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1

Hydrogen fusion-energy reactions  

SciTech Connect

At the Los Alamos Ion Beam Facility we have installed a low-energy fusion cross section (LEFCS) apparatus specifically designed to measure cross sections to high accuracy for the various fusion-energy reactions among the hydrogen isotopes in the bombarding-energy range 10 to 120 keV. To date, we have completed and published our study of the D(t,..cap alpha..)n reaction, have finished data-taking for the D(d,p)T and D(d,/sup 3/He)n reactions, and have nearly finished data-taking for the T(t,..cap alpha..)nn reaction. Here we describe the LEFCS facility, present final and preliminary results for these reactions, and compare them with R-matrix calculations. 16 refs., 10 figs.

Brown, R.E.; Jarmie, N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Method of controlling fusion reaction rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Valeo, Ernest J. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Goldhaber, Maurice (Bayport, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Method of controlling fusion reaction rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method of controlling the reaction rates in a nuclear fusion reactor; and more particularly, to the use of polarized nuclear fuel.

Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Goldhaber, M.

1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Measurement of the Fusion Probability, PCN, for Hot Fusion Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: The cross section for forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the capture cross section, the fusion probability, PCN, i.e., the probability that the projectile-target system will evolve inside the fission saddle point to form a completely fused system rather than re-separating (quasifission), and the survival of the completely fused system against fission. PCN is the least known of these quantities. Purpose: To measure PCN for the reaction of 101.2 MeV 18O, 147.3 MeV 26Mg, 170.9 MeV 30Si and 195.3 MeV 36S with 197Au. Methods: We measured the fission fragment angular distributions for these reactions and used the formalism of Back to deduce the fusion-fission and quasifission cross sections. From these quantities we deduced PCN for each reaction. Results: The values of PCN for the reaction of 101.2 MeV 18O, 147.3 MeV 26Mg, 170.9 MeV 30Si and 195.3 MeV 36S with 197Au are 0.66, 1.00, 0.06, 0.13, respectively. Conclusions: The new measured values of PCN agree roughly with the semi-empirical system- atic dependence of PCN upon fissility for excited nuclei.

R. Yanez; W. Loveland; J. S. Barrett; L. Yao; B. B. Back; S. Zhu; T. L. Khoo

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

Influence of projectile neutron number on cross section in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON CROSS SECTION IN COLD FUSION REACTIONS I. Dragojevi? ,type of reaction has been referred to as “cold fusion. ”The study of cold fusion reactions is an indispensable

Dragojevic, I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Fusion-reaction cross section in (high-temperature). mu. -catalyzed fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The barrier penetration factor for the fusion reaction of ..mu..-mesic hydrogen atoms with hydrogen nuclei is studied. (MOW)

Takahashi, H.; Moats, A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage ({approx}100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

Donovan, D. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boris, D. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, South West, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Piefer, G. R. [Phoenix Nuclear Labs, 2555 Industrial Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53713 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fusion-fission reactions with modified Woods-Saxon potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modified Woods-Saxon potential model is proposed for a unified description of the entrance channel fusion barrier and the fission barrier of fusion-fission reactions based on the Skyrme energy-density functional approach. The fusion excitation functions of 120 reactions have been systematically studied. The fusion (capture) cross sections are well described with the calculated potential and an empirical barrier distribution. Incorporating a statistical model (HIVAP code) for describing the decay of the compound nucleus, the evaporation residue (and fission) cross sections of 51 fusion-fission reactions have been systematically investigated. Optimal values of some key parameters of the HIVAP code are obtained based on the experimental data of these reactions. The experimental data are reasonably well reproduced by the calculated results. The upper and lower confidence limits of the systematic errors of the calculated results are given.

Ning Wang; Kai Zhao; Werner Scheid; Xizhen Wu

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu; Enguang Zhao

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

Experimental study of nuclear fusion reactions in muonic molecular systems  

SciTech Connect

Since the pioneering discovery of the muon catalysis by Alvarez [L. W. Alvarez, K. Brander, F. S. Crawford, et al., Phys. Rev. 105, 1127 (1957)], considerable efforts were aimed at observation of various fusion processes. Results of these studies facilitated understanding the properties of lightest nuclei and dynamics of low-energy fusion reactions. There still remain unsolved theoretical and experimental problems, especially in case of pt fusion.

Bogdanova, L. N., E-mail: ludmila@itep.ru [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reaction Barrier Transparency for Cold Fusion with Deuterium and Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An improved parametric representation of Coulomb barrier penetration is presented. These detailed calculations are improvements upon the conventionally used Gamow tunneling coefficient. This analysis yields a reaction barrier transparency (RBT) which may have singular ramifications for cold fusion, as well as significant consequences in a wide variety of fusion settings. 1.

Yeong E. Kim; Jin-hee Yoon; Alexander L. Zubarev; Mario Rabinowitz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Transfer/Breakup Channel Couplings in Sub-barrier Fusion Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent availability of state-of-the-art radioactive ion beams, there has been a renew interest in the investigation of nuclear reactions with heavy ions near the Coulomb barrier. The role of inelastic and transfer channel couplings in fusion reactions induced by stable heavy ions can be revisited. Detailed Analysis of recent experimental fusion cross sections by using standard coupled-channel calculations is first discussed. Multi-neutron transfer effects are introduced in the fusion process below the Coulomb barrier by analyzing 32S+90,96Zr as benchmark reactions. The enhancement of fusion cross sections for 32S+96Zr is well reproduced at sub-barrier energies by NTFus code calculations including the coupling of the neutron-transfer channels following the Zagrebaev semi-classical model. Similar effects for 40Ca+90Zr and 40Ca+96Zr fusion excitation functions are found. The breakup coupling in both the elastic scattering and in the fusion process induced by weakly bound stable projectiles is also shown to be crucial. In the second part of this work, full coupled-channel calculations of the fusion excitation functions are performed by using the breakup coupling for the more neutron-rich reaction and for the more weakly bound projectiles. we clearly demonstrate that Continuum-Discretized Coupled-Channel calculations are capable to reproduce the fusion enhancement from the breakup coupling in 6Li+59Co.

C. Beck

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Resources Environment, Safety & Health Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact...

14

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li; Werner Scheid

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

Using Nuclear Fusion Reactions to Peer Inside the Core of a Dense...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Using Nuclear Fusion Reactions to Peer Inside the Core of a Dense Hot Plasma Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES...

17

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour How Fusion Reactions Work THE NUCLEAR PHYSICS OF FUSION Fusion of light (low-mass)...

18

Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model  

SciTech Connect

We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, PL-05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Neutron detectors for fusion reaction-rate measurements  

SciTech Connect

Fusion reactions in an inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) target filled with deuterium or a deuterium/tritium fuel release nearly monoenergetic neutrons. Because most the neutrons leave the compressed target without collision, they preserve reaction-rate information as they travel radially outward from their point of origin. Three fast, neutron detector techniques, each capable of measuring the fusion reaction-rate of ICF targets, have been demonstrated. The most advanced detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator material (BC-422) which acts as a neutron-to-light converter. Signals, which are recorded with a fast optical streak camera, have a resolution of 25 ps. Good signals can be recorded for targets producing only 5 x 10{sup 7} DT neutrons. Two other detectors use knock-on collisions between neutrons and protons in a thin polyethylene (CH{sub 2}) converter. In one, the converter is placed in front of the photocathode of an x-ray streak camera. Recoil protons pass through the photocathode and knock out electrons which are accelerated and deflected to produce a signal. Resolutions < 25 ps are possible. In the other, the converter is placed in front of a microchannel plate (MCP) with a gated microstrip. Recoil protons eject electrons from the gold layer forming the microstrip. If a gate pulse is present, the signal is amplified. Present gate times are about 80 ps.

Lerche, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Landen, O.L.; Murphy, T.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Jaanimagi, P.A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Laboratory for Laser Energetics

1994-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nuclear fusion in dense matter: Reaction rate and carbon burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the nuclear fusion rate between equal nuclei for all five different nuclear burning regimes in dense matter (two thermonuclear regimes, two pycnonuclear ones, and the intermediate regime). The rate is determined by Coulomb barrier penetration in dense environments and by the astrophysical S-factor at low energies. We evaluate previous studies of the Coulomb barrier problem and propose a simple phenomenological formula for the reaction rate which covers all cases. The parameters of this formula can be varied, taking into account current theoretical uncertainties in the reaction rate. The results are illustrated for the example of the ^{12}C+^{12}C fusion reaction. This reaction is very important for the understanding of nuclear burning in evolved stars, in exploding white dwarfs producing type Ia supernovae, and in accreting neutron stars. The S-factor at stellar energies depends on a reliable fit and extrapolation of the experimental data. We calculate the energy dependence of the S-factor using a recently developed parameter-free model for the nuclear interaction, taking into account the effects of the Pauli nonlocality. For illustration, we analyze the efficiency of carbon burning in a wide range of densities and temperatures of stellar matter with the emphasis on carbon ignition at densities rho > 10^9 g/cc.

L. R. Gasques; A. V. Afanasjev; E. F. Aguilera; M. Beard; L. C. Chamon; P. Ring; M. Wiescher; D. G. Yakovlev

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Unified description of fission in fusion and spallation reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical-model description of fission, in the framework of compound-nucleus decay, which is found to simultaneously reproduce data from both heavy-ion-induced fusion reactions and proton-induced spallation reactions at around 1 GeV. For the spallation reactions, the initial compound-nucleus population is predicted by the Li\\`{e}ge Intranuclear Cascade Model. We are able to reproduce experimental fission probabilities and fission-fragment mass distributions in both reactions types with the same parameter sets. However, no unique parameter set was obtained for the fission probability. The introduction of fission transients can be offset by an increase of the ratio of level-density parameters for the saddle-point and ground-state configurations. Changes to the finite-range fission barriers could be offset by a scaling of the Bohr-Wheeler decay width as predicted by Kramers. The parameter sets presented allow accurate prediction of fission probabilities for excitation energies up to 300 MeV and spins up to 60 \\hbar.

Davide Mancusi; Robert J. Charity; Joseph Cugnon

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fusion and breakup in the reactions of 6,7Li and 9Be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a three body classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method to dicsuss the effect of the breakup process on heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by weakly bound nuclei. This method follows the classical trajectories of breakup fragments after the breakup takes place, and thus provides an unambiguous separation between complete and incomplete fusion cross sections. Applying this method to the fusion reaction $^{6}$Li + $^{209}$Bi, we find that there is a significant contribution to the total complete fusion cross sections from the process where all the breakup fragments are captured by the target nucleus (i.e., the breakup followed by complete fusion).

K. Hagino; M. Dasgupta; D. J. Hinde

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Statistical Model of Heavy-Ion Fusion-Fission Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross-section and neutron-emission data from heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions are consistent with the fission of fully equilibrated systems with fission lifetime estimates obtained via a Kramers-modified statistical model which takes into account the collective motion of the system about the ground state, the temperature dependence of the location and height of fission transition points, and the orientation degree of freedom. If the standard techniques for calculating fission lifetimes are used, then the calculated excitation-energy dependence of fission lifetimes is incorrect. We see no evidence to suggest that the nuclear viscosity has a temperature dependence. The strong increase in the nuclear viscosity above a temperature of approximately 1.3 MeV deduced by others is an artifact generated by an inadequate fission model.

J. P. Lestone; S. G. McCalla

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

24

On the nuclear interaction. Potential, binding energy and fusion reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear interaction is responsible for keeping neutrons and protons joined in an atomic nucleus. Phenomenological nuclear potentials, fitted to experimental data, allow one to know about the nuclear behaviour with more or less success where quantum mechanics is hard to be used. A nuclear potential is suggested and an expression for the potential energy of two nuclear entities, either nuclei or nucleons, is developed. In order to estimate parameters in this expression, some nucleon additions to nuclei are considered and a model is suggested as a guide of the addition process. Coulomb barrier and energy for the addition of a proton to each one of several nuclei are estimated by taking into account both the nuclear and electrostatic components of energy. Studies on the binding energies of several nuclei and on the fusion reaction of two nuclei are carried out.

I. Casinos

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

On the nuclear interaction. Potential, binding energy and fusion reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear interaction is responsible for keeping neutrons and protons joined in an atomic nucleus. Phenomenological nuclear potentials, fitted to experimental data, allow one to know about the nuclear behaviour with more or less success where quantum mechanics is hard to be used. A nuclear potential is suggested and an expression for the potential energy of two nuclear entities, either nuclei or nucleons, is developed. In order to estimate parameters in this expression, some nucleon additions to nuclei are considered and a model is suggested as a guide of the addition process. Coulomb barrier and energy for the addition of a proton to each one of several nuclei are estimated by taking into account both the nuclear and electrostatic components of energy. Studies on the binding energies of several nuclei and on the fusion reaction of two nuclei are carried out.

Casinos, I

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advent of high-intensity pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei, by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

C. Labaune; C. Baccou; S. Depierreux; C. Goyon; G. Loisel; V. Yahia; J. Rafelski

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

28

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER Don Steiner, Jeffrey Freidberg Farrokh Najmabadi William Nevins , and John Perkins The Energy Issues Working Group on Long-Term Visions energy production in the next century? 2. What is fusion's potential for penetrating the energy market

Najmabadi, Farrokh

29

Fusion and Direct Reactions of Halo Nuclei at Energies around the Coulomb Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present understanding of reaction processes involving light unstable nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier is reviewed. The effect of coupling to direct reaction channels on elastic scattering and fusion is investigated, with the focus on halo nuclei. A list of definitions of processes is given, followed by a review of the experimental and theoretical tools and information presently available. The effect of couplings on elastic scattering and fusion is studied with a series of model calculations within the coupled-channels framework. The experimental data on fusion are compared to "bare" no-coupling one-dimensional barrier penetration model calculations. On the basis of these calculations and comparisons with experimental data, conclusions are drawn from the observation of recurring features. The total fusion cross sections for halo nuclei show a suppression with respect to the "bare" calculations at energies just above the barrier that is probably due to single neutron transfer reactions. The data for total fusion are also consistent with a possible sub-barrier enhancement; however, this observation is not conclusive and other couplings besides the single-neutron channels would be needed in order to explain any actual enhancement. We find that a characteristic feature of halo nuclei is the dominance of direct reactions over fusion at near and sub-barrier energies; the main part of the cross section is related to neutron transfers, while calculations indicate only a modest contribution from the breakup process.

N. Keeley; R. Raabe; N. Alamanos; J. L. Sida

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

30

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioative beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out) reactions using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because intensities of radioactive beams are in most of the cases significantly lower than the ones of the stable beams, reactions with the highest radioactive beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland who investigated the same nuclei.

Smolanczuk, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioative beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out) reactions using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because intensities of radioactive beams are in most of the cases significantly lower than the ones of the stable beams, reactions with the highest radioactive beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland who investigated the same nuclei.

Robert Smolanczuk

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

32

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioactive beams  

SciTech Connect

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out reactions) using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because in most of the cases intensities of radioactive beams are significantly less than those of the stable beams, reactions with the greatest radioactive-beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland [Phys. Rev. C 76, 014612 (2007)], who investigated the same nuclei.

Smolanczuk, Robert [Theoretical Physics Department, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warszawa (Poland)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Transfer/Breakup Channel Couplings in Sub-barrier Fusion Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent availability of state-of-the-art radioactive ion beams, there has been a renew interest in the investigation of nuclear reactions with heavy ions near the Coulomb barrier. The role of inelastic and transfer channel couplings in fusion reactions induced by stable heavy ions can be revisited. Detailed Analysis of recent experimental fusion cross sections by using standard coupled-channel calculations is first discussed. Multi-neutron transfer effects are introduced in the fusion process below the Coulomb barrier by analyzing 32S+90,96Zr as benchmark reactions. The enhancement of fusion cross sections for 32S+96Zr is well reproduced at sub-barrier energies by NTFus code calculations including the coupling of the neutron-transfer channels following the Zagrebaev semi-classical model. Similar effects for 40Ca+90Zr and 40Ca+96Zr fusion excitation functions are found. The breakup coupling in both the elastic scattering and in the fusion process induced by weakly bound stable projectiles is also shown...

Beck, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

On the true nature of transfer reactions leading to the complete fusion of projectile and target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transfer of nucleons in hot-fusion reactions occurs within 0.17 yoctosecond, in a new state of nuclear matter. We suggest that the same state should show itself in an early stage of the phenomena occurring in nucleus-nucleus collisions realized at relativistic energies.

G. Mouze; C. Ythier

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

VII. Nuclear Chemistry (Chapter 17) A. Modes of radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, fission, fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40 VII. Nuclear Chemistry (Chapter 17) A. Modes of radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, fission #12;41 These masses are not exactly integer multiples due to nuclear interactions between the protons differences via the famous formula E = mc2 . Nuclear Fusion! For example, if you combine 2 protons and two

36

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Fusion Conditions Achieving Fusion Conditions CPEP: Online Fusion Course Main Topics Energy Sources and Conversions Two Key Fusion Reactions How Fusion Reactions Work Creating the Conditions for Fusion Plasmas - the 4th State of Matter Achieving Fusion Conditions More Info About CPEP Fusion Chart Images: English + 6 More Languages Main CPEP Web Site Printed Charts in 3 Sizes Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Achieving Fusion Conditions EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS IN FUSION RESEARCH Both inertial and magnetic confinement fusion research have focused on understanding plasma confinement and heating. This research has led to increases in plasma temperature, T, density, n, and energy confinement

37

Isotopic Yield Distributions of Transfer- and Fusion-Induced Fission from 238U+12C Reactions in Inverse Kinematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel method to access the complete identification in atomic number Z and mass A of fragments produced in low-energy fission of actinides is presented. This method, based on the use of multi- nucleon transfer and fusion reactions in inverse kinematics, is applied in this work to reactions between a 238U beam and a 12C target to produce and induce fission of moderately excited actinides. The fission fragments are detected and fully identified with the VAMOS spectrometer of GANIL, allowing the measurement of fragment yields of several hundreds of isotopes in a range between A ~ 80 and ~ 160, and from Z ~ 30 to ~ 64. For the first time, complete isotopic yield distributions of fragments from well-defined fissioning systems are available. Together with the precise measurement of the fragment emission angles and velocities, this technique gives further insight into the nuclear-fission process.

M. Caamańo; O. Delaune; F. Farget; X. Derkx; K. -H. Schmidt; L. Audouin; C. -O. Bacri; G. Barreau; J. Benlliure; E. Casarejos; A. Chbihi; B. Fernandez-Dominguez; L. Gaudefroy; C. Golabek; B. Jurado; A. Lemasson; A. Navin; M. Rejmund; T. Roger; A. Shrivastava; C. Schmitt

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Fusion cross sections for 6,7Li + 24Mg reactions at energies below and above the barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of fusion cross sections for the 6,7Li + 24Mg reactions by the characteristic gamma-ray method has been done at energies from below to well above the respective Coulomb barriers. The fusion cross sections obtained from these gamma-ray cross sections for the two systems are found to agree well with the total reaction cross sections at low energies. The decrease of fusion cross sections with increase of energy is consistent with the fact that other channels, in particular breakup open up with increase of bombarding energy. This shows that there is neither inhibition nor enhancement of fusion cross sections for these systems at above or below the barrier. The critical angular momenta (lcr) deduced from the fusion cross sections are found to have an energy dependence similar to other Li - induced reactions.

M. Ray; A. Mukherjee; M. K. Pradhan; Ritesh Kshetri; M. Saha Sarkar; R. Palit; I. Majumdar; P. K. Joshi; H. C. Jain; B. Dasmahapatra

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Competition of fusion and quasi-fission in the reactions leading to production of the superheavy elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanism of fusion hindrance, an effect observed in the reactions of cold, warm and hot fusion leading to production of the superheavy elements, is investigated. A systematics of transfermium production cross sections is used to determine fusion probabilities. Mechanism of fusion hindrance is described as a competition of fusion and quasi-fission. Available evaporation residue cross sections in the superheavy region are reproduced satisfactorily. Analysis of the measured capture cross sections is performed and a sudden disappearance of the capture cross sections is observed at low fusion probabilities. A dependence of the fusion hindrance on the asymmetry of the projectile-target system is investigated using the available data. The most promising pathways for further experiments are suggested.

M. Veselsky

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

40

$^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni fusion reaction calculated with the density-constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study fusion reactions of the $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni system using the density-constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) formalism. In this formalism the fusion barriers are directly obtained from TDHF dynamics. In addition, we incorporate the entrance channel alignments of the slightly deformed (oblate) $^{64}$Ni nuclei due to dynamical Coulomb excitation. We show that alignment leads to a fusion barrier distribution and alters the naive picture for defining which energies are actually sub-barrier. We also show that core polarization effects could play a significant role in fusion cross section calculations.

A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Study of near-stability nuclei populated as fission fragments in heavy-ion fusion reactions  

SciTech Connect

Examples are presented to illustrate the power of prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of fission fragments from compound nuclei with A{approx}200 formed in fusion-evaporation reactions in experiments using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Complementary methods, such as Coulomb excitation and deep-inelastic processes, are also discussed. In other cases (n,xn{gamma}) reactions on stable isotopes have been used to establish neutron excitation functions for {gamma}-rays using a pulsed 'white'-neutron source, coupled to a high-energy-resolution germanium-detector array. The excitation functions can unambiguously assign {gamma}-rays to a specific reaction product. Results from all these methods bridge the gaps in the systematics of high-spin states between the neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclei. Results near shell closures should motivate new shell model calculations.

Fotiades, N.; Nelson, R. O.; Devlin, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Cizewski, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Kruecken, R. [Physik Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Clark, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Becker, J. A.; Younes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fusion reactions with the one-neutron halo nucleus 15C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of 15C, with an s1/2 neutron weakly bound to a closed-neutron shell nucleus 14C, makes it a prime candidate for a one-neutron halo nucleus. We have for the first time studied the cross section for the fusion-fission reaction 15C + 232Th at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier and compared it to the yield of the neighboring 14C + 232Th system measured in the same experiment. At sub-barrier energies, an enhancement of the fusion yield by factors of 2-5 was observed for 15C, while the cross sections for 14C match the trends measured for 12,13C.

M. Alcorta; K. E. Rehm; B. B. Back; S. Bedoor; P. F. Bertone; C. M. Deibel; B. DiGiovine; H. Esbensen; J. P. Greene; C. R. Hoffmann; C. L. Jiang; J. C. Lighthall; S. T. Marley; R. C. Pardo; M. Paul; A. M. Rogers; C. Ugalde; A. H. Wuosmaa

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fission Decay Widths for Heavy-Ion Fusion-Fission Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross-section and neutron-emission data from heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions are consistent with a Kramers-modified statistical model which takes into account the collective motion of the system about the ground state; the temperature dependence of the location of fission transition points; and the orientation degree of freedom. We see no evidence to suggest that the nuclear viscosity departs from the surface-plus-window dissipation model. The strong increase in the nuclear viscosity above a temperature of ~1 MeV deduced by others is an artifact generated by an inadequate fission model.

S. G. McCalla; J. P. Lestone

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Evidence of microscopic effects in fragment mass distribution in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our measurements of variances ($\\sigma_{m}^2$) in mass distributions of fission fragments from fusion-fission reactions of light projectiles (C, O and F) on deformed thorium targets exhibit a sharp anomalous increase with energy near the Coulomb barrier, in contrast to the smooth variation of $\\sigma_{m}^2$ for the spherical bismuth target. This departure from expectation based on a statistical description is explained in terms of microscopic effects arising from the orientational dependence in the case of deformed thorium targets.

T. K. Ghosh; S. Pal; K. S. Gold; P. Bhattacharya

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fusion Probability in the Reactions {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass-energy distributions, as well as capture cross-section of fission-like fragments for the reactions {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu leading to the formation of superheavy compound system with Z = 120 and N 182 at energies near the Coulomb barrier have been measured. Fusion-fission cross sections were estimated from the analysis of mass and total kinetic energy distributions. It was found that the fusion probability is about one order of magnitude higher for the reaction {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu than that for the reaction with {sup 64}Ni-ions.

Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kozulin, E. M. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fusion-fission and quasifission in the reactions with heavy ions leading to the formation of Hs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm,{sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb leading to Hs isotopes have been measured. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs*, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U the considerable part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier the symmetric fragments originate mainly from fusion-fission process for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies. The pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities as a function of the fragment mass have been obtained for the reactions studied.

Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

A classical approach in simple nuclear fusion reaction {sub 1}H{sup 2}+{sub 1}H{sup 3} using two-dimension granular molecular dynamics model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics in 2-D accompanied by granular model provides an opportunity to investigate binding between nuclei particles and its properties that arises during collision in a fusion reaction. A fully classical approach is used to observe the influence of initial angle of nucleus orientation to the product yielded by the reaction. As an example, a simplest fusion reaction between {sub 1}H{sup 2} and {sub 1}H{sup 3} is observed. Several products of the fusion reaction have been obtained, even the unreported ones, including temporary {sub 2}He{sup 4} nucleus.

Viridi, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Waris, A.; Perkasa, Y. S. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Doctoral Program in Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 Physics Department, Universitas Islam Negeri Sunan Gunung Djati, Bandung 40614 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Statistics at work in heavy-ion reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first part special aspects of the compound nucleus decay are considered. The evaporation of particles intermediate between nucleons and fission fragments is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The limitations of the fission decay width expression obtained with the transition state method are discussed, and a more general approach is proposed. In the second part the process of angular momentum transfer in deep inelastic reactions is considered. The limit of statistical equilibrium is studied and specifically applied to the estimation of the degree of alignment of the fragment spins. The magnitude and alignment of the transferred angular momentum is experimentally determined from sequentially emitted alpha, gamma, and fission fragments.

Moretto, L.G.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Calculation of excitation function of some structural fusion material for (n,p) reactions up to 25 MeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion serves an inexhaustible energy for humankind. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, Furthermore, there are not radioactive nuclear waste problems in the fusion reactors. In this study, (n, p) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 27Al, 51V, 52Cr, 55Mn and 56Fe have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27 Al(n,p) 27 Mg, 51 V(n,p) 51 Ti, 52 Cr(n,p) 52 V, 55 Mn(n,p) 55 Cr and 56 Fe(n,p) 56 Mn reactions have been carried out up to 30 MeV incident neutron energy. Statistical model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS-1.0 and were compared with available experimental data in the literature and with ENDF/B-VII, T=300k; JENDL-3.3, T=300k and JEFF3.1, T=300k evaluated libraries .

Tarik Siddik

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Calculation of excitation function of some structural fusion material for (n,p) reactions up to 25 MeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion serves an inexhaustible energy for humankind. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, Furthermore, there are not radioactive nuclear waste problems in the fusion reactors. In this study, (n, p) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 27Al, 51V, 52Cr, 55Mn and 56Fe have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27 Al(n,p) 27 Mg, 51 V(n,p) 51 Ti, 52 Cr(n,p) 52 V, 55 Mn(n,p) 55 Cr and 56 Fe(n,p) 56 Mn reactions have been carried out up to 30 MeV incident neutron energy. Statistical model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS-1.0 and were compared with available experimental data in the literature and with ENDF/B-VII, T=300k; JENDL-3.3, T=300k and JEFF3.1, T=300k evaluated libraries .

Siddik, Tarik

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorescent Lights and Neon Signs Fluorescent Lights and Neon Signs CPEP: Online Fusion Course Main Topics Energy Sources and Conversions Two Key Fusion Reactions How Fusion Reactions Work Creating the Conditions for Fusion Plasmas - the 4th State of Matter Achieving Fusion Conditions More Info About CPEP Fusion Chart Images: English + 6 More Languages Main CPEP Web Site Printed Charts in 3 Sizes Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Fluorescent Lights and Neon Signs Two of the most common plasma devices on the planet are the fluorescent light bulb, and its cousin, the neon sign. Since their development in the 1940's, fluorescent bulbs have become the lighting fixture of choice in

52

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun Sun Layers CPEP: Online Fusion Course Main Topics Energy Sources and Conversions Two Key Fusion Reactions How Fusion Reactions Work Creating the Conditions for Fusion Plasmas - the 4th State of Matter Achieving Fusion Conditions More Info About CPEP Fusion Chart Images: English + 6 More Languages Main CPEP Web Site Printed Charts in 3 Sizes Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour From Core to Corona Layers of the Sun Image Credit: p. 110,125, Kaler The Core The innermost layer of the sun is the core. With a density of 160 g/cm^3, 10 times that of lead, the core might be expected to be solid. However, the core's temperature of 15 million kelvins (27 million degrees Fahrenheit)

53

Fission-Fusion: A new reaction mechanism for nuclear astrophysics based on laser-ion acceleration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to produce neutron-rich nuclei in the range of the astrophysical r-process around the waiting point N = 126 by fissioning a dense laser-accelerated thorium ion bunch in a thorium target (covered by a CH{sub 2} layer), where the light fission fragments of the beam fuse with the light fission fragments of the target. Via the 'hole-boring' mode of laser Radiation Pressure Acceleration using a high-intensity, short pulse laser, very efficiently bunches of {sup 232}Th with solid-state density can be generated from a Th target and a deuterated CD{sub 2} foil, both forming the production target assembly. Laser-accelerated Th ions with about 7 MeV/u will pass through a thin CH{sub 2} layer placed in front of a thicker second Th foil (both forming the reaction target) closely behind the production target and disintegrate into light and heavy fission fragments. In addition, light ions (d,C) from the CD{sub 2} layer of the production target will be accelerated as well, inducing the fission process of {sup 232}Th also in the second Th layer. The laser-accelerated ion bunches with solid-state density, which are about 10{sup 14} times more dense than classically accelerated ion bunches, allow for a high probability that generated fission products can fuse again. The high ion beam density may lead to a strong collective modification of the stopping power, leading to significant range and thus yield enhancement. Using a high-intensity laser as envisaged for the ELI-Nuclear Physics project in Bucharest (ELI-NP), order-of-magnitude estimates promise a fusion yield of about 10{sup 3} ions per laser pulse in the mass range of A = 180-190, thus enabling to approach the r-process waiting point at N = 126.

Thirolf, P. G.; Gross, M.; Allinger, K.; Bin, J.; Henig, A.; Kiefer, D. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Habs, D. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ma, W.; Schreiber, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fusion-evaporation reactions: a tool for gamma-ray spectroscopy on light nuclei  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the weak-decay channels of fusion/evaporation in light projectile/light target systems in order to provide reliable predictions for gamma-spectroscopy experiments.

Gibelin, J.; Phair, L.; Wiedeking, M.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M.-A.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I.-Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; McMahan, M. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bernstein, L. A.; Burke, J. T.; Bleuel, D. L.; Lesher, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hatarik, R. [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08854 (United States); Lake, P. T.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Moretto, L. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Lyles, B. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States)

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Photo-fusion reactions in a new compact device for ELI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last few years significant progress on technological, experimental and numerical studies on fusion process in high density and high temperature plasmas produced by a high intensity laser pulse interaction with clusters in a high external applied magnetic field, enable us to propose a compact photo-fusion magnetic device for high neutron production. For the purpose of the project a pulsed magnetic field driver with values up to 110 Tesla has been developed which allows increasing the trapping time of the high density plasma in the device and improving the neutron yield. Numerical simulations show that the proposed device is capable of producing up to 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons per laser shot with an external magnetic field of 150 Tesla. The proposed device can be used for experiments and numerical code validation concerning different conventional and (or) exotic fusion fuels.

Moustaizis, S. D.; Auvray, P.; Hora, H.; Lalousis, P.; Larour, J.; Mourou, G. [Technical University of Crete, Science Department, 73100 Chania, Crete (Greece); LPP-Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Department of Theoret. Physics, Univ. New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, FORTH, Heraklion (Greece); LPP-Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); LOA Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA, Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

56

Odd-Z Transactinide Compound Nucleus Reactions Including the Discovery of 260Bh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactions: hot fusion and cold fusion. The main differencenot yet well understood. Cold fusion reactions are, as theof nuclides. An advantage that cold fusion reactions have is

Nelson, Sarah L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Latent Matcher Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Latent Matcher Fusion -- Lessons Learned IAI ... 14 Page 15. The Fusion was in Two Steps • Step 1 – a reduced working candidate list was ...

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

58

Study of some steller iron group fusion materials for (n,p) reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The excitation functions for (n,p) reactions from reaction threshold to 24 MeV on some important iron (Fe) group target elements for astrophysical (n, p) reactions such as Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co and Ni were calculated using TALYS-1.0 nuclear model code. The new calculations on the excitation functions Of 28Si(n,p)28Al, 29Si(n, p)29Al, 42Ca(n, p)42K, 45Sc(n, p)45Ca, 46Ti(n,p)46Sc, 52Cr(n, p)52V, 53Cr(n, p)53V, 54Fe(n,p)54Mn, 57Fe(n,p)57Mn, 59Co(n, p)59Fe, 58Ni(n, p)58Co and 60Ni(n, p)60Co reactions have been carried out up to 24 MeV incident neutron energy. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. Statistical model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS-1.0 and were compared with existing experimental data as well as with evaluated data files (Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data (EXFOR).According to these calculations, we assume that these model calculations can be applied to some heavy elements, ejected into interstellar medium by dramatic supernova events.

Tarik Siddik

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

Analytic criteria for shock ignition of fusion reactions in a central hot spot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock ignition is an inertial confinement fusion scheme where the ignition conditions are achieved in two steps. First, the DT shell is compressed at a low implosion velocity creating a central core at a low temperature and a high density. Then, a strong spherical converging shock is launched before the fuel stagnation time. It increases the central pressure and ignites the core. It is shown in this paper that this latter phase can be described analytically by using a self-similar solution to the equations of ideal hydrodynamics. A high and uniformly distributed pressure in the hot spot can be created thus providing favorable conditions for ignition. Analytic ignition criteria are obtained that relate the areal density of the compressed core with the shock velocity. The conclusions of the analytical model are confirmed in full hydrodynamic simulations.

Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Breil, J.; Lafon, M.; Le Bel, E. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Universite Bordeaux 1-CEA-CNRS, Talence 33405 (France)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Probing the Structure of {sup 74}Ge Nucleus with Coupled-channels Analysis of {sup 74}Ge+{sup 74}Ge Fusion Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the fusion reaction of the {sup 74}Ge+{sup 74}Ge system in term of the full order coupled-channels formalism. We especially calculated the fusion cross section as well as the fusion barrier distribution of this reaction using transition matrix suggested by recent Coulomb excitation experiment. We compare the results with the one obtained by coupling matrix based on pure vibrational and rotational models. The present coupled-channels calculations for the barrier distributions obtained using experiment coupling matrix is in good agreement with the one obtained with vibrational model, in contrast to the rotational model. This is indicates that {sup 74}Ge nucleus favor a spherical shape than a deformed shape in its ground state. Our results will resolve the debates concerning the structure of this nucleus.

Zamrun F, Muhammad [Deparment of Physics University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 (Malaysia); Jurusan Fisika FMIPA, Universitas Haluoleo, Kendari, Sulawesi Tenggara, 93232 (Indonesia); Kasim, Hasan Abu [Deparment of Physics University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Topical Area MFE Title: Burning Plasma Science_____________________________________________ Description Fusion energy is released by burning light elements using nuclear reactions which consume mass and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Topical Area MFE Title: Burning Plasma Science_____________________________________________ · Description Fusion energy is released by burning light elements using nuclear reactions which consume mass-sustained purely by its alpha particle heating. The science of burning plasmas consists of: (1) the physics

62

Entrance Channel Dynamics of Hot and Cold Fusion Reactions Leading to Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the entrance channel dynamics for the reactions $\\mathrm{^{70}Zn}+\\mathrm{^{208}Pb}$ and $\\mathrm{^{48}Ca}+\\mathrm{^{238}U}$ using the fully microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory coupled with a density constraint. We calculate excitation energies and capture cross-sections relevant for the study of superheavy formations. We discuss the deformation dependence of the ion-ion potential for the $\\mathrm{^{48}Ca}+\\mathrm{^{238}U}$ system and perform an alignment angle averaging for the calculation of the capture cross-section. The results show that this parameter-free approach can generate results in good agreement with experiment and other theories.

A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker; J. A. Maruhn; P. -G. Reinhard

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Historical collection of preprints, reprints, working papers, correspondence, and other documents related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann.  

SciTech Connect

This historical collection consists of various letters, correspondence, working papers, reprints, preprints, workshop reports, and news clippings related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann. Binders and contents. 1. Laboratory Reprints/Preprints (Laboratory Documents from 9 national Labs. Some original documents); 2. Summary Report by Dr. Duane L. Barney (Articles, Letters, and Reports through 1994 on Cold Fusion. Original Documents); 3. Conference Workshops (Official Documents, schedules, and notes from 4 conferences); 4. HSS&T Hearings, SRI Incident Jan. 1992 (Summary of Cold Fusion Research and reports following SRI Incident. Original Documents); 5. Media 1989 to Present (circa 1995) (Journals, Magazines, Newspapers, and Press Releases from 1989-1995. Some reprints, some original articles/magazines); 6. Science in Service of National Economy aka Manfred's Book (A comprehensive overview of various research being done at Laboratories across the country that could impact the economy); 7. ERAB Information (Comprehensive Report on Cold Fusion Research w/ recommendations on funding and continued research. Original documents); 8. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1989 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion in order of print from 1989. Original documents); 9. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1990-1992 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1990-1992. Original documents); 10. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1993-1995 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1993-1995. Original documents); 11. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution A-H (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 12. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution I-R (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 13. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution S-Z (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 14. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries A-F (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 15. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries G-L (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 16. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries M-R (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 17. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries S-Z (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 18. Miscellaneous papers (Investigation of Cold Fusion Phenomena in Deuterated Metals-NCFI Final Report Volumes I. II, and III; June 1991; 4th Annual Conference on Cold Fusion Proceedings: Volumes 1-4; Development of Advanced Concepts for Nuclear Processes in Deuterated Metals; A Comprehensive Report on the research methods, background information, and principles related to Cold Fusion; Cold Fusion Research: November 1989; ERAB report on Cold Fusion Research; Proceedings: Workshop on Anomalous Effects in Deuterided Metals; Workshop designed to generate audio between skeptics and advocates to examine Cold Fusion research results and remaining questions in research methods; Muon Catalyzed Fusion; Overview of Muon Catalyzed Fusion; Grant Application for Cold Fusion Research; Original application to DOE from Prof. Pons that was withdrawn in favor of a new grant proposal).

None

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Two Important Fusion Reactions D + T > He-4 + n D-T reaction graphic For first...

65

Calculations of Branching Ratios for Radiative-Capture, One-Proton, and Two-Neutron Channels in the Fusion Reaction $^{209}$Bi+$^{70}$Zn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of the non-one-neutron emission channels in the cold fusion reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi to produce the element Z=113. For this purpose, we calculate the evaporation-residue cross sections of one-proton, radiative-capture, and two-neutron emissions relative to the one-neutron emission in the reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi. To estimate the upper bounds of those quantities, we vary model parameters in the calculations, such as the level-density parameter and the height of the fission barrier. We conclude that the highest possibility is for the 2n reaction channel, and its upper bounds are 2.4$%$ and at most less than 7.9% with unrealistic parameter values, under the actual experimental conditions of [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. {\\bf 73} (2004) 2593].

Takatoshi Ichikawa; Akira Iwamoto

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

Calculations of Branching Ratios for Radiative-Capture, One-Proton, and Two-Neutron Channels in the Fusion Reaction $^{209}$Bi+$^{70}$Zn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of the non-one-neutron emission channels in the cold fusion reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi to produce the element Z=113. For this purpose, we calculate the evaporation-residue cross sections of one-proton, radiative-capture, and two-neutron emissions relative to the one-neutron emission in the reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi. To estimate the upper bounds of those quantities, we vary model parameters in the calculations, such as the level-density parameter and the height of the fission barrier. We conclude that the highest possibility is for the 2n reaction channel, and its upper bounds are 2.4$%$ and at most less than 7.9% with unrealistic parameter values, under the actual experimental conditions of [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. {\\bf 73} (2004) 2593].

Ichikawa, Takatoshi; 10.1143/JPSJ.79.074201

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260Bh Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models. For many years, “cold fusionreactions utilizingproduced via the new “cold fusionreaction 209 Bi( 52 Cr,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

1 DEMONSTRATION OF NUCLEAR FUSION IN AN ORDINARY CLAY FLOWER POT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work demonstrates a sustainable nuclear fusion reaction of hydrogen using a clay flower port as a reactor vessel. Our novel approach uses a “charge mirror ” that reduces the electromagnetic repulsion between nuclei enough to allow fusion initiation at room temperature. The device can also be used as a secure error-free transgalactic communications pipe with zero latency and near infinite bandwidth. I.

Albert Einstein; Er Bell; Richard Feynman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

Rainer W. Kuehne

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

Kuehne, R W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Nuclear Fusion Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Nuclear fusion reactors, if they can be made to work, promise virtually unlimited power for the indefinite future. This is because the fuel, isotopes of hydrogen, are...

72

Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and 208Pb, 209Bi, 238U, and 248Cm Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sections of hot and cold fusion reactions. Experimentalreaction products. Cold fusion reactions were examined usingexperimental data. The cold fusion experimental results are

Patin, Joshua B.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Dynamical Simulation of Gamma-Ray Multiplicity in B10+Np23, B11+ Th232, C12+Th232, O16 +Th232 Heavy Ion Fusion-Fission Reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The passive Q-switched performance of the ruby laser with slow-relaxing solid-state saturable absorber calcium fluoride crystals doped with divalent dysprosium Dy2+:CaF2 is numerical simulation, saturable absorber, Q-switch. is numerically investigated ... Keywords: (fusion-fission reactions, Langevin equations, Monte Carlo simulation, ?-ray multiplicity)

M. R. Pahlavani; S. M. Mirfathi; D. Naderi

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

LLNL-PRES-463228 FUSION PERSPECTIVES*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LLNL-PRES-463228 FUSION PERSPECTIVES* LLNL Fusion Energy Sciences Program D.D. Ryutov Fusion, Novosibirsk, July 1988: working together with the LLNL team #12;Axisymmetric mirrors can serve as a basis

75

work  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S WORKING CAPITAL FUND U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES OCTOBER 1998 AUDIT REPORT CR-B-99-01 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, BUSINESS MANAGEMENT STAFF FROM: William S. Maharay Acting Manager, Capital Regional Audit Office, Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on the Department's Working Capital Fund BACKGROUND The Department established the Working Capital Fund (Fund) in January 1996 as a financial management tool for charging the costs of common services provided at Headquarters to Departmental program offices. The objectives in establishing the Fund were to increase efficiency of the Department's operations, improve management of administrative services

76

Fusion safety program Annual report, Fiscal year 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY-95. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A final activity described is work to develop DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Fusion Test Facilities.

Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Carmack, W.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

FUSION CROSS-SECTIONS AND THE NEW DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Olmi, 0. Schwalm and W. Wb'lfli, "Fusion Reaction Studies ofin I n i t i a t i n g Fusion between Very High Ions", GSI-Alexander and G.R. Satchler, "Fusion Barriers, Empirical and

Swiatecki, W.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Homodyne target tracking for direct drive laser inertial fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

direct drive inertial fusion reactor (Sethian). HAPL’sblock from the fusion reactor chamber. 4.3 Demonstration A.fusion reaction for generating electricity (see figure 1.1). In order for such a nuclear reactor

Spalding, Jon David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Converting energy from fusion into useful forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If fusion power reactors are to be feasible, it will still be necessary to convert the energy of the nuclear reaction into usable form. The heat produced will be removed from the reactor core by a primary coolant, which might be water, helium, molten lithium-lead, molten lithium-containing salt, or CO2. The heat could then be transferred to a conventional Rankine cycle or Brayton (gas turbine) cycle. Alternatively it could be used for thermochemical processes such as producing hydrogen or other transport fuels. Fusion presents new problems because of the high energy neutrons released. These affect the selection of materials and the operating temperature, ultimately determining the choice of coolant and working cycle. The limited temperature ranges allowed by present day irradiated structural materials, combined with the large internal power demand of the plant, will limit the overall thermal efficiency. The operating conditions of the fusion power source, the materials, coolant, and energy conversion system w...

Kovari, M; Jenkins, I; Kiely, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cold nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

Tsyganov, E. N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cluster-Impact Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers the theoretical interpretation of cluster-impact fusion (CIF). The proton energy spectrum of CIF shows it to be hot fusion on a microscopic atomic scale. The temperature of the reaction can be determined by the Doppler-like broadening of the 3.025 MeV proton line. The spectrum also indicates that the high temperature results from a one-dimensional rather than a three-dimensional velocity distribution.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

Sarantites, D.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Atomic data for fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.) [eds.; Barnett, C.F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fusion reactors for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the types of processes now being considered for synthetic fuels production from fusion energy, together with an example of each type are listed. The process efficiency is defined as the chemical energy in the generated hydrogen (at the higher heating value (HHV)) divided by the total fusion energy release, including alpha particles and secondary neutron reactions in the blanket. Except where specifically noted, both high and low temperature blanket heats are counted as part of total fusion energy release.

Powell, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion conditions is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion.

Kirkpatrick, R. C. (Ronald C.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Will NIF Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is vital that new clean and abundant sources of energy be developed for the sustainability of modern society. Nuclear fusion of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, if successful, might make a major contribution toward satisfying this need. The U.S. has an important effort aimed at achieving practical inertial confinement fusion, ICF, which has been under development for decades at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a giant laser to multiply-shock and thus quasi-isentropically compress a capsule of deuterium-tritium (DT) to high density and temperature, where the fusion rate is proportional to density squared times temperature to the fourth power. The principal problem that must be solved for NIF to work successfully is elimination of the Rayleigh-Tailor (R-T) instability that originates from the interface between the solid shell and the DT fuel within it. The R-T instability poisons the fusion reaction by reducing the temperature of the DT achieved ...

Nellis, W J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Inertial confinement fusion with direct electric generation by magnetic flux comparession  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-power-density laser-fusion-reactor concept in investigated in which directed kinetic enery imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium--in which the fusion target is centrally located--is maximized. In turn, this kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with, potentially, very high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the concept maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall can be many orders of magnitude less than is typical of D-T fusion reactor concepts.

Lasche, G.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Particle beam fusion  

SciTech Connect

Today, in keeping with Sandia Laboratories` designation by the Department of Energy as the lead laboratory for the pulsed power approach to fusion, its efforts include major research activities and the construction of new facilities at its Albuquerque site. Additionally, in its capacity as lead laboratory, Sandia coordinates DOE-supported pulsed power fusion work at other government operated laboratories, with industrial contractors, and universities. The beginning of Sandia`s involvement in developing fusion power was an outgrowth of its contributions to the nation`s nuclear weapon program. The Laboratories` work in the early 1960`s emphasized the use of pulsed radiation environments to test the resistance of US nuclear weapons to enemy nuclear bursts. A careful study of options for fusion power indicated that Sandia`s expertise in the pulsed power field could provide a powerful match to ignite fusion fuel. Although creating test environments is an achieved goal of Sandia`s overall program, this work and other military tasks protected by appropriate security regulations will continue, making full use of the same pulsed power technology and accelerators as the fusion-for-energy program. Major goals of Sandia`s fusion program including the following: (1) complete a particle accelerator to deliver sufficient beam energy for igniting fusion targets; (2) obtain net energy gain, this goal would provide fusion energy output in excess of energy stored in the accelerator; (3) develop a technology base for the repetitive ignition of pellets in a power reactor. After accomplishing these goals, the technology will be introduced to the nation`s commercial sector.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11, 1980, p. 725. MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY Staff W. Kunkel andsupport) Accelerator and Fusion Research Division N.Abt Y.Wong J. Zatver HEAVY ION FUSION Work continued during FY80

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Homodyne target tracking for direct drive laser inertial fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory. Inertial Fusion Energy: How IFE Works,Tracking of Direct Drive Inertial Fusion Targets."Fusion Science and Technology 52.3 (2007): 435-439. Tillack,

Spalding, Jon David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fusion power production in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

Up to 9.3 MW of fusion power has been produced from deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reactions in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The total fusion yield from a single plasma pulse has reached 6.5 MJ. The experiments in TFTR with deuterium-tritium plasmas fueled and heated by neutral beam injection span wide ranges in plasma and operating conditions. Through the use of lithium pellet conditioning to control the edge recycling, the plasma confinement in TFTR has been improved to the point where the stability of the plasma to pressure driven modes is limiting the fusion power for plasma currents up to 2.5 MA. The central energy and fusion power densities in these plasmas are comparable to those expected in a thermalized DT reactor, such as ITER.

Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of odd-Z-projectile reactions for transactinide element synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Superheavy Nuclei in Cold Fusion Reactions, Phys. Rev. Cof Super-Heavy Nuclei in Cold Fusion Reactions, Int. J. Mod.barrier, why should cold fusion give excitation energies of

Folden III, Charles Marvin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Role of atomic collisions in fusion  

SciTech Connect

Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

Post, D.E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Magneized target fusion: An overview of the concept  

SciTech Connect

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) seeks to take advantage of the reduction of thermal conductivity through the application of a strong magneticfield and thereby ease the requirements for reaching fusion conditions in a thermonuclear (TN) fusion fuel. A potentially important benefit of the strong field in the partial trapping of energetic charged particles to enhance energy deposition by the TN fusion reaction products. The essential physics is described. MTF appears to lead to fusion targets that require orders of magnitude less power and intensity for fusion ignition than currently proposed (unmagnetized) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets do, making some very energetic pulsed power drivers attractive for realizing controlled fusion.

Kirkpatrick, R.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Z-inertial fusion energy: power plant final report FY 2006.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work conducted for the Z-inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) late start Laboratory Directed Research Project. A major area of focus was on creating a roadmap to a z-pinch driven fusion power plant. The roadmap ties ZIFE into the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative through the use of high energy fusion neutrons to burn the actinides of spent fuel waste. Transmutation presents a near term use for Z-IFE technology and will aid in paving the path to fusion energy. The work this year continued to develop the science and engineering needed to support the Z-IFE roadmap. This included plant system and driver cost estimates, recyclable transmission line studies, flibe characterization, reaction chamber design, and shock mitigation techniques.

Anderson, Mark (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kulcinski, Gerald (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Zhao, Haihua (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Olson, Craig Lee; Sierra, Dannelle P.; Meier, Wayne (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories); McConnell, Paul E.; Ghiaasiaan, M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kern, Brian (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tajima, Yu (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Campen, Chistopher (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Sketchley, Tomas (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Moir, R (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories); Bardet, Philippe M. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Durbin, Samuel; Morrow, Charles W.; Vigil, Virginia L (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Modesto-Beato, Marcos A.; Franklin, James Kenneth (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Smith, James Dean; Ying, Alice (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Cook, Jason T.; Schmitz, Lothar (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Abdel-Khalik, S. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Abdou, Mohamed A. (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Bonazza, Riccardo (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Sridharan, Kumar (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rochau, Gary Eugene; Gudmundson, Jesse (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Peterson, Per F. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marriott, Ed (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Oakley, Jason (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fusion Website  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Basics Fusion Intro Fusion Education Research DIII-D Internal Site Opportunities Virtual DIII-D Collaborators Countries Physics Eng Physics Operations Diagnostics Computing IFT IFT Site ITER ITER Site FDF Theory Collaborators Conferences GA-Hosted Room Reservations Fusion Meetings Plasma Publications Presentations Images Brochures Posters Movies Corporate General Atomics Products Visitor GA Fusion Hotels Internal Users GA Internal Site DIII-D General Experimental Science Experimental Science Home 2013 Experimental Campaign Burning Plasma Physics Dynamics & Control Boundary and Pedestal ELM Control Operations Diagnostics Computing Support Visitors DIII-D Web Access Help IFT ITER-GA Theory Research Highlights Personnel Links Policies Safety Comp Support Trouble Ticket Eng/Design Fusion Webmail Phone Book

98

Fusion breeder  

SciTech Connect

The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

Moir, R.W.

1982-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fusion breeder  

SciTech Connect

The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

Moir, R.W.

1982-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

100

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions. Phys. Rev. C,transfermium elements in cold fusion reactions. Phys. Rev.have been deemed “cold fusionreactions because of the low

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fusion energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fusion Implementation  

SciTech Connect

If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

J.A. Schmidt

2002-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Assisted fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of nuclear fusion consisting of a wave packet impinging into a well located between square one dimensional barriers is treated analytically. The wave function inside the well is calculated exactly for the assisted tunneling induced by a perturbation mimicking a constant electric field with arbitrary time dependence. Conditions are found for the enhancement of fusion.

German Kälbermann

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included. (RME)

Fowler, T.K.

1977-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

Development of an odd-Z-projectile reaction for heavy element synthesis: 208Pb(64Ni, n)271Ds and 208Pb(65Cu, n)272111  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of heavy elements in cold fusion reactions which have very23.60. +e, 27.90. +b Cold nuclear fusion reactions have been

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of $^{16}$O with $^{154,}$$^{144}$Sm,$^{186}$W and $^{208}$Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two $^{64}$Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

F. Muhammad Zamrun; K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

SPIELMAN,RICK B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

SciTech Connect

A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

Lasche, G.P.

1987-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Controlled production of energy by fusion of light nuclei has been the goal of a large portion of the physics community since the 1950's. In order for a fusion reaction to take place, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. At this temperature, matter can exist only in the form of an almost fully ionized plasma. In order for the reaction to produce net power, the product of the density and energy confinement time must exceed a minimum value of 10/sup 20/ sec m/sup -3/, the so-called Lawson criterion. Basically, two approaches are being taken to meet this criterion: inertial confinement and magnetic confinement. Inertial confinement is the basis of the laser fusion approach; a fuel pellet is imploded by intense laser beams from all sides and ignites. Magnetic confinement devices, which exist in a variety of geometries, rely upon electromagnetic forces on the charged particles of the plasma to keep the hot plasma from expanding. Of these devices, the most encouraging results have been achieved with a class of devices known as tokamaks. Recent successes with these devices have given plasma physicists confidence that scientific feasibility will be demonstrated in the next generation of tokamaks; however, an even larger effort will be required to make fusion power commercially feasible. As a result, emphasis in the controlled thermonuclear research program is beginning to shift from plasma physics to a new branch of nuclear engineering which can be called fusion engineering, in which instrumentation and control engineers will play a major role. Among the new problem areas they will deal with are plasma diagnostics and superconducting coil instrumentation.

Walstrom, P.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Group, Contemporary Physics Education Project The Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) is a non-profit organization of teachers, educators and physicists working to...

112

Fusion Safety Program annual report, Fiscal Year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in Fiscal Year 1993. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been designated by DOE as the lead laboratory for fusion safety, and EG&G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for INEL operations. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations, including universities and private companies. Technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, beryllium safety, activation product release, reactions involving potential plasma-facing materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions and edge physics modeling, risk assessment failure rates, computer codes for reactor transient analysis, and regulatory support. These areas include work completed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed at the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor projects at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and a summary of the technical support for the ARIES/PULSAR commercial reactor design studies.

Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Motloch, C.G.; Petti, D.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Dynamic Instruction Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC INSTRUCTION FUSION A thesis submitted in4 2.2 Instruction Fusion & Complex10 3.1 Fusion Selection

Lee, Ian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Minimal fusion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We define minimal fusion systems in a way that every non-solvable fusion system has a section which is minimal. Minimal fusion systems can also be… (more)

Henke, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is unlikely that nuclear fission power plants willIn the case of nuclear fission reactions, the fundamentalaspects of nuclear fusion and fission. This approach, termed

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Fast power cycle for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

The unique, deep penetration capability of 14 MeV neutrons produced in DT fusion reactions allows the generation of very high temperature working fluid temperatures in a thermal power cycle. In the FAST (Fusion Augmented Steam Turbine) power cycle steam is directly superheated by the high temperature ceramic refractory interior of the blanket, after being generated by heat extracted from the relatively cool blanket structure. The steam is then passed to a high temperature gas turbine for power generation. Cycle studies have been carried out for a range of turbine inlet temperatures (1600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F (870 to 1650/sup 0/C)), number of reheats, turbine mechanical efficiency, recuperator effectiveness, and system pressure losses. Gross cycle efficiency is projected to be in the range of 55 to 60%, (fusion energy to electric power), depending on parameters selected. Turbine inlet temperatures above 2000/sup 0/F, while they do increase efficiency somewhat, are not necessarily for high cycle efficiency.

Powell, J.; Fillo, J.; Makowitz, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

How does breakup influence near-barrier fusion of weakly bound light nuclei ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence on the fusion process of coupling to collective degrees of freedom has been explored. The significant enhancement of he fusion cross setion at sub-barrier energies was understood in terms of the dynamical processes arising from strong couplings to collective inelastic excitations of the target and projectile. However, in the case of reactions where breakup becomes an important process, conflicing model predictions and experimental results have been reported in the literature. Excitation functions for sub- and near-barrier total (complete + incomplete) fusion cross sections have been measured for the $^{6,7}$Li + $^{59}$Co at the Vivitron facility and at the 8UD Pelletron tandem facility using standard $\\gamma$-ray techniques. The data extend to medium-mass systems previous works exploring the coupling effects in fusion reactions of both lighter and heavier systems. Results of continuum-discretized coupled channel (CDCC) calculations indicate a small enhancement of total fusion for the more weakly bound $^{6}$Li at sub-barrier energies, with similar cross sections for both reactions at and above the barrier. A systematic study of $^{4,6}$He induced fusion reactions with the CDCC method is in progress. The understanding of the reaction dynamics involving couplings to the breakup channels requires th explicit measurement of precise elastic scattering data as well as yields leading to the breakup itself. Recent coincidence experiments for $^{6,7}$Li + $^{59}$Co are addressing this issue. The particle identification of the breakup products have been achieved by measuring the three-body final-state correlations.

C. Beck; N. Rowley; M. Rousseau; F. Haas; P. Bednarczyk; S. Courtin; N. Kintz; F. Hoellinger; P. Papka; S. Szilner; A. Sanchez I Zafra; A. Hachem; E. Martin; O. Stezowski; A. Diaz-Torres; F. A. Souza; A. Szanto De Toledo; A. Aissaoui; N. Carlin; R. Liguori Neto; M. G. Munhoz; J. Takahashi; A. A. P. Suade; M. M. De Moura; E. M. Szanto; K. Hagino; I. J. Thompson

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Computational Magnetohydrodynamic Model of a Gasdynamic Fusion Space Propulsion System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work advances the gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion space propulsion system concept by testing the potential of an advanced aneutronic fusion fuel combination of proton?11boron… (more)

Ohlandt, Chad J. R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Search for fusion power  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the basics of fusion power is given. Both inertial confinement and magnetic confinement fusion are discussed.

Post, R.F.

1978-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

The influence of projectile neutron number in the 208Pb(48Ti, n)255Rf and 208Pb(50Ti, n)257Rf reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type of reaction has been referred to as “cold fusion. ”Cold fusion reactions have been used in the discovery ofwe used as a guide in our cold fusion studies was recently

Dragojevic, I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparison of reactions for the production of 258,257Db: 208Pb(51V,xn) and 209Bi(50Ti,xn)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as 10 - 15 MeV, hence ‘cold’ fusion. These low excitationmodel for predicting cold fusion reaction cross sections [7,been produced in ‘cold’ nuclear fusion reactions with Pb and

Gates, Jacklyn M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fudge: a high-bandwidth fusion diagnostic of the NIF  

SciTech Connect

Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)/Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program must include good characterization of the fusion source. Ideally, diagnostics would measure the spatially-resolved history of the fusion reaction rate and temperature. Existing diagnostics can satisfy this goal only partially. One class of new techniques that could play a major role in high-yield diagnostics is measurements based on fusion {gamma} rays. The Fusion Diagnostic Gamma Experiment (FUDGE) can be used to perform energy-resolved measurements of (D,T) fusion reaction rates This diagnostic is based on the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays that are produced by (D,T) fusion. The {gamma} rays are free of spectral dispersion and can be detected with a high bandwidth Cherenkov detector. A simple magnetic monochromator selects signals from the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays and reduces background signals from non-fusion {gamma} rays.

Moran, M. J., LLNL

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fusion breeder: its potential role and prospects  

SciTech Connect

The fusion breeder is a concept that utilizes 14 MeV neutrons from D + T ..-->.. n(14.1 MeV) + ..cap alpha..(3.5 MeV) fusion reactions to produce more fuel than the tritium (T) needed to sustain the fusion process. This excess fuel production capacity is used to produce fissile material (Pu-239 or U-233) for subsequent use in fission reactors. We are concentrating on a class of blankets we call fission suppressed. The blanket is the region surrounding the fusion plasma in which fusion neutrons interact to produce fuel and heat. The fission-suppressed blanket uses non-fission reactions (mainly (n,2n) or (n,n't)) to generate excess neutrons for the production of net fuel. This is in contrast to the fast fission class of blankets which use (n,fiss) reactions to generate excess neutrons. Fusion reactors with fast fission blankets are commony known as fusion-fission hybrids because they combine fusion and fission in the same device.

Lee, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fusion Induced by Radioactive Ion Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of radioactive beams opens a new frontier for fusion studies. The coupling to the continuum can be explored with very loosely bound nuclei. Experiments were performed with beams of nuclei at or near the proton and neutron drip-lines to measure fusion and associated reactions in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition, the fusion yield is predicted to be enhanced in reactions involving very neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Experimental measurements were carried out to investigate if it is feasible to use such beams to produce new heavy elements. The current status of these experimental activities is given in this review.

J. F. Liang; C. Signorini

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

TWO IMPORTANT FUSION PROCESSES CREATING THE CONDITIONS FOR FUSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPORTANT FUSION PROCESSES CREATING THE CONDITIONS FOR FUSION F u s i o n Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source C o n f i n e m e n t Q u a l i t y , n τ ( m - 3 s ) 1970-75 1990s 1975-80 1980s Ion Temperature (K) 10 21 10 20 10 19 10 18 10 17 10 6 10 7 10 8 10 9 Inertial Magnetic Expected reactor regime Expected reactor regime Useful Nuclear Masses (The electron's mass is 0.000549 u.) Label Species Mass (u*) n ( 1 n) neutron 1.008665 p ( 1 H) proton 1.007276 D ( 2 H) deuteron 2.013553 T ( 3 H) triton 3.015500 3 He helium-3 3.014932 α ( 4 He) helium-4 4.001505 * 1 u = 1.66054 x 10 -27 kg = 931.466 MeV/c 2 Nuclear Mass (u) B i n d i n g E n e r g y P e r N u c l e o n ( M e V ) 1 200 150 100 50 10 0 5 62 Ni Fusion Reactions Release Energy Fission Reactions Release Energy EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS IN FUSION RESEARCH Fusion requires high tempera- ture plasmas confined long enough at high density

126

Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream  

SciTech Connect

In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

Clayton, E.D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of hydrogen (deuterium and tritium), are derived from water and the metal lithium, a relatively abundant resource. The fuels are virtually inexhaustible and they are available worldwide. Deuterium from one gallon of seawater would provide the equivalent energy of 300 gallons of gasoline, or over a half ton of coal. This energy is released when deuterium and tritium nuclei are fused together to form a helium nucleus and a neutron. The neutron is used to breed tritium from lithium. The energy released is carried by the helium nucleus (3.5 MeV) and the neutron (14 MeV). The energetic helium nucleus heats the fuel, helping to sustain the fusion reaction. Once the helium cools, it is collected and becomes a useful byproduct. A fusion power plant would produce no climate-changing gases.

Moses, E

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Data security on the national fusion grid  

SciTech Connect

The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Security on the US Fusion Grid  

SciTech Connect

The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fusion reactors: a remote possibility  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of controlled thermonuclear reactor experiments will be faced with the handling problems of tritium and neutron activation that will dominate the safety and maintenance problems of future fusion reactors. The nuclear industry has been working with highly radioactive systems for many years and has developed the tools and methods to do safely productive work in the presence of high radiation fields. These methods can be applied to CTR work by extending them to the unique problems associated with fusion reactors. (auth)

Doggett, J.N.

1975-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

Inertial fusion energy: A clearer view of the environmental and safety perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If fusion energy is to achieve its full potential for safety and environmental (S&E) advantages, the S&E characteristics of fusion power plant designs must be quantified and understood, and the resulting insights must be embodied in the ongoing process of development of fusion energy. As part of this task, the present work compares S&E characteristics of five inertial and two magnetic fusion power plant designs. For each design, a set of radiological hazard indices has been calculated with a system of computer codes and data libraries assembled for this purpose. These indices quantify the radiological hazards associated with the operation of fusion power plants with respect to three classes of hazard: accidents, occupational exposure, and waste disposal. The three classes of hazard have been qualitatively integrated to rank the best and worst fusion power plant designs with respect to S&E characteristics. From these rankings, the specific designs, and other S&E trends, design features that result in S&E advantages have been identified. Additionally, key areas for future fusion research have been identified. Specific experiments needed include the investigation of elemental release rates (expanded to include many more materials) and the verification of sequential charged-particle reactions. Improvements to the calculational methodology are recommended to enable future comparative analyses to represent more accurately the radiological hazards presented by fusion power plants. Finally, future work must consider economic effects. Trade-offs among design features will be decided not by S&E characteristics alone, but also by cost-benefit analyses. 118 refs., 35 figs., 35 tabs.

Latkowski, J.F.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Senate targets fusion, backs NIF  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses a budget approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee which funds the fusion program even lower than the drastically reduced level the House approved in July. Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) would continue but the Tokamak Physics Experiment would be halted. At the same time, the Senate bill allots money to start work on the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

Lawler, A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cold Fusion Production and Decay of Neutron-Deficient Isotopes of Dubnium and Development of Extraction Systems for Group V Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

separator for the study of fusion reaction products."by heavy-ion induced fusion?" Zeitschrift Fur Physik a-J. Wilczy?ski (2003). "Fusion by Diffusion." Acta Physica

Gates, Jacklyn M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cold Fusion Production and Decay of Neutron-Deficient Isotopes of Dubnium and Development of Extraction Systems for Group V Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of transfermium elements in cold fusion reactions." Physical1. Introduction Part I: Cold Fusion Production and Decay of1.2. Hot versus Cold Fusion 1.3. Excitation Functions 1.3.1.

Gates, Jacklyn M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Z Research: Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Fusion Sun Plasma The ultimate energy source Fusion occurs when two atomic nuclei are joined together. To fuse the atoms, the force that repels them as they come together must be overcome. Accelerators accomplish this by forcing molecules to collide with one another at very high temperatures (high temperatures are simply molecules moving at high speeds). When light nuclei are involved, fusion can produce more energy than was required to start the reaction. This process is the force that powers the Sun, whose source of energy is an ongoing fusion chain reaction. As an unconfined event, fusion was first developed for use in nuclear weapons. Fusion's great potential as a new energy source depends on scientists' ability to harness its power in laboratory events. The Z

136

Experiments in cold fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

Palmer, E.P.

1986-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Sensor fusion for intelligent process control.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated system for the fusion of product and process sensors and controls for production of flat glass was envisioned, having as its objective the maximization of throughput and product quality subject to emission limits, furnace refractory wear, and other constraints. Although the project was prematurely terminated, stopping the work short of its goal, the tasks that were completed show the value of the approach and objectives. Though the demonstration was to have been done on a flat glass production line, the approach is applicable to control of production in the other sectors of the glass industry. Furthermore, the system architecture is also applicable in other industries utilizing processes in which product uniformity is determined by ability to control feed composition, mixing, heating and cooling, chemical reactions, and physical processes such as distillation, crystallization, drying, etc. The first phase of the project, with Visteon Automotive Systems as industrial partner, was focused on simulation and control of the glass annealing lehr. That work produced the analysis and computer code that provide the foundation for model-based control of annealing lehrs during steady state operation and through color and thickness changes. In the second phase of the work, with PPG Industries as the industrial partner, the emphasis was on control of temperature and combustion stoichiometry in the melting furnace, to provide a wider operating window, improve product yield, and increase energy efficiency. A program of experiments with the furnace, CFD modeling and simulation, flow measurements, and sensor fusion was undertaken to provide the experimental and theoretical basis for an integrated, model-based control system utilizing the new infrastructure installed at the demonstration site for the purpose. In spite of the fact that the project was terminated during the first year of the second phase of the work, the results of these first steps toward implementation of model-based control were sufficient to demonstrate the value of the approach to improving the productivity of glass manufacture.

Connors, John J. (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Hill, Kevin (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Hanekamp, David (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Haley, William F. (PPG Industries, Inc., Wichita Falls, TX); Gallagher, Robert J.; Gowin, Craig (PPG Industries, Inc., Batavia, IL); Farrar, Arthur R. (PPG Industries, Inc., Wichita Falls, TX); Sheaffer, Donald A.; DeYoung, Mark A. (PPG Industries, Inc., Mt. Zion, IL); Bertram, Lee A.; Dodge, Craig (PPG Industries, Inc., Mt. Zion, IL); Binion, Bruce (PPG Industries, Inc., Mt. Zion, IL); Walsh, Peter M.; Houf, William G.; Desam, Padmabhushana R. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Tiwary, Rajiv (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Stokes, Michael R. (PPG Industries, Inc.); Miller, Alan J. (PPG Industries, Inc., Mt. Zion, IL); Michael, Richard W. (PPG Industries, Inc., Lincoln, AL); Mayer, Raymond M. (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Jiao, Yu (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Smith, Philip J. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Arbab, Mehran (PPG Industries, Inc., Harmar Township, PA); Hillaire, Robert G.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor which will be completedDrivers and Reactors for Inertial Confinement Fusion, K.A.

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fusion as a source of synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the near-term, coal derived synthetic fuels will be used; but in the long-term, resource depletion and environmental effects will mandate synthetic fuels from inexhaustible sources - fission, fusion, and solar. Of the three sources, fusion appears uniquely suited for the efficient production of hydrogen-based fuels, due to its ability to directly generate very high process temperatures (up to approx. 2000/sup 0/C) for water splitting reactions. Fusion-based water splitting reactions include high temperature electrolysis (HTE) of steam, thermochemical cycles, hybrid electrochemical/thermochemical, and direct thermal decomposition. HTE appears to be the simplest and most efficient process with efficiencies of 50 to 70% (fusion to hydrogen chemical energy), depending on process conditions.

Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Steinberg, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Failure rate data for fusion safety and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducts safety research in materials, chemical reactions, safety analysis, risk assessment, and in component research and development to support existing magnetic fusion experiments and also to promote safety in the design of future experiments. One of the areas of safety research is applying probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods to fusion experiments. To apply PRA, we need a fusion-relevant radiological dose code and a component failure rate data base. This paper describes the FSP effort to develop a failure rate data base for fusion-specific components.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Failure rate data for fusion safety and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducts safety research in materials, chemical reactions, safety analysis, risk assessment, and in component research and development to support existing magnetic fusion experiments and also to promote safety in the design of future experiments. One of the areas of safety research is applying probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods to fusion experiments. To apply PRA, we need a fusion-relevant radiological dose code and a component failure rate data base. This paper describes the FSP effort to develop a failure rate data base for fusion-specific components.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs  

SciTech Connect

A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fusion pumped light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fusion pumped light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the lasing medium. 3 figs.

Pappas, D.S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 (2004) 471487 PII: S0741-3335(04)69034-8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion the cold plasma dispersion relation, the ion­ion hybrid cutoff frequency is uniquely determined and tritium density equilibrium (nD nT), maximizing fusion reactions in a burning plasma experiment. A number

Heidbrink, William W.

147

Influence of projectile - breakup threshold on complete fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete fusion excitations for 11,10B+159Tb have been measured at energies around the respective Coulomb barriers, and the existing complete fusion measurements for 7Li+159Tb have been extended to higher energies. The measurements show significant reduction of complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies for both the reactions, 10B+159Tb and 7Li+159Tb, when compared to those for 11B+159Tb. The comparison shows that the extent of suppression of complete fusion cross sections is correlated with the -separation energies of the projectiles. Also, the two reactions, 10B+159Tb and 7Li+159Tb were found to produce incomplete fusion products at energies near the respective Coulomb barriers, with the - particle emitting channel being the favoured incomplete fusion process in both the cases.

A. Mukherjee; Subinit Roy; M. K. Pradhan; M. Saha Sarkar; P. Basu; B. Dasmahapatra; T. Bhattacharya; S. Bhattacharya; S. K. Basu; A. Chatterjee; V. Tripathi; S. Kailas

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fusion Breeder Program interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83.

Moir, R.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.

1982-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fusion Energy Greg Hammett & Russell Kulsred Princeton University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spitzer's 100th: Founding PPPL & Pioneering Work in Fusion Energy Greg Hammett & Russell Kulsred Princeton University Wednesday, Dec 4, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at...

150

Fusion systems and biset functors via ghost algebras.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work we utilize ghost groups of Burnside groups introduced by Boltje and Danz in order to investigate fusion systems of finite groups, double… (more)

O'Hare, Shawn Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

UCSD Support for Fusion Simulation Project Planning Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a close-out report on work performed by UCSD researchers in support of the Fusion Simulation Project Planning Activity.

Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Diamond, P. H.

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Heavy-ion accelerator research for inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

Thermonuclear fusion offers a most attractive long-term solution to the problem of future energy supplies: The fuel is virtually inexhaustible and the fusion reaction is notably free of long-lived radioactive by-products. Also, because the fuel is in the form of a plasma, there is no solid fuel core that could melt down. The DOE supports two major fusion research programs to exploit these virtues, one based on magnetic confinement and a second on inertial confinement. One part of the program aimed at inertial fusion is known as Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, or HIFAR. In this booklet, the aim is to place this effort in the context of fusion research generally, to review the brief history of heavy-ion fusion, and to describe the current status of the HIFAR program.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fusion of Decisions Transmitted Over Fading Channels in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion of Decisions Transmitted Over Fading Channels in Wireless Sensor Networks Biao Chen, Syracuse, NY 13244 Abstract Information fusion by utilizing multiple distributed sensors is studied in this work. We derive the optimal likelihood based fusion statistic for a parallel decision fusion problem

Chen, Biao

154

Experimental studies of tritium barrier concepts for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing experimental studies at ANL aimed at the development of methods to reduce tritium migration in fusion reactor systems currently include (1) work on the development of multilayered metal composites and impurity-coated refractory metals as barriers to tritium permeation in elevated temperature (greater than 300$sup 0$C) structures and (2) investigations of the kinetics of tritium trapping reactions in inert gas purge streams under conditions that emulate fusion reactor environments. Significant results obtained thus far are (1) demonstration of greater than 50-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of stainless steel structures by using stainless steel-clad composites containing an intermediate layer of a selected copper alloy and (2) verification that surface-oxide coatings lead to greater than 100-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of vanadium, but that severe oxygen penetration and embrittlement of the vanadium occur at temperatures in the range from 300 to 800$sup 0$C and under conditions of extremely low oxygen potential. Other considerations pertaining to the large-scale use of metal composites in fusion reactors are discussed, and progress in efforts to demonstrate the fabricability of metal composites is reviewed. Also presented are results of studies of the efficiencies of (1) CuO and CuO-MnO$sub 2$ beds in converting HT to HTO and (2) magnesium metal beds in converting HTO to HT. (auth)

Maroni, V.A.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Renner, T.A.; Pelto, R.H.; Wierdak, C.J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Individual Reactions of Permanganate and Various Reductants - Student Report to the DOE ERULF Program for Work Conducted May to July 2000  

SciTech Connect

Tank waste on the Hanford Site contains radioactive elements that need to be removed from solution prior to disposal. One effective way to do this is to precipitate the radioactive elements with manganese solids, produced by permanganate oxidation. When added to tank waste, the permanganate reacts quickly producing manganese (IV) dioxide precipitate. Because of the speed of the reaction it is difficult to tell what exactly is happening. Individual reactions using non-radioactive reductants found in the tanks were done to determine reaction kinetics, what permanganate was reduced to, and what oxidation products were formed. In this project sodium formate, sodium nitrite, glycolic acid, glycine, and sodium oxalate were studied using various concentrations of reductant in alkaline sodium hydroxide solutions. It was determined that formate reacted the quickest, followed by glycine and glycolic acid. Oxalate and nitrite did not appear to react with the permanganate solutions. The products of the oxidation reaction were examined. Formate was oxidized to carbonate and water. Glycolic acid was oxidized slower producing oxalate and water. Glycine reactions formed some ammonia in solution, oxalate, and water. The research reported by Amber Gauger in this report was part of a DOE ERULF student intern program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the direction of Richard Hallen in the summer of 2000.

Gauger, Amber M.; Hallen, Richard T.

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

What is believed about cold fusion?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1989, Fleischmann and Pons[1-5] claimed to initiate a fusion reaction between deuterons in palladium that resulted in an unusual amount of heat. This claim was rejected because insufficient supporting experimental information was provided, the claim was very difficult to replicate, and no plausible explanation could be proposed. During the 20 years since then, studies in at least 8 countries has provided a rich collection of information, improved reproducibility, and encouraged many explanations. This work has been reviewed by Storms[6] in 2007 based on over 1000 citations and will not be repeated here. This paper provides a brief and focused summary of what is believed to be true about the effect at the present time. Energy production in the form of heat is the most often investigated indication of a novel effect. The reported power ranges from a few milliwatts to over 100 watts with most studies reporting values at the low end of this range. The large range in values is caused by accidental creation of the necessary physical structures that are required to initiate the heat producing reactions, called the nuclear active environment (NAE). This environment requires a very large concentration of deuterons and involves structures having nano-sized dimensions. Although focus has been applied mostly to palladium, other elements are apparently involved.

Edmund Storms

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fusion for Earth and Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compact reactor concept (Williams, 2007) has the potential to provide clean, safe and unlimited supply of energy for Earth and Space applications. The concept is a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for individual home and space power. The concept also would make it possible for each plant or remote location to have it's own power source, on site, without the need for a connection to the power grid. This would minimize, or eliminate, power blackouts. The concept could replace large fission reactors and fossil fuel power plants plus provide energy for ships, locomotives, trucks and autos. It would make an ideal source of energy for space power applications and for space propulsion.

Williams, Pharis E

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Review of fusion synfuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

Fillo, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Inertial Confinement Fusion Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear fusion advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade has seen advances in the shaping and confinement of plasmas, and in approaches to noninductive current drive. Here, the author presents an overview of nuclear fusion advances between 1983-93 examining: fusion milestones; plasma shaping; ...

W. Sweet

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fusion versus Breakup: Observation of Large Fusion Suppression for 9 Be + 208 Pb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete fusion excitation functions for 9 Be + 208 Pb have been measured to high precision at near barrier energies. The experimental fusion barrier distribution extracted from these data allows reliable prediction of the expected complete fusion cross-sections. However, the measured cross-sections are only 68 % of those predicted. The large cross-sections observed for incomplete fusion products support the interpretation that this suppression of fusion is caused by 9Be breaking up into charged fragments before reaching the fusion 1 barrier. Implications for the fusion of radioactive nuclei are discussed. 2 Typeset using REVTEXThe recent availability of radioactive beams has made possible the study of the interactions and structure of exotic nuclei far from the line of stability. Unstable neutron–rich nuclei having very weakly bound neutrons exhibit characteristic features such as a neutron halo [1] extending to large radii, associated low–lying dipole modes, and a low energy threshold for breakup. These features may dramatically affect fusion and other reaction

M. Dasgupta; D. J. Hinde; R. D. Butt; R. M. Anjos; A. C. Berriman; N. Carlin; P. R. S. Gomes; C. R. Morton; J. O. Newton; A. Szanto De Toledo; K. Hagino

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fusion Forum 1981  

SciTech Connect

This review covers the basics of the fusion process. Some research programs and their present status are mentioned. (MOW)

Fowler, T.K.

1981-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Despite the cold war, which raged for another 30 years, controlled fusion research became a modelFusion Plasmas Martin Greenwald Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, John Webster - editor, published by John Wiley & Sons, New York (1999) #12;Controlled Fusion For half a century

Greenwald, Martin

165

Slow liner fusion  

SciTech Connect

{open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

Shaffer, M.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Lab Breakthrough: Neutron Science for the Fusion Mission | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Neutron Science for the Fusion Mission Neutron Science for the Fusion Mission Lab Breakthrough: Neutron Science for the Fusion Mission May 16, 2012 - 9:52am Addthis An accelerator team lead by Robert McGreevy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is testing material - a critical role in building an experimental fusion reactor for commercial use. As part of the international coalition, they expect to have an operational reactor by 2050. View the entire Lab Breakthrough playlist. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What is the difference between fusion and fission? Fission pulls molecules apart. This type of reactor runs nuclear power plants. Fusion puts molecules together. This type of reaction powers the Sun. Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientist Robert McGreevy explains the

167

Laser fusion pulse shape controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

Siebert, Larry D. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fusion research: the past is prologue  

SciTech Connect

At this juncture fusion research can be viewed as being at a turning point, a time to review its past and to imagine its future. Today, almost 50 years since the first serious attempts to address the daunting problem of achieving controlled fusion, we have both an opportunity and a challenge. Some predictions place fusion research today at a point midway between its first inception and its eventual maturation - in the middle of the 21st century - when fusion would become a major source of energy. Our opportunity therefore is to assess what we have learned from 50 years of hard work and use that knowledge as a starting point for new and better approaches to solving the fusion problem. Our challenge is to prove the "50 more years" prophesy wrong, by finding ways to shorten the time when fusion power becomes a reality. The thesis will be advanced that in the magnetic confinement approach to fusion open-ended magnetic confinement geometries offer much in responding to the challenge. A major advantage of open systems is that, owing to their theoretically and experimentally demonstrated ability to suppress plasma instabilities of both the MHD and the high-frequency wave-particle variety, the confinement becomes predictable from "classical," i.e., Fokker-Planck-type analysis. In a time of straitened budgetary circumstances for magnetic fusion research now being faced in the United States, the theoretical tractability of mirror-based systems is a substantial asset. In pursuing this avenue it is also necessary to keep an open mind as to the forms that mirror-based fusion power plants might take. For example, one can look to the high-energy physics community for a possible model: This community has shown the feasibility of constructing large and complex particle accelerators using superconducting magnets, vacuum chambers and complicated particle-handling technology, housed in underground tunnels that are 20 or more kilometers long. In the paper examples of mirror-based fusion power systems resembling long "linear colliders" will be discussed. It is not the intent of this paper to present detailed proposals for next-generation experiments in magnetic fusion research, but rather to encourage a return to the ambiance of an earlier era of fusion research, when innovative thinking and a spirit of scientific adventure prevailed. In that way we can realistically build a new era of fusion research, an era that would be firmly undergirded by the scientific and technological foundation that was laid in fusion's first half-century.

Post, R F

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

AFRD - Fusion Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory AFRD - Fusion Energy Sciences AFRD - Home Fusion - Home HIF-VNL Website Ion Beam Technology Group website Artist's conception of a heavy ion fusion power plant Artist's conception of an IFE powerplant We further inertial fusion energy as a future power source, primarily through R&D on heavy-ion induction accelerators. Our program is part of a "Virtual National Laboratory," headquartered in AFRD, that joins us with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in close collaboration on inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions. The related emergent science of high-energy-density physics (HEDP) has become a major focus. For further synergy, we have combined forces with the former Ion Beam

170

Nuclear Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used to measure the properties of nuclei. Reactions that exchange energy or nucleons can be used to measure the energies of...

171

Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Security on the US Fusion Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEMPLATE for Submission in Fusion Engineering and Design)et al. , “Building the US National Fusion Grid: Resultsfrom the National Fusion Collaboratory Project,” Fusion Eng.

Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Data security on the national fusion grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEMPLATE for Submission in Fusion Engineering and Design)et al. , “Building the US National Fusion Grid: Resultsfrom the National Fusion Collaboratory Project,” Fusion Eng.

Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Creating the Conditions for Fusion PLASMA CONFINEMENT AND HEATING Fusion requires high...

175

Structural and kinetic analysis of the unnatural fusion protein 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase::stilbene synthase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To increase the biochemical efficiency of biosynthetic systems, metabolic engineers have explored different approaches for organizing enzymes, including the generation of unnatural fusion proteins. Previous work aimed at improving the biosynthesis of resveratrol, a stilbene associated a range of health-promoting activities, in yeast used an unnatural engineered fusion protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (At4CL1) and Vitis vinifera (grape) stilbene synthase (VvSTS) to increase resveratrol levels 15-fold relative to yeast expressing the individual enzymes. Here we present the crystallographic and biochemical analysis of the 4CL::STS fusion protein. Determination of the X-ray crystal structure of 4CL::STS provides the first molecular view of an artificial didomain adenylation/ketosynthase fusion protein. Comparison of the steady-state kinetic properties of At4CL1, VvSTS, and 4CL::STS demonstrates that the fusion protein improves catalytic efficiency of either reaction less than 3-fold. Structural and kinetic analysis suggests that colocalization of the two enzyme active sites within 70 {angstrom} of each other provides the basis for enhanced in vivo synthesis of resveratrol.

Wang, Yechun; Yi, Hankuil; Wang, Melissa; Yu, Oliver; Jez, Joseph M. (WU); (Danforth)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Fast Track to Fusion Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World energy use is predicted to double in the next 40 years. Today, 80% is provided by burning fossil fuels, but this is not sustainable indefinitely because (i) it is driving climate change, and (ii) fossil fuels will eventually be exhausted (starting with oil). The resulting potential energy crisis requires increased investment in energy research and development (which is currently very small on the scale of the $3 trillion p.a. energy market, and falling). The wide portfolio of energy work that should be supported must include fusion, which is one of very few options that are capable in principle of supplying a large fraction of need in an environmentally responsible manner. The case for fusion has been strengthened by recent advances in plasma physics and fusion technology and by studies of fusion power plants that address safety and cost issues. The big questions are, 'How can we deliver fusion power as fast as possible?' and 'How long is it likely to take?' I will review progress in fusion, and argue for a focused fast-track program that could deliver a working prototype power station in less than 30 years.

Smith, Chris Llewellyn (UKAEA, Culham)

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Elements of Successful and Safe Fusion Experiment Operations  

SciTech Connect

A group of fusion safety professionals contribute to a Joint Working Group (JWG) that performs occupational safety walkthroughs of US and Japanese fusion experiments on a routine basis to enhance the safety of visiting researchers. The most recent walkthrough was completed in Japan in March 2008 by the US Safety Monitor team. This paper gives the general conclusions on fusion facility personnel safety that can be drawn from the series of walkthroughs.

K. Rule, L. Cadwallader, Y. Takase, T. Norimatsu, O. Kaneko, M. Sato, and R. Savercool

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS State of fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS State of fusion In the 1950s,the promise of controlled nuclear fusion, although there is still some way to go to realize the dream,the latest status report on fusion research compiled by the International Fusion Research Council (Nucl. Fusion 45,A1­A28; 2005) provides good reason

Loss, Daniel

179

Status of fusion maintenance  

SciTech Connect

Effective maintenance will be an essential ingredient in determining fusion system productivity. This level of productivity will result only after close attention is paid to the entire system as an entity and appropriate integration of the elements is made. The status of fusion maintenance is reviewed in the context of the entire system. While there are many challenging developmental tasks ahead in fusion maintenance, the required technologies are available in several high-technology industries, including nuclear fission.

Fuller, G.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Investigation of condensed matter fusion  

SciTech Connect

Work on muon-catalyzed fusion led to research on a possible new type of fusion occurring in hydrogen isotopes embedded in metal lattices. While the nuclear-product yields observed to date are so small as to require careful further checking, rates observed over short times appear sufficiently large to suggest that significant neutrons and triton yields could be realized -- if the process could be understood and controlled. During 1990, we have developed two charged-particle detection systems and three new neutron detectors. A segmented, high-efficiency neutron counter was taken into 600 m underground in a mine in Colorado for studies out of the cosmic-ray background. Significant neutron emissions were observed in this environment in both deuterium-gas-loaded metals and in electrolytic cells, confirming our earlier observations.

Jones, S.E.; Berrondo, M.; Czirr, J.B.; Decker, D.L.; Harrison, K.; Jensen, G.L.; Palmer, E.P.; Rees, L.B.; Taylor, S.; Vanfleet, H.B.; Wang, J.C.; Bennion, D.N.; Harb, J.N.; Pitt, W.G.; Thorne, J.M.; Anderson, A.N.; McMurtry, G.; Murphy, N.; Goff, F.E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fusion Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rotating Plasma Finding is Key for ITER Heavy-Ion Fusion Science (HIFS) Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights HPC Requirements Reviews NERSC HPC Achievement...

182

Fusion Communication Summit cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMUNICATIONS SUMMIT for U.S. Magnetic Fusion September 12-13, 2012 Princeton University - Frist Campus Center Princeton, New Jersey, USA Mission Statement Announcements...

183

Fusion Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017 The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Production Computing and...

184

Fusion Energy Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Division http:www.ornl.govscinseddivisionfed.shtml Please click link above if you were not already redirected to the page....

185

Controlled fusion physics: experimental  

SciTech Connect

A historical review is given of the experimental thermonuclear research program. The role of pinch devices, mirror machines, tokamak devices, and laser fusion is discussed. (MOW)

Post, R.F.

1975-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

186

Magnetic fusion reactor economics  

SciTech Connect

An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Path toward fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

A brief history of the fusion research program is given. Some of the problems that plagued the developmental progress are described. (MOW)

Furth, H.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Fusion Energy Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and engineering activities. Our plasma theorists develop the fundamental plasma theory and computational base needed to understand plasma behavior in fusion devices, to...

189

Use of data fusion to optimize contaminant transport predictions  

SciTech Connect

The original data fusion workstation, as envisioned by Coleman Research Corp., was constructed under funding from DOE (EM-50) in the early 1990s. The intent was to demonstrate the viability of fusion and analysis of data from various types of sensors for waste site characterization, but primarily geophysical. This overall concept changed over time and evolved more towards hydrogeological (groundwater) data fusion after some initial geophysical fusion work focused at Coleman. This initial geophysical fusion platform was tested at Hanford and Fernald, and the later hydrogeological fusion work has been demonstrated at Pantex, Savannah River, the US Army Letterkenny Depot, a DoD Massachusetts site and a DoD California site. The hydrogeologic data fusion package has been spun off to a company named Fusion and Control Technology, Inc. This package is called the Hydrological Fusion And Control Tool (Hydro-FACT) and is being sold as a product that links with the software package, MS-VMS (MODFLOW-SURFACT Visual Modeling System), sold by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. MODFLOW is a USGS development, and is in the public domain. Since the government paid for the data fusion development at Coleman, the government and their contractors have access to the data fusion technology in this hydrogeologic package for certain computer platforms, but would probably have to hire FACT (Fusion and Control Technology, Inc.,) and/or HydroGeoLogic for some level of software and services. Further discussion in this report will concentrate on the hydrogeologic fusion module that is being sold as Hydro-FACT, which can be linked with MS-VMS.

Eeckhout, E. van

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fusion and Plasmas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion and Fusion and Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (104KB) FES Budget FES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Fusion and Plasmas Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » About Fusion and Plasmas Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page WHAT IS FUSION? a Fusion the process that powers the sun and the stars. In one type of this reaction, two atoms of hydrogen combine together, or , to form an atom of helium. In the process some of the mass of the hydrogen is converted into energy. The easiest fusion reaction to make happen combines (or "heavy hydrogen") with (or "heavy-heavy hydrogen") to make and a . Deuterium is plentifully available in ordinary water. Tritium can be produced by combining the fusion neutron with the abundant light metal . Thus fusion has the potential to be an inexhaustible source of energy.

191

Using MCNP for fusion neutronics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Any fusion reactor using tritium-deuterium fusion will be a prolific source of 14 MeV neutrons. In fact, 80% of the fusion energy will be carried… (more)

Wasastjerna, Frej

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Mirror fusion--fission hybrids  

SciTech Connect

The fusion-fission concept and the mirror fusion-fission hybrid program are outlined. Magnetic mirror fusion drivers and blankets for hybrid reactors are discussed. Results of system analyses are presented and a reference design is described.

Lee, J.D.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Summary of HEDL Fusion Reactor Safety Support studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HEDL Fusion Reactor Safety Support studies are focused on characterizing blanket-coolant-material reactions for deuterium-tritium fusion reactor designs. The objective is to determine and examine potential safety and environmental issues associated with proposed blanket/coolant combinations under postulated accident conditions. The first studies considered liquid lithium as both blanket and coolant, and examined liquid lithium-material reactions. Liquid lithium reactions with oxygen, nitrogen, and various concretes have been characterized. Evaluations of lithium reaction extinguishment methods, lithium aerosol generation and collection, and the volatilization and transport of radioactive materials in connection with lithium-air reactions have been completed. Lithium compound blanket material reactions with water, a prime coolant candidate, have been characterized in terms of energy and gas release rates. Blanket materials considered were lithium aluminate, lithium oxide, lithium zirconate, lithium silicate, and lithium lead alloys (Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/ and Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/).

Muhlestein, L.D.; Jeppson, D.W.; Barreca, J.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Introducing the Fission-Fusion Reaction Process: Using a Laser-Accelerated Th Beam to produce Neutron-Rich Nuclei towards the N=126 Waiting Point of the r Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to produce neutron-rich nuclei in the range of the astrophysical r-process around the waiting point N=126 by fissioning a dense laser-accelerated thorium ion bunch in a thorium target (covered by a CH2 layer), where the light fission fragments of the beam fuse with the light fission fragments of the target. Via the 'hole-boring' mode of laser Radiation Pressure Acceleration using a high-intensity, short pulse laser, very efficiently bunches of 232Th with solid-state density can be generated from a Th layer, placed beneath a deuterated polyethylene foil, both forming the production target. Th ions laser-accelerated to about 7 MeV/u will pass through a thin CH2 layer placed in front of a thicker second Th foil closely behind the production target and disintegrate into light and heavy fission fragments. In addition, light ions (d,C) from the CD2 production target will be accelerated as well to about 7 MeV/u, inducing the fission process of 232Th also in the second Th layer. The laser-accelerated ion bunches with solid-state density, which are about 10^14 times more dense than classically accelerated ion bunches, allow for a high probability that generated fission products can fuse again. In contrast to classical radioactive beam facilities, where intense but low-density radioactive beams are merged with stable targets, the novel fission-fusion process draws on the fusion between neutron-rich, short-lived, light fission fragments both from beam and target. The high ion beam density may lead to a strong collective modification of the stopping power in the target, leading to significant range enhancement. Using a high-intensity laser as envisaged for the ELI-Nuclear Physics project in Bucharest (ELI-NP), estimates promise a fusion yield of about 10^3 ions per laser pulse in the mass range of A=180-190, thus enabling to approach the r-process waiting point at N=126.

D. Habs; P. G. Thirolf; M. Gross; K. Allinger; J. Bin; A. Henig; D. Kiefer; W. Ma; J. Schreiber

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Monte Carlo simulation of neutral beam injection into fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Motivations and techniques for the Monte Carlo computer simulation of energetic neutral beam injection for fusion reactors are described. The versatility of this approach allows a significantly more sophisticated treatment of charge transfer collision phenomena and consequent effects on engineering design than available from prior work. Exemplary results for a mirror Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF) are discussed. (auth)

Miller, R.L.

1975-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fusion of Giant Unilamellar Liposomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion of Giant Unilamellar Liposomes. ... Our main aim is to demonstrate whether a stalk forms during the fusion process or not. ...

197

Heavy Ion Fusion development plan  

SciTech Connect

Some general cnsiderations in the fusion development program are given. The various factors are considered that must be determined before heavy ion fusion can be assessed. (MOW)

Maschke, A.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

FUSION ENERGY Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports a vigorous research and development program for fusion energy. Fusion represents a potential energy source that is sustainable and has favorable safety and environmental features. Like fission, fusion offers the opportunity to generate substantial quantities of energy while producing no CO2 or other “greenhouse gases” that may contribute to global warming. Even with substantial conservation efforts and improvements in end-use efficiency, the future world demand for energy is expected to increase as a result of population growth and economic development. The timely advent of fusion as a practical energy source may be crucial. In particular, the ANS believes the following: 1. The long-term benefits of fusion energy warrant a sustained effort aimed at advancing fusion science and technology. International cooperation is a cost-effective complement to strong national programs. 2. Recent scientific progress in fusion research has been encouraging and warrants an enhanced and expanded fusion engineering and technology development program. 3. Based on the continuing success of physics and technology development programs, it appears

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

About sponsorship Fusion power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project to build a nuclear-fusion reactor came a step closer to reality when politicians agreed it should are needed. Unlike existing nuclear reactors, which produce nasty long-lived radioactive wasteAbout sponsorship Fusion power Nuclear ambitions Jun 30th 2005 From The Economist print edition

200

Fusion Power Deployment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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201

Antiproton catalyzed fusion  

SciTech Connect

Because of the potential application to power production, it is important to investigate a wide range of possible means to achieve nuclear fusion, even those that may appear initially to be infeasible. In antiproton catalyzed fusion, the negative antiproton shields the repulsion between the positively charged nuclei of hydrogen isotopes, thus allowing a much higher level of penetration through the repulsive Coulomb barrier, and thereby greatly enhancing the fusion cross section. Because of their more compact wave function, the more massive antiprotons offer considerably more shielding than do negative muons. The effects of the shielding on fusion cross sections are most predominate, at low energies. If the antiproton could exist in the ground state with a nucleus for a sufficient time without annihilating, the fusion cross sections are so enhanced that at room temperature energies, values up to about 1,000 barns (that for d+t) would be possible. Unfortunately, the cross section for antiproton annihilation with the incoming nucleus is even higher. A model that provides an upper bound for the fusion to annihilation cross section for all relevant energies indicates that each antiproton will catalyze no more than about one fusion. Because the energy required to make one antiproton greatly exceeds the fusion energy that is released, this level of catalysis is far from adequate for power production.

Morgan, D.L. Jr.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.

1995-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effects of Minor Alloy Additions on the Interfacial Reactions with Low ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These alloying elements might substantially change the reaction rate and the ... Effect Of Alloying Elements On Electrification-Fusion Phenomenon Of Sn-based ...

203

Fusion dynamics of symmetric systems near barrier energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections was explained as the lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model. The numbers of nucleon transfer in the neck region are appreciably dependent on the incident energies, but strongly on the reaction systems. A comparison of the neck dynamics is performed for the symmetric reactions $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. An increase of the ratios of neutron to proton in the neck region at initial collision stage is observed and obvious for neutron-rich systems, which can reduce the interaction potential of two colliding nuclei. The distribution of the dynamical fusion barriers and the fusion excitation functions are calculated and compared them with the available experimental data.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

Ross, P.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

Polynomial fusion rings of W-extended logarithmic minimal models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The countably infinite number of Virasoro representations of the logarithmic minimal model LM(p,p') can be reorganized into a finite number of W-representations with respect to the extended Virasoro algebra symmetry W. Using a lattice implementation of fusion, we recently determined the fusion algebra of these representations and found that it closes, albeit without an identity for p>1. Here, we provide a fusion-matrix realization of this fusion algebra and identify a fusion ring isomorphic to it. We also consider various extensions of it and quotients thereof, and introduce and analyze commutative diagrams with morphisms between the involved fusion algebras and the corresponding quotient polynomial fusion rings. One particular extension is reminiscent of the fundamental fusion algebra of LM(p,p') and offers a natural way of introducing the missing identity for p>1. Working out explicit fusion matrices is facilitated by a further enlargement based on a pair of mutual Moore-Penrose inverses intertwining between the W-fundamental and enlarged fusion algebras.

Jorgen Rasmussen

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Vintage DOE: What is Fusion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vintage DOE: What is Fusion Vintage DOE: What is Fusion Vintage DOE: What is Fusion January 10, 2011 - 12:45pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs As our team works to build our new website and new content features over the coming months, we're also reviewing the Department's video archives. In the below piece, a narrator ask people on the street "what is fusion?" and then, around the 2-minute mark, kicks off a nice introduction to fusion science. It's worth a watch if you could use a brush up on the basic science, or if you'd just enjoy a reminder of what Americans were wearing a couple decades ago. With much research and development, scientists at the Department of Energy have done a great deal to advance our knowledge of fusion since the time

207

I-SENSE: Intelligent embedded multi-sensor fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — I-SENSE demonstrates the potential of combining the scientific research areas multi-sensor data fusion and pervasive embedded computing. The main idea is to provide a generic architecture which supports a distributed online data fusion on an embedded system. Due to their high onboard processing and communication power our proposed architecture is designed to perform sophisticated data fusion tasks in realtime. Another goal of I-SENSE is to dynamically change the configuration, thus, to be able able to react to changes in the systems environment. This paper describes ongoing work in developing necessary hard- and software components in order to perform realtime multi-level data fusion. We present the distributed I-SENSE platform and introduce our multi-level fusion framework. First experimental results on embedded image fusion demonstrates the feasibility of our approach.

Andreas Klausner; Bernhard Rinner; Allan Tengg

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Design considerations in inertially-confined fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the effects of short time pulses of energetic particles and waves typical of inertially-confined thermonuclear reactions on the first wall, blanket and shield of conceptual reactors. Several reactor designs are presented which attempt to cope with the various problems from the microexplosion debris. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the first-wall problems of laser-initiated, inertially confined fusion reactors using the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle.

Hovingh, J.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 10 (2013) Flibe-Tritium Research for Fission or Fusion Reactors at Kyushu University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is increasing interest in using ionic molten-salt Flibe not only as self-cooled tritium(T)-breeding material in a fusion reactor blanket but also as fuel solvent of molten-salt fission reactors. Application of Flibe to T-breeding fluid for a stellarator-type fusion reactor operated at a high magnetic field brings large simplification of its blanket structure, allowing continuous operation under high-beta plasma conditions. Using mixed Flibe-ThF 4+UF 4 fuel in molten salt fission reactors permits stable long-term operation without fuel exchange. When Flibe or Flinak is irradiated by neutrons, however, acid and corrosive TF is generated, and some T permeates through structural walls. In order to solve these problems, chemical conditions of Flibe are changed using the redox-control reaction, Be+2TF=BeF 2+T 2. In addition, permeation of hydrogen isotopes is lowered by enhancing T recovery rates. Part of Flibe-tritium researches are performed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Japan-US collaboration work of JUPITER-II. Our own contributions to the topics are shortly introduced in this paper.

Satoshi Fukada

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effects of Fusion Mass Density and Fusion Location on the Strength of a Lumbar Interbody Fusion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The location and elastic modulus of a fusion mass are important factors for clinical assessment of the adequacy of interbody fusion. Various finite element models… (more)

Shelly, Cassi Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Suppressed fusion cross section for neutron halo nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion reactions of neutron-halo nuclei are investigated theoretically with a three-body model. The time-dependent wave-packet method is used to solve the three-body Schrodinger equation. The halo neutron behaves as a spectator during the Coulomb dissociation process of the projectile. The fusion cross sections of 11Be-209Bi and 6He-238U are calculated and are compared with measurements. Our calculation indicates that the fusion cross section is slightly hindered by the presence of weakly bound neutrons.

Makoto Ito; Kazuhiro Yabana; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Manabu Ueda

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

Simulations of Doppler Effects in Nuclear Reactions for AGATA Commissioning Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this master thesis is to simulate suitable nuclear reactions for a commissioning experiment, to be performed with the AGATA gamma-ray tracking spectrometer. The main aim of the work is to find a reaction, which gives large Doppler effects of the emitted gamma rays, with as small contribution as possible due to the energy and angular spread of the nuclei emitting the gamma rays. Inverse kinematics heavy-ion (HI) fusion reactions of the type (HI,gamma), (HI, n) on proton and deuteron targets have been studied. Target effects were investigated using the program TRIM in order to determine the impact on the Doppler effects caused by energy and angular straggling in the target material. The cross sections of a large number of reactions of protons and deuterons on nuclei with mass numbers in the range A=20-100 have been evaluated using the TALYS reaction code. The fusion-evaporation reactions, d(V-51,n)Cr-52 and d(Cl-37,n)Ar-38 were simulated in detail using the Monte Carlo code evapOR. The interactions in AGATA of the gamma rays emitted in these reactions were simulated using Geant4. The energy resolution of the gamma rays after gamma-ray tracking and Doppler correction were determined as a function of the interaction position resolution of the germanium detectors. The conclusion of this work is that of the two reactions d(V-51,n)Cr-52 is more suitable for an AGATA commissioning experiment.

Ali Al-Adili

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

Transfer reactions at ATLAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transfer reactions before, and with, HELIOS Or - "...seems like an awful lot of work just to do (d,p)..." Congratulations ATLAS Happy 25 th Prologue: Long before ATLAS... 11...

214

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

215

Why and how of fusion  

SciTech Connect

The potential advantages of fusion power are listed. The approaches to plasma containment are mentioned and the status of the fusion program is described. The ERDA and EPRI programs are discussed. The Fusion Energy Foundation's activities are mentioned. Fusion research at the U. of Ill. is described briefly. (MHR)

Miley, G.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Multishell inertial confinement fusion target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Multishell inertial confinement fusion target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Fusion Science to Prepare  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIII-D Explorations of Fusion Science to Prepare for ITER and FNSF Dr. Richard Buttery General Atomics Tuesday, Dec 10, 2013 - 11:00AM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 10:45AM The...

219

Fusion-breeder program  

SciTech Connect

The various approaches to a combined fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of breeding /sup 239/Pu and /sup 233/U are described. Design aspects and cost estimates for fuel production and electricity generation are discussed. (MOW)

Moir, R.W.

1982-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will present a uniform technical assessment of the benefits of the three approaches. The draft report will be presented and extensively discussed during the July meeting, leading to a final report. This report will provide critical fusion community input to the decision process of FESAC and DOE in 2002-2003, and to the review of burning plasma science by the National Academy of Sciences called for by FESAC and Energy Legislation which was passed by the House of Representatives [H.R. 4]. Members of the fusion community are encouraged to participate in the Snowmass working groups.

N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our work involves the study of intermediate energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions. This work has two foci. On the one hand, we desire to learn about the properties of nuclear matter under abnormal conditions, in this energy domain, predominately low densities. This purpose runs abreast of the second, which is the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. The two objectives are inexorably linked because our experimental laboratory for studying nuclear matter properties is a dynamic one. We are forced to ask how nuclear matter properties, such as phase transitions, are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. It may be that irrefutable information about nuclear matter will not be extracted from the reaction work. Nevertheless, we are compelled to undertake this effort not only because it is the only game in town and as yet we do not know that information cannot be extracted, but also because of our second objective. The process leads to an understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. Our program has been: To study energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition by studying incomplete fusion reactions. To gain confidence that we understand how highly excited systems decompose by studying all emissions from the highly excited systems. To push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain, with excitation function studies. And attempt to learn about the dynamics of the decays using particle-particle correlations. In the last effort, we have decided to focus on simple systems, where we believe, definitive statements are possible. These avenues of research share a common theme, large complex fragment production.

Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Study of fusion dynamics using Skyrme energy density formalism with different surface corrections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of Skyrme energy density formalism, we investigate the role of surface corrections on the fusion of colliding nuclei. For this, the coefficient of surface correction was varied between 1/36 and 4/36, and its impact was studied on about 180 reactions. Our detailed investigations indicate a linear relationship between the fusion barrier heights and strength of the surface corrections. Our analysis of the fusion barriers advocate the strength of surface correction of 1/36.

Ishwar Dutt; Narinder K. Dhiman

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

The international magnetic fusion energy program  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1988, the long tradition of international cooperation in magnetic fusion energy research culminated in the initiation of design work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). If eventually constructed in the 1990s, ITER would be the world's first magnetic fusion reactor. This paper discusses the background events that led to ITER and the present status of the ITER activity. This paper presents a brief summary of the technical, political, and organizational activities that have led to the creation of the ITER design activity. The ITER activity is now the main focus of international cooperation in magnetic fusion research and one of the largest international cooperative efforts in all of science. 2 refs., 12 figs.

Fowler, T.K.

1988-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

224

Causality detection and turbulence in fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work explores the potential of an information-theoretical causality detection method for unraveling the relation between fluctuating variables in complex nonlinear systems. The method is tested on some simple though nonlinear models, and guidelines for the choice of analysis parameters are established. Then, measurements from magnetically confined fusion plasmas are analyzed. The selected data bear relevance to the all-important spontaneous confinement transitions often observed in fusion plasmas, fundamental for the design of an economically attractive fusion reactor. It is shown how the present method is capable of clarifying the interaction between fluctuating quantities such as the turbulence amplitude, turbulent flux, and Zonal Flow amplitude, and uncovers several interactions that were missed by traditional methods.

van Milligen, B Ph; Ramisch, M; Estrada, T; Hidalgo, C; Alonso, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

On the Structure of the Fusion Ideal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Structure of the Fusion Ideal 4. Bouwknegt, P. ,of Wess-Zumino-Witten fusion rings. Rev. Math. Phys.A conjectural presentation of fusion algebras. Preprint,

Douglas, Christopher L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport for Heavy Ion Fusion* Edward Lee** LawrenceHm Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Abstract Solenoid transport ofseveral stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this

Lee, Edward

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Neutronics issues and inertial fusion energy: a summary of findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed and compared five major inertial fusion energy (IFE) and two representative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) power plant designs for their environment, safety, and health (ES&H) characteristics. Our work has focussed upon the neutronics of each of the designs and the resulting radiological hazard indices. The calculation of a consistent set of hazard indices allows comparisons to be made between the designs. Such comparisons enable identification of trends in fusion ES&H characteristics and may be used to increase the likelihood of fusion achieving its full potential with respect to ES&H characteristics. The present work summarizes our findings and conclusions. This work emphasizes the need for more research in low-activation materials and for the experimental measurement of radionuclide release fractions under accident conditions.

Latkowski, J. F., LLNL

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fusion research at General Atomics annual report, October 1, 1993-- September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

In FY94, the General Atomics (GA) Fusion Group made significant contributions to the technology needs of the controlled fusion power program. The work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy, Advanced Physics and Technology Division and ITER and Technology Division, of the US Department of Energy. The work is reported in the following sections on Fusion Power Plant Studies, Plasma Interactive Materials, RF Technology, and Diagnostics. Meetings attended and publications are listed in their respective sections. The overall objective of GA`s fusion technology research is to develop the technologies necessary for fusion to move successfully from present-day physics experiments to the next-generation fusion reactor experiments, Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and ITER, and ultimately to fusion power plants. To achieve this overall objective, we carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power reactors, and we conduct research to develop basic knowledge about these technologies, including plasma technologies, fusion nuclear technologies, and fusion materials. We continue to be committed to the development of fusion power and its commercialization by US industry.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Application of deuteron-deuteron (d-d) fusion neutrons to 40 ar/39/ar geochronology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development of high-?ux D–D fusion reactors is a worthy goalfusion reaction 2 H(d,n) 3 He. A new generation of D–D reactors

Renne, P.; Knight, K.B.; Nomade, S.; Leung, K.-N.; Lou, T.P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Role of Fusion Energy in a Sustainable Global Energy Strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion energy is one of only a few truly long-term energy options. Since its inception in the 1950s, the vision of the fusion energy research program has been to develop a viable means of harnessing the virtually unlimited energy stored in the nuclei of light atoms--the primary fuel deuterium is present as one part in 6,500 of all hydrogen. This vision grew out of the recognition that the immense power radiated by the sun is fueled by nuclear fusion in its hot core. Such high temperatures are a prerequisite for driving significant fusion reactions. The fascinating fourth state of matter at high temperatures is known as plasma. It is only in this fourth state of matter that the nuclei of two light atoms can fuse, releasing the excess energy that was needed to separately bind each of the original two nuclei. Because the nuclei of atoms carry a net positive electric charge, they repel each other. Hydrogenic nuclei, such as deuterium and tritium, must be heated to approximately 100 million degrees Celsius to overcome this electric repulsion and fuse. There have been dramatic recent advances in both the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas and in the generation of fusion power in the laboratory. Today, there is little doubt that fusion energy production is feasible. For this reason, the general thrust of fusion research has focused on configuration improvements leading to an economically competitive product. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are among the reasons to pursue these opportunities [1]. In this paper we review the tremendous scientific progress in fusion during the last 10 years. We utilize the detailed engineering design activities of burning plasma experiments as well as conceptual fusion power plant studies to describe our visions of attractive fusion power plants. We use these studies to compare technical requirements of an attractive fusion system with present achievements to identify remaining technical challenges for fusion. We discuss scenarios for fusion energy deployment in the energy market.

Meier, W; Najmabadi, F; Schmidt, J; Sheffield, J

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fusion Energy [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Fusion Energy Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Fusion Energy Bookmark and Share Since 1995, Argonne has had primary responsibility for the development of new design rules regarding various components in a fusion reactor, particularly those subject to irradiation embrittlement. During 1998, Argonne issued the final draft of the structural design criteria for in-vessel components in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER).

233

Unexpected results in neutron-rich radioactive beams induced fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fission-fragment beams at HRIBF provide a unique opportunity for studying the mechanisms of fusion involving nuclei with large neutron excess. To explore the role of transfer couplings, fusion excitation functions have been measured using neutron-rich radioactive $^{132}$Sn beams incident on $^{40}$Ca and $^{58}$Ni targets. The sub-barrier fusion enhancement for $^{132}$Sn+$^{40}$Ca is larger than that for $^{132}$Sn+$^{58}$Ni although the neutron transfer Q-values are similar for the two reactions. The fusion excitation function for $^{46}$Ti+$^{124}$Sn has been measured in an attempt to resolve the differences observed in $^{132}$Sn+$^{40}$Ca and $^{132}$Sn+$^{58}$Ni.

Liang, J Felix [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

How much laser power can propagate through fusion plasma?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propagation of intense laser beams is crucial for inertial confinement fusion, which requires precise beam control to achieve the compression and heating necessary to ignite the fusion reaction. The National Ignition Facility (NIF), where fusion will be attempted, is now under construction. Control of intense beam propagation may be ruined by laser beam self-focusing. We have identified the maximum laser beam power that can propagate through fusion plasma without significant self-focusing and have found excellent agreement with recent experimental data, and suggest a way to increase that maximum by appropriate choice of plasma composition with implication for NIF designs. Our theory also leads to the prediction of anti-correlation between beam spray and backscatter and suggests the indirect control of backscatter through manipulation of plasma ionization state or acoustic damping.

Pavel M. Lushnikov; Harvey A. Rose

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Recent results from the carbon fusion project at Notre Dame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The carbon fusion project at Notre Dame is aimed towards measuring the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C fusion cross section and its decay branches relevant to astrophysics down to the lowest possible energies. To complement this approach, we are also exploring new techniques for providing more reliable extrapolations of the cross sections in the energy ranges where experimental data are unavailable. In this paper, we report two recent results: 1) an upper limit for the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C fusion cross section, and 2) a new measurement of {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,n) along with an improved extrapolation technique based on the mirror reaction channel, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,p). The outlook for astrophysical heavy-ion fusion studies at Notre Dame is also discussed.

Bucher, Brian; Notani, Masahiro; Alongi, Adam; Browne, Justin; Cahillane, Craig; Dahlstrom, Erin; Davies, Paul; Fang Xiao; Lamm, Larry; Ma Chi; Moncion, Alexander; Tan Wanpeng; Tang Xiaodong; Thomas, Spencer [Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sub-barrier fusion enhancement with radioactive 134Te  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections of radioactive $^{134}$Te + $^{40}$Ca were measured at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The evaporation residues produced in the reaction were detected in a zero-degree ionization chamber providing high efficiency for inverse kinematics. Both coupled-channel calculations and comparison with similar Sn+Ca systems indicate an increased sub-barrier fusion probability that is correlated with the presence of positive Q-value neutron transfer channels. In comparison, the measured fusion excitation functions of $^{130}$Te + $^{58,64}$Ni, which have positive Q-value neutron transfer channels, were accurately reproduced by coupled-channel calculations including only inelastic excitations. The results demonstrate that the coupling of transfer channels can lead to enhanced sub-barrier fusion but this is not directly correlated with positive Q-value neutron transfer channels in all cases.

Z. Kohley; J. F. Liang; D. Shapira; C. J. Gross; R. L. Varner; J. M. Allmond; J. J. Kolata; P. E. Mueller; A. Roberts

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

Sub-barrier fusion enhancement with radioactive 134Te  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections of radioactive 134Te + 40Ca were measured at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The evaporation residues produced in the reaction were detected in a zero-degree ionization chamber providing high efficiency for inverse kinematics. Both coupled-channel calculations and comparison with similar Sn + Ca systems indicate an increased sub-barrier fusion probability that is correlated with the presence of positive Q-value neutron transfer channels. In comparison, the measured fusion excitation functions of 130Te + 58,64Ni, which have positive Q-value neutron transfer channels, were accurately reproduced by coupled-channel calculations including only inelastic excitations. The results demonstrate that the coupling of transfer channels can lead to enhanced sub-barrier fusion but this is not directly correlated with positive Q-value neutron transfer channels in all cases.

Kohley, Zachary W [ORNL; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Allmond, James M [ORNL; Kolata, Jim J [University of Notre Dame, IN; Mueller, Paul Edward [ORNL; Roberts, Amy [University of Notre Dame, IN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Laser-driven fusion etching process  

SciTech Connect

The surfaces of solid ionic substrates are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing an ionic substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g. a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrance of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic salt substrates, e.g., a solid inorganic salt such as LiNbO.sub.3, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gerardo, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactions generate energy in nuclear reactors, in stars, and are responsible for the existence of all elements heavier than hydrogen in the universe. Nuclear reactions denote reactions between nuclei, and between nuclei and other fundamental particles, such as electrons and photons. A short description of the conservation laws and the definition of basic physical quantities is presented, followed by a more detailed account of specific cases: (a) formation and decay of compound nuclei; (b)direct reactions; (c) photon and electron scattering; (d) heavy ion collisions; (e) formation of a quark-gluon plasma; (f) thermonuclear reactions; (g) and reactions with radioactive beams. Whenever necessary, basic equations are introduced to help understand general properties of these reactions. Published in Wiley Encyclopedia of Physics, ISBN-13: 978-3-527-40691-3 - Wiley-VCH, Berlin, 2009.

C. A. Bertulani

2009-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Safety considerations of lithium lead alloy as a fusion reactor breeding material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test results and conclusions are presented for lithium lead alloy interactions with various gas atmospheres, concrete and potential reactor coolants. The reactions are characterized to evaluate the potential of volatilizing and transporting radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. The safety concerns identified for lithium lead alloy reactions with the above materials are compared to those previously identified for a reference fusion breeder material, liquid lithium. Conclusions made from this comparison are also included.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Safety considerations of lithium lead alloy as a fusion reactor breeding material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test results and conclusions are presented for lithium lead alloy interactions with various gas atmospheres, concrete and potential reactor coolants. The reactions are characterized to evaluate the potential of volatilizing and transporting radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. The safety concerns identified for lithium lead alloy reactions with the above materials are compared to those previously identified for a reference fusion breeder material, liquid lithium. Conclusions made from this comparison are also included.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Ceramics for fusion applications  

SciTech Connect

Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications.

Clinard, F.W. Jr.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Peaceful uses of fusion  

SciTech Connect

Applications a thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and when once brought under control are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low--specific-yield formations are also suggested.

Teller, E.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ceramics for fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors.

Clinard, F.W. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Inverse Fusion PCR Cloning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse fusion PCR cloning (IFPC) is an easy, PCR based three-step cloning method that allows the seamless and directional insertion of PCR products into virtually all plasmids, this with a free choice of the insertion site. The PCR-derived inserts contain a vector-complementary 59-end that allows a fusion with the vector by an overlap extension PCR, and the resulting amplified insert-vector fusions are then circularized by ligation prior transformation. A minimal amount of starting material is needed and experimental steps are reduced. Untreated circular plasmid, or alternatively bacteria containing the plasmid, can be used as templates for the insertion, and clean-up of the insert fragment is not urgently required. The whole cloning procedure can be performed within a minimal hands-on time and results in the generation of hundreds to ten-thousands of positive colonies, with a minimal background.

Markus Spiliotis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fusion Categories and Homotopy Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply the yoga of classical homotopy theory to classification problems of G-extensions of fusion and braided fusion categories, where G is a finite group. Namely, we reduce such problems to classification (up to homotopy) ...

Etingof, Pavel I.

249

Fusion Development Facility (A26455)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 23rd IEEE/NPSS Symposium On Fusion Engineering, San Diego, California; To Be Published In The Proceedings23rd IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering San Diego California, US, 2009999616325

Smith, J.P.

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Multisensor data fusion algorithm development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fusion technology status and requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

Thomassen, K.I.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fusion welding process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

Thomas, Kenneth C. (Export, PA); Jones, Eric D. (Salem, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more proliferation-resistant than that bred by conventional fast reactors. Furthermore, it can maintain constant total hybrid power output as burnup proceeds by varying the neutron source strength.

Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Neutronic analysis of a fusion hybrid reactor  

SciTech Connect

In a PHYSOR 2010 paper(1) we introduced a fusion hybrid reactor whose fusion component is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM), and whose blanket was made of thorium - 232. The thrust of that study was to demonstrate the performance of such a reactor by establishing the breeding of uranium - 233 in the blanket, and the burning thereof to produce power. In that analysis, we utilized the diffusion equation for one-energy neutron group, namely, those produced by the fusion reactions, to establish the power distribution and density in the system. Those results should be viewed as a first approximation since the high energy neutrons are not effective in inducing fission, but contribute primarily to the production of actinides. In the presence of a coolant, however, such as water, these neutrons tend to thermalize rather quickly, hence a better assessment of the reactor performance would require at least a two group analysis, namely the fast and thermal groups. We follow that approach and write an approximate set of equations for the fluxes of these groups. From these relations we deduce the all-important quantity, k{sub eff}, which we utilize to compute the multiplication factor, and subsequently, the power density in the reactor. We show that k{sub eff} can be made to have a value of 0.99, thus indicating that 100 thermal neutrons are generated per fusion neutron, while allowing the system to function as 'subcritical.' Moreover, we show that such a hybrid reactor can generate hundreds of megawatts of thermal power per cm of length depending on the flux of the fusion neutrons impinging on the blanket. (authors)

Kammash, T. [Univ. of Michigan, NERS, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

FUELING OF ITER-SCALE FUSION PLASMAS M. J. Gouge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems to handle the larger DT throughput. Gas and pellet fueling efficiency data from past tokamak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8071, USA (423) 576-4467 ABSTRACT Fueling system functions for the International in the fusion reaction, to establish a density gradient for plasma particle (especially helium ash) flow

256

REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS ABOUT THE COLD FUSION EFFECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental literature describing the cold fusion phenomenon is reviewed. The number and variety of careful experimental measurements of heat, tritium, neutron, and helium production strongly support the occurrence of nuclear reactions in a metal lattice near room temperature as proposed by Pons and Fleischmann and independently by Jones. I.

Cold Fusion

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Alpha-nucleus potential for alpha-decay and sub-barrier fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The set of parameters for alpha-nucleus potential is derived by using the data for both the alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections around the barrier for reactions alpha+40Ca, alpha+59Co, alpha+208Pb. The alpha-decay half-lives are obtained in the framework of a cluster model using the WKB approximation. The evaluated alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections agreed well with the data. Fusion reactions between alpha-particle and heavy nuclei can be used for both the formation of very heavy nuclei and spectroscopic studies of the formed compound nuclei.

V. Yu. Denisov; H. Ikezoe

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Flexible data fusion (& fission)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach is described for developing methods for "data fusion": given how events A & B occurring by themselves influence some measure, estimate the influence (on that measure) of A and B occurring together. An example is "combine the effects of evidence ...

Alexander Yeh

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Status of inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

The technology advancement to high-power beams has also given birth to new technologies. That class of Free Electron Lasers that employs rf linacs, synchrotrons, and storage rings - although the use the tools of High Energy Physics (HEP) - was developed well behind the kinetic energy frontier. The induction linac, however, is something of an exception; it was born directly from the needs of the magnetic fusion program, and was not motivated by a high-energy physics application. The heavy-ion approach to inertial fusion starts with picking from the rich menu of accelerator technologies those that have, ab initio, the essential ingredients needed for a power plant driver: multigap acceleration - which leads to reliability/lifetime; electrical efficiency; repetition rate; and beams that can be reliably focused over a suitably long distance. The report describes the programs underway in Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research as well as listing expected advances in driver, target, and beam quality areas in the inertial fusion power program.

Keefe, D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Accelerator and Fusion Research Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outreach and Diversity Highlights Safety Other Sites and Labs Intramural Outreach and Diversity Highlights Safety Other Sites and Labs Intramural Historical photo of Laboratory founder and cyclotron inventor Ernest Orlando Lawrence at his desk OUR SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMS Accelerator Physics for the ALS Center for Beam Physics LOASIS Laboratory Fusion Science and Ion Beam Technology Superconducting Magnets Free Electron Laser R&D News: AFRD's Jean-Luc Vay and former AFRD scientist Kwang-Je Kim share the US Particle Accelerator School Prize. Andre Anders places two articles among the year's top 30 in the Journal of Applied Physics. AFRD personnel win an R&D 100 in a joint project with industry; the laser at the heart of BELLA sets a world record for laser power. Employees: Safety tips regarding the mountain lion are available. The results from our two most recent Self-Assessment Focus Groups are up, covering emergency preparedness and ergonomics while working offsite.

263

Inertial confinement fusion: present status and future potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power from inertial confinement fusion holds much promise for society. This paper points out many of the benefits relative to combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and fission power. Potential problems are also identified and put in perspective. The progress toward achieving inertial fusion power is described and results of recent work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Key phenomenological uncertainties are described and experimental goals for the Nova laser system are given. Several ICF reactor designs are discussed.

Hogan, W.J.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

264

Directions for improved fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10 to 15 years have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points towards smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. A generic fusion physics/engineering/costing model is used to provide a quantiative basis for these arguments for specific fusion concepts.

Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Delene, J.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Commercial application of laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

The fundamentals of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described.

Booth, L.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Accelerators for heavy ion fusion  

SciTech Connect

Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

Bangerter, R.O.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Research on fusion neutron sources  

SciTech Connect

The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. 'Fusion for Neutrons' (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

Gryaznevich, M. P. [Tokamak Solutions UK, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON, OX133DB (United Kingdom)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fusion of imprecise, uncertain, and conflicting beliefs with DSm rules of combination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper one studies, within Dezert-Smarandache Theory (DSmT), the case when the sources of information provide imprecise belief functions/masses, and we generalize the DSm rules of combination (classic or hybrid rules) from scalar fusion to sub-unitary interval fusion and, more general, to any set of sub-unitary interval fusion. This work generalizes previous works available in literature which appear limited to IBS (Interval-valued belief structures) in the Transferable Belief Model framework. Numerical didactic examples of these new DSm fusion rules for dealing with imprecise information are also presented.

Jean Dezert; Florentin Smarandache

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

269

Controlled thermonuclear fusion research in Europe -- Competence in advanced physics and technologies  

SciTech Connect

Development of Fusion power is being pursued in all major industrial countries. The European Union, together with countries associated to the EURATOM-Framework Program undertakes an integrated RTD program for the development of magnetic fusion. The Key Action Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion has the objectives to develop the capacity to construct and operated a Next Step device for which the design is being pursued in international collaboration (ITER EDA, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Engineering Design Activities); to undertake structured activities for concept improvements for a fusion power station; to develop technologies needed in the longer term for a prototype fusion reactor. Work on the socio-economic aspects of fusion and a keep in touch activity coordinating national civil research activities in inertial confinement fusion complement the program.

Bruhns, H.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cooling Fusion in a Flash | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Fusion in a Flash American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: Cooling Fusion in a Flash...

271

Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

Chapman, John J.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Finite element modeling and experimental study of brittle fracture in tempered martensitic steels for thermonuclear fusion applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work we have studied brittle fracture in high-chromium reduced activation tempered martensitic steels foreseen as structural materials for thermonuclear fusion reactors. Developing the… (more)

Mueller, Pablo Federico

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fusion pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Pappas, D.S.

1987-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

and Enable Development of Fusion’s Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demonstrate advanced physics operation of a tokamak in steadystate with Burn – Utilize conservative expressions of all elements of Advanced Tokamak physics to produce 100-250 MW fusion power with modest energy gain (Q 2 weeks – Further develop all elements of Advanced Tokamak physics, qualifying them for an advanced performance DEMO Develop fusion’s nuclear technology – Test materials with high neutron fluence (3-6 MW-yr/m 2) with duty factor 0.3 on a year – Demonstrate Tritium self-sufficiency – Develop fusion blankets that make both tritium and electricity at 1-2 MW/m 2 neutron fluxes – Develop fusion blankets that produce hydrogen With ITER and IFMIF, provide the basis for a fusion DEMO Power Plant

R. D. Stambaugh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Laser fusion overview. [Forecasting of laser fusion feasibility  

SciTech Connect

Because of recent breakthroughs in the target area, and in the glass laser area, the scientific feasibility of laser fusion--and of inertial fusion--may be demonstrated in the early 1980's. Then the development in that time period of a suitable laser (or storage ring or other driving source) would make possible an operational inertial fusion reactor in this century. These are roughly the same time scales as projected by the Tokamak magnetic confinement approach. It thus appears that the 15-20 year earlier start by magnetic confinement fusion may be overcome. Because inertial confinement has been demonstrated, and inertial fusion reactors may operate on smaller scales than Tokamaks, laser fusion may have important technical and economic advantages.

Nuckolls, J.

1976-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Modular Aneutronic Fusion Engine  

SciTech Connect

NASA's JUNO mission will arrive at Jupiter in July 2016, after nearly five years in space. Since operational costs tend to rise with mission time, minimizing such times becomes a top priority. We present the conceptual design for a 10MW aneutronic fusion engine with high exhaust velocities that would reduce transit time for a Jupiter mission to eighteen months and enable more challenging exploration missions in the solar system and beyond. __________________________________________________

Gary Pajer, Yosef Razin, Michael Paluszek, A.H. Glasser and Samuel Cohen

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

277

(Fusion energy research)  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

COLLABORATIVE: FUSION SIMULATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, participated in the ���¢��������Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) Planning Activities���¢������� [http://www.pppl.gov/fsp], with C.S. Chang as the institutional PI. FSP���¢��������s mission was to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. Specific institutional goal of the New York University was to participate in the planning of the edge integrated simulation, with emphasis on the usage of large scale HPCs, in connection with the SciDAC CPES project which the PI was leading. New York University successfully completed its mission by participating in the various planning activities, including the edge physics integration, the edge science drivers, and the mathematical verification. The activity resulted in the combined report that can be found in http://www.pppl.gov/fsp/Overview.html. Participation and presentations as part of this project are listed in a separation file.

Chang, Choong Seock

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fusion technology development. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

In FY95, the General Atomics (GA) Fusion Group made significant contributions to the technology needs of the magnetic fusion program. The work is reported in the following sections on Fusion Power Plant Studies (Section 2), DiMES (Section 3), SiC Composite Studies (Section 4), Magnetic Probe (Section 5) and RF Technology (Section 6). Meetings attended and publications are listed in their respective sections. The overall objective of GA`s fusion technology research is to develop the technologies necessary for fusion to move successfully from present-day physics experiments to ITER and other next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately to fusion power plants. To achieve this overall objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic knowledge about these technologies, including plasma technologies, fusion nuclear technologies, and fusion materials. They continue to be committed to the development of fusion power and its commercialization by US industry.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fusion power: the transition from fundamental science to fusion reactor engineering  

SciTech Connect

The historical development of fusion research is outlined. The basics of fusion power along with fuel cost and advantages of fusion are discussed. Some quantitative requirements for fusion power are described. (MOW)

Post, R.F.

1975-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

282

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Posted By Office of Public Affairs Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF) recently focused all

283

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Posted By Office of Public Affairs Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF) recently focused all

284

Intitutional constraints to fusion commercialization  

SciTech Connect

The major thrust of this report is that the long time frame associated with the development of commercial fusion systems in the context of the commercialization and institutional history of an allied technology, fission-power, suggests that fusion commercialization will not occur without active and broad-based support on the part of the Nation's political leaders. Its key recommendation is that DOE fusion planners devote considerable resources to analytical efforts aimed at determining the need for fusion and the timing of that need, in order to convince policymakers that they need do more than preserve fusion as an option for application at some indefinite point in the future. It is the thesis of the report that, in fact, an act of political vision on the part of the Nation's leaders will be required to accomplish fusion commercialization.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Some safety considerations of liquid lithium as a fusion breeder material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test results and conclusions are presented for the reaction of steam with a high temperature lithium pool and for the reaction of high temperature lithium spray with a nitrogen atmosphere. The reactions are characterized and evaluated in regard to the potential for mobilization of radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. These evaluations include measured lithium temperature responses, atmosphere temperature and pressure responses, gas consumption and generation, aerosol quantities and particle size characterization, and potentially radioactive species releases. Conclusions are made as to the consequences of these safety considerations for the use of lithium as a fusion reactor breeder material.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Some safety considerations of liquid lithium as a fusion breeder material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test results and conclusions are presented for the reaction of steam with a high temperature lithium pool and for the reaction of high temperature lithium spray with a nitrogen atmosphere. The reactions are characterized and evaluated in regard to the potential for mobilization of radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. These evaluations include measured lithium temperature responses, atmosphere temperature and pressure responses, gas consumption and generation, aerosol quantities and particle size characterization, and potentially radioactive species releases. Conclusions are made as to the consequences of these safety considerations for the use of lithium as a fusion reactor breeder material.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The IHS Transformations Based Image Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The IHS sharpening technique is one of the most commonly used techniques for sharpening. Different transformations have been developed to transfer a color image from the RGB space to the IHS space. Through literature, it appears that, various scientists proposed alternative IHS transformations and many papers have reported good results whereas others show bad ones as will as not those obtained which the formula of IHS transformation were used. In addition to that, many papers show different formulas of transformation matrix such as IHS transformation. This leads to confusion what is the exact formula of the IHS transformation?. Therefore, the main purpose of this work is to explore different IHS transformation techniques and experiment it as IHS based image fusion. The image fusion performance was evaluated, in this study, using various methods to estimate the quality and degree of information improvement of a fused image quantitatively.

Al-Wassai, Firouz Abdullah; Al-Zuky, Ali A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fusion Energy Division Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Agreement with UT-Battelle to collaborate with Japan's National Institute for Fusion Science. Division Director Stanley L. Milora Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box...

289

Fusion rings for quantum groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from [KS] and give a similar description of the sp(2n)-fusion ring in terms of noncommutative symmetric functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings extending known results in special cases. Finally we also compute the fusion rings for type G2.

Henning Haahr Andersen; Catharina Stroppel

2012-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Economic potential of inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents.

Nuckolls, J.H.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Stockpile tritium production from fusion  

SciTech Connect

A fusion breeder holds the promise of a new capability - ''dialable'' reserve capacity at little additional cost - that offers stockpile planners a new way to deal with today's uncertainties in forecasting long range needs. Though still in the research stage, fusion can be developed in time to meet future military requirements. Much of the necessary technology will be developed by the ongoing magnetic fusion energy program. However, a specific program to develop the nuclear technology required for materials production is needed if fusion is to become a viable option for a new production complex around the turn of the century.

Lokke, W.A.; Fowler, T.K.

1986-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fusion technology development. Annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

In FY97, the General Atomics (GA) Fusion Group made significant contributions to the technology needs of the magnetic fusion program. The work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, International and Technology Division, of the US Department of Energy. The work is reported in the following sections on Fusion Power Plant Studies (Section 2), Plasma Interactive Materials (Section 3), Magnetic Diagnostic Probes (Section 4) and RF Technology (Section 5). Meetings attended and publications are listed in their respective sections. The overall objective of GA`s fusion technology research is to develop the technologies necessary for fusion to move successfully from present-day physics experiments to ITER and other next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately to fusion power plants. To achieve this overall objective, we carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and we conduct research to develop basic knowledge about these technologies, including plasma technologies, fusion nuclear technologies, and fusion materials. We continue to be committed to the development of fusion power and its commercialization by US industry.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Multiscale Modeling of Irradiation effects in Fusion Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of this collaborative research work was to apply predictive, physically based multiscale modeling to improve understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material changes in the fusion environment, with the ultimate objective to aid development of advanced materials. The multiscale modeling methodology involved a hierarchical approach, integrating ab initio electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC), and three dimensional dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, over the relevant length and time scales to model the fates of defects and solutes (including hydrogen and helium) and thus, predict microstructural evolution in ferritic/martensitic and vanadium based alloys. The main task at WSU was to investigate changes in mechanical properties as a result of the production of a varied population of nanostructural features and to be obtained from three dimensional dislocation dynamics simulation (DD). The initial dislocation structure and microstructure could be obtained from electron microscopy characterization and the appropriate nanostructural features produced during irradiation are introduced from predictions of the multiscale modeling. The dislocation structure was then allowed to evolve under an applied load, taking into account all possible forces and reactions between the dislocations with the radiation induced nanostructure as well as network dislocations. In this manner, quantitative predictions of irradiation hardening would result without the use of empirical constants within the framework of dispersed barrier hardening models.

Hussein Zbib

2004-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nuclear fusion in muonic deuterium-helium complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental study of the nuclear fusion reaction in charge-asymmetrical d-mu-3He complex is presented. The 14.6 MeV protons were detected by three pairs of Si(dE-E) telescopes placed around the cryogenic target filled with the deuterium + helium-3 gas at 34 K. The 6.85 keV gamma rays emitted during the de-excitation of d-mu-3He complex were detected by a germanium detector. The measurements were performed at two target densities, 0.0585 and 0.169 (relative to liquid hydrogen density) with an atomic concentration of 3He c=0.0469. The values of the effective rate of nuclear fusion in d-mu-3He was obtained for the first time, and the J=0 nuclear fusion rate in d-mu-3He was derived.

V. M. Bystritsky; M. Filipowicz; V. V. Gerasimov; P. E. Knowles; F. Mulhauser; N. P. Popov; V. A. Stolupin; V. P. Volnykh; J. Wozniak

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

Effects of Superconductor Electron Screening on Fusion Reaction Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Other Concepts and Assessments / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Kamron Fazel; Qi Li; Kostadin Ivanov

296

Fission-suppressed fusion breeder on the thorium cycle and nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion reactors could be designed to breed fissile material while suppressing fissioning thereby enhancing safety. The produced fuel could be used to startup and makeup fuel for fission reactors. Each fusion reaction can produce typically 0.6 fissile atoms and release about 1.6 times the 14 MeV neutron's energy in the blanket in the fission-suppressed design. This production rate is 2660 kg/1000 MW of fusion power for a year. The revenues would be doubled from such a plant by selling fuel at a price of 60/g and electricity at $0.05/kWh for Q=P fusion /Pinput=4. Fusion reactors could be designed to destroy fission wastes by transmutation and fissioning but this is not a natural use of fusion whereas it is a designed use of fission reactors. Fusion could supply makeup fuel to fission reactors that were dedicated to fissioning wastes with some of their neutrons. The design for safety and heat removal and other items is already accomplished with fission reactors. Whereas fusion reactors have geometry that compromises safety with a complex and thin wall separating the fusion zone from the blanket zone where wastes could be destroyed. Nonproliferation can be enhanced by mixing 233U with 238U. Also nonproliferation is enhanced in typical fission-suppressed designs by generating up to 0.05 232U atoms for each 233U atom produced from thorium

R. W. Moir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Proceedings of Brookhaven National Laboratory's fusion/synfuel workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fusion synfuels workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 27-29, 1979 examined the current status of candidate synfuel processes and the R and D required to develop the capability for fusion synfuel production. Participants divided into five working groups, covering the following areas: (1) economics and applications; (2) high-temperature electrolysis; (3) thermochemical processes (including hybrid thermo-electrochemical); (4) blanket and materials; and (5) high-efficiency power cycles. Each working group presented a summary of their conclusions and recommendations to all participants during the third day of the Workshop. These summaries are given.

Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R. (eds.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fusion 2.0 the next generation of fusion in California : aligning state and regional fusion centers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A growing number of states have created multiple fusion centers, including California. In addition to having a state fusion center, California has four regional centers… (more)

MacGregor, David S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Magnetic Confinement Fusion FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Fusion by Magnetic Confinement The image above is an artistic rendering of a tokamak, a donut-shaped magnetic vacuum chamber in which wispy vapors of fusion fuel are

300

A 3 MEGAJOULE HEAVY ION FUSION DRIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research, Office of Inertia! Fusion, Research Division ofA 3 MEGAJOULE HEAVY ION FUSION DRIVER* A. Faltens, E. Hoyer,Research, Office of Inertial Fusion, Research Division of

Faltens, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Structure and Heavy-Ton Fusion* A series of lecturesthe cross section for fusion in the experiments consideredEffects g in III. Subharrier Fusion Cross Sections for Light

Stokstad, R.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

On the infinity Laplacian and Hrushovski's fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Definable rank and degree 4.1.2 Fusion . . . . . . . . . .s example . . . . . 4.2 A new fusion construction . . . .4.2.1 Free fusion . . . . . . . . . 4.2.2 Codes . . . . . .

Smart, Charles Krug

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

RAPPORTEUR TALK FOR IAEA FUSION MEETING, BRUSSELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion Fusion Papers: The Argonne Heavy Ion Fusion Program:to the target. 3. The Argonne Heavy Ion Fusion Program:ring system developed at Argonne National Laboratory shows

Watson, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Fusion Engineering and Design 42 (1998) 537548 Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy--three  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 650°C and has a low enough vapor pressure. Li and Li17Pb83 would also work but must be 1.5 m thick and increased pumping power features required by use of Li or Li17Pb83 suggest Flibe might be the lowest cost to a large variety of chamber design concepts for inertial fusion energy (IFE). Refs. [1­8] provide

Abdou, Mohamed

306

Data fusion of multi-sensor for IOT precise measurement based on improved PSO algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work proposes an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO) method to increase the measurement precision of multi-sensors data fusion in the Internet of Things (IOT) system. Critical IOT technologies consist of a wireless sensor network, RFID, various ... Keywords: Data fusion, Internet of things, Particle swarm optimization, RFID, Wireless sensor network

Wen-Tsai Sung; Ming-Han Tsai

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Multi-agent coordination by temporal plan fusion: Application to combat search and rescue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coordination of actions and plans that must be achieved by multiple agents is one of the most difficult tasks in the multi-agent domain. In order to work together and achieve a common goal, agents need to coordinate their plans in a way that guarantees, ... Keywords: Distributed plan monitoring, Multi-agent coordination, Plan fusion, Temporal fusion, Temporal merging, Temporal planning

Mohamad K. Allouche; Abdeslem Boukhtouta

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Longitudinal Tracking of Direct Drive Inertial Fusion Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Technology of Fusion Energy - Inertial Fusion Technology: Targets and Chambers

J. D. Spalding; L. C. Carlson; M. S. Tillack; N. B. Alexander; D. T. Goodin; R. W. Petzoldt

310

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1996-2000 Editions of the CPEP Fusion Chart English plus Dutch (Flemish), French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish (European) Created by the Fusion Group of the Contemporary...

311

Radiation Effects on Structural Ceramics in Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Materials—Radiation Effects and Activation / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

G. R. Hopkins; R. J. Price; P. W. Trester

312

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview | The Guided Tour Click anywhere on this picture to go to the relevant fusion topic, or try the Guided Tour. Fusion Chart These introductory educational materials on...

313

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Energy Sources & Conversion An Overview of Energy Conversion Processes One of the...

314

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Plasmas - the Fourth State of Matter CHARACTERISTICS OF TYPICAL PLASMAS Plasmas consist...

315

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National...

316

Role Of Calcium In Membrane Fusion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project is focused on understanding the role of calcium in membrane fusion at the atomic level. Membrane fusion is an intense area of experimental… (more)

Issa, Zeena Kas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Civilian applications of laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. We have found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser fusion studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented.

Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

1978-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fusion algebra of critical percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an explicit conjecture for the chiral fusion algebra of critical percolation considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The representations we take to generate fusion are countably infinite in number. The ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of these representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of these representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure. They involve representations which we call Kac representations of which some are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fusion algebra is a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the recent results of Eberle-Flohr and Read-Saleur. Notably, in agreement with Eberle-Flohr, we find the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. Our fusion rules are supported by extensive numerical studies of an integrable lattice model of critical percolation. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere.

Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related FieldsFusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fieldscalled, in the magnetic fusion energy community, a tandem

Kwan, J.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Neutron measurements and radiation damage calculations for fusion materials studies  

SciTech Connect

Fusion reactors will generate intense neutron fields, especially at the inner surfaces of containment vessels. With a typical wall loading of 1 MW/m/sup 2/, the yearly neutron fluence will be about 10/sup 26/ n/m/sup 2/. In a material like stainless steel this irradiation will produce about 10 atomic displacements-per-atom (DPA), 100 appM helium, 500 appM hydrogen, and various other transmutations. The gas-to-DPA ratios are very high compared to fission reactors due to the 14 MeV neutrons from the d-t fusion reaction. No existing neutron source can produce both the high fluence and high gas rates needed to simulate fusion damage. Consequently, fusion material studies are underway in a variety of facilities including fission reactors and accelerator-based neutron sources. A Subtask Group has been created by DOE to characterize these diverse facilities in terms of neutron flux and energy spectrum and to calculate DPA and transmutation for specific irradiations. Material property changes can then be correlated between facilities and extrapolated to fusion reactor conditions.

Greenwood, L.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Is there hope for fusion  

SciTech Connect

From the outset in the 1950's, fusion research has been motivated by environmental concerns as well as long-term fuel supply issues. Compared to fossil fuels both fusion and fission would produce essentially zero emissions to the atmosphere. Compared to fission, fusion reactors should offer high demonstrability of public protection from accidents and a substantial amelioration of the radioactive waste problem. Fusion still requires lengthy development, the earliest commercial deployment being likely to occur around 2025--2050. However, steady scientific progress is being made and there is a wide consensus that it is time to plan large-scale engineering development. A major international effort, called the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is being carried out under IAEA auspices to design the world's first fusion engineering test reactor, which could be constructed in the 1990's. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Fowler, T.K. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

1990-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Effect of Cold Work on Microstructure and SCC Susceptibility in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the papers, it is said that cold work has tendency to accelerate the SCC .... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar Weld

326

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Fusion Research An updated, searchable Fusion FAQ is being prepared. In the meantime, the incomplete public-domain Fusion FAQ from 1994-1995 is still available

327

LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

L.E. Zakharov

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Multiple shell fusion targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

1975-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

Jassby, D.L.

1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fusion pumped laser  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A REALISTIC EXAMINATION OF COLD FUSION CLAIMS 24 YEARS LATER  

SciTech Connect

On March 29, 1989, chemists Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced they had discovered an effect whose explanation was required to lie in the realm of nuclear reactions. Their claim, and those subsequent to it of roughly similar nature, became known as ‘cold fusion’. Research continues to this day on this effect, but what has become clear is that whatever it is, it is not a conventional fusion process. Thus the ‘cold fusion’ moniker is somewhat inappropriate and many current researchers in the field prefer the term “Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR)”, although other terms have been coined for it as well. the results developed out of the LENR research do in fact show something is happening to produce signals which might be interpreted as supporting nuclear reactions (which is what encourages and sustains LENR researchers), but which can also be interpreted via a set of unique and interesting conventional processes. The focus of this document is to describe and address recent objections to such processes so that subsequent LENR research can be guided to develop information that will determine whether either set of explanations has merit. It is hoped that criteria delineated herein will aid the USDOE and other agencies in determining if LENR proposals are meritorious and worthy of support or not.

Shanahan, K.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nuclear fusion of protons with boron  

SciTech Connect

Two methods are investigated in this paper to convert the released fusion energy directly in electric power. The first is very simply the use of a beam of protons traversing a fixed target of Boron. Unfortunately this method cannot be made to work, but its investigation naturally yields to the second method which makes use of two beams, one of protons and one of ions of Boron, colliding with each other. This second method is feasible but it requires a significant amount of research and development in accelerator technology.

Ruggiero, A.G.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Civilian applications of laser fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. It was found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented.

Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

1977-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

Future of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, fusion R&D programs have made enormous technical progress. Projected billion-dollar scale research facilities are designed to approach net energy production. In this century, scientific and engineering progress must continue until the economics of fusion power plants improves sufficiently to win large scale private funding in competition with fission and non-nuclear energy systems. This economic advantage must be sustained: trillion dollar investments will be required to build enough fusion power plants to generate ten percent of the world's energy. For Inertial Fusion Energy, multi-billion dollar driver costs must be reduced by up to an order of magnitude, to a small fraction of the total cost of the power plant. Major cost reductions could be achieved via substantial improvements in target performance-both higher gain and reduced ignition energy. Large target performance improvements may be feasible through a combination of design innovations, e.g., ''fast ignition,'' propagation down density gradients, and compression of fusion fuel with a combination of driver and chemical energy. The assumptions that limit projected performance of fusion targets should be carefully examined. The National Ignition Facility will enable development and testing of revolutionary targets designed to make possible economically competitive fusion power plants.

Nuckolls, J H; Wood, L L

2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

335

Determination of Atomic Data Pertinent to the Fusion Energy Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize progress that has been made on the determination of atomic data pertinent to the fusion energy program. Work is reported on the identification of spectral lines of impurity ions, spectroscopic data assessment and compilations, expansion and upgrade of the NIST atomic databases, collision and spectroscopy experiments with highly charged ions on EBIT, and atomic structure calculations and modeling of plasma spectra.

None

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hypothesis-driven information fusion in adversarial, deceptive environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem domain addressed in this work is urban, armed engagement against a guerilla force. The paper focuses particularly on the algorithm developed to combine incomplete and potentially deceptive observations of the opponent forces and actions into ... Keywords: Adversarial reasoning, Deception analysis, Information fusion, Military intelligence, Risk-sensitive control

Alexander Kott; Rajdeep Singh; William M. McEneaney; Wes Milks

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Distributed Multisensor Fusion Lucy Y. Pao \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Multisensor Fusion Lucy Y. Pao \\Lambda Northwestern University Evanston, IL 60208. The distributed fusion prob­ lem is more complex than the centralized fusion problem due to correlation across track estimates for the same object. We propose an approach for distributed sen­ sor fusion

Pao, Lucy Y.

338

Fusion of Loops for Parallelism and Locality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AbstractżLoop fusion improves data locality and reduces synchronization in data-parallel applications. However, loop fusion is not always legal. Even when legal, fusion may introduce loop-carried dependences which prevent parallelism. In addition, performance ... Keywords: Locality enhancement, loop fusion, cache conflicts, loop transformations, data-parallel applications, scalable shared-memory multiprocessors.

Naraig Manjikian; Tarek S. Abdelrahman

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

Militzer, Burkhard

340

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

Militzer, Burkhard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Super-high density laser fusion CTR  

SciTech Connect

From sixth European conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics; Moscow, USSR (30 Jul 1973). A basic discussion of laser-induced fusion is presented. Implosion development and applications are described. Implosion and thermonuclear physics are discussed in some detail along with laser technology, laser fusion reactors, and fusion energy conversion. (MOW)

Thiessen, A.; Zimmerman, G.; Weaver, T.; Emmett, J.; Nuckolls, J.; Wood, L.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fusion materials irradiations at MaRIE's fission fusion facility  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory's proposed signature facility, MaRIE, will provide scientists and engineers with new capabilities for modeling, synthesizing, examining, and testing materials of the future that will enhance the USA's energy security and national security. In the area of fusion power, the development of new structural alloys with better tolerance to the harsh radiation environments expected in fusion reactors will lead to improved safety and lower operating costs. The Fission and Fusion Materials Facility (F{sup 3}), one of three pillars of the proposed MaRIE facility, will offer researchers unprecedented access to a neutron radiation environment so that the effects of radiation damage on materials can be measured in-situ, during irradiation. The calculated radiation damage conditions within the F{sup 3} match, in many respects, that of a fusion reactor first wall, making it well suited for testing fusion materials. Here we report in particular on two important characteristics of the radiation environment with relevancy to radiation damage: the primary knock-on atom spectrum and the impact of the pulse structure of the proton beam on temporal characteristics of the atomic displacement rate. With respect to both of these, analyses show the F{sup 3} has conditions that are consistent with those of a steady-state fusion reactor first wall.

Pitcher, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

343

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Sun Our Sun FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement The Sun Runs on Fusion Energy How the sun looks through x-ray eyes! Like all stars, the sun is a huge fusion reactor, pumping out 100 million times as much energy in a single second as the entire population of Earth

344

A genetic-algorithm-based fusion system optimization for 3D image interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information fusion systems are complex systems with many parameters that must be adjusted to obtain interesting results. Generally applied in specialized domains such as military, medical and industrial areas, these systems must work in collaboration ...

Lionel Valet; Beatriz S. L. P. De Lima; Alexandre G. Evsukoff

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fusion/Plasma Physics materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FusionPlasma Physics materials 71958-00 Large Chart 107 150 cm 17. 71958-01 Package of 30 Three-hole-punched Notebook Charts, chart size 43 28 cm, folded size 22 28 cm...

346

Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to refine the system details, interfaces and the requirements for remote handling. Table 1. FIRE RadialInsulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM objectives and subsystem requirements in an arrangement that allows remote maintenance of in

347

U. S. Fusion Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

Fusion implementation scenarios for the US have been developed. The dependence of these scenarios on both the fusion development and implementation paths has been assessed. A range of implementation paths has been studied. The deployment of CANDU fission reactors in Canada and the deployment of fission reactors in France have been assessed as possible models for US fusion deployment. The waste production and resource (including tritium) needs have been assessed. The conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that it is challenging to make a significant impact on energy production during this century. However, the rapid deployment of fission reactors in Canada and France support fusion implementation scenarios for the US with significant power production during this century. If the country can meet the schedule requirements then the resource needs and waste production are found to be manageable problems.

John A. Schmidt; Dan Jassby; Scott Larson; Maria Pueyo; Paul H. Rutherford

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fire protection system operating experience review for fusion applications  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a review of fire protection system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of fire protection system component failure rates and fire accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with these systems are discussed, including spurious operation. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

350

Possible fusion reactor. [Movable plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A scheme to improve performance characteristics of a tokamak-type fusion reactor is proposed. Basically, the tokamak-type plasma could be moved around so that the plasma could be heated by compression, brought to the region where the blanket surrounds the plasma, and moved so as to keep wall loading below the acceptable limit. This idea should be able to help to economize a fusion reactor.

Yoshikawa, S.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

Ahlstrom, H.G. [ed.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advanced synfuel production with fusion  

SciTech Connect

An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers a nearly inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Magnetic fusion 1985: what next  

SciTech Connect

Recent budget reductions for magnetic fusion have led to a re-examination of program schedules and objectives. Faced with delays and postponement of major facilities as previously planned, some have called for a near-term focus on science, others have stressed technology. This talk will suggest a different focus as the keynote for this conference, namely, the applications of fusion. There is no doubt that plasma science is by now mature and fusion technology is at the forefront. This has and will continue to benefit many fields of endeavor, both in actual new discoveries and techniques and in attracting and training scientists and engineers who move on to make significant contributions in science, defense and industry. Nonetheless, however superb the science or how challenging the technology, these are means, not ends. To maintain its support, the magnetic fusion program must also offer the promise of power reactors that could be competitive in the future. At this conference, several new reactor designs will be described that claim to be smaller and economically competitive with fission reactors while retaining the environmental and safety characteristics that are the hallmark of fusion. The American Nuclear Society is an appropriate forum in which to examine these new designs critically, and to stimulate better ideas and improvements. As a preview, this talk will include brief discussions of new tokamak, tandem mirror and reversed field pinch reactor designs to be presented in later sessions. Finally, as a preview of the session on fusion breeders, the talk will explore once again the economic implications of a new nuclear age, beginning with improved fission reactors fueled by fusion breeders, then ultimately evolving to reactors based solely on fusion.

Fowler, T.K.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NUCLEAR FUSION doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/1/014004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion energy research began in the early 1950s as scientists worked to harness the awesome power of the atom for peaceful purposes. There was early optimism for a quick solution for fusion energy as there had been for fission. However, this was soon tempered by reality as the difficulty of producing and confining fusion fuel at temperatures of 100 million ? C in the laboratory was appreciated. Fusion research has followed two main paths— inertial confinement fusion and magnetic confinement fusion. Over the past 50 years, there has been remarkable progress with both approaches, and now each has a solid technical foundation that has led to the construction of major facilities that are aimed at demonstrating fusion energy producing plasmas. PACS numbers: 52.55.?s, 52.57.?z, 28.52.?s, 89.30.Jj (Some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introduction—fusion energy prior to 1958 The 1950s were a period of rapid progress and high expectations in science and technology. Nuclear weapons were advanced with the first fusion assisted nuclear weapons being tested in 1952. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy in

Dale Meade

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Primary heat transfer loop design for the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates a heat exchanger and balance of plant design to accompany the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber concept. The concept uses solid Li/sub 2/O or other lithium-ceramic granules, held to the wall of a rotating reaction chamber by centrifugal action, as a tritium breeding blanket and first wall protection. The Li/sub 2/O granules enter the chamber at 800 K and exit at 1200 K after absorbing the thermal energy produced by the fusion process.

Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Working Copy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NWP subcontractor personnel work at a number of DOE generator sites where NWP has no direct contractual authority for overall site operations. NWP has therefore negotiated...

357

Fusion power and the environment  

SciTech Connect

Environmental characteristics of conceptual fusion-reactor systems based on magnetic confinement are examined quantitatively, and some comparisons with fission systems are made. Fusion, like all other energy sources, will not be completely free of environmental liabilities, but the most obvious of these-- tritium leakage and activation of structural materials by neutron bombardment-- are susceptible to significant reduction by ingenuity in choice of materials and design. Large fusion reactors can probably be designed so that worst-case releases of radioactivity owing to accident or sabotage would produce no prompt fatalities in the public. A world energy economy relying heavily on fusion could make heavy demands on scarce nonfuel materials, a topic deserving further attention. Fusion's potential environmental advantages are not entirely ''automatic'', converting them into practical reality will require emphasis on environmental characteristics throughout the process of reactor design and engineering. The central role of environmental impact in the long-term energy dilemma of civilization justifies the highest priority on this aspect of fusion. (auth)

Holdren, J.P.; Fowler, T.K.; Post, R.F.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fundamental Studies of Diffusion and Reactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental Science ofEnergy 010 "Fundamental studies of diffusion and reactionsInstitute's (UCEI) Fundamental Science of Energy Working

Van de Walle, Chris G; Peles, Amra; Janotti, Anderson; Wilson-Short, Gareth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1665. [38] B G Logan, 1993 Fusion Engineering and Design 22,J Perkins, (June 2007), to be submitted to Nuclear Fusion. [36] M Tabak 1996 Nuclear Fusion 36, No 2. [37] S Atzeni, and

Logan, B.G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 44 (2004) S254S265 PII: S0029-5515(04)88685-X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of the target supply in a fusion economy, and show that costs are within the range of commercial in the condensation reaction that builds a 1­5 µm polymer overcoat withnoreplicationofthefoamcellstructure the ablator, has a critical effect on the performance (gain) of the target. Layering requires establishing

Tillack, Mark

362

Laser fusion diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The current status of the capability of laser fusion diagnostics is reviewed. Optical and infrared streak cameras provide one time resolution measurement capability of less than 10 ps, while x-ray streak cameras provide 15 ps time resolution in the range of about 1--30 keV presently. Time integrated spatial resolutions of 1 ..mu..m are provided with a variety of optical techniques. Ultraviolet holographic interferometry has measured electron densities above 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/ with 1 ..mu..m spatial resolution and 15 ps temporal resolution. X-ray microscopes provide 3 ..mu..m time integrated resolution and the x-ray streak pinhole camera has 6 ..mu..m spatial resolution. Development of the framing camera has thus far provided 50 ..mu..m spatial resolution with 125 ps frame duration and the third order reconstruction of zone plate images has provided 3 ..mu..m resolutions for alpha particles. Time integrated measurements of x-rays span the range shown. Finally, the new Shiva neutron spectrometer increases the energy resolution capability of that technique to 25 keV for 14-MeV neutrons. These combined capabilities provide a unique set of diagnostics for the detailed measurement of the interaction of laser light with targets and a subsequent performance of those targets.

Coleman, L.W.

1978-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Interplay between compound and fragments aspects of nuclear fission and heavy-ion reaction  

SciTech Connect

The scission point in nuclear fission plays a special role where one-body system changes to two-body system. Inverse of this situation is realized in heavy-ion fusion reaction where two-body system changes to one body system. Among several peculiar phenomena expected to occur during this change, we focus our attention to the behavior of compound and fragments shell effects. Some aspects of the interplay between compound and fragments shell effect are discussed related to the topics of the fission valleys in the potential energy surface of actinide nuclei and the fusion-like trajectory found in the cold fusion reaction leading to superheavy nuclei.

Moller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwamoto, A [JAPAN; Ichikawa, I [JAPAN

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/maroon_fusion.css background-image: url(../images/background.gif);  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/maroon_fusion.css body { background-image: url(../images/background.gif); ../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/ maroon_fusion.css body { background-color: #3e5c5f; ../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/ maroon_fusion.css #ToolbarVertical { background: #500000; maroon_fusion.css #Toolbar { background

Ahmad, Sajjad

365

ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Brussels, Belgium,of the Heavy Ion Fusion Workshop held at Brookhaven NationalReport, Hearthfire Heavy Ion Fusion, October 1, 1979 - March

Faltens, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement American Fusion News Category: General Atomics (GA) Link: General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New...

367

Placing Fusion Power on a Pedestal | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Placing Fusion Power on a Pedestal American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: Placing Fusion Power on a Pedestal...

368

Knudsen Layer Reduction of Fusion Reactivity Kim Molvig and Nelson...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fusion cross section determine Gamow peak in the fusion reactivity. 2 Inertially confined fusion systems typically have plasma fuel enveloped by a cold non-reacting region or...

369

Fusion Education | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Benefits of FES Fusion Education Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About FES Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Fusion Education Funding Opportunities...

370

Praise and suggestions for fusion research from a utility industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select and View High Resolution Images to Download Learn More Engineering Fusion energy Fusion reactor design Inertial confinement fusion Nuclear energy Plasma physics Tokamaks...

371

Plasma Blobs and Filaments: Fusion Scientists Discover Secrets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma Blobs and Filaments: Fusion Scientists Discover Secrets of Turbulent Edge Transport American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: Plasma Blobs and Filaments: Fusion...

372

Fusion systems and biset functors via ghost algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2 Fusion Preserving1 Background 1.1 Fusion System Basics . . . . . . 1.2A. Craven. The theory of fusion systems. Vol. 131. Cambridge

O'Hare, Shawn Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science | Princeton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy...

374

Frozen Bullets Tame Unruly Edge Plasmas in Fusion Experiment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frozen Bullets Tame Unruly Edge Plasmas in Fusion Experiment American Fusion News Category: General Atomics (GA) Link: Frozen Bullets Tame Unruly Edge Plasmas in Fusion Experiment...

375

Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned Carbon Walls American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices...

376

Energy payback and CO{sub 2} gas emissions from fusion and solar photovoltaic electric power plants. Final report to Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cradle-to-grave net energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of a modern photovoltaic facility that produces electricity has been performed and compared to a similar analysis on fusion. A summary of the work has been included in a Ph.D. thesis titled ''Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis'' by Paul J. Meier, and a synopsis of the work was presented at the 15th Topical meeting on Fusion Energy held in Washington, DC in November 2002. In addition, a technical note on the effect of the introduction of fusion energy on the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States was submitted to the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

Kulcinski, G.L.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy payback and CO{sub 2} gas emissions from fusion and solar photovoltaic electric power plants. Final report to Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences  

SciTech Connect

A cradle-to-grave net energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of a modern photovoltaic facility that produces electricity has been performed and compared to a similar analysis on fusion. A summary of the work has been included in a Ph.D. thesis titled ''Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis'' by Paul J. Meier, and a synopsis of the work was presented at the 15th Topical meeting on Fusion Energy held in Washington, DC in November 2002. In addition, a technical note on the effect of the introduction of fusion energy on the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States was submitted to the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

Kulcinski, G.L.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Endothermic photo-catalytic reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this report is to present the results of an investigation to provide guidelines for future experimental work, on solar energy driven endothermic photo-catalytic reactions, and primarily to select candidate synthesis reactions which lead to high $-value products. An intensive literature search was conducted to find properties, market demand, and prices of pertinent chemicals; meeting four criteria: (1) the reaction must be endothermic and favorable; (2) the reaction must be catalytic; (3) the product must be produced from low cost feedstocks; and (4) the product must have a sales price >$1.00/lb. Initial examination of low cost feedstocks to high value products lead to consideration of n-paraffins to aromatics and substituted aromatics. Fifteen candidate endothermic synthesis reactions, meeting the above criteria, are suggested. The ratio of product price by reactant cost indicates {approximately}5--8 for the best possibilities; all can be visualized as starting with low cost paraffin and methanol feedstocks.

Prengle, H.W. Jr.; Wentworth, W.E.; Polonczyk, K.C.; Saghafi, M.; Wilking, J.A.; Kramer, K.S. (Houston Univ., TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Systematic study of projectile structure effect on fusion barrier distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasielastic excitation function measurement has been carried out for the $^{4}$He + $^{232}$Th system at $\\theta_{lab}$=160$^\\circ$ with respect to the beam direction, to obtain a representation of the fusion barrier distribution. Using the present data along with previously measured barrier distribution results on $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O, and $^{19}$F + $^{232}$Th systems a systematic analysis has been carried out to investigate the role of target and/or projectile structures on fusion barrier distribution. It is observed that for $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, and $^{16}$O + $^{232}$Th, reactions the couplings due to target states only are required in coupled channel fusion calculations to explain the experimental data, whereas for the $^{19}$F+ $^{232}$Th system along with the coupling of target states, inelastic states of $^{19}$F are also required to explain the experimental results on fusion-barrier distribution. The width of the barrier distribution shows interesting transition behavior when plotted with respect to the target-projectile charge product for the above systems.

Pratap Roy; A. Saxena; B. K. Nayak; E. T. Mirgule; B. John; Y. K. Gupta; L. S. Danu; R. P. Vind; Ashok Kumar; R. K. Choudhury

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

Inductive learning as a fusion engine for mine detection  

SciTech Connect

Semiotics is defined by some researchers as {open_quotes}the study of the appearance (visual or otherwise) meaning, and use of symbols and symbol systems.{close_quotes} Semiotic fusion of data from multiple sensory sources is a potential solution to the problem of landmine detection. This turns out to be significant, because notwithstanding the diversity of sensor technologies being used to attack the problem, there is no single effective landmine sensor technology. The only practical, general-purpose mine detector presently available is the trained dog. Most research into mine-detection technology seeds to emulate the dog`s seemingly uncanny abilities. An ideal data-fusion system would mimic animal reaction, with the brain`s perceptive power melding multiple sensory cues into an awareness of the size and location of a mine. Furthermore, the fusion process should be adaptive, with the skill at combining cues into awareness improving with experience. Electronic data-fusion systems reported in the countermine literature use conventional vector-based pattern recognition methods. Although neural nets are popular, they have never satisfactorily met the challenge. Despite years of investigation, nobody has ever found a vector space representation that reliably characterizes mine identity. This strongly suggests that the features have not been found because researchers have been looking for the wrong characteristics. It is worth considering that dogs probably do not represent data as mathematical number lists, but they almost certainly represent data via semiotic structures.

Kercel, S.W.; Dress, W.B.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement The Glossary of Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Research Browse | Search | Submit an Entry Introduction, Sources and Contributors This Glossary seeks to provide plain-language definitions of over 3600

383

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home> Student and Teacher Resources > For Introductory Students Home> Student and Teacher Resources > For Introductory Students FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Guide to Fusion Education Resources for Introductory Physics Students This is a compilation of online and offline education resources for

384

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us About Us FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Webby Honoree graphic graphic Key Resource Snap editors choice new scientist DrMatrix Webby Awards Honoree, April 10, 2007 The Alchemist - WebPick, January 29, 1999 Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 October 19, 1998 - October 19, 1999 Site of the Day, September 24, 1998. Hot spot. Student Science Resource, April 16, 1997

385

Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

Conformal nets III: fusion of defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conformal nets provides a mathematical model for conformal field theory. We define a notion of defect between conformal nets, formalizing the idea of an interaction between two conformal field theories. We introduce an operation of fusion of defects, and prove that the fusion of two defects is again a defect, provided the fusion occurs over a conformal net of finite index. There is a notion of sector (or bimodule) between two defects, and operations of horizontal and vertical fusion of such sectors. Our most difficult technical result is that the horizontal fusion of the vacuum sectors of two defects is isomorphic to the vacuum sector of the fused defect. Equipped with this isomorphism, we construct the basic interchange isomorphism between the horizontal fusion of two vertical fusions and the vertical fusion of two horizontal fusions of sectors.

Arthur Bartels; Christopher L. Douglas; André Henriques

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

A.: Sparse fusion frames: existence and construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Fusion frame theory is an emerging mathematical theory that provides a natural framework for performing hierarchical data processing. A fusion frame is a frame-like collection of subspaces in a Hilbert space, thereby generalizing the concept of a frame for signal representation. In this paper, we study the existence and construction of fusion frames. We first present a complete characterization of a special class of fusion frames, called Parseval fusion frames. The value of Parseval fusion frames is that the inverse fusion frame operator is equal to the identity and therefore signal reconstruction can be performed with minimal complexity. We then introduce two general methods – the spatial complement and the Naimark complement – for constructing a new fusion frame from a given fusion frame. We then establish existence conditions for fusion frames with desired properties. In particular, we address the following question: Given M, N, m ? N and {?j} M j=1, does there exist a fusion frame in RM with N subspaces of dimension m for which {?j} M j=1 are the eigenvalues of the associated fusion frame operator? We address this problem by providing an algorithm which computes such a fusion frame for almost any collection of parameters M, N, m ? N and {?j} M j=1. Moreover, we show how this procedure can be applied, if subspaces are to be added to a given fusion frame to force it to become Parseval. 1.

Robert Calderbank; Peter G. Casazza; Andreas Heinecke; Gitta Kutyniok; Ali Pezeshki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Different activities of the reovirus FAST proteins and influenza hemagglutinin in cell-cell fusion assays and in response to membrane curvature agents  

SciTech Connect

The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) proteins evolved to induce cell-cell, rather than virus-cell, membrane fusion. It is unclear whether the FAST protein fusion reaction proceeds in the same manner as the enveloped virus fusion proteins. We now show that fluorescence-based cell-cell and cell-RBC hemifusion assays are unsuited for detecting lipid mixing in the absence of content mixing during FAST protein-mediated membrane fusion. Furthermore, membrane curvature agents that inhibit hemifusion or promote pore formation mediated by influenza hemagglutinin had no effect on p14-induced cell-cell fusion, even under conditions of limiting p14 concentrations. Standard assays used to detect fusion intermediates induced by enveloped virus fusion proteins are therefore not applicable to the FAST proteins. These results suggest the possibility that the nature of the fusion intermediates or the mechanisms used to transit through the various stages of the fusion reaction may differ between these distinct classes of viral fusogens.

Clancy, Eileen K.; Barry, Chris; Ciechonska, Marta [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Duncan, Roy, E-mail: roy.duncan@dal.c [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 1X5 (Canada)

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32] E. Greenspan. Fusion reactors blanket nucleonics. Intemperature windows for fusion reactor structural materials.steels for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF. Journal of

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF. Journal of NuclearFusion reactors blanket nucleonics. In Progress in NuclearFusion-Fission hybrid reactors. In Advances in Nuclear

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The agreement gives the go-ahead for work to start  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

international parties involved in an experimental nuclear fusion reactor project have initialed a 10bnThe agreement gives the go- ahead for work to start Fusion reactor work gets go-ahead Seven-euro (ÂŁ682m) agreement on the plan. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter

392

Work Manager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-time control system has been developed and deployed nationally to support BT‘s work management programme. This paper traces the history, system architecture, development, deployment and service aspects of this very large programme. Many ...

G. J. Garwood

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

Prager, Stewart (PPPL)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fusion of $^{6}$Li with $^{159}$Tb} at near barrier energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete and incomplete fusion cross sections for $^{6}$Li+$^{159}$Tb have been measured at energies around the Coulomb barrier by the $\\gamma$-ray method. The measurements show that the complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies are suppressed by $\\sim$34% compared to the coupled channels calculations. A comparison of the complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies with the existing data of $^{11,10}$B+$^{159}$Tb and $^{7}$Li+$^{159}$Tb shows that the extent of suppression is correlated with the $\\alpha$-separation energies of the projectiles. It has been argued that the Dy isotopes produced in the reaction $^{6}$Li+$^{159}$Tb, at below-barrier energies are primarily due to the $d$-transfer to unbound states of $^{159}$Tb, while both transfer and incomplete fusion processes contribute at above-barrier energies.

M. K. Pradhan; A. Mukherjee; P. Basu; A. Goswami; R. Kshetri; R. Palit; V. V. Parkar; M. Ray; Subinit Roy; P. Roy Chowdhury; M. Saha Sarkar; S. Santra

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of irradiation facility options for fusion materials research and development  

SciTech Connect

Successful development of fusion energy will require the design of high-performance structural materials that exhibit dimensional stability and good resistance to fusion neutron degradation of mechanical and physical properties. The high levels of gaseous (H, He) transmutation products associated with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion neutron transmutation reactions, along with displacement damage dose requirements up to 50-200 displacements per atom (dpa) for a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), pose an extraordinary challenge. The intense neutron source(s) is needed to address two complimentary missions: 1) Scientific investigations of radiation degradation phenomena and microstructural evolution under fusion-relevant irradiation conditions (to provide the foundation for designing improved radiation resistant materials), and 2) Engineering database development for design and licensing of next-step fusion energy machines such as a fusion DEMO. A wide variety of irradiation facilities have been proposed to investigate materials science phenomena and to test and qualify materials for a DEMO reactor. Currently available and proposed facilities include fission reactors (including isotopic and spectral tailoring techniques to modify the rate of H and He production per dpa), dual- and triple-ion accelerator irradiation facilities that enable greatly accelerated irradiation studies with fusion-relevant H and He production rates per dpa within microscopic volumes, D-Li stripping reaction and spallation neutron sources, and plasma-based sources. The advantages and limitations of the main proposed fusion materials irradiation facility options are reviewed. Evaluation parameters include irradiation volume, potential for performing accelerated irradiation studies, capital and operating costs, similarity of neutron irradiation spectrum to fusion reactor conditions, temperature and irradiation flux stability/control, ability to perform multiple-effect tests (e.g., irradiation in the presence of a flowing coolant, or in the presence of complex applied stress fields), and technical maturity/risk of the concept. Ultimately, it is anticipated that heavy utilization of ion beam and fission neutron irradiation facilities along with sophisticated materials models, in addition to a dedicated fusion-relevant neutron irradiation facility, will be necessary to provide a comprehensive and cost-effective understanding of anticipated materials evolution in a fusion DEMO and to therefore provide a timely and robust materials database.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Möslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO/sub 2/ lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization.

Perkins, R.B.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 80 - SEPT. 81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were derived from a MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY STAFF W, Kunkel (H. 1. F. Staff, Heavy Ion Fusion Half-year Report October 1,LBL-12594 (1981). Heavy Ion Fusion Staff, Heavy Ion Fusion

Johnson Ed, R.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Engineering the fusion reactor first wall  

SciTech Connect

Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and magnetohydrodynamics. While work to date has been quite valuable, no blanket concept has been built and operated in anything approaching a realistic fusion reactor environment. Rather, work has been limited to isolated experiments on first wall components and paper studies. The need now is to complete necessary R&D on first wall components, assemble components into a practical design, and test the first wall in a realistic fusion environment. Besides supporting work, major prototype experiments could be performed in non-nuclear experiments, as part of the ITER project and as part of the Component Test Facility. The latter is under active consideration and is a proposed machine which would use a driven plasma to expose an entire first wall to a fusion environment. Key US contributors to first wall research have been UCLA, UCSD, U of Wisconsin, LANL, ORNL, PNNL, Argonne and Idaho National Lab. Current efforts have been coordinated by UCLA. It is recognized that when this work progresses to a larger scale, leadership from a national laboratory will be required. LANL is well-prepared to provide such leadership.

Wurden, Glen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Willms [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Laser fusion experiments at LLL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

Ahlstrom, H.G.

1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Neutron-induced dpa, transmutations, gas production, and helium embrittlement of fusion materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a fusion reactor materials will be subjected to significant fluxes of high-energy neutrons. As well as causing radiation damage, the neutrons also initiate nuclear reactions leading to changes in the chemical composition of materials (transmutation). Many of these reactions produce gases, particularly helium, which cause additional swelling and embrittlement of materials. This paper investigates, using a combination of neutron-transport and inventory calculations, the variation in displacements per atom (dpa) and helium production levels as a function of position within the high flux regions of a recent conceptual model for the "next-step" fusion device DEMO. Subsequently, the gas production rates are used to provide revised estimates, based on new density-functional-theory results, for the critical component lifetimes associated with the helium-induced grain-boundary embrittlement of materials. The revised estimates give more optimistic projections for the lifetimes of materials in a fusion power plant co...

Gilbert, M R; Nguyen-Manh, D; Zheng, S; Packer, L W; Sublet, J -Ch

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions. Progress report, January 1, 1990--August 5, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our work involves the study of intermediate energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions. This work has two foci. On the one hand, we desire to learn about the properties of nuclear matter under abnormal conditions, in this energy domain, predominately low densities. This purpose runs abreast of the second, which is the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. The two objectives are inexorably linked because our experimental laboratory for studying nuclear matter properties is a dynamic one. We are forced to ask how nuclear matter properties, such as phase transitions, are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. It may be that irrefutable information about nuclear matter will not be extracted from the reaction work. Nevertheless, we are compelled to undertake this effort not only because it is the only game in town and as yet we do not know that information cannot be extracted, but also because of our second objective. The process leads to an understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. Our program has been: To study energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition by studying incomplete fusion reactions. To gain confidence that we understand how highly excited systems decompose by studying all emissions from the highly excited systems. To push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain, with excitation function studies. And attempt to learn about the dynamics of the decays using particle-particle correlations. In the last effort, we have decided to focus on simple systems, where we believe, definitive statements are possible. These avenues of research share a common theme, large complex fragment production.

Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

EU could go it alone on nuclear fusion plant 29.11.2004 -10:02 CET | By Richard Carter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research ministers. Talks over the world's first nuclear fusion reactor have stalled because Japan to house the ITER project", said the official. Whereas today's nuclear reactors work by smashing atomsEU could go it alone on nuclear fusion plant 29.11.2004 - 10:02 CET | By Richard Carter The EU

403

Demonstrating a Target Supply for Inertial Fusion Energy (A24816)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Science And Technology 47, 1131 (2005)16th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Madison Wisconsin, US, 2004999609940

Goodin, D.T.

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 80 - SEPT. 81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beamlines and Other fusion Reactor Components, M.S. Thesis,Future fusion experiments and reactors may require the

Johnson Ed, R.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Development of odd-Z-projectile reactions for transactinide element synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The development of new odd-Z-projectile reactions leading to the production of transactinide elements is described. The cross section of the even-Z-projectile 208Pb(64Ni, n)271Ds reaction was measured at two new energies using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. In total, seven decay chains attributable to 271Ds were observed. These data, combined with previous results, establish an excitation function for the production of 271Ds. The maximum cross section was 20 +15 -11 pb at a center-of-target energy of 311.5 MeV in the laboratory frame.The data from the 271Ds experiments were used to estimate the optimum beam energy for the new odd-Z-projectile 208Pb(65Cu, n)272-111 reaction using the Fusion by Diffusion theory proposed by Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski. A cross section for this reaction was measured for the first time, at a center-of-target energy of 321.1 MeV in the laboratory frame. The excitation energy f or compound nuclei formed at the target center was 13.2 MeV. One decay chain was observed, resulting in a measured cross section of 1.7 +3.9 -1.4 pb. This decay chain is in good agreement with previously published data on the decay of 272-111.The new odd-Z-projectile 208Pb(55Mn, n)262Bh reaction was studied at three different projectile energies, and 33 decay chains of 262Bh were observed. The existence of a previously reported alpha-decaying isomeric state in this nuclide was confirmed. Production of the ground state was preferred at all three beam energies. The maximum cross section was 540 +180 -150 pb at a projectile center-of-target energy of 264.0 MeV. This cross section is much larger than that previously reported for the even-Z-projectile 209Bi(54Cr, n)262Bh reaction, which may be because the 54Cr projectile energies in the latter reaction were too high for optimum production of the 1n product. At the highest projectile energy of 268.0 MeV in the target center, two decay chains from 261Bh were observed as a result of the 208Pb(55Mn, 2n) reaction. In summary, this work shows that odd-Z-projectile reactions can have cross sections comparable to analogous even-Z-projectile reactions, and that the energy of the maximum cross section for 1n reactions can be estimated simply.

Folden III, Charles Marvin

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fusion roadmapping | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion roadmapping Fusion roadmapping Subscribe to RSS - Fusion roadmapping The process of mapping a path to a commercial fusion reactor by planning a sequence of future machines. Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science Quest Magazine Summer 2013 Welcome to the premiere issue of Quest, the annual magazine of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Read more about Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and design Read more about PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and design

407

Image fusion for a nighttime driving display  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation into image fusion for a nighttime driving display application was performed. Most of the image fusion techniques being investigated in this application were developed for other purposes. When comparing the ...

Herrington, William Frederick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To dig deeper into the fundamental physics of fusion, simply explore any of the Guided Tour topics in the menu frame at left. For visitors new to the subject of fusion, we...

409

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Lightning Sound and Fury Image courtesy of Steve Albers at NOAA On clear days and...

410

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Planetary Nebulae A planetary nebula can result as a star with mass of less than...

411

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stars The Sun Runs on Fusion Energy Like all stars, the sun is a huge fusion reactor, pumping out 100 million times as much energy in a single second as the entire population of...

412

Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

Kulsrud, R.M.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Magnetic fusion: planning for the future  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of international cooperation in the fusion program is given. The author shares his views on the technical prospects and future potential of fusion as a practical energy source. (MOW)

Fowler, T.K.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Method for vacuum fusion bonding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fusion bonding and alignment fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Laser fusion monthly, February 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report is divided into the following sections: (1) facility reports (Argus and Shiva); (2) Nova project; and (3) fusion experiments. In the Fusion Experiments section of this report, the author describes the results of a series of experiments on Shiva which further the understanding of the production and transport of suprathermal electrons. He found that of the suprathermal electrons which strike a laser irradiated disk target or which interact with the rear surface of a half Cairn hohlraum target, a significant fraction of these electrons orbit the target and strike the rear of the disk. These results have significant implications in the interpretation and modeling of the laser irradiated target experiments.

Ahlstrom, H.G.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fusion energy for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Environmental impact of fusion power  

SciTech Connect

From 140th meeting on the American Association for the Advancement of Science; San Francisco, California, USA (24 Feb The environmental effects of fusion power is considered assuming as a typical model a conceptual design for a full-scale fusion power plant. The appraisal indlcates that such a system would yield plentiful, cheap power for all of the world's energy requirements and provide fine solutions to most of the environmental pollution problems if the uncertainties in the plasma physics can be resolved in the fashion that current experiments lead one to expect. (auth)

Fraas, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

Moses, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges these issues. 2 #12;FNST is the science, engineering, technology and materials Fusion Nuclear Science & Technology (FNST) FNST is the science, engineering, technology and materials for the fusion nuclear

Abdou, Mohamed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile FY 2010 Current Appropriation FY 2011 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science 163,479 +57,399 182, Fusion Energy Sciences 394,518b +91,023 426,000 380,000 Public Law Authorizations: Public Law 95

422

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile Adjustments FY 2006 Current Appropriation FY 2007 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science,182 Total, Fusion Energy Sciences........... 266,947b 290,550 -2,906 287,644 318,950 Public Law

423

"50" Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Steady-state operation is a highly desirable characteristic for a magnetic fusion power plant with toroidal multipole at GA 1966 #12;Four New Superconducting Tokamaks will Address Steady- State Advanced by Sakharov in the early 50s). ­ Wave propagation became basis for RF heating · Experimental Progress (some

424

Fusion ProgramFusion Program Overview at Los Alamos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p Fusion Energy: Status & Prospects Washington DC Dec. 2, 2009 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated configuration plasma physics with the U of Washington, and field diagnostics to study radiation and plasma power windows ­ May produce technically viable design, but not with desired optimal economic

425

Calculation of fusion product angular correlation coefficients for fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The angular correlation coefficients for fusion products are calculated in the cases of Maxwellian and beam-target plasmas. Measurement of these coefficients as a localized ion temperature or fast-ion diagnostic is discussed. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Murphy, T.J.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

R. W. Moir; N. N. Martovetsky; A. W. Molvik; D. D. Ryutov; T. C. Simonen

427

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility - Advanced Tokamak Option  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant, Demo, and FNSF / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

C. P. C. Wong; V. S. Chan; A. M. Garofalo; J. A. Leuer; M. E. Sawan; J. P. Smith; R. D. Stambaugh

428

Exo-endo cellulase fusion protein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct, which encodes a fusion protein having cellulolytic activity comprising a catalytic domain derived from a fungal exo-cellobiohydrolase and a catalytic domain derived from an endoglucanase. The invention also relates to vectors and fungal host cells comprising the heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct as well as methods for producing a cellulase fusion protein and enzymatic cellulase compositions.

Bower, Benjamin S. (Palo Alto, CA); Larenas, Edmund A. (Palo Alto, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

One-to-Many Multimodal Fusion Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The One-to-many Multimodal Fusion Package. Participants from the Iris Exchange (IREX) III Evaluation and the Multibiometrics ...

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

430

1994 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the abstracts of the paper presented at the 1994 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

FESAC Fusion Development Path Rob Goldston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ProjectedOntario(OPG)Tritium Inventory(kg) Candu Supply w/o Fusion Projected Tritium Supply Impacts Blanket

432

Institute of Plasma and Fusion Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for fusion accumulated over 40 years of CANDU reactors operation will peak at 27 kg in the year 2027 and

433

Polynomial Fusion Rings of Logarithmic Minimal Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identify quotient polynomial rings isomorphic to the recently found fundamental fusion algebras of logarithmic minimal models.

Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

434

Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment study  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment (HIFSA) study was conducted with the specific objective of evaluating the prospects of using induction linac drivers to generate economical electrical power from inertial confinement fusion. The study used algorithmic models of representative components of a fusion system to identify favored areas in the multidimensional parameter space. The resulting cost-of-electricity (COE) projections are comparable to those from other (magnetic) fusion scenarios, at a plant size of 100 MWe.

Dudziak, D.J.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Fusion safety regulations in the United States: Progress and trends  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the issue of regulations as they apply to current and future fusion experimental machines. It addresses fusion regulatory issues, current regulations used for fusion, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor experience with regulations, and future regulations to achieve fusion`s safety and environmental potential.

DeLooper, J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fusion in a Staged Z-pinch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York (1978) Teller, E. : Fusion. Academic Press, New York (O R I G I N A L A RT I C L E Fusion in a Staged Z-pinch H.U.implosion the sim- ulated fusion-energy yield is 7.6 MJ,

Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Rostoker, N.; Wessel, F. J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

DISTRIBUTED SENSOR FUSION USING DYNAMIC CONSENSUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTED SENSOR FUSION USING DYNAMIC CONSENSUS Demetri P. Spanos Richard M. Murray California in the underlying network topology and performance, making it an interesting candidate for sensor fusion, Decentralized systems, Graph theoretic models, Sensor Fusion 1. INTRODUCTION Sensor networks are a prominent

Murray, Richard M.

438

White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies Prepared for The President's Committee May 16,1995 #12;Page 2 White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies 1. Introduction Dramatic present our vision for the future of fusion energy research. In this white paper, following a summary

439

Designing ontologies for higher level fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of higher level fusion is to produce contextual understanding of the states of the environment and prediction of their impact in relation to specific goals of decision makers. One of the main challenges of designing higher level fusion processes ... Keywords: Basic formal ontology (BFO), Higher level fusion, Mereotopology, Ontology, Postdisaster environment, Relations

Eric G. Little; Galina L. Rogova

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

CO/sub 2/-laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

The basic concept of laser fusion is described, with a set of requirements on the laser system. Systems and applications concepts are presented and discussed. The CO/sub 2/ laser's characteristics and advantages for laser fusion are described. Finally, technological issues in the development of CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion applications are discussed.

Stark, E.E. Jr.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusion reactions work" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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441

Information fusion in data privacy: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we review the role of information fusion in data privacy. To that end, we introduce data privacy, and describe how information and data fusion are used in some fields of data privacy. Our study is focused on the use of aggregation for ... Keywords: Data privacy, Information fusion, Microaggregation, Record linkage

Guillermo Navarro-Arribas; Vicenç Torra

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Reviewers Comments on the 5th Symposium and the Status of Fusion Research 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Better to understand the status of fusion research in the year 2003 we will first put the research in its historical context. Fusion power research, now beginning its sixth decade of continuous effort, is unique in the field of scientific research. Unique in its mixture of pure and applied research, unique in its long-term goal and its promise for the future, and unique in the degree that it has been guided and constrained by national and international governmental policy. Though fusion research's goal has from the start been precisely defined, namely, to obtain a net release of energy from controlled nuclear fusion reactions between light isotopes (in particular those of hydrogen and helium) the difficulty of the problem has spawned in the past a very wide variety of approaches to the problem. Some of these approaches have had massive international support for decades, some have been pursued only at a ''shoestring'' level by dedicated groups in small research laboratories or universities. In discussing the historical and present status of fusion research the implications of there being two distinctly different approaches to achieving net fusion power should be pointed out. The first, and oldest, approach is the use of strong magnetic fields to confine the heated fuel, in the form of a plasma and at a density typically four or five orders of magnitude smaller than the density of the atmosphere. In steady state this fusion fuel density is still sufficient to release fusion energy at the rate of many megawatts per cubic meter. The plasma confinement times required for net energy release in this regime are long--typically a second or more, representing an extremely difficult scientific challenge --witness the five decades of research in magnetic fusion, still without having reaching that goal. The second, more recently initiated approach, is of course the ''inertial'' approach. As its name implies, the ''confinement'' problem is solved ''inertially,'' that is by compressing and heating a tiny pellet of frozen fusion fuel in nanoseconds, such that before disassembly the pellet fuses and releases its energy as a micro-explosion. The first, and most thoroughly investigated means to create this compression and heating is to use multiple laser beams, with total energies of megajoules, focused down to impinge uniformly on the pellet target. To illustrate the extreme difference between the usual magnetic confinement regime at that of inertial fusion, there are twenty orders of magnitude in fusion power density (ten orders of magnitude in plasma density) between the two regimes. In principle fusion power systems could operate at any density between these extremes, if means were to be found to exploit this possibility.

Post, R F

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

443

Fusion algebras, symmetric polynomials, orbits of N-groups, and rank-level duality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of computing fusion coefficients for Lie algebras of type $A_{n-1}$ on level $k$ was recently developed by A. Feingold and M. Weiner \\cite{FW} using orbits of $\\mathbb{Z}_n^k$ under the permutation action of $S_k$ on $k$-tuples. They got the fusion coefficients only for n = 2 and 3. We will extend this method to all $n \\geq 2$ and all $k \\geq 1$. First we show a connection between Young diagrams and $S_k$-orbits of $\\mathbb{Z}_n ^k$, and using Pieri rules we prove that this method works for certain specific weights that generate the fusion algebra. Then we show that the orbit method does not work in general, but with the help of the Jacobi-Trudi determinant, we give an iterative method to reproduce all type A fusion products.

Omar Saldarriaga

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Working Copy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/WIPP-99-2286 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Notification or Reporting Implementation Plan Revision 7 U.S. Department of Energy December 2013 This document supersedes DOE/WIPP-99-2286, Rev. 6. Working Copy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Notification or Reporting Implementation Plan DOE/WIPP-99-2286, Rev. 7 2 TABLE OF CONTENTSCHANGE HISTORY SUMMARY .............................................. 3 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................ 4 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 6 2.0 NOTIFICATION OR REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND COMMITMENTS ..... 7

445

Working Copy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Effective Date: 11/05/13 WP 12-IS.01-6 Revision 10 Industrial Safety Program - Visitor, Vendor, User, Tenant, and Subcontractor Safety Controls Cognizant Section: Industrial Safety/Industrial Hygiene Approved By: Tom Ferguson Working Copy Industrial Safety Program - Visitor, Vendor, User, Tenant, and Subcontractor Safety Controls WP 12-IS.01-6, Rev. 10 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHANGE HISTORY SUMMARY ..................................................................................... 7 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................. 8 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1 ............................................................................................... 10 2.0 VISITORS ........................................................................................................... 11

446

Fusion Simulation Project Workshop Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for tokamak operation, disruptions, energetic particle stability and confinement, turbulent transport to performance projections and operational limits. The Fusion Simulation Project, which will focus on tokamak and transient heat loads on the divertor . . . . . 17 2.1.3 Tritium migration and impurity transport

Gropp, Bill

447

Tritium breeding in fusion reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets are reviewed. The breeding potential of candidate materials is evaluated and compared to the tritium breeding requirements. The sensitivity of tritium breeding to design and nuclear data parameters is reviewed. A framework for an integrated approach to improve tritium breeding prediction is discussed with emphasis on nuclear data requirements.

Abdou, M.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Overview of ORNL Fusion Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Science and Technology Div. 8 Nuclear Science and Technology Div. 9 Research Reactor Div. 10 High Flux Isotope Reactor #12;Molecular dynamics simulation of particle surface interactions Controlled plasma theory and the computational base needed to understand plasma behavior in fusion devices

450

Data fusion with minimal communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sensors obtain data vectors x and y, respectively, and transmit real vectors m&oarr;1(x) and m&oarr;2(y), respectively, to a fusion center. The authors obtain tight lower bounds on the number of messages (the sum of ...

Zhi-Quan Luo; J. N. Tsitsiklis

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Overview of nonelectrical applications of fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for, and importance of, nonelectrical applications of fusion energy is discussed. Three possibilities are reviewed in some detail: fusion-fission hybrids for fissile fuel production; high-temperature electrolysis and thermochemical processes for hydrogen production; and high-temperature steam for coal gasification. The hybrid could be an early application of fusion if this route is identified as a desirable goal. Hydrogen production and coal gasification processes appear feasible and could be developed as a part of the conventional fusion blanket research and development. The question of economics, particularly in view of the high capital cost of fusion plants, remains an open issue requiring more study.

Miley, G.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Work Address:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BO SAULSBURY BO SAULSBURY Work Address: Home Address: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 12952 Buckley Road National Transportation Research Center Knoxville, TN 37934 Building NTRC-2, Room 118 (865) 288-0750 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6479 (865) 574-4694 saulsburyjw@ornl.gov Technical Specialties: Land use planning Environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) project management Vehicle fuel economy Education: 1986 B. A., History (minors in English and Business), The University of Tennessee 1989 M. S., Planning, The University of Tennessee (Thesis title: Land Use Compatibility Planning for Airfield Environs: Intergovernmental Cooperation to Protect Land Users From the Effects of Aircraft Operations)

453

Multimodal fusion for multimedia analysis: a survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This survey aims at providing multimedia researchers with a state-of-the-art overview of fusion strategies, which are used for combining multiple modalities in order to accomplish various multimedia analysis tasks. The existing literature on multimodal fusion research is presented through several classifications based on the fusion methodology and the level of fusion (feature, decision, and hybrid). The fusion methods are described from the perspective of the basic concept, advantages, weaknesses, and their usage in various analysis tasks as reported in the literature. Moreover, several distinctive issues that influence a multimodal fusion process such as, the use of correlation and independence, confidence level, contextual information, synchronization between different modalities, and the optimal modality selection are also highlighted. Finally, we present the open issues for further research in the area of multimodal fusion.

P. K. Atrey; M. A. Hossain; Abdulmotaleb El Saddik; Mohan S. Kankanhalli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

American Fusion News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Fusion News American Fusion News General Atomics (GA) December 4, 2012 The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" December 4, 2012 Frozen Bullets Tame Unruly Edge Plasmas in Fusion Experiment February 15, 2012 General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement See All Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) April 5, 2013 Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science February 22, 2013 A Tour of Plasma Physics in Downtown Cambridge December 4, 2012 Placing Fusion Power on a Pedestal September 21, 2012 MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTUE OF TECHNOLOGY See All National Ignition Facility February 22, 2013 Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy February 16, 2012 National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes

455

Automated reaction mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated reaction mapping is a fundamental first step in the analysis of chemical reactions and opens the door to the development of sophisticated chemical kinetic tools. This article formulates the reaction mapping problem as an optimization problem. ... Keywords: Cheminformatics, mechanisms

John D. Crabtree; Dinesh P. Mehta

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Evaluating fusion techniques for multi-sensor satellite image data  

SciTech Connect

Satellite image data fusion is a topic of interest in many areas including environmental monitoring, emergency response, and defense. Typically any single satellite sensor cannot provide all of the benefits offered by a combination of different sensors (e.g., high-spatial but low spectral resolution vs. low-spatial but high spectral, optical vs. SAR). Given the respective strengths and weaknesses of the different types of image data, it is beneficial to fuse many types of image data to extract as much information as possible from the data. Our work focuses on the fusion of multi-sensor image data into a unified representation that incorporates the potential strengths of a sensor in order to minimize classification error. Of particular interest is the fusion of optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images into a single, multispectral image of the best possible spatial resolution. We explore various methods to optimally fuse these images and evaluate the quality of the image fusion by using K-means clustering to categorize regions in the fused images and comparing the accuracies of the resulting categorization maps.

Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation  

SciTech Connect

Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R=1.0 to 3.0) requirements.

Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Magneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 1 LA-UR-11-01898 #12;Some Observations An economic for the DOE/NNSA 2 #12;Magneto-inertial fusion: Part of a plan B · May allow more efficient drivers, lower Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 3 #12;A Wide Range of Driver

459

T-661: ColdFusion Security Hotfix | APSB11-14, ColdFusion Important Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: ColdFusion Security Hotfix | APSB11-14, ColdFusion Important 1: ColdFusion Security Hotfix | APSB11-14, ColdFusion Important Update T-661: ColdFusion Security Hotfix | APSB11-14, ColdFusion Important Update July 5, 2011 - 7:57am Addthis PROBLEM: ColdFusion 9.0.1, ColdFusion 9, ColdFusion 8.0.1, and ColdFusion 8 are affected with vulnerabilities mentioned in the security bulletins APSB11-14 and APSB11-15. ColdFusion 9.0.1, 9.0, 8.0.1 and 8.0 for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX (APSB11-14); ColdFusion integrated/installed with LCDS (APSB11-15) PLATFORM: ColdFusion 9.0.1, 9.0, 8.0.1 and 8.0 for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX ABSTRACT: Vulnerabilities have been identified in ColdFusion 9.0.1 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX. These vulnerabilities could lead to a cross-site request forgery (CSRF) or a remote denial-of-service (DoS).

460

The Suitability of the Materials Test Station for Fusion Materials Irradiations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Technology Facilities / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials, Part A: Fusion Technology

E. J. Pitcher; C. T. Kelsey IV; S. A. Maloy

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461

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility-AT: A Material and Component Testing Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Technology Facilities / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials, Part A: Fusion Technology

C. P. C. Wong; V. S. Chan; A. M. Garofalo; R. Stambaugh; M. E. Sawan; R. Kurtz; B. Merrill

462

Dynamical approach to heavy-ion induced fusion using actinide target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To treat heavy-ion reactions using actinide target nucleus, we propose a model which takes into account the coupling to the collective states of interacting nuclei in the penetration of the Coulomb barrier and the dynamical evolution of nuclear shape from the contact configuration. A fluctuation-dissipation model (Langevin equation) was applied in the dynamical calculation, where effect of nuclear orientation at the initial impact on the prolately deformed target nucleus was considered. Using this model, we analyzed the experimental data for the mass distribution of fission fragments (MDFF) in the reaction of {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U at several incident energies. Fusion-fission, quasifission and deep-quasi-fission are separated as different trajectories on the potential energy surface. We estimated the fusion cross section of the reaction.

Aritomo, Y.; Hagino, K.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

A blueprint for higher-level fusion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contends that demands on the data fusion community are beginning to exceed its historical roots in sensor fusion, by requiring greater development of automated situation and impact assessments and more appropriate integration with humans engaged ... Keywords: Cognitive machines, Data fusion, Higher-level fusion, Higher-level fusion interfaces, Impact assessment, Information fusion, JDL model, Object assessment, Semantic machines, Sensor fusion, Situation assessment, Situation awareness, Social machines

Dale A. Lambert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fusion reactor breeder material safety compatibility studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium breeder material selection for fusion reactors is strongly influenced by the desire to minimize safety and environmental concerns. Breeder material safety compatibility studies are being conducted to identify and characterize breeder-coolant-material interactions under postulated reactor accident conditions. Recently completed scoping compatibility tests indicate the following. 1. Ternary oxides (LiAlO/sub 2/, Li/sub 2/ZrO/sub 3/, Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/, and LiTiO/sub 3/) at postulated blanket operating temperatures are chemically compatible with water coolant, while liquid lithium and Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/ reactions with water generate heat, aerosol, and hydrogen. 2. Lithium oxide and 17Li-83Pb alloy react mildly with water requiring special precautions to control hydrogen release. 3. Liquid lithium reacts substantially, while 17Li83Pb alloy reacts mildly with concrete to produce hydrogen. 4. Liquid lithium-air reactions may present some major safety concerns. Additional scoping tests are needed, but the ternary oxides, lithium oxide, and 17Li-83Pb have definite safety advantages over liquid lithium and Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/. The ternary oxides present minimal safetyrelated problems when used with water as coolant, air or concrete; but they do require neutron multipliers, which may have safety compatibility concerns with surrounding materials. The combined favorable neutronics and minor safety compatibility concerns of lithium oxide and 17Li-83Pb make them prime candidates as breeder materials. Current safety efforts are directed toward assessing the compatibility of lithium oxide and the lithium-lead alloy with coolants and other materials.

Jeppson, D.W.; Cohen, S.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Grid computing and collaboration technology in support of fusion energy sciencesa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Science research in general and magnetic fusion research in particular continue to grow in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. The simultaneous increase in wide area network speeds has made it practical to envision distributed working environments that are as productive as traditionally collocated work. In computing power

D. P. Schissel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Past, present and future of laser fusion research  

SciTech Connect

The concept of laser fusion was devised very shortly after the invention of laser. In 1972, the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University was established by the author in accordance with the Edward Teller{close_quote}s special lecture on {open_quote}{open_quote}New Internal Combustion Engine{close_quote}{close_quote} for IQEC at Montreal which predicted the implosion fusion. In 1975 we invented the so called indirect drive fusion concept {open_quote}{open_quote}Cannonball Target{close_quote}{close_quote} which became later to be recognize as a same concept of {open_quote}{open_quote}Hohlraum Target{close_quote}{close_quote} from Livermore. As well known, ICF research in the US had been veiled for a long time due to the defense classification. While researchers from Japan, Germany and elsewhere have concentrated the efforts to investigate the inertial fusion energy which seems to be very interesting for a future civil energy. They were publishing their own works not only on the direct implosion scheme but also the indirect implosion experiment. These advanced results often frustrated the US researchers who were not allowed to talk about the details of their works. In 1988, international members of the ICF research society including the US scientists gathered together at ECLIM to discuss the necessity of freedom in the ICF research and concluded to make a statement {open_quote}{open_quote}Madrid Manifest{close_quote}{close_quote} which requested the declassification of the ICF research internationally. After 6 years of halt, the US DOE decided to declassify portions of the program as a part of secretary Hazel O{close_quote}Leary{close_quote}s openness initiative. The first revealed presentation from the US was done at Seville 1994, which however were well known already. Classification impeded the progress by restricting the flow of information and did not allow the ICF work to compete by the open scientific security. (Abstract Truncated)

Yamanaka, C. [Institute for Laser Technology, Yamadaoka Suita, Osaka 565, Himeji Institute of Technology, Shosha Himeji 671 (Japan)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

FUSION WELDING METHOD AND APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the fusion welding of metal pieces at a joint is described. The apparatus comprises a highvacuum chamber enclosing the metal pieces and a thermionic filament emitter. Sufficient power is applied to the emitter so that when the electron emission therefrom is focused on the joint it has sufficient energy to melt the metal pieces, ionize the metallic vapor abcve the molten metal, and establish an arc discharge between the joint and the emitter.

Wyman, W.L.; Steinkamp, W.I.

1961-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

Inertial-confinement-fusion targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

Hendricks, C.D.

1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

469

Inertial Confinement Fusion: Quarterly report, April-June 1996  

SciTech Connect

The lead article, `Ion-beam propagation in a low-density reactor chamber for heavy-ion inertial fusion` (p. 89), explores the ability of heavy-ion beams to be adequately transported and focused in an IFE reactor. The next article, `Efficient production and applications of 2- to 10-keV x rays by laser-heated underdense radiators` (p. 96), explores the ability of the NIF to produce sufficient high-energy x rays for diagnostic backlighting, target preheating, or uniform irradiation of large test objects for Nuclear Weapons Effects Testing. For capsule implosion experiments, the increasing energies and distances involved in the NIF compared to Nova require the development of new diagnostics methods. The article `Fusion reaction-rate measurements--Nova and NIF` (p. 115) first reviews the use of time-resolved neutron measurements on Nova to monitor fusion burn histories and then explores the limitations of that technique, principally Doppler broadening, for the proposed NIF. It also explores the use of gamma rays on Nova, thereby providing a proof-of-principle for using gamma rays for monitoring fusion burn histories on the NIF. The articles `The energetics of gas-filled hohlraums` (p. 110) and `Measurements of laser- speckle-induced perturbations in laser-driven foils` (p. 123) report measurements on Nova of two important aspects of implosion experiments. The first characterizes the amount of energy lost from a hohlraum by stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering as a function of gas fill and laser-beam uniformity. The second of these articles shows that the growth of density nonuniformities implanted on smooth capsule surfaces by laser speckle can be correlated with the effects of physical surface roughness. The article `Laser-tissue interaction modeling with the LATIS computer program` (p. 103) explores the use of modeling to enhance the effectiveness--maximize desired effects and minimize collateral damage--of lasers for medical purposes.

Correll, D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Cluster expression in fission and fusion in high-dimensional macroscopic-microscopic calculations  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the relation between the fission-fusion potential-energy surfaces of very heavy nuclei and the formation process of these nuclei in cold-fusion reactions. In the potential-energy surfaces, we find a pronounced valley structure, with one valley corresponding to the cold-fusion reaction, the other to fission. As the touching point is approached in the cold-fusion entrance channel, an instability towards dynamical deformation of the projectile occurs, which enhances the fusion cross section. These two 'cluster effects' enhance the production of superheavy nuclei in cold-fusion reactions, in addition to the effect of the low compound-system excitation energy in these reactions. Heavy-ion fusion reactions have been used extensively to synthesize heavy elements beyond actinide nuclei. In order to proceed further in this direction, we need to understand the formation process more precisely, not just the decay process. The dynamics of the formation process are considerably more complex than the dynamics necessary to interpret the spontaneous-fission decay of heavy elements. However, before implementing a full dynamical description it is useful to understand the basic properties of the potential-energy landscape encountered in the initial stages of the collision. The collision process and entrance-channel landscape can conveniently be separated into two parts, namely the early-stage separated system before touching and the late-stage composite system after touching. The transition between these two stages is particularly important, but not very well understood until now. To understand better the transition between the two stages we analyze here in detail the potential energy landscape or 'collision surface' of the system both outside and inside the touching configuration of the target and projectile. In Sec. 2, we discuss calculated five-dimensional potential-energy landscapes inside touching and identify major features. In Sec. 3, we present calculated 'collision surfaces' for still separated targets and projectiles. Implications for SHE formation are discussed. Section 4 is a short summary of the present analysis.

Iwamoto, A. (Akira); Ichikawa, T. (Takatoshi); Moller, P. (Peter); Sierk, A. J. (Arnold J.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

C.E. Kessel, et. al.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z