale demonstration facility, operable on depleted uranium, with a throughput capacity for 0.5 Mt/d. At the front end, the facility had a feed surge vessel, input accountability tank, and feed vessel for the single cycle of solvent extraction. The basic solvent extraction system was configured to use centrifugal contactors for extraction and scrub and a full-size pulsed column for strip. A surge tank received the solvent extraction product solution and fed a continuous operating thermo-syphon-type product evaporator. Product receiving and accountability vessels were available. Feed material could be prepared using a continuous rotary dissolve or by recycling the product with adjustment as new feed. Continuous operations 24/7 could be realized with full chemical recovery and solvent recycle systems in operation. The facility was fully instrumented for process control and operation, and a full solution monitoring application had been implemented for safeguards demonstrations, including actual diversion tests for sensitivity evaluation. A significant effort for online instrument development was a part of the program at the time. The fuel recycle program at Oak Ridge ended in the early 1990s, and the IET facility was mothballed. However, the equipment and systems remain and could be returned to service to support nonproliferation demonstrations. This paper discusses the status of the facility and operations.

Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Safety analysis of the 700-horsepower combustion test facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the 700 h.p. Combustion Test Facility located in Building 93 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Extensive safety related measures have been incorporated into the design, construction, and operation of the Combustion Test Facility. These include: nitrogen addition to the coal storage bin, slurry hopper, roller mill and pulverizer baghouse, use of low oxygen content combustion gas for coal conveying, an oxygen analyzer for the combustion gas, insulation on hot surfaces, proper classification of electrical equipment, process monitoring instrumentation and a planned remote television monitoring system. Analysis of the system considering these factors has resulted in the determination of overall probabilities of occurrence of hazards as shown in Table I. Implementation of the recommendations in this report will reduce these probabilities as indicated. The identified hazards include coal dust ignition by hot ductwork and equipment, loss of inerting within the coal conveying system leading to a coal dust fire, and ignition of hydrocarbon vapors or spilled oil, or slurry. The possibility of self-heating of coal was investigated. Implementation of the recommendations in this report will reduce the ignition probability to no more than 1 x 10/sup -6/ per event. In addition to fire and explosion hazards, there are potential exposures to materials which have been identified as hazardous to personal health, such as carbon monoxide, coal dust, hydrocarbon vapors, and oxygen deficient atmosphere, but past monitoring experience has not revealed any problem areas. The major environmental hazard is an oil spill. The facility has a comprehensive spill control plan.

Berkey, B.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Experimental test facility for evaluation of solar control strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental solar heating and cooling system has been constructed at LBL. It was designed to serve as a test system to check out the operation of an LBL-developed solar controller that looked promising in terms of its commercialization potential. Improvements were made in the experimental heating and cooling system to enable quantitative determination of the auxiliary energy savings made possible by using this type of controller. These improvements consisted of installation and calibration of accurate instrumentation, data acquisition capabilities, and development of simulated input and output devices that would allow repeated experiments using the same running conditions. In addition, the possibilities of further development of the heating and cooling system into an experimental test facility for a wide range of solar control strategies have been investigated.

Majteles, M.; Lee, H.; Wahlig, M.; Warren, M.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

HALGREN DL

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

Facility design for cyclic testing of advanced solid desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of high performance components is required to reach the goal of desiccant cooling system cost-competitiveness with conventional vapor compensation air conditioning systems. SERI has designed a laminar flow, parallel passage dehumidifier that has this potential. The goal of SERI's desiccant cooling research program is to fully characterize experimentally the performance of the parallel passage dehumidifier under a wide range of operating conditions, investigate improvements in design, and verify existing models of dehumidifier performance against experimental results. This report documents the design of the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility for performing the above testing. With slight modifications, the testing can be used for testing other desiccant cooling system components. The dehumidifier processes and the parameters and variables needed to control and characterize its performance are presented. The physical layout of the test loop and instrumentation for monitoring the operating conditions and dehumidifer performance and the controls for maintaining the operating conditions are specified. The computerized data acquisition system conversion equations and an error analysis of measurement variables are also presented.

Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.; Zangrando, F.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Knowledge Preservation at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) that could support the development of an environmentally and economically sound nuclear fuel cycle. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent LMR to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992, and was designed as a fully instrumented test reactor with on-line, real time test control and performance monitoring of components and tests installed in the reactor. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, and startup of the reactor, as well as on preserving information obtained from 10 years of successful operating history and extensive irradiation testing of fuels and materials. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has sequestered reports, files, tapes, and drawings to allow for secure retrieval. A disciplined and orderly approach has been developed to respond to client's requests for documents and data in order to minimize the search effort and ensure that future requests for this information can be readily accommodated.

Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

The OSU Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility: Standard Fuel Element Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or standard fuel element (SFE), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates due to hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the fuel development program and will take place at OSU in the Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF). Discussion of a preliminary test matrix, SFE design, measurement and instrumentation techniques, and facility description are detailed in this paper.

Wade R. Marcum; Brian G. Woods; Ann Marie Phillips; Richard G. Ambrosek; James D. Wiest; Daniel M. Wachs

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the worlds premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5 to 5.0 in diameter and are all 48 in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives cannot be met using the INL facilities. The ATR NSUF program includes a robust education program enabling students to participate in their research at INL and the partner facilities, attend the ATR NSUF annual User Week, and compete for prizes at sponsored conferences. Development of additional research capabilities is also a key component of the ATR NSUF Program; researchers are encouraged to propose research projects leading to these enhanced capabilities. Some ATR irradiation experiment projects irradiate more specimens than are tested, resulting in irradiated materials available for post irradiation examination by other researchers. These extra specimens comprise the ATR NSUF Sample Library. This presentation will highlight the ATR NSUF Sample Library and the process open to researchers who want to access these materials and how to propose research projects using them. This presentation will provide the current status of all the ATR NSUF Program elements. Many of these were not envisioned in 2007, when DOE established the ATR NSUF.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Integrated Disposal Facility FY2010 Glass Testing Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility (e.g., source term). Vitrifying the low-activity waste at Hanford is expected to generate over 1.6 105 m3 of glass (Puigh 1999). The volume of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at Hanford is the largest in the DOE complex and is one of the largest inventories (approximately 0.89 1018 Bq total activity) of long-lived radionuclides, principally 99Tc (t1/2 = 2.1 105), planned for disposal in a low-level waste (LLW) facility. Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessement (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, in order to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2010 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of low-activity waste glasses. The emphasis in FY2010 was the completing an evaluation of the most sensitive kinetic rate law parameters used to predict glass weathering, documented in Bacon and Pierce (2010), and transitioning from the use of the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases to Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases computer code for near-field calculations. The FY2010 activities also consisted of developing a Monte Carlo and Geochemical Modeling framework that links glass composition to alteration phase formation by 1) determining the structure of unreacted and reacted glasses for use as input information into Monte Carlo calculations, 2) compiling the solution data and alteration phases identified from accelerated weathering tests conducted with ILAW glass by PNNL and Viteous State Laboratory/Catholic University of America as well as other literature sources for use in geochemical modeling calculations, and 3) conducting several initial calculations on glasses that contain the four major components of ILAW-Al2O3, B2O3, Na2O, and SiO2.

Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Windisch, Charles F.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Serne, R Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

Southern Company Services

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Thermal vacuum life test facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy (DOE) assigned Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility, now operated by EG G Mound Applied Technologies, the responsibility for assembling and testing General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Assembled and tested were five RTGs, which included four flight units and one non-flight qualification unit. Figure 1 shows the RTG, which was designed by General Electric AstroSpace Division (GE/ASD) to produce 285 W of electrical power. A detailed description of the processes for RTG assembly and testing is presented by Amos and Goebel (1989). The RTG performance data are described by Bennett, et al. (1986). The flight units will provide electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Galileo mission to Jupiter (two RTGs) and the joint NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Ulysses mission to study the polar regions of the sun (one RTG). The remaining flight unit will serve as the spare for both missions, and a non-flight qualification unit was assembled and tested to ensure that performance criteria were adequately met. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Deaton, R.L.; Goebel, C.J.; Amos, W.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

ERDA test facilities, East Mesa Test Site. Geothermal resource investigations, Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed specifications which must be complied with in the construction of the ERDA Test Facilities at the East Mesa Site for geothermal resource investigations in Imperial Valley, California are presented for use by prospective bidders for the construction contract. The principle construction work includes a 700 gpm cooling tower with its associated supports and equipment, pipelines from wells, electrical equipment, and all earthwork. (LCL)

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

237

Preserving Physics Knowledge at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Department of Energys Office of Nuclear Energy, initiated under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) and continued under the Advanced Reactor Concepts Program (ARC) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) that could support the development of an environmentally and economically sound nuclear fuel cycle. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent LMR to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992, and was designed as a fully instrumented test reactor with on-line, real time test control and performance monitoring of components and tests installed in the reactor. The 10 years of operation of the FFTF provided a very useful framework for testing the advances in LMR safety technology based on passive safety features that may be of increased importance to new designs after the events at Fukushima. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, and startup of the reactor, as well as on preserving information obtained from 10 years of successful operating history and extensive irradiation testing of fuels and materials. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has sequestered reports, files, tapes, and drawings to allow for secure retrieval. A disciplined and orderly approach has been developed to respond to clients requests for documents and data in order to minimize the search effort and ensure that future requests for this information can be readily accommodated.

Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver panel test requirements document solar thermal test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing plans for a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally, the design planned for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are presented. Testing is to include operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the panel's transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. Test hardware are described, including the pilot plant receiver, the test receiver assembly, receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and structural assembly. Requirements for the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. The safety of the system is briefly discussed, and procedures are described for assembly, installation, checkout, normal and abnormal operations, maintenance, removal and disposition. Also briefly discussed are quality assurance, contract responsibilities, and test documentation. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

239

Candidates for a Fusion Nuclear Sciernce Facility (FDF and ST-CTF) (A26780)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings Of 37th European Physical Society Conference On Plasma Physics, June 21-25, 2010, Dublin, Ireland, Http://ocs.ciemat.es/EPS2010PAP/html/author.html, Paper P2.11037th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics Dublin, IE, 2010999617590

Stambaugh, R.D.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

240

Testing Promising Technologies: A Role for Federal Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I S T R A T I O N I S T R A T I O N Testing Promising Technologies: A Role for Federal Facilities Presented to: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group April 18, 2011 Presented by: Jack Callahan, P.E., CEM, CMVP Emerging Technology Program Manager BPA Energy Efficiency B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Overview of Presentation  Overview of BPA's efforts on emerging technologies (E3T)  Review some technologies  What BPA provides  How you can participate 2 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL's computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

MEACHAM JE

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Emittance Measurements of the SSRL Gun Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A photocathode RF gun test stand is under construction in the injector vault of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. The goal of this facility is to produce an electron beam with a normalized emittance of 1-3[mm-mr], a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 10[ps] FWHM and approximately 1[nC] of charge per bunch. The beam will be generated from a laser driven copper photocathode RF gun developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL and UCLA. The 3-5[MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section. The emittance of the electron beam will be measured through the use of quadrupole scans with phosphor screens and also a wire scanner. The details of the experimental setup will be discussed, and first measurements will be presented and compared with results from PARMELA simulations.

Hernandez, Michael; Clendenin, James; Fisher, Alan; Miller, Roger; Palmer, Dennis; Park, Sam; Schmerge, John; Weaver, Jim; Wiedemann, Helmut; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, Dian; /SLAC; Meyerhofer, David; Reis, David; /Rochester U.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Diagnostic development and support of MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for HRSR support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with MHD Energy Center computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. MSU personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for MHD power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL's computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. 25 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

Southern Company Services

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC25  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC25, the second test campaign using a high moisture lignite coal from the Red Hills mine in Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC25 was conducted from July 4, 2008, through August 12, 2008. During TC25, the PSDF gasification process operated for 742 hours in air-blown gasification mode. Operation with the Mississippi lignite was significantly improved in TC25 compared to the previous test (TC22) with this fuel due to the addition of a fluid bed coal dryer. The new dryer was installed to dry coals with very high moisture contents for reliable coal feeding. The TC25 test campaign demonstrated steady operation with high carbon conversion and optimized performance of the coal handling and gasifier systems. Operation during TC25 provided the opportunity for further testing of instrumentation enhancements, hot gas filter materials, and advanced syngas cleanup technologies. The PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane with syngas from the Transport Gasifier.

Southern Company Services

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

10-MWe pilot-plant-receiver-panel test-requirements document: Solar Thermal Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for insolation testing of a full-scale test receiver panel and supporting hardware which essentially duplicate both physically and functionally the design planned for the 10 MWe pilot plant. Testing includes operation during normal start and shutdown, intermittent cloud conditions, and emergencies to determine the transient and steady state operating characteristics and performance under conditions equal to or exceeding those expected in the pilot plant. The effects of variations of input and output conditions on receiver operation are also to be investigated. A brief description of the pilot plant receiver subsystem is presented, followed by a detailed description of the receiver assembly to be tested at the Solar Thermal Test Facility. Major subassemblies are described, including the receiver panel, flow control, electrical control and instrumentation, and the structural assembly. Requirements of the Solar Thermal Test Facility for the tests are given. System safety measures are described. The tests, operating conditions, and expected results are presented. Quality assurance, task responsibilities, and test documentation are also discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

Long-Term Leaching Tests With High Ash Fusion Maryland Coal Slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction-procedure toxicity tests showed that the solid residue materials resulting from the Texaco coal gasification process using fluxed high ash fusion Maryland coal were nonhazardous. Contaminant concentration in the leachate was below or only slightly above the primary maximum contaminant limits (PMCL) established for public drinking water supplies.

1991-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Interoperability requirements for a South African joint command and control test facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South African National Defence Force is in the process of establishing a Joint Command and Control Test Facility at a National Research Institute. The goal with this facility is to provide an integrated environment for Joint Command and Control doctrine ... Keywords: architectures, interoperability requirements, joint command & control, service-orientated architectures, test facility

Willem H. le Roux

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Recognition and Classification of the Wolf Motor Function Test Items using Multimode Sensor Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Multimode Sensor Fusion A thesis submitted in partialusing Multimode Sensor Fusion by Yan Wang Master of Scienceby proposing a new sensor fusion method. Chapter 2 System

Wang, Yan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

Southern Company Services

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Enhanced Computational Infrastructure for Data Analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DIII-D National Team consists of about 120 operating staff and 100 research scientists drawn from 9 U.S. National Laboratories, 19 foreign laboratories, 16 universities, and 5 industrial partnerships. This multi-institution collaboration carries out the integrated DIII-D program mission which is to establish the scientific basis for the optimization of the tokamak approach to fusion energy production. Presently, about two-thirds of the research physics staff are from the national and international collaborating institutions.

Schissel, D.P.; Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Tepstra, T.B.; Casper, T.A.; Freeman, J.; Jong, R.; Keith, K.M.; McHarg, B.B., Jr; Meyer, W.H.; Parker, C.T.; Warner, A.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Design and operation of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unique counter-rotating aspirated compressor was tested in a blowdown facility at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT. The facility expanded on experience from previous blowdown turbine and blowdown compressor experiments. ...

Parker, David V. (David Vickery)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Briefing Book 1 Summary  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of evaluations preformed during 1997 to determine what, if an, future role the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) might have in support of the Department of Energys tritium productions strategy. An evaluation was also conducted to assess the potential for the FFTF to produce medical isotopes. No safety, environmental, or technical issues associated with producing 1.5 kilograms of tritium per year in the FFTF have been identified that would change the previous evaluations by the Department of Energy, the JASON panel, or Putnam, Hayes & Bartlett. The FFTF can be refitted and restated by July 2002 for a total expenditure of $371 million, with an additional $64 million of startup expense necessary to incorporate the production of medical isotopes. Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of reactor-generated medical isotopes will increase dramatically over the next decade. Essential medical isotopes can be produced in the FFTF simultaneously with tritium production, and while a stand-alone medical isotope mission for the facility cannot be economically justified given current marker conditions, conservative estimates based on a report by Frost &Sullivan indicate that 60% of the annual operational costs (reactor and fuel supply) could be offset by revenues from medical isotope production within 10 yeas of restart. The recommendation of the report is for the Department of Energy to continue to maintain the FFTF in standby and proceed with preparation of appropriate Nations Environmental Policy Act documentation in full consultation with the public to consider the FFTF as an interim tritium production option (1.5 kilograms/year) with a secondary mission of producing medical isotopes.

WJ Apley

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

Doss, E.D. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [ed.] [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC22  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC22, the first test campaign using a high moisture lignite from Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC22 was conducted from March 24 to April 17, 2007. The gasification process was operated for 543 hours, increasing the total gasification operation at the PSDF to over 10,000 hours. The PSDF gasification process was operated in air-blown mode with a total of about 1,080 tons of coal. Coal feeder operation was challenging due to the high as-received moisture content of the lignite, but adjustments to the feeder operating parameters reduced the frequency of coal feeder trips. Gasifier operation was stable, and carbon conversions as high as 98.9 percent were demonstrated. Operation of the PCD and other support equipment such as the recycle gas compressor and ash removal systems operated reliably.

Southern Company Services

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

SciTech Connect

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

2010 Ford Fusion VIN 4757 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Ford Fusion HEV (VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE RF GUN BASED INJECTOR FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE RF GUN BASED INJECTOR FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber for the TESLA Collaboration, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany Abstract During 1997 and 1998 a first accelerator module was tested successfully at the TESLA Test Facility Linac (TTFL) at DESY. Eight superconducting

264

Securing Operating Data From Passive Safety Tests at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. The technologies employed in designing and constructing this reactor, along with information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, are currently being secured and archived by the Department of Energys Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program. This report is one in a series documenting the overall project efforts to retrieve and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors. A previous report summarized the initial efforts to review, retrieve and preserve the most salient documents related to Passive Safety Testing (PST) in the FFTF. Efforts continue to locate, secure, and retrieve record copies of original plant data tapes for the series of passive safety tests conducted between 1986 and 1991.

Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Securing Operating Data From Passive Safety Tests at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. The technologies employed in designing and constructing this reactor, along with information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, are currently being secured and archived by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program. This report is one in a series documenting the overall project efforts to retrieve and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors. A previous report summarized the initial efforts to review, retrieve and preserve the most salient documents related to Passive Safety Testing (PST) in the FFTF. Efforts continue to locate, secure, and retrieve record copies of original plant data tapes for the series of passive safety tests conducted between 1986 and 1991.

Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab. Since November 2010 Cryomodule 1 has been operating at 2 Kelvin. After evaluating each of the eight cavities while individually powered, the entire module has recently been powered and peak operation determined as shown in Figure 4. Several more weeks of measurements are planned before the module is warmed up, removed and replaced with Cryomodule 2 now under assembly at Fermilab.

Harms, E.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Cullerton, E.; Hocker, A.; Jensen, C.; Joireman, P.; Klebaner, A.; Kubicki, T.; Kucera, M.; Legan, A.; /Fermilab /DESY

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. [bold 21], 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert[sup TM] system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of [approx]10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of [alpha]-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined [alpha] particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed.

Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Ja

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Interface Control Document for the Interface between the Central Solenoid Insert Coil and the Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the interface definition and interface control between the Central Solenoid Insert Coil and the Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility in Japan.

Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL; Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Nunoya, Yoshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Modeling and analysis of a heat transport transient test facility for space nuclear systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is to design a robust test facility for a small space nuclear power system and model its physical behavior under (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the tokamak fusion test reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1--0.2 s for a line-average density range (n-bar/sub e/) of (1--2.5) x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o)approx.1.2--2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(0)approx.0.9--1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/approx.3. A comparison of Princeton large torus, poloidal divertor experiment, and tokamak fusion test reactor plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

273

EA-0993: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Testing Facility, Richland, Washington |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Testing Facility, Richland, 93: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Testing Facility, Richland, Washington EA-0993: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Testing Facility, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site's proposal to place the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition, suitable for a long-term surveillance and maintenance phase prior to final decontamination and decommissioning. This EA addresses the actions associated with Phase I (Facility Transition) and Phase II (Surveillance and Maintenance). PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 1, 1995 EA-0993: Finding of No Significant Impact Shutdown of the Fast Flux Testing Facility

274

RELAP5 Prediction of Transient Tests in the RD-14 Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the RELAP5 computer code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of a pressurized water reactor and its associated systems, it could not assess the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor adequately. However, some studies have been initiated to explore the applicability for simulating a large-break loss-of-coolant accident in CANDU reactors. In the present study, the small-reactor inlet header break test and the steam generator secondary-side depressurization test conducted in the RD-14 test facility were simulated with the RELAP5/MOD3.2.2 code to examine its extended capability for all the postulated transients and accidents in CANDU reactors. The results were compared with experimental data and those of the CATHENA code performed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.In the RELAP5 analyses, the heated sections in the facility were simulated as a multichannel with five pipe models, which have identical flow areas and hydraulic elevations, as well as a single-pipe model.The results of the small-reactor inlet header break and the steam generator secondary-side depressurization simulations predicted experimental data reasonably well. However, some discrepancies in the depressurization of the primary heat transport system after the header break and consequent time delay of the major phenomena were observed in the simulation of the small-reactor inlet header break test.

Lee, Sukho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Manwoong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hho-Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (Korea, Republic of); Lee, John C. [University of Michigan (United States)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Engineering considerations in the selection of the tokamak to follow the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR)  

SciTech Connect

The tokamak to follow the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) should satisfy two important objectives. First, it should be a significant step in physics and engineering goals in order to maintain the level of progress which the US has established as the world leader in fusion energy development. The second objective should be to provide the information necessary to support the strategy and goals of the long-range Department of Energy (DOE) Fusion Program. In their Comprehensive Program Management Plan, the DOE identifies the need for a reactor technology program in the 1990s in which the major goal is to prove engineering feasibility. In this paper, the specific engineering needs are identified which have been developed through the tokamak design studies over the past decade. On the basis of these needs, it appears that several options are available for the next tokamak to follow TFTR. The final choice of the concept will involve consideration of the technical needs and the reality of the Fusion Program budget.

Shannon, T.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A tritium-compatible piezoelectric valve for the tokamak fusion test reactor  

SciTech Connect

This work describes modifications made to a commercial piezoelectric valve to make it sufficiently tritium compatible for the TFTR trritium injection scenario. The results of testing the valve for leakage and performance following a series of progressively more severe tritium exposures are also presented. Finally, a proposal for a totally radiation-compatible piezoelectric valve, suitable for tritium-burning fusion machines of the future, is decribed. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Coffin, D.O.; Cole, S.P.; Wilhelm, R.C.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Fast Flux Test Facility, Sodium Storage Facility project-specific project management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Project-Specific Project Management Plan describes the project management methods and controls used by the WHC Projects Department to manage Project 03-F-031. The Sodium Storage Facility provides for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF Plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

Shank, D.R.

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Wind/hybrid power system test facilities in the United States and Canada  

SciTech Connect

By 1995, there will be four facilities available for testing of wind/hybrid power systems in the United States and Canada. This paper describes the mission, approach, capabilities, and status of activity at each of these facilities. These facilities have in common a focus on power systems for remote, off-grid locations that include wind energy. At the same time, these facilities have diverse, yet complimentary, missions that range from research to technology development to testing. The first facility is the test facility at the Institut de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), Hydro-Quebec`s research institute near Montreal, Canada. This facility, not currently in operation, was used for initial experiments demonstrating the dynamic stability of a high penetration, no-storage wind/diesel (HPNSWD) concept. The second facility is located at the Atlantic Wind Test Site (AWTS) on Prince Edward Island, Canada, where testing of the HPNSWD concept developed by Hydro-Quebec is currently underway. The third is the Hybrid Power Test Facility planned for the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, which will focus on testing commercially available hybrid power systems. The fourth is the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Conservation and Production Research Laboratory in Bushland, Texas, where a test laboratory is being developed to study wind-energy penetration and control strategies for wind/hybrid systems. The authors recognize that this summary of test facilities is not all inclusive; for example, at least one US industrial facility is currently testing a hybrid power system. Our intent, though, is to describe four facilities owned by nonprofit or governmental institutions in North America that are or will be available for ongoing development of wind/hybrid power systems.

Green, H J [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Clark, R N [USDA Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, TX (United States); Brothers, C [Atlantic Wind Test Site, North Cape, PE (Canada); Saulnier, B [Institut de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

Capabilities of the High Voltage Stress Test System at the Outdoor Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We illustrate the capabilities of the High Voltage Stress Test (HVST) which operates continuously in the array field east of the Outdoor Test Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Because we know that photovoltaic (PV) modules generating electrical power in both residential and utility-scale array installations will develop high-voltage biases approaching 600 VDC and 1,000 VDC, respectively, we expect such high voltages will result in current leakage between cells and ground, typically through the frames or mounts. We know that inevitably such leakage currents are capable of producing electrochemical corrosion that adversely impacts long-term module performance. With the HVST, we stress or operate PV modules under high-voltage bias, to characterize their leakage currents under all prevailing ambient conditions and assess performance changes emanating from high-voltage stress. We perform this test both on single modules and an active array.

del Cueto, J. A.; Trudell, D.; Sekulic, W.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades July 23, 2010 - 1:19pm Addthis Boston's Wind Technology Testing Center, funded in part with Recovery Act funds, will be first in U.S. to test blades up to 300 feet long. | Photo Courtesy of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Boston's Wind Technology Testing Center, funded in part with Recovery Act funds, will be first in U.S. to test blades up to 300 feet long. | Photo Courtesy of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE America's first-of-its-kind wind blade testing facility - capable of testing a blade as long as a football field - almost never was. Because of funding woes, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC),

282

DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport March 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) today announced plans to construct and operate a hydrogen fuel production plant and vehicle fueling station at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility will use grid electricity to split water to produce pure hydrogen fuel. The fuel will be used by the airport's operations and the 130th Air Wing of the West Virginia Air National Guard. NETL will begin operations at the Yeager Airport facility in August 2009 and plans to conduct two years of testing and evaluation. The facility will be designed using "open architecture," allowing the capability to add

283

Report of Survey of the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly Facility Report of Survey of the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly Facility The purpose of this document is to report the results of a survey conducted at the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA Facility). The survey was conducted during the week of 3/20/00. The primary purpose of the survey is to identify facility conditions and issues that need to be addressed to transfer responsibility for the facility from the Office of Science (SC) to the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The second purpose is to provide EM with insight regarding the facility's risks and liabilities, which may influence the management of eventual downstream life-cycle activities. The survey and this report are part of a process for implementing the

284

EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR 17: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a Wave Energy Test Facility that will be located near Newport, Oregon. The testing facility will be located within Oregon territorial waters, near the Hatfield Marine Science Center and close to onshore roads and marine support services. The site will not only allow testing of new wave energy technologies, but will also be used to help study any potential environmental impacts on sediments, invertebrates and fish. The project is being jointly funded by the State of Oregon and DOE. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2012 EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan

285

EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR 17: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a Wave Energy Test Facility that will be located near Newport, Oregon. The testing facility will be located within Oregon territorial waters, near the Hatfield Marine Science Center and close to onshore roads and marine support services. The site will not only allow testing of new wave energy technologies, but will also be used to help study any potential environmental impacts on sediments, invertebrates and fish. The project is being jointly funded by the State of Oregon and DOE. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2012 EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan

286

Facilities for testing desiccant materials and geometries of dehumidifiers for solar-regenerated desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

Four experimental test facilities for characterizing the performance of solid desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices which have the potential to be used in solar-regenerated desiccant cooling systems are reviewed. The water equilibrium capacity and sorption rates of desiccant materials, depending on their form, can be either measured with a quartz crystal microbalance or a desiccant sorption test facility. Pressure drop, heat- and mass-transfer rates and transient equilibrium dehumidification capacity of a dehumidifier matrices are measured in a desiccant heat and mass transfer test facility. The performance and steady state dehumidification capabilities of prototype dehumidifier components under realistic conditions are measured in a desiccant cyclic test facility. The description of the test apparatus, experimental procedure, measurement errors, and typical results for the four test facilities are presented here. 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE STATUS OF THE RF-GUN BASED INJECTOR OF THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber£ for the TESLA Collaboration, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany Abstract The TESLA Test Facility Linac (TTFL) at DESY uses two modules with 8 TESLA superconducting accelerat- ing structures each to accelerate an electron

288

OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE TEST FACILITIES FOR TESLA H. Weise, DESY, Hamburg, Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE TEST FACILITIES FOR TESLA H. Weise, DESY, Hamburg, Germany Abstract The TESLA superconducting electron-positron linear collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory government in matters of science. In preparation of this, the TESLA Test Facility was set up at DESY. More

289

Status and Plan of the System Codes Development for ITER Test Blanket Module and Fusion Breeding Blanket in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test Blanket, Fuel Cycle, and Breeding / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 2) Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Dong Won Lee et al.

290

EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los 35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Weapons Component Testing Facility from Building 450 to Building 207, both within Technical Area 16, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Finding of No Significant Impact Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Final Environmental Assessment

291

From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference December 16, 2013 - 2:46pm Addthis The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Pezzullo

292

From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference From the Lab to Your Gas Tank: 4 Bioenergy Testing Facilities That Are Making a Difference December 16, 2013 - 2:46pm Addthis The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado enables partners to test conversion technologies on up to one ton of biomass material a day. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Pezzullo

293

Evaluation of the advanced mixed oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The advanced mixed-oxide (UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), is undergoing postirradiation examination (PIE). This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) (Leggett and Omberg 1987) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of twelve different types. The test was irradiated for 312 equivalent full power days (EFPD) in FFTF. It had a peak pin power of 13.7 kW/ft and reached a peak burnup of 65.2 MWd/kgM with a peak fast fluence of 9.9 /times/ 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). This document discusses the test and its results. 6 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Gilpin, L.L.; Baker, R.B.; Chastain, S.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

UPDATE ON GASIFICATION TESTING AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama was established in 1995 to lead the United States ' effort to develop cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable, coal-based power plant technologies. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key components of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power

Senior Engineer; Pannalal Vimalchand; Roxann Leonard; Robert C. Lambrecht

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Particle beam fusion  

SciTech Connect

Today, in keeping with Sandia Laboratories` designation by the Department of Energy as the lead laboratory for the pulsed power approach to fusion, its efforts include major research activities and the construction of new facilities at its Albuquerque site. Additionally, in its capacity as lead laboratory, Sandia coordinates DOE-supported pulsed power fusion work at other government operated laboratories, with industrial contractors, and universities. The beginning of Sandia`s involvement in developing fusion power was an outgrowth of its contributions to the nation`s nuclear weapon program. The Laboratories` work in the early 1960`s emphasized the use of pulsed radiation environments to test the resistance of US nuclear weapons to enemy nuclear bursts. A careful study of options for fusion power indicated that Sandia`s expertise in the pulsed power field could provide a powerful match to ignite fusion fuel. Although creating test environments is an achieved goal of Sandia`s overall program, this work and other military tasks protected by appropriate security regulations will continue, making full use of the same pulsed power technology and accelerators as the fusion-for-energy program. Major goals of Sandia`s fusion program including the following: (1) complete a particle accelerator to deliver sufficient beam energy for igniting fusion targets; (2) obtain net energy gain, this goal would provide fusion energy output in excess of energy stored in the accelerator; (3) develop a technology base for the repetitive ignition of pellets in a power reactor. After accomplishing these goals, the technology will be introduced to the nation`s commercial sector.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

FELIX: construction and testing of a facility to study electromagnetic effects for first wall, blanket, and shield systems  

SciTech Connect

An experimental test facility for the study of electromagnetic effects in the FWBS systems of fusion reactors has been constructed over the past 1-1/2 years at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In a test volume of 0.76 m/sup 3/ a vertical pulsed 0.5 T dipole field (B < 50 T/s) is perpendicular to a 1 T solenoid field. Power supplies of 2.75 MW and 5.5 MW and a solid state switch rated 13 kV, 13.1 kA (170 MW) control the pulsed magnetic fields. The total stored energy in the coils is 2.13 MJ. The coils are designed for a future upgrade to 4 T or the solenoid and 1 T for the dipole field (a total of 23.7 MJ). This paper describes the design and construction features of the facility. These include the power supplies, the solid state switches, winding and impregnation of large dipole saddle coils, control of the magnetic forces, computer control of FELIX and of experimental data acquisition and analysis, and an initial experimental test setup to analyze the eddy current distribution in a flat disk.

Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Biggs, J.A.; Knott, M.J.; Lari, R.J.; McGhee, D.G.; Wehrle, R.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

First-wall, blanket, and shield engineering test program for magnetically confined fusion power reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key engineering areas identified for early study relate to FW/B/S system thermal-hydraulics, thermomechnics, nucleonics, electromagnetics, assembly, maintenance, and repair. Programmatic guidance derived frm planning exercises involving over thirty organizations (laboratories, industries, and universities) has indicated (1) that meaningful near term engineering testing should be feasible within the bounds of a modest funding base, (2) that there are existing facilities and expertise which can be profitably utilized in this testing, and (3) that near term efforts should focus on the measurement of engineering data and the verification/calibration of predictive methods for anticipated normal operational and transient FW/B/S conditions. The remainder of this paper discusses in more detail the planning strategies, proposed approach to near term testing, and longer range needs for integrated FW/B/S test facilities.

Maroni, V.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing Facility (PCAT) The Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing facility (PCAT) at Oak Ridge National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with electricity transmission reliability and security in the US. Figures 1 and 2 show a view). The facility consists of five 161kV-rated steel transmission poles, which have extensive support to ensure of Energy's (DOE) National Transmission Technology Research Center (NTTRC). PCAT is part of DOE's effort

299

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

Not Available

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

304

Design and testing of the magnetic quadrupole for the Heavy Ion Fusion Program  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Fusion Program at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is conducting experiments in the transport and acceleration of ``driverlike`` beams. The single beam coming from the four-to-one beam combiner will be transported in a lattice of pulsed magnetic quadrupoles. The present beam transport consists of high field, short aspect ratio magnetic quadrupoles to maximize the transportable current. This design could also be converted to be superconducting for future uses in a driver. The pulsed quadrupole will develop a maximum field of two Tesla and will be housed within the induction accelerator cells at the appropriate lattice period. Hardware implementation of the physics requirements and full parameter testing is described.

Benjegerdes, R.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Stuart, M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Measurements of Nonlinear Energy Transfer in Turbulence in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The application of a new bispectral analysis technique to density fluctuation measurements in the core of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor indicates that the peak in the autopower spectrum usually lies in a region of linear stability. Large changes in the linear and nonlinear characteristics of the turbulence are observed as the plasma toroidal rotation and/or confinement properties are varied, while estimates of the turbulence-driven diffusivity varies only slightly with rotation. These observations are consistent with the operation of a global organizing property that may be related to the observation of Bohm-like scaling of ion thermal transport. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Kim, J.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Durst, R.D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Fernandez, E.; Terry, P.W. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Paul, S.F.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

PBF (Power Burst Facility) severe fuel damage test 1--3 test results report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--3 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1--3 was the third test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel rod behavior, hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (38,000 MWd/tU) pressurized water reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 empty zircaloy guide tubes, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1-h transient at a nominal coolant pressure of 6.85 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 1340-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of online instrumentation, analysis of fission product data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 34 refs., 241 figs., 51 tabs.

Martinson, Z.R.; Gasparini, M.; Hobbins, R.R.; Petti, D.A.; Allison, C.M.; Hohorst, J.K.; Hagrman, D.L.; Vinjamuri, K. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

311

Battery Energy Storage Test (BEST) Facility: Summary report, 1976-1986: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the development, operations, and contributions of the Battery Energy Storage Test Facility. Providing direction for the nation's battery technology research, the facility has generated a better understanding of the work involved in operating energy storage systems and has been instrumental in demonstrating lead-acid battery applications for utilities worldwide.

Hyman, E.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Operator awareness of system status during Fast Flux Test Facility transition to standby  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A facility in transition, due to a change in its mission or its operating status, begins to depart from a previously well-defined normal mode of operation. The equipment becomes reconfigured or deactivated. In an environment of transition, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has employed methods to enhance operator awareness of system status. These methods are described in this report.

Gibson, J.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

EXPERIMENTAL TEST FACILITY FOR EVALUATION OF CONTROLS AND CONTROL STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sept. Proc. of 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling Researchence Applications, Inc. SOLAR HEATING/ COOLING TEST FACILITYperformance of different solar heating control strategies

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

NIST Hydrogen Fuel Materials Test Facility Starts Delivering ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... microscope images of a test section of X100 alloy pipeline steel shows ... hydrogen gas combined with fatigue reduces the service life of pipelines. ...

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

315

Testing Promising Technologies: A Role for Federal Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the testing of promising technologies and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

316

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific...

317

Testing a Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner in the Surtsey Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance tests of a scaled passive autocatalytic recombine (PAR) were performed in the Surtsey test vessel at Sandia National Laboratories. Measured hydrogen depletion rate data were obtained and compared with previous work. Depletion rate is most likely proportional to PAR scale. PAR performance in steamy environments (with and without hydrophobic coating) was investigated. The tests determined that the PAR startup delay times decrease with increasing hydrogen concentrations in steamy environments. Tests with placement of the PAR near a wall (as opposed to a center location) yielded reduced depletion rates. Tests at low oxygen concentrations also showed a reduced recombination rate. The PAR repeatedly ignited hydrogen at about 6 mol% concentration with a catalyst temperature near 940 K. Velocity data at the PAR exhaust were used to calculate the volumetric flow rate through the PAR as a function of the vessel hydrogen concentration.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Malliakos, Asimios

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor which will be completedDrivers and Reactors for Inertial Confinement Fusion, K.A.

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Future of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, fusion R&D programs have made enormous technical progress. Projected billion-dollar scale research facilities are designed to approach net energy production. In this century, scientific and engineering progress must continue until the economics of fusion power plants improves sufficiently to win large scale private funding in competition with fission and non-nuclear energy systems. This economic advantage must be sustained: trillion dollar investments will be required to build enough fusion power plants to generate ten percent of the world's energy. For Inertial Fusion Energy, multi-billion dollar driver costs must be reduced by up to an order of magnitude, to a small fraction of the total cost of the power plant. Major cost reductions could be achieved via substantial improvements in target performance-both higher gain and reduced ignition energy. Large target performance improvements may be feasible through a combination of design innovations, e.g., ''fast ignition,'' propagation down density gradients, and compression of fusion fuel with a combination of driver and chemical energy. The assumptions that limit projected performance of fusion targets should be carefully examined. The National Ignition Facility will enable development and testing of revolutionary targets designed to make possible economically competitive fusion power plants.

Nuckolls, J H; Wood, L L

2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Summary description of the Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document has been compiled and issued to provide an illustrated engineering summary description of the FFTF. The document is limited to a description of the plant and its functions, and does not cover the extensive associated programs that have been carried out in the fields of design, design analysis, safety analysis, fuels development, equipment development and testing, quality assurance, equipment fabrication, plant construction, acceptance testing, operations planning and training, and the like.

Cabell, C.P. (comp.)

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive test program has been envisioned by ERDA to accomplish the OTEC program objectives of developing an industrial and technological base that will lead to the commercial capability to successfully construct and economically operate OTEC plants. This study was performed to develop alternative non-site specific OTEC test facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program including both land and floating test facilities. A progression of tests was established in which OTEC power cycle component designs proceed through advanced research and technology, component, and systems test phases. This progression leads to the first OTEC pilot plant and provides support for following developments which potentially reduce the cost of OTEC energy. It also includes provisions for feedback of results from all test phases to enhance modifications to existing designs or development of new concepts. The tests described should be considered as representative of generic types since specifics can be expected to change as the OTEC plant design evolves. Emphasis is placed on defining the test facility which is capable of supporting the spectrum of tests envisioned. All test support facilities and equipment have been identified and included in terms of space, utilities, cost, schedule, and constraints or risks. A highly integrated data acquisition and control system has been included to improve test operations and facility effectiveness through a centralized computer system capable of automatic test control, real-time data analysis, engineering analyses, and selected facility control including safety alarms. Electrical power, hydrogen, and ammonia are shown to be technically feasible as means for transmitting OTEC power to a land-based distribution point. (WHK)

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fluence thresholds for laser-induced damage of optical components in the injector laser of the SSRL gun test facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluence thresholds for laser-induced damage of optical components in the injector laser of the SSRL gun test facility

Bolton, P

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fusion Education | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Benefits of FES Fusion Education Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About FES Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Fusion Education Funding Opportunities...

325

Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C. (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

K-Basin sludge treatment facility pump test report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests of a disc pump and a dual diaphragm pump are stymied by pumping a metal laden fluid. Auxiliary systems added to a diaphragm pump might enable the transfer of such fluids, but the additional system complexity is not desirable for remotely operated and maintained systems.

SQUIER, D.M.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Investigation of global Alfven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) were excited by the energetic neutral beam ions tangentially injected into plasmas at low magnetic field in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ({ital Proceedings} {ital of} {ital the} 11{ital th} {ital International} {ital Conference} {ital on} {ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 51). The injection velocities were comparable to the Alfven speed. The modes were identified by measurements from Mirnov coils and beam emission spectroscopy (BES). TAE modes appear in bursts whose repetition rate increases with beam power. The neutron emission rate exhibits sawtoothlike behavior and the crashes always coincide with TAE bursts. This indicates ejection of fast ions from the plasma until these modes are stabilized. The dynamics of growth and stabilization were investigated at various plasma currents and magnetic fields. The results indicate that the instability can effectively clamp the number of energetic ions in the plasmas. The observed instability threshold is discussed in light of recent theories. In addition to these TAE modes, intermittent oscillations at three times the fundamental TAE frequency were observed by Mirnov coils, but no corresponding signal was found in BES. It appears that these high-frequency oscillations do not have a direct effect on the plasma neutron source strength.

Wong, K.L.; Durst, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Paul, S.F.; Roberts, D.R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Bell, M.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Cheng, C.Z.; Cohen, S.; Hammett, G.W.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, L.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, D.K.; Sabbagh, S.; Synakowski, E.J. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

New Zero Net-Energy Facility: A Test Bed for Home Efficiency | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zero Net-Energy Facility: A Test Bed for Home Efficiency Zero Net-Energy Facility: A Test Bed for Home Efficiency New Zero Net-Energy Facility: A Test Bed for Home Efficiency September 17, 2012 - 2:34pm Addthis Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Kathleen Hogan joined representatives from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and state and local elected officials to celebrate the opening of the new zero net-energy residential test laboratory. | Photo courtesy of NIST. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Kathleen Hogan joined representatives from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and state and local elected officials to celebrate the opening of the new zero net-energy residential test laboratory. | Photo courtesy of NIST. David Lee Residential Program Supervisor, Building Technologies Program

330

Design Considerations and Operating Experience of the Sanford Com Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 400 MW oil-fired boiler was fitted with new burner guns and accessories to burn coal/oil mixture (COM) for a 120 full-power burn-day demonstration. Coal unloading and storage, and COM preparation and storage facilities were installed adjacent to the power house. Modifications to the steam generator and firing systems were made as the test program progressed. Burn tests through 50 percent coal (by weight) were completed, and optimization and long term test programs with 40 percent coal were completed. This paper describes the reasons for the demonstration, the project schedule, and the test facility itself. Discussions are also included of the rationale for equipment and process selection, the test program, and some of the operating experience that should be considered in the design of future permanent facilities.

Causilla, H.; Kasprik, A. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ESTB: A New Beam Test Facility at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

End Station A Test Beam (ESTB) is a beam line at SLAC using a small fraction of the bunches of the 13.6 GeV electron beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), restoring test beam capabilities in the large End Station A (ESA) experimental hall. ESTB will provide one of a kind test beam essential for developing accelerator instrumentation and accelerator R&D, performing particle and particle astrophysics detector research, linear collider machine and detector interface (MDI) R&D studies, development of radiation-hard detectors, and material damage studies with several distinctive features. In the past, 18 institutions participated in the ESA program at SLAC. In stage I, 4 new kicker magnets will be added to divert 5 Hz of the LCLS beam to the A-line. A new beam dump will be installed and a new Personnel Protection System (PPS) is being built in ESA. In stage II, a secondary hadron target will be installed, able to produce pions up to about 12 GeV/c at 1 particle/pulse.

Pivi, M.; Fieguth, T.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Jaros, J.; Jobe, K.; Keller, L.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fusion Development Facility Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615760

Stambaugh, R.D.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

333

Diagnostics of the ITER neutral beam test facility  

SciTech Connect

The ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) injector, based on negative ions accelerated at 1 MV, will be tested and optimized in the SPIDER source and MITICA full injector prototypes, using a set of diagnostics not available on the ITER HNB. The RF source, where the H{sup -}/D{sup -} production is enhanced by cesium evaporation, will be monitored with thermocouples, electrostatic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, cavity ring down, and laser absorption spectroscopy. The beam is analyzed by cooling water calorimetry, a short pulse instrumented calorimeter, beam emission spectroscopy, visible tomography, and neutron imaging. Design of the diagnostic systems is presented.

Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Gazza, E.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Spolaore, M.; Zaniol, B. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Sonato, P.; De Muri, M. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Padova University (Italy); Croci, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 6, Operation of the Component Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to summarize the component development and laboratory binder test work at Wilsonville during Task 6. This Task included the construction and startup of the Component Development Test Facility (CDTF), coal procurement, evaluation of unit operation and dewatering performance, laboratory binder tests for diesel and heptane, production characterization, and vendor tests. Data evaluation, interpretation, and analysis are not included in this report, but will be discussed in the Task 7 report.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1 to 0.2 s for a line-average density range (anti n/sub e/) of 1 to 2.5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o) approx. 1.2 to 2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(o) approx. 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. 3. A comparison of PLT, PDX, and TFTR plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Ultra-Accelerated Natural Sunlight Exposure Testing Facilities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS onto a secondary reflector that delivers a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in a chamber that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO)

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

337

Preliminary design for hot dirty-gas control-valve test facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a preliminary design and cost estimating effort for a facility for the testing of control valves in Hot Dirty Gas (HDGCV) service. This design was performed by Mittelhauser Corporation for the United States Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The objective of this effort was to provide METC with a feasible preliminary design for a test facility which could be used to evaluate valve designs under simulated service conditions and provide a technology data base for DOE and industry. In addition to the actual preliminary design of the test facility, final design/construction/operating schedules and a facility cost estimate were prepared to provide METC sufficient information with which to evaluate this design. The bases, assumptions, and limitations of this study effort are given. The tasks carried out were as follows: METC Facility Review, Environmental Control Study, Gas Generation Study, Metallurgy Review, Safety Review, Facility Process Design, Facility Conceptual Layout, Instrumentation Design, Cost Estimates, and Schedules. The report provides information regarding the methods of approach used in the various tasks involved in the completion of this study. Section 5.0 of this report presents the results of the study effort. The results obtained from the above-defined tasks are described briefly. The turnkey cost of the test facility is estimated to be $9,774,700 in fourth quarter 1979 dollars, and the annual operating cost is estimated to be $960,000 plus utilities costs which are not included because unit costs per utility were not available from METC.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Lead Coolant Test Facility Systems Design, Thermal Hydraulic Analysis and Cost Estimate  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed: (1) Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger; (2) Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core; (3) Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control; (4) Demonstrate Safe Operation; and (5) Provision for Future Testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimate. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli Khericha; Edwin Harvego; John Svoboda; Ryan Dalling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Zero-Release Mixed Waste Process Facility Design and Testing  

SciTech Connect

A zero-release offgas cleaning system for mixed-waste thermal treatment processes has been evaluated through experimental scoping tests and process modeling. The principles can possibly be adapted to a fluidized-bed calcination or stream reforming process, a waste melter, a rotarykiln process, and possibly other waste treatment thermal processes. The basic concept of a zero-release offgas cleaning system is to recycle the bulk of the offgas stream to the thermal treatment process. A slip stream is taken off the offgas recycle to separate and purge benign constituents that may build up in the gas, such as water vapor, argon, nitrogen, and CO2. Contaminants are separated from the slip stream and returned to the thermal unit for eventual destruction or incorporation into the waste immobilization media. In the current study, a standard packed-bed scrubber, followed by gas separation membranes, is proposed for removal of contaminants from the offgas recycle slipstream. The scrub solution is continuously regenerated by cooling and precipitating sulfate, nitrate, and other salts that reach a solubility limit in the scrub solution. Mercury is also separated by the scrubber. A miscible chemical oxidizing agent was shown to effectively oxidize mercury and also NO, thus increasing their removal efficiency. The current study indicates that the proposed process is a viable option for reducing offgas emissions. Consideration of the proposed closed-system offgas cleaning loop is warranted when emissions limits are stringent, or when a reduction in the total gas emissions volume is desired. Although the current closed-loop appears to be technically feasible, economical considerations must be also be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Richard D. Boardman; John A. Deldebbio; Robert J. Kirkham; Martin K. Clemens; Robert Geosits; Ping Wan

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Time resolved neutron spectrum measurements at the Mirror Fusion Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

An advanced neutron diagnostic system has been developed for spectrum measurements on MFTF. Its collimated field of view allows spatially resolved neutron spectrum measurements. The 10 Mhz pulse height analysis and particle identification capability allow spectrum measurements in intervals as short as 10 ms. These capabilities will be used for space and time resolved determinations of ion energy from measurements of neutron Doppler width.

Slaughter, D.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

PPPL to launch major upgrade of key fusion energy test facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the plasma will also double and reach 2 million amperes. By contrast, a 100-watt light bulb draws one ampere of current. Achieving these increases calls for widening a stack at...

343

High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections.

Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the gap for test data on advanced materials of ... in NCAL and Center for Theoretical and Computational Materials Science (CTCMS) cluster; ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

346

Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli T. Khericha

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Lawrence Berkeley laboratory neutral-beam engineering test facility power-supply system  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is upgrading the neutral beam source test facility (NBSTF) into a neutral beam engineering test facility (NBETF) with increased capabilities for the development of neutral beam systems. The NBETF will have an accel power supply capable of 170 kV, 70 A, 30 sec pulse length, 10% duty cycle; and the auxiliary power supplies required for the sources. This paper describes the major components, their ratings and capabilities, and the flexibility designed to accomodate the needs of source development.

Lutz, I.C.; Arthur, C.A.; deVries, G.J.; Owren, H.M.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

REPORT OF SURVEY OF THE LOS ALAMOS TRITIUM SYSTEMS TEST ASSEMBLY FACILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE LOS ALAMOS TRITIUM THE LOS ALAMOS TRITIUM SYSTEMS TEST ASSEMBLY FACILITY U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management & Office of Science Report of Survey of the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly Facility Rev. E (Final) October 3, 2000 Contents 1. Introduction 1.1 Purpose 1.2 Facility Description 1.3 Organization Representatives 1.4 Survey Participants 2. Summary, Conclusions & Recommendations 2.1 Comparison With LCAM Requirements 2.2 Transfer Considerations 2.3 Post-Transfer EM Path Forward & Management Risk 2.4 Post-Transfer S&M Reduction via Administrative Contamination Limit Revision 2.5 Stable Metal Tritides Consideration During D&D 3. Survey Results

349

Facility Closure Report for T-Tunnel (U12t), Area 12, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Facility Closure Report (FCR) has been prepared to document the actions taken to permanently close the remaining accessible areas of U12t-Tunnel (T-Tunnel) in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of T-Tunnel was a prerequisite to transfer facility ownership from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Closure of the facility was accomplished with the cooperation and concurrence of both NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The purpose of this FCR is to document that the closure of T-Tunnel complied with the closure requirements specified in the Facility Closure Plan for N- and T-Tunnels Area 12, Nevada Test Site (Appendix D) and that the facility is ready for transfer to NNSA/NSO. The Facility Closure Plan (FCP) is provided in Appendix D. T-Tunnel is located approximately 42 miles north of Mercury in Area 12 of the NTS (Figure 1). Between 1970 and 1987, T-Tunnel was used for six Nuclear Weapons Effects Tests (NWETs). The tunnel was excavated horizontally into the volcanic tuffs of Rainier Mesa. The T-Tunnel complex consists of a main access drift with two NWET containment structures, a Gas Seal Plug (GSP), and a Gas Seal Door (GSD) (Figure 2). The T-Tunnel complex was mothballed in 1993 to preserve the tunnel for resumption of testing, should it happen in the future, to stop the discharge of tunnel effluent, and to prevent unauthorized access. This was accomplished by sealing the main drift GSD.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Concentrating Photovoltaic Module Testing at NREL's Concentrating Solar Radiation Users Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much recent interest in photovoltaic modules designed to operate with concentrated sunlight (>100 suns). Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) technology offers an exciting new opportunity as a viable alternative to dish Stirling engines. Advantages of CPV include potential for>40% cell efficiency in the long term (25% now), no moving parts, no intervening heat transfer surface, near-ambient temperature operation, no thermal mass, fast response, concentration reduces cost of cells relative to optics, and scalable to a range of sizes. Over the last few years, we have conducted testing of several CPV modules for DOEs Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) program. The testing facilities are located at the Concentrating Solar Radiation Users Facility (CRULF) and consist the 10 kW High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) and a 14m2 Concentrating Technologies, LLC (CTEK) dish. This paper will primarily describe the test capabilities; module test results will be detailed in the presentation.

Bingham, C.; Lewandowski, A.; Stone, K.; Sherif, R.; Ortabasi, U.; Kusek, S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Stability of CIS/CIGS Modules at the Outdoor Test Facility over Two Decades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses examining the status and question of long-term stability of copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic (PV) module performance for numerous modules that are deployed in the array field, or on the roof of, the outdoor test facility (OTF) at NREL, acquired from two manufacturers.

del Cueto, J. A.; Rummel, S.; Kroposki, B.; Osterwald, C.; Anderberg, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Scoping assessment on medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Scoping Assessment addresses the need for medical isotope production and the capability of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide such isotopes. Included in the discussion are types of isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals, which types of cancers are targets, and in what way isotopes provide treatment and/or pain relief for patients.

Scott, S.W.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

NREL Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This measurement station at NREL's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF) monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment.

Lustbader, J.; Andreas, A.

354

NREL Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This measurement station at NREL's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF) monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment.

Lustbader, J.; Andreas, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

Ghanbari, C.; Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E.; Pacheco, J.E.; Rawlinson, K.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The D9-4 experiment: Improving on the fast flux test facility driver pin  

SciTech Connect

The driver fuel system for the fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has proven to be a very robust and reliable spectrum liquid-metal reactor. A series of fuel assembly tests, has now been completed that incorporate unique improvements to extend the lifetime of the driver fuel design to increase the ease of fabrication, and to increase the breeding potential. The D9-4 test was a high-exposure fuel assembly in this series, and detailed examinations of this test have been completed. Commonalities with the standard FFTF driver fuel included dimensions and the use of uranium/plutonium mixed-oxide pellet fuel.

Chastain, S.A. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Numerical prediction of basalt response for near-surface test facility heater tests No. 1 and No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This report details the numerical predictions undertaken by Dames and Moore for Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Project. Predictions are made for the temperatures, stresses, strains and displacements in the basalt around Full-Scale Heater Tests No. 1 and No. 2 at the Near-Surface Test Facility using the finite element code DAMSWEL. The rock around the main heaters was modeled using an axisymmetric idealization in which deformational properties were transversely isotropic with a bilinear stress/strain relationship which was independent of temperature. The selection of the input parameters represents an engineering assessment of their values based on the results of laboratory tests and in situ measurements. The predictive modeling analysis, using the best information available as of April 1980, was completed prior to test startup. Additional information on geology, geological characterization, rock-mass characterization, laboratory properties, and field properties of basalt is being acquired on a regular basis as part of the overall Near-Surface Test Facility test program. An assessment of the effect of additions to the data base upon the predictive modeling and test analysis shall be made on a periodic basis.

Hocking, G.; Williams, J.R.; Boonlualohr, P.; Mathews, I.; Mustoe, G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Final progress report, March 1980--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-80ET-15601, Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities, developed diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, were refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics were developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems were interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support was provided for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort. DIAL personnel also cooperated with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. The initial contract, Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery, established a data base on heat transfer, slagging effects on heat transfer surfaces, metal durability, secondary combustor performance, secondary combustor design requirements, and other information pertinent to the design of HR/SR components at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). To accomplish these objectives, a combustion test stand was constructed that simulated MHD environments, and mathematical models were developed and evaluated for the heat transfer in hot-wall test sections. Two transitions occurred during the span of this contract. In May 1983, the objectives and title of the contract changed from Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery to Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities. In July 1988, the research laboratory`s name changed from the MHD Energy Center to the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L.L.

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deactivation activities are currently in progress at the Fast Flux Test Facility. These deactivation activities are intended to remove most hazardous materials and prepare the facility for final disposition. The two major hazards to be removed are the nuclear fuel and the alkali metal (most sodium) coolant. The fuel and coolant removal activities are proceeding well and are expected to complete in 2006. Plant systems are being shut down as allowed by completion of various fuel and coolant removal actions. A Decommissioning Environmental Impact Statement is in progress to evaluate a range of potential final disposition end states.

BURKE, T.M.

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Special Nuclear Materials Detection Using IEC Fusion Pulsed Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental Facilities and Nonelectric Applications / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

J. H. Sorebo; G. L. Kulcinski; R. F. Radel; J. F. Santarius

362

200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility operational test specification. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met. The technical requirements for operational testing of the 200 Area TEDF are defined by the test requirements presented in Appendix A. These test requirements demonstrate the following: pump station No.1 and associated support equipment operate both automatically and manually; pump station No. 2 and associated support equipment operate both automatically and manually; water is transported through the collection and transfer lines to the disposal ponds with no detectable leakage; the disposal ponds accept flow from the transfer lines with all support equipment operating as designed; and the control systems operate and status the 200 Area TEDF including monitoring of appropriate generator discharge parameters.

Crane, A.F.

1995-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thermionic system evaluation test (TSET) facility construction: A United States and Russian effort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) is a ground test of an unfueled Russian TOPAZ-II in-core thermionic space reactor powered by electric heaters. The facility that will be used for testing of the TOPAZ-II systems is located at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) complex in Albuquerque, NM. The reassembly of the Russian test equipment is the responsibility of International Scientific Products (ISP), a San Jose, CA, company and Inertek, a Russian corporation, with support provided by engineers and technicians from Phillips Laboratory (PL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the University of New Mexico (UNM). This test is the first test to be performed under the New Mexico Strategic Alliance agreement. This alliance consist of the PL, SNL, LANL, and UNM. The testing is being funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) with the PL responsible for project execution.

Wold, S.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plastics Separation Pilot Plant Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plastics Separation Pilot Plant Sam Jody and displays recycled plastics Bassam Jody displays plastics recovered from shredder residue by the Argonne separation process and successfully tested for making auto parts. The Challenge of Separating Plastic Waste Separating plastics at high concentrations from waste streams has been a challenge because many conventional separation methods depend on material density or employ organic solvents. Many plastics have overlapping densities and, therefore, could not be separated from each other based on density differences alone. Organic solvents pose environmental risks. Argonne's Froth-flotation Process Argonne has developed a process for separating individual polymers and groups of compatible polymers from various polymer rich waste streams. The

365

Operation, modification, and maintenance of DOE/PETC 700 H. P. Combustion Test Facility. Quarterly activity report, January 1, 1979--April 1, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Number six fuel oil tests, 30% COM tests, and 40% COM tests were conducted. Operation, modification, and maintenance of the combustion test facility is described. (LTN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico existing environmental analyses bounding environmental test facilities.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies current environmental operating parameters for the various test and support facilities at SNL/NM. The intent of this report is solely to provide the limits which bound the facilities' operations. Understanding environmental limits is important to maximizing the capabilities and working within the existing constraints of each facility, and supports the decision-making process in meeting customer requests, cost and schedule planning, modifications to processes, future commitments, and use of resources. Working within environmental limits ensures that mission objectives will be met in a manner that protects human health and the environment. It should be noted that, in addition to adhering to the established limits, other approvals and permits may be required for specific projects.

May, Rodney A.; Bailey-White, Brenda E. (Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Cantwell, Amber (Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

MELCOR modeling of the PBF (Power Burst Facility) Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a MELCOR Version 1.8 simulation of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--4. The input data for the analysis were obtained from the Test Results Report and from SCDAP/RELAP5 input. Results are presented for the transient liquid level in the test bundle, clad temperatures, shroud temperatures, clad oxidation and hydrogen generation, bundle geometry changes, fission product release, and heat transfer to the bypass flow. Comparisons are made with experimental data and with SCDAP/RELAP5 calculations. 10 refs., 7 figs.

Madni, I.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Planning and design of additional East Mesa Geothermal Test Facilities. Phase 1B. Volume I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planning and design of additions to the ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility are discussed. The ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility will provide moderate temperature/low salinity fluids to facilitate comprehensive testing of conversion systems and components under realistic field conditions. The project objectives included development of designs of new wells and modifications to existing wells to improve definitive reservoir evaluations and design of additional test facilities integrated with the limited-scale facilities to accommodate diverse commercial utilization technology experiments. A reservoir utilization evaluation was conducted to establish locations and design drilling programs for three new wells and modifications to existing wells to improve reservoir definition and provide a comprehensive inventory of geothermal well fluids for testing. Ten test facility additions were developed as individual procurement packages of specifications and drawings to facilitate near term construction activation.

Pearson, R.O.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Comparison of constant-rate pumping test and slug interference test results at the Hanford Site B pond multilevel test facility  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, is responsible for monitoring the movement and fate of contamination within the unconfined aquifer to ensure that public health and the environment are protected. To support the monitoring and assessment of contamination migration on the Hanford Site, a sitewide 3-dimensional groundwater flow model is being developed. Providing quantitative hydrologic property data is instrumental in development of the 3-dimensional model. Multilevel monitoring facilities have been installed to provide detailed, vertically distributed hydrologic characterization information for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer. In previous reports, vertically distributed water-level and hydrochemical data obtained over time from these multi-level monitoring facilities have been evaluated and reported. This report describes the B pond facility in Section 2.0. It also provides analysis results for a constant-rate pumping test (Section 3.0) and slug interference test (Section 4.0) that were conducted at a multilevel test facility located near B Pond (see Figure 1. 1) in the central part of the Hanford Site. A hydraulic test summary (Section 5.0) that focuses on the comparison of hydraulic property estimates obtained using the two test methods is also presented. Reference materials are listed in Section 6.0.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Thorne, P.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Calendar year 2003 : annual site enviromental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2003. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2003) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg 2., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In June of 2008, the first week-long ATR NSUF Summer Session was attended by 68 students, university faculty and industry representatives. The Summer Session featured presentations by 19 technical experts from across the country and covered topics including irradiation damage mechanisms, degradation of reactor materials, LWR and gas reactor fuels, and non-destructive evaluation. High impact research results from leveraging the entire research infrastructure, including universities, industry, small business, and the national laboratories. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. Current partner facilities include the MIT Reactor, the University of Michigan Irradiated Materials Testing Laboratory, the University of Wisconsin Characterization Laboratory, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas transmission Electron Microscope User Facility. Needs for irradiation of material specimens at tightly controlled temperatures are being met by dedication of a large in-pile pressurized water loop facility for use by ATR NSUF users. Several environmental mechanical testing systems are under construction to determine crack growth rates and fracture toughness on irradiated test systems.

T. R. Allen; J. B. Benson; J. A. Foster; F. M. Marshall; M. K. Meyer; M. C. Thelen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Test of a magnetic device for the amelioration of scale formation at Treatment Facility D  

SciTech Connect

A commercial device (Descal-A-Matic{reg_sign}, Norfolk, VA) designed to treat water by means of a magnetic field has been evaluated for its effect on the formation of calcite scale at LLNL Treatment Facility D. At this facility, volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) are removed by air stripping, which raises the water pH, causing the deposition of calcium carbonate as calcite scale downstream. To evaluate the magnetic treatment technique, the ground water was passed through the Descal-A-Matic{reg_sign} device before treatment by the air stripping unit, and the resulting scale formation and other water characteristics were compared with those found during a test with no water treatment and a test with chemical treatment with a polyphosphate additive. No beneficial effect was found when using the magnetic device. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Krauter, P.W., Harrar, J.E., Orloff, S.P., Bahowick, S.M.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a pumped-storage hydroelectric facility. As described byand tunnels several hydroelectric generation facilities.tors in ore location. Hydroelectric facilities incorporating

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

R&D of DRAGON Series Lithium-Lead Loops for Material and Blanket Technology Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Technology Facilities / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials, Part A: Fusion Technology

Yican Wu; Qunying Huang; Zhiqiang Zhu; Sheng Gao; Yong Song

378

Development of a propulsion system and component test facility for advanced radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verification and validation of design and modeling activities for radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms undertaken at the Center for Space Nuclear Research is essential for proof of concept. Previous research at the center has driven the selection of advanced material combinations; some of which require specialized handling capabilities. The development of a closed and contained test facility to forward this research is discussed within this paper.

Robert C. O'Brien; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M/sup 2/) on an 8-m/sup 2/ test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m/sup 2/ and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR.

Not Available

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Design of a Scaled-down DRACS Test Facility for an AHTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) has been proposed for an Advanced-High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) that uses fluoride salt as the coolant. A study is being carried out to test its performance and provide experimental data for model validation. A detailed scaling analysis has been performed for the DRACS, as reported in a companion paper [1], in which a scaling methodology is developed. In this paper, scaling results for a protoltypic DRACS design are presented to design a scaled-down DRACs test facility.

Christensen, R. N. [Ohio State University; Lv, Q. NMN [Ohio State University; Subharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Sun, X NMN [Ohio State University; Blue, T. E. [Ohio State University; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Wang, X. NMN [Ohio State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

MELCOR simulation of the PBF (Power Burst Facility) severe fuel damage test 1-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a MELCOR version 1.7.1 simulation of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) 1-1 test. The input data for the simulation was obtained from the SFD 1-1 Test Results Report and from SCDAP input. Results are presented for the transient two-phase interface level in the core, fuel and clad temperatures at various elevations in the fuel bundle, clad oxidation, hydrogen generation, fission product release, and heat transfer to the surrounding structures. Comparisons are made with experimental data and predictions from STCP and the NRC's mechanistic code SCDAP (version 18). 6 refs., 12 figs.

Madni, I.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind power industry in North America has an immediate need for larger blade test facilities to ensure the survival of the industry. Blade testing is necessary to meet certification and investor requirements and is critical to achieving the reliability and blade life needed for the wind turbine industry to succeed. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program is exploring options for collaborating with government, private, or academic entities in a partnership to build larger blade test facilities in North America capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m in length. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) prepared this report for DOE to describe the immediate need to pursue larger blade test facilities in North America, categorize the numerous prospective partners for a North American collaboration, and document the requirements for a North American test facility.

Cotrell, J.; Musial, W.; Hughes, S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF A SHIELD TESTING AND MATERIALS IRRADIATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design is presented for a test reactor facility to be used for shielding experiments and component irradintions necessary for airframe development for the nuclear airplane program. To meet both requirements a modified swimming-pool reactor is used, with a dry irradintion cell of 320 cu ft of useful volume provided for component testing, while shielding experiments are performed in the pool in the usual manner. A BSR-type core is operated at 1 MW to provide a fest neutron flux in the irradiation cell of 10/sup 12/n/cm/sup 2/ sec at the core face and 10/sup 11/at a distance of 4 feet. The irradiation-cell facility is designed to avoid the need of remote operations in making up service connections to the experimental piece. The reactor is contained in a cylindrical building designed for 6 psi internal pressure to meet the conditions of the maximum credible accident. The estimated cost of the facility, including the reactor and the fabrication cost for an initial fuel charge, is 874,000. (auth)

Frankfort, J.H.

1956-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Building State-of-the-Art Wind Technology Testing Facilities (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development is the ability to test new designs, components, and materials. In addition, wind turbine blade manufacturers are required to test their blades as part of the turbine certification process. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) to design, construct, and operate the Wind Technology Center (WTTC) in Boston, Massachusetts. The WTTC offers a full suite of certification tests for turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. NREL worked closely with MTS Systems Corporation to develop the novel large-scale test systems needed to conduct the static and fatigue tests required for certification. Static tests pull wind turbine blades horizontally and vertically to measure blade deflection and strains. Fatigue tests cycle the blades millions of times to simulate what a blade goes through in its lifetime on a wind turbine. For static testing, the WTTC is equipped with servo-hydraulic winches and cylinders that are connected to the blade through cables to apply up to an 84-mega Newton meter maximum static bending moment. For fatigue testing, MTS developed a commercial version of NREL's patented resonant excitation system with hydraulic cylinders that actuate linear moving masses on the blade at one or more locations. This system applies up to a 21-meter tip-to-tip fatigue test tip displacement to generate 20-plus years of cyclic field loads in a matter of months. NREL also developed and supplied the WTTC with an advanced data acquisition system capable of measuring and recording hundreds of data channels at very fast sampling rates while communicating with test control systems.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations  

SciTech Connect

Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Eye hazard and glint evaluation for the 5-MW/sub t/ Solar Thermal Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential eye hazards associated with concentrated reflected light are evaluated for the ERDA 5-MW/sub t/ Solar Thermal Test Facility to be constructed at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Light intensities and hazardous ranges of single and multiple coincident heliostat beams are evaluated at ground level and in the air space above the facility. Possible long-range and short-range effects of distractive effects of reflected beams are discussed. Also described are certain beam control modifications which were incorporated to minimize the altitudes at which overflying aircraft could encounter unsafe levels. Recommendations are made for further evaluation of intensity excursions during fail-safe shutdown situations, and for experiments to verify analytical models and to assess distractive glint effects.

Brumleve, T.D.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Retrofit of waste-to-energy facilities equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Volume III: Test protocol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers' [ASME] Center for Research and Technology Development [CRTD] has been awarded a subcontract by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory [NREL] to demonstrate the technical performance and viability of flue gas temperature control in combination with dry acid gas reagent and activated carbon injection at an existing electrostatic precipitator [ESP] equipped municipal waste combustor [MWC]. The objective of this proof-of-concept demonstration test is to economically and reliably meet 40 CFR 60 Subpart Cb Emissions Guidelines for MWC's at existing ESP equipped facilities. The effort is being directed by a Subcommittee of tile ASME Research Committee on Industrial and Municipal Wastes [RCIMW] chaired by Dave Hoecke. Mr. Greg Barthold of ASME/CRTD is the Project Manager. ASME/CRTD contracted with Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc. in cooperation with A.J. Chandler & Associates, Ltd. to be the Principal Investigator for the project and manage the day-t o-day aspects of the program, conduct the testing reduce and interpret the data and prepare the report. Testing will be conducted at the 2 by 210 TPD, ESP equipped MWC at the Davis County Resource Recovery Facility in Layton, Utah. The test plan calls for duplicate metals (Cd, Pb and Hg), dioxin and acid gas runs.

Rigo, H.G. [Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc., Berea, OH (US); Chandler, A.J. [A.J. Chandler & Associates, Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Cold test plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tank contents removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project Cold Test Plan describes the activities to be conducted during the cold test of the OHF sluicing and pumping system at the Tank Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF). The TTCTF is located at the Robotics and Process Systems Complex at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The cold test will demonstrate performance of the pumping and sluicing system, fine-tune operating instructions, and train the personnel in the actual work to be performed. After completion of the cold test a Technical Memorandum will be prepared documenting completion of the cold test, and the equipment will be relocated to the OHF site.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Development of tritium technology for the United States magnetic fusion energy program  

SciTech Connect

Tritium technology development for the DOE fusion program is taking place principally at three laboratories, Mound Facility, Argonne National Laboratory and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This paper will review the major aspects of each of the three programs and look at aspects of the tritium technology being developed at other laboratories within the United States. Facilities and experiments to be discussed include the Tritium Effluent Control Laboratory and the Tritium Storage and Delivery System for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Mound Facility; the Lithium Processing Test Loop and the solid breeder blanket studies at Argonne; and the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos.

Anderson, J.L.; Wilkes, W.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fusion safety program Annual report, Fiscal year 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY-95. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A final activity described is work to develop DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Fusion Test Facilities.

Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Carmack, W.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of the advanced mixed-oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in the FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility)  

SciTech Connect

The advanced mixed-oxide (UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is undergoing postirradiation examination. This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of 12 different types. Two L (annular) fuel pins, GF02L04 (FFTF and transient tested) and GF02L09 (FFTF only), were destructively examined. Evaluation of the FO-2 fuel pins and assembly shows the excellent and predictable performance of the mixed-oxide fuels with HT9 structural material. This, combined with the robust behavior of the pins in transient tests, and the continued excellent performance of the CDE indicate this is a superior fuel system for liquid-metal reactors. It offers greatly reduced deformation during irradiation, while maintaining good operating characteristics.

Burley Gilpin, L.L.; Chastain, S.A.; Baker, R.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors  

SciTech Connect

Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O' Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Small Hybrid Systems and Applications Testing at NREL's Outdoor Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PV International Program at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently installed a small hybrid solar and wind energy system that could produce enough electricity to power a cabin or provide electricity in a remote village, without being connected to a utility grid. The solar system can provide 1,400 watts of power, and the wind turbine is rated at 900 watts when the wind is blowing at 28 miles per hour. The 48-volt system has eight batteries for storage. When the batteries are fully charged, the control system slows down the wind turbine so as not to overcharge the batteries. The turbine is mounted on a tilt-down, guyless, 30-foot tower that allows one person to easily lower and raise the machine for maintenance. A data acquisition system is being designed to monitor the individual outputs from the solar system and the wind system. The small hybrid system is housed in an insulated shed, the PV International Program's Test Building (ITB). The ITB contains electrical loads found in the average home, including a refrigerator, lights, heaters, air coolers, computers, and a radio.

Roybal, L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Review of deuterium--tritium results from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. At present the maximum fusion power of 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-{beta}{sub {ital p}} discharge following a current rampdown. The fusion power density in a core of the plasma is {approx}2.8 MW m{sup {minus}3}, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) at 1500 MW total fusion power. The energy confinement time, {tau}{sub {ital E}}, is observed to increase in D--T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the {ital n}{sub {ital i}}(0) {ital T}{sub {ital i}}(0) {tau}{sub {ital E}} product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-{beta}{sub {ital p}} discharges. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating of a D--T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP simulations. Initial measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from He gas puffing experiments. The loss of alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed. D--T experiments on TFTR will continue to explore the assumptions of the ITER design and to examine some of the physics issues associated with an advanced tokamak reactor.

McGuire, K.M.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Chang, C.S.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dendy, R.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M.J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Marmar, E.S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Mauel, M.; McCarthy, M.P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O`Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S.F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Status of Proof-Of-Concept testing at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proof-of-concept (POC) testing, and collection and evaluation of data continued at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility during the past year. Following four preliminary tests firing Rosebud coal in 1991 to establish base conditions for the Rosebud coal POC tests, three POC tests were run in 1992, and a fourth test early in 1993. Major equipment additions or modifications included installation of a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which replaced a badly deteriorated venturi. This component also provides improved capability to meet Tennessee pollution regulations while operating the dry ESP and/or baghouse off design, or if one of these two control devices does not function properly. Improvements were also made to the dry ESP prior to the 1993 test, which appear to have improved the performance of this equipment. This paper will present an overview of the major results obtained during the Rosebud coal POC tests, including the performance of the dry and wet electrostatic precipitators. Differences between the Rosebud and Illinois coals will be described, but it is emphasized that these observations are based on incomplete results for the Rosebud coal.

Attig, R.C.; Chapman, J.N.; Johanson, N.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Investigation of water accumulation in an offgas test facility HEPA housing  

SciTech Connect

The Consolidated Incineration Facility, at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site, is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated by site operations and clean-up activities. During CIF`s pretrial burn campaigns in 1995, an appreciable amount of water was recovered from the HEPA housings. Questions were immediately raised as to the source of the water, and the degree of wetness of the filters during operation. There are two primary issues involved: Water could reduce the life expectancy and performance of the HEPA filters, housing, and associated ducting, and wet HEPAs also present radiological concerns for personnel during filter change-out. A similar phenomenon was noted at the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1/10 scale pilot of CIF`s air pollution control system. Tests at OCTF indicated the water`s most likely origin to be vapor condensing out from the flue gas stream due to excessive air in-leakage at housing door seals, ducting flanges, and actual holes in the ducting. The rate of accumulation bears no statistical correlation to such process parameters as steam flow, reheater outlet temperature and offgas velocity in the duct. Test results also indicated that the HEPA filter media is moistened by the initial process flow while the facility is being brought on line. However, even when the HEPA filters were manually drenched prior to startup, they became completely dry within four hours of the time steam was introduced to the reheater. Finally, no demonstrable relationship was found between the degree of filter media wetness and filter dP.

Speed, D.L.; Burns, D.B.; Van Pelt, W.B.; Burns, H.H.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

DOE and Fusion Links | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Sites General Atomics (GA) MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center U.S. ITER National Ignition Facility (NIF) American Fusion News International Sites Australian...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Planning and design of additional East Mesa Geothermal Test Facilities. Phase 1B. Volume II. Procurement package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Procurement packages of technical specifications and construction drawings for eleven test facility additions to the ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility are presented. Each of the specifications includes all of the technical requirements needed for procurement and construction starting with Division 2. The information is presented under the following subject headings: injection pump system: 52-2 injection pipeline; control and instrumentation spools; calibration test bench; test pad modifications; test pad piping headers; production and injection wells; well 5-2 modifications; well 8-1 down-hole pump; well 6-1 down-hole pump; and well 8-1 booster pump. (JGB)

Pearson, R.O.

1976-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Superheater/intermediate temperature air heater tube corrosion tests in the MHD coal fired flow facility (Montana Rosebud POC tests)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nineteen alloys have been exposed for approximately 1000 test hours as candidate superheater and intermediate temperature air heater tubes in a U.S. DOE facility dedicated to demonstrating Proof of Concept for the bottoming or heat and seed recovery portion of coal fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generating plants. Corrosion data have been obtained from a test series utilizing a western United States sub-bituminous coal, Montana Rosebud. The test alloys included a broad range of compositions ranging from carbon steel to austenitic stainless steels to high chromium nickel-base alloys. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO-containing deposits, developed principally, oxide scales by an oxidation/sulfidation mechanism. In addition to being generally porous, these scales were frequently spalled and/or non-compact due to a dispersed form of outward growth by oxide precipitation in the adjacent deposit. Austenitic alloys generally had internal penetration as trans Tranular and/or intergranular oxides and sulfides. While only two of the alloys had damage visible without magnification as a result of the relatively short exposure, there was some concern about Iona-term corrosion performance owing to the relatively poor quality scales formed. Comparison of data from these tests to those from a prior series of tests with Illinois No. 6, a high sulfur bituminous coal, showed less corrosion in the present test series with the lower sulfur coal. Although K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}was the principal corrosive agent as the supplier of sulfur, which acted to degrade alloy surface scales, tying up sulfur as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} prevented the occurrence of complex alkali iron trisulfates responsible for severe or catastrophic corrosion in conventional power plants with certain coals and metal temperatures.

White, M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy spectra and spectrally resolved one-dimensional fluence images of self-emitted charged-fusion products (14.7 MeV D[superscript 3]He protons) are routinely measured from indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion ...

Li, C. K.

405

SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W. Burgess, J. B. Chesser, V. B. Graves, and S.L. Schrock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W remote handling techniques and tools for replacing target system components. During the past year seal configuration to assess leak tightness and remote handling features. In addition, testing

McDonald, Kirk

406

Particulate Control Device (PCD) Testing at the Power Systems Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) objectives overseen by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to test systems and components for advanced coal-based power generation systems, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and integrated gasification/fuel cell (IGFC) systems. Stringent particulate requirements for fuel gas for both combustion turbines and fuel cells that are integral to these systems. Particulates erode and chemically attack the blade surfaces in turbines, and cause blinding of the electrodes in fuel cells. Filtration of the hot, high-pressure, gasified coal is required to protect these units. Filtration can be accomplished by first cooling the gas, but the system efficiency is reduced. High-temperature, high-pressure, particulate control devices (PCDs) need to be developed to achieve high efficiency and to extend the lifetime of downstream components to acceptable levels. Demonstration of practical high-temperature PCDs is crucial to the evolution of advanced, high-efficiency, coal-based power generation systems. The intent at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is to establish a flexible test facility that can be used to (1) develop advanced power system components, such as high-temperature, high-pressure PCDs; (2) evaluate advanced power system configurations and (3) assess the integration and control issues of these advanced power systems.

Longanbach, J.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

USE AND CALIBRATION OF A GAS CHROMATOGRAPH FOR GAS ANALYSIS AT THE PROJECT ROVER TEST FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gas-chromatograph system operated by test site personnel was used for over a year to monitor the purity of gases used at the Project Rover test facilities at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. Information was obtained on the efficiency of gas line purges, total impurities of frozen air in a large liquid hydrogen dewar, and the quality of room inerting systems. Daily monitoring of several block and bleed systems, which prevent hydrogen gas from entering a system through a leaky valve, and periodic monitoring of all gas added to the 10/sup 6/ cubic feet gas storage bottles are required for safe facilities operation. In addition the chromatograph proved useful in special cases for leak detection in vacuum and high pressure systems. The calibration and operation of the chromatograph system using a column of Linde 5A Molecular Sieve for analysis of H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, land O/sub 2/ is described. Observations of a thermal conductivity reversal in the binary mixture He--H/sub 2/ is presented. (auth)

Liebenberg, D.H.; Edeskuty, F.J.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes Record American Fusion News Category: National Ignition Facility Link: National Ignition Facility (NIF):...

409

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - National Ignition Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national-ignition-facility National Ignition Facility en Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy http:www.pppl.govnode1361

410

Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

High poloidal beta equilibria in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor limited by a natural inboard poloidal field null  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (Plasma Phys. Controlled Nucl. Fusion Research {bold 1}, 51 (1986)) has produced plasma equilibria with values of {Lambda}{equivalent to}{beta}{sub {ital p} eq}+{ital l}{sub {ital i}}/2 as large as 7, {epsilon}{beta}{sub {ital p} dia}{equivalent to}2{mu}{sub 0}{epsilon}{l angle}{ital p}{sub {perpendicular}}{r angle}/{l angle}{l angle}{ital B}{sub {ital p}}{r angle}{r angle}{sup 2} as large as 1.6, and Troyon normalized diamagnetic beta (Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 26}, 209 (1984); Phys. Lett. {bold 110A}, 29 (1985)), {beta}{sub {ital N}dia}{equivalent to}10{sup 8}{l angle}{beta}{sub {ital t}{perpendicular}}{r angle}{ital aB}{sub 0}/{ital I}{sub {ital p}} as large as 4.7. When {epsilon}{beta}{sub {ital p} dia}{approx gt}1.25, a separatrix entered the vacuum chamber, producing a naturally diverted discharge that was sustained for many energy confinement times, {tau}{sub {ital E}}. The largest values of {epsilon}{beta}{sub {ital p}} and plasma stored energy were obtained when the plasma current was ramped down prior to neutral beam injection. The measured peak ion and electron temperatures were as large as 24 and 8.5 keV, respectively. Plasma stored energy in excess of 2.5 MJ and {tau}{sub {ital E}} greater than 130 msec were obtained. Confinement times of greater than 3 times that expected from L-mode predictions have been achieved. The fusion power gain {ital Q}{sub DD} reached a value of 1.3{times}10{sup {minus}3} in a discharge with {ital I}{sub {ital p}}=1 MA and {epsilon}{beta}{sub {ital p} dia}=0.85. A large, sustained negative loop voltage during the steady-state portion of the discharge indicates that a substantial noninductive component of {ital I}{sub {ital p}} exists in these plasmas. Transport code analysis indicates that the bootstrap current constitutes up to 65% of {ital I}{sub {ital p}}.

Sabbagh, S.A.; Gross, R.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A. (Department of Applied Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (USA)); Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chance, M.S.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Hatcher, R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hirshman, S.P.; Janos, A.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Manickam, J.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, D.K.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (USA)); Kesner, J.; Marmar, E.S.; Terry, J.L. (MIT Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (USA))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Seventh Quarter of the First Budget Period, April 1 through June 30, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion will include the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. Combustion Gas Turbine; Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment; and Externally Fired Gas Turbine/Water Augmented Gas Turbine. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fusion Energy [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Fusion Energy Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Fusion Energy Bookmark and Share Since 1995, Argonne has had primary responsibility for the development of new design rules regarding various components in a fusion reactor, particularly those subject to irradiation embrittlement. During 1998, Argonne issued the final draft of the structural design criteria for in-vessel components in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER).

414

Measurements of the radial structure and poloidal spectra of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) have been excited by tangential neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [[ital Proceedings] [ital of] [ital the] [ital Thirteenth] [ital International] [ital Conference] [ital on] [ital Plasma] [ital Physics] [ital and] [ital Controlled] [ital Nuclear] [ital Fusion] [ital Research], 1990, Washington, D.C. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1990), Vol. I, p. 9]. Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) has been used to study the radial structure and the poloidal power spectra of these modes. Radial profiles show a global, standing wave structure with a node near [ital r]/[ital a]=0.6 and a maximum displacement of about 5--10 mm. The cross-phase profiles and the power spectra both imply that the mode is composed of a mixture of components with various poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, as expected for the TAE. Measurements of the poloidal mode spectrum via BES show good agreement with theoretical simulations performed by a nonvariational, kinetic magnetohydrodynamics stability code (NOVA[minus]K [Cheng, Phys. Rep. [bold 211], 1 (1992)]). In particular, the dominant harmonics in the poloidal spectrum obey the expected relation [ital m]+1/2[approx][ital q]([ital r])[ital n].

Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)); Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Paul, S.F. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for...

416

DOE-STD-3026-99; DOE Standard Filter Test Facility Quality Program Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-99 6-99 February 1999 Superseding DOE NE F 3-44 July 1986 DOE STANDARD FILTER TEST FACILITY QUALITY PROGRAM PLAN U.S. Department of Energy FSC 4460 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3026-99 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy standard supercedes DOE NE F 3-44 and is approved for use by all DOE components and their contractors.

417

PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Technical progress report: Third Quarter, CY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC (pressurized fluidized-bed combustion) Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility (HGCU). This report covers the period of work completed during the Third Quarter of CY 1993. During this quarter, the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) was operated for a total of 1295 hours. This represents 58% availability during July, August, September, and including June 30 of the previous quarter. The operating dates and times since initial operation are summarized. The APF operating temperatures and differential pressures are provided. Details of the APF runs during this quarter are included in this report.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Dimensional changes in FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) austenitic cladding and ducts  

SciTech Connect

As the standard cladding and duct material for the Fast Flux Test Facility driver fuel, 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel has provided good service up to a fast fluence of 16 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} in extreme cases. The titanium-stabilized variant of 316 SS, called D9, has extended the useful life of the austenitic alloys by increasing the incubation fluence necessary for the onset of volumetric swelling. Duct flat-to-flat, length and bow, pin bundle distortion, fuel pin diameter and length, as well as cladding volumetric swelling have been examined for high fluence components representing both alloys. These data emphasize the importance of the swelling process, the superiority of D9, and the interrelation between deformations in the duct, bundle, and individual pins. 8 refs., 10 figs.

Makenas, B.J.; Chastain, S.A.; Gneiting, B.C.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Three-dimensional Fast Flux Test Facility plenum model turbulent flow prediction and data comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent flow in a scaled Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) upper plenum model were performed using the TEMPEST hydrothermal code. A standard k-element of model was used to describe turbulence through an effective viscosity. Comparisons with previously reported mean velocity and turbulence field data measured in the plenum model and two-dimensional numerical simulations using the TEACH code were made. Predicted horizontal and vertical mean velocities and turbulent kinetic energy are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data when inlet conditions of the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy are appropriately prescribed. The three-dimensional quarter-symmetry simulation predicts the turbulent kinetic energy field significantly better than the two-dimensional centerplane simulations. These results lead to conclusions concerning deficiencies in the experimental data and the turbulence model.

Eyler, L.L.; Sawdye, R.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Diagnostic development and support of MHD Test Facilities. Technical progress report, October 1991--December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion test facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Miniature Torsion Specimen Shear Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of SiC composites in fusion environments likely requires joining of plates using reactive joining or brazing. One promising reactive joining method uses solid-state displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti3SiC2 + SiC. We continue to explore the processing envelope for this joint for the TITAN collaboration in order to produce optimal joints to undergo irradiation studies in HFIR. The TITAN collaboration has designed miniature torsion joints for preparation, testing, and irradiation in HFIR. PNNL synthesized 40 miniature torsion joints and several were tested for shear strength prior to irradiation testing in HFIR. The resulting tests indicated that (1) joint fixture alignment problems cause joint strengths to be lower than optimal, (2) that non-planar torsion test failures limit the effectiveness of the miniature specimen design, and (3) that several joints that were well aligned had high shear strengths and promising mechanical properties. In summary, we now show conclusively that high joint strengths cause non-planar shear fracture and complicate strength analysis for miniature torsion specimens.

Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Ventrella, Andrea; Ferraris, Monica

2011-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fermilab PXIE Beam Diagnostics Development and Testing at the HINS Beam Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fermilab is planning the construction of a prototype front end of the Project X linac. The Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) is expected to accelerate 1 mA CW H- beam up to 30 MeV. Some of the major goals of the project are to test a CW RFQ and H- source, a broadband bunch-by-bunch beam chopper and a low-energy superconducting linac. The successful characterization and operation of such an accelerator place stringent requirements on beamline diagnostics. These crucial beam measurements include bunch currents, beam orbit, beam phase, bunch length, transverse profile and emittance and beam halo and tails, as well as the extinction performance of the broadband chopper. This paper presents PXIE beam measurement requirements and instrumentation development plans. Presented are plans to test key instruments at the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) beam facility. Since HINS is already an operational accelerator, utilizing HINS for instrumentation testing will allow for quicker development of the required PXIE diagnostics.

Lebedev, V.A.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Steimel, J.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab; Hanna, B.M.; Prost, L.R.; Scarpine, V.E.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Dynamic system characterization of an integral test facility of an advanced PWR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work characterizes the dynamic behavior for the modified Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF), which has been selected by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for confirmatory testing of the Westinghouse AP600 design. The LSTF is performing a series of tests to generate data for code assessment against AP600 relevant phenomena. The AP600 design relies only on passive safety features such as gravity driven draining pressurized tanks, and battery power logic and actuators for its safety functions. The inclusion of Core Makeup Tanks and passive heat removal systems into the design increase its dynamic complexity well beyond that of any conventional pressurized water reactor, in which the safeties can be treated as imposed boundary conditions. The bond graph methodology was used to formulate the equations and their topology, as they are used to characterize such a complex system. This characterization was applied to one of the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA) program transients, the one-inch cold leg break (AP-CL-03), to construct a mathematical model of the system. The model's constitutive equations were linearized for a selected period of the transient that is of particular importance to the safety analysis. These equations were used for the linear analysis of the system.

Smith, Simon Gregory

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The IEC Fusion-Plasma Torch - A Path for Closing the Materials Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental Facilities and Nonelectric Applications / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

William C. Gough; George H. Miley

425

CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

NA

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

PFBC HGCU test facility technical progress report. First Quarter, CY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the eighteenth Technical Progress Report submitted in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. During this quarter, the Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up System operated for 835 hours during six separate test runs. The system was starting into a seventh run at the end of the quarter. Highlights of this period are summarized below: the longest run during the quarter was approximately 333 hours; filter pressure drop was stable during all test runs this quarter using spoiling air to the primary cyclone upstream of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF); the tempering air system was commissioned this quarter which enabled the unit to operate at full load conditions while limiting the gas temperature in the APF to 1,400 F; during a portion of the one run, the tempering air was removed and the filter operated without problems up to 1,450 F; ash sampling was performed by Battelle personnel upstream and downstream of the APF and ash loading and particle size distribution data were obtained, a summary report is included; a hot area on the APF head was successfully repaired in service; a hot spot on the top of an expansion joint was successfully repaired by drilling holes from the inside of the pipe and pumping in refractory insulation; a corrosion inspection program for the HGCU system was issued giving recommendations for points to inspect; filter internal inspections following test runs 13 and 17 revealed a light coating (up to 1/4 inch thick) of residual ash on the candles and some ash bridging between the dust sheds and inner rows of candles. Data from these inspections are included with this report.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort (Brochure), Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) offer the opportunity to shift transportation energy demands from petroleum to electricity, but broad adoption will require integration with other systems. While automotive experts work to reduce the cost of PEVs, fossil- fueled cars and trucks continue to burn hundreds of billions of gallons of petroleum each year-not only to get from point A to point B, but also to keep passengers comfortable with air condi- tioning and heat. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), three instal- lations form a research laboratory known as the Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF). At the VTIF, engineers are develop-

428

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Magnetic Confinement Fusion FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Fusion by Magnetic Confinement The image above is an artistic rendering of a tokamak, a donut-shaped magnetic vacuum chamber in which wispy vapors of fusion fuel are

429

An Experimental Shield Test Facility for the Development of Minimum Weight Shields for Compact Reactor Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Discussions are given of the characteristics of fission-source plate, graphite reactor, and pool-type reactor facilities applicable to development studies of minimum weight shielding materials. Advantages of a proposed SNAP dual-purpose shielding facility are described in terms of a disk-shaped fission-source plate, reactor, and building. A program for the study of advanced shielding materials is discussed for materials and configuations to be evaluted with the fission-source plate, the testing of the prototype at high-power levels, and full-power tests on the actual reactor.

Tomlinson, R.L.

1959-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Process Testing to Support the Conceptual Design of a Plutonium Vitrification Facility  

SciTech Connect

In the aftermath of the Cold War, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has identified up to 50 metric tonnes of excess plutonium that needs to be dispositioned. The bulk of the material is slated to be blended with uranium and fabricated into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for subsequent burning in commercial nuclear reactors. Excess plutonium-containing materials that are not suitable for fabrication into MOX fuel will need to be dispositioned via other means. A lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass was identified as a preferred form for the disposition of the impure plutonium-containing feeds. The LaBS glass formulation uses a lanthanide borosilicate frit rather than the alkali borosilicate frit used to vitrify high level waste. The LaBS glass has been shown to be able to accommodate high quantities of fissile material (greater than 10 wt % elemental plutonium) and tolerate the impurities expected in the plutonium feed streams. A conceptual design effort is now underway at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to design a vitrification facility to immobilize the excess Pu feeds that are not slated for disposition via MOX fuel. The conceptual design phase is planned to complete in FY07. A test program was initiated at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to provide input data to the conceptual design effort. A major component of this test effort involves vitrification process testing. A cylindrical induction melter (CIM) was developed for the vitrification of actinide feed streams. Due to the high temperatures required to incorporate high plutonium oxide contents into the glass by dissolution and melting, the melter vessel is constructed out of Pt/Rh alloy and can be operated at temperatures up to 1600 deg. C. Additionally, the melter design is compact to facilitate installation in a glovebox (the size of the conceptual facility melter is approximately 6'' in diameter by 18'' tall). The CIM has proven to be a viable means to process the LaBS glass at processing temperatures of 1400-1500 deg. C. In this paper, the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities are discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {mu}m filter. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {mu}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {mu}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. (authors)

Zamecnik, J.R.; Jones, T.M.; Miller, D.H.; Herman, D.T.; Marra, J.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.F. , 1974, Bad Creek pumped storage project, in ElectricJ.J. , 1974, Potential pumped storage projects that wouldconverting in pumped storage facilities, Franklin Pierce

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fusion Development Facility Divertor Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615435

Garofalo, A.M.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Mechanical Properties of SiC/SiCon Mechanical Properties of SiC/SiC 1: 500C, HFIR 2: 400C, HFIR 3: 200-500C, HFIR 4: 300-500C, JMTR 5: 430-500C, EBR-II ·YHi-Nicalon Type-S/PyC/FCVI-SiC ·¡Hi-Nicalon/PyC/FCVI-SiC ·£Nicalon/PyC/FCVI-SiC ·zTyranno-SA/PyC/FCVI-SiC ·>Monolithic CVD-SiC 6: 300C, HFIR 7: 800C, HFIR 8: 800C

434

Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} source test facility Allison scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H{sup -} ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

Long, C. D.; Stockli, M. P.; Gorlov, T. V.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Test Operation of Oxygen-Enriched Incinerator for Wastes From Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect

The oxygen-enriched combustion concept, which can minimize off-gas production, has been applied to the incineration of combustible uranium-containing wastes from a nuclear fuel fabrication facility. A simulation for oxygen combustion shows the off-gas production can be reduced by a factor of 6.7 theoretically, compared with conventional air combustion. The laboratory-scale oxygen enriched incineration (OEI) process with a thermal capacity of 350 MJ/h is composed of an oxygen feeding and control system, a combustion chamber, a quencher, a ceramic filter, an induced draft fan, a condenser, a stack, an off-gas recycle path, and a measurement and control system. Test burning with cleaning paper and office paper in this OEI process shows that the thermal capacity is about 320 MJ/h, 90 % of design value and the off-gas reduces by a factor of 3.5, compared with air combustion. The CO concentration for oxygen combustion is lower than that of air combustion, while the O2 concentration in off-gas is kept above 25 vol % for a simple incineration process without any grate. The NOx concentration in an off-gas stream does not reduce significantly due to air incoming by leakage, and the volume and weight reduction factors are not changed significantly, which suggests a need for an improvement in sealing.

Kim, J.-G.; Yang, H.cC.; Park, G.-I.; Kim, I.-T.; Kim, J.-K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Solar Total Energy Test Facility Project. Semiannual report, October 1976--March 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Total Energy System will operate as follows: A heat transfer fluid (Therminol 66) is heated in the receiver tubes of the solar collectors by reflected and focused solar radiation. This fluid is pumped to the high-temperature storage subsystem. Fluid is extracted from this storage on a demand basis and pumped to the heat exchanger which produces superheated toluene vapor to power the turbine/generator. The boiler can also be operated from a fossil fuel-fired heater to insure continuity of operation during extended cloudy periods. Turbine condenser coolant is pumped to the low-temperature storage tank and becomes the energy source for heating and air-conditioning components of the system. Progress is reported on the design, fabrication, installation, and checkout of the first 200 m/sup 2/ collector field quadrant, a high-temperature stratified storage tank, a 32-kW turbine/generator and Therminol-to-toluene heat exchanger, an instrumentation and control subsystem, a cooling tower, the turbine and control building, and all necessary pumps and fluid loops to interconnect these subsystems. Also, experience with operating the facility in accordance with a detailed test plan to provide performance data on all subsystems and to accumulate operating and maintenance experience which can provide a basis for the design of large-scale experimental plants and future solar energy systems is described. (WHK)

Petterson, B. Jr. (ed.)

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the system, thus substantially reducing the number of cables required to power the sensors. The high gradient capacity of the 1.3 GHz cavities required a revision of the radiation shielding and interlocks. The cave was updated as per the recommendations of the radiation safety committee. The high pressure rinse system was updated with new adapters to assist the rinsing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities. Finally, a proposal for cold testing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities at A0 north cave was made to the small experiments approval committee, radiation safety committee and the Tevatron cryogenic safety sub-committee for an operational readiness clearance and the same was approved. The project was classified under research and development of single cell cavities (project 18) and was allocated a budget of $200,000 in FY 2007.

Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

MHD seawater thruster performance: A comparison of predictions with experimental results from a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate a design oriented MHD thruster performance computer code. The thruster performance code consists of a one-dimensional MHD hydrodynamic model coupled to a two-dimensional electrical model. The code includes major loss mechanisms affecting the performance of the thruster. Among these losses are the joule dissipation losses, frictional losses, electrical end losses, and single electrode potential losses. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster p