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1

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Creating the Conditions for Fusion PLASMA CONFINEMENT AND HEATING Fusion requires high...

2

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Energy Sources & Conversion An Overview of Energy Conversion Processes One of the...

3

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Plasmas - the Fourth State of Matter CHARACTERISTICS OF TYPICAL PLASMAS Plasmas consist...

4

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour How Fusion Reactions Work THE NUCLEAR PHYSICS OF FUSION Fusion of light (low-mass)...

5

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Two Important Fusion Reactions D + T > He-4 + n D-T reaction graphic For first...

6

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Lightning Sound and Fury Image courtesy of Steve Albers at NOAA On clear days and...

7

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Planetary Nebulae A planetary nebula can result as a star with mass of less than...

8

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Magnetic Confinement Fusion FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Fusion by Magnetic Confinement The image above is an artistic rendering of a tokamak, a donut-shaped magnetic vacuum chamber in which wispy vapors of fusion fuel are

9

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Sun Our Sun FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement The Sun Runs on Fusion Energy How the sun looks through x-ray eyes! Like all stars, the sun is a huge fusion reactor, pumping out 100 million times as much energy in a single second as the entire population of Earth

10

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Fusion Research An updated, searchable Fusion FAQ is being prepared. In the meantime, the incomplete public-domain Fusion FAQ from 1994-1995 is still available

11

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement The Glossary of Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Research Browse | Search | Submit an Entry Introduction, Sources and Contributors This Glossary seeks to provide plain-language definitions of over 3600

12

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us About Us FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Webby Honoree graphic graphic Key Resource Snap editors choice new scientist DrMatrix Webby Awards Honoree, April 10, 2007 The Alchemist - WebPick, January 29, 1999 Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 October 19, 1998 - October 19, 1999 Site of the Day, September 24, 1998. Hot spot. Student Science Resource, April 16, 1997

13

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home> Student and Teacher Resources > For Introductory Students Home> Student and Teacher Resources > For Introductory Students FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Guide to Fusion Education Resources for Introductory Physics Students This is a compilation of online and offline education resources for

14

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Fusion Conditions Achieving Fusion Conditions CPEP: Online Fusion Course Main Topics Energy Sources and Conversions Two Key Fusion Reactions How Fusion Reactions Work Creating the Conditions for Fusion Plasmas - the 4th State of Matter Achieving Fusion Conditions More Info About CPEP Fusion Chart Images: English + 6 More Languages Main CPEP Web Site Printed Charts in 3 Sizes Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Achieving Fusion Conditions EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS IN FUSION RESEARCH Both inertial and magnetic confinement fusion research have focused on understanding plasma confinement and heating. This research has led to increases in plasma temperature, T, density, n, and energy confinement

15

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun Sun Layers CPEP: Online Fusion Course Main Topics Energy Sources and Conversions Two Key Fusion Reactions How Fusion Reactions Work Creating the Conditions for Fusion Plasmas - the 4th State of Matter Achieving Fusion Conditions More Info About CPEP Fusion Chart Images: English + 6 More Languages Main CPEP Web Site Printed Charts in 3 Sizes Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour From Core to Corona Layers of the Sun Image Credit: p. 110,125, Kaler The Core The innermost layer of the sun is the core. With a density of 160 g/cm^3, 10 times that of lead, the core might be expected to be solid. However, the core's temperature of 15 million kelvins (27 million degrees Fahrenheit)

16

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorescent Lights and Neon Signs Fluorescent Lights and Neon Signs CPEP: Online Fusion Course Main Topics Energy Sources and Conversions Two Key Fusion Reactions How Fusion Reactions Work Creating the Conditions for Fusion Plasmas - the 4th State of Matter Achieving Fusion Conditions More Info About CPEP Fusion Chart Images: English + 6 More Languages Main CPEP Web Site Printed Charts in 3 Sizes Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Overview | The Guided Tour Fluorescent Lights and Neon Signs Two of the most common plasma devices on the planet are the fluorescent light bulb, and its cousin, the neon sign. Since their development in the 1940's, fluorescent bulbs have become the lighting fixture of choice in

17

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National...

18

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stars The Sun Runs on Fusion Energy Like all stars, the sun is a huge fusion reactor, pumping out 100 million times as much energy in a single second as the entire population of...

19

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1996-2000 Editions of the CPEP Fusion Chart English plus Dutch (Flemish), French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish (European) Created by the Fusion Group of the Contemporary...

20

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview | The Guided Tour Click anywhere on this picture to go to the relevant fusion topic, or try the Guided Tour. Fusion Chart These introductory educational materials on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To dig deeper into the fundamental physics of fusion, simply explore any of the Guided Tour topics in the menu frame at left. For visitors new to the subject of fusion, we...

22

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Group, Contemporary Physics Education Project The Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) is a non-profit organization of teachers, educators and physicists working to...

23

Fusion energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

interesting to someone posting to the group. I believe the archives below contain zip-compressed files with the full text of the newsgroup's postings, from its inception in...

25

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The solar wind confines the magnetic field of Earth and governs phenomena such as geomagnetic storms and aurorae. The solar wind confines the magnetic fields of other planets as...

26

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(UIUC) - Nuclear Engineering University of Maryland, Institute for Plasma Research University of Michigan, Ann Arbor - Nuclear Eng. and Radiological Sciences...

27

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

engineering are also viable options, especially if your interest lies more in reactor design and engineering. At this point the majority of Ph.D. opportunities are on the...

28

AFRD - Fusion Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory AFRD - Fusion Energy Sciences AFRD - Home Fusion - Home HIF-VNL Website Ion Beam Technology Group website Artist's conception of a heavy ion fusion power plant Artist's conception of an IFE powerplant We further inertial fusion energy as a future power source, primarily through R&D on heavy-ion induction accelerators. Our program is part of a "Virtual National Laboratory," headquartered in AFRD, that joins us with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in close collaboration on inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions. The related emergent science of high-energy-density physics (HEDP) has become a major focus. For further synergy, we have combined forces with the former Ion Beam

29

Fusion Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017 The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Production Computing and...

30

Fusion Energy Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Division http:www.ornl.govscinseddivisionfed.shtml Please click link above if you were not already redirected to the page....

31

FUSION ENERGY Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports a vigorous research and development program for fusion energy. Fusion represents a potential energy source that is sustainable and has favorable safety and environmental features. Like fission, fusion offers the opportunity to generate substantial quantities of energy while producing no CO2 or other “greenhouse gases” that may contribute to global warming. Even with substantial conservation efforts and improvements in end-use efficiency, the future world demand for energy is expected to increase as a result of population growth and economic development. The timely advent of fusion as a practical energy source may be crucial. In particular, the ANS believes the following: 1. The long-term benefits of fusion energy warrant a sustained effort aimed at advancing fusion science and technology. International cooperation is a cost-effective complement to strong national programs. 2. Recent scientific progress in fusion research has been encouraging and warrants an enhanced and expanded fusion engineering and technology development program. 3. Based on the continuing success of physics and technology development programs, it appears

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Path toward fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

A brief history of the fusion research program is given. Some of the problems that plagued the developmental progress are described. (MOW)

Furth, H.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fusion Energy Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and engineering activities. Our plasma theorists develop the fundamental plasma theory and computational base needed to understand plasma behavior in fusion devices, to...

34

Future of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, fusion R&D programs have made enormous technical progress. Projected billion-dollar scale research facilities are designed to approach net energy production. In this century, scientific and engineering progress must continue until the economics of fusion power plants improves sufficiently to win large scale private funding in competition with fission and non-nuclear energy systems. This economic advantage must be sustained: trillion dollar investments will be required to build enough fusion power plants to generate ten percent of the world's energy. For Inertial Fusion Energy, multi-billion dollar driver costs must be reduced by up to an order of magnitude, to a small fraction of the total cost of the power plant. Major cost reductions could be achieved via substantial improvements in target performance-both higher gain and reduced ignition energy. Large target performance improvements may be feasible through a combination of design innovations, e.g., ''fast ignition,'' propagation down density gradients, and compression of fusion fuel with a combination of driver and chemical energy. The assumptions that limit projected performance of fusion targets should be carefully examined. The National Ignition Facility will enable development and testing of revolutionary targets designed to make possible economically competitive fusion power plants.

Nuckolls, J H; Wood, L L

2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

35

U. S. Fusion Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

Fusion implementation scenarios for the US have been developed. The dependence of these scenarios on both the fusion development and implementation paths has been assessed. A range of implementation paths has been studied. The deployment of CANDU fission reactors in Canada and the deployment of fission reactors in France have been assessed as possible models for US fusion deployment. The waste production and resource (including tritium) needs have been assessed. The conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that it is challenging to make a significant impact on energy production during this century. However, the rapid deployment of fission reactors in Canada and France support fusion implementation scenarios for the US with significant power production during this century. If the country can meet the schedule requirements then the resource needs and waste production are found to be manageable problems.

John A. Schmidt; Dan Jassby; Scott Larson; Maria Pueyo; Paul H. Rutherford

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

(Fusion energy research)  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile FY 2010 Current Appropriation FY 2011 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science 163,479 +57,399 182, Fusion Energy Sciences 394,518b +91,023 426,000 380,000 Public Law Authorizations: Public Law 95

38

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile Adjustments FY 2006 Current Appropriation FY 2007 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science,182 Total, Fusion Energy Sciences........... 266,947b 290,550 -2,906 287,644 318,950 Public Law

39

Fusion energy for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science | Princeton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fusion Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govfesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

42

Hydrogen fusion-energy reactions  

SciTech Connect

At the Los Alamos Ion Beam Facility we have installed a low-energy fusion cross section (LEFCS) apparatus specifically designed to measure cross sections to high accuracy for the various fusion-energy reactions among the hydrogen isotopes in the bombarding-energy range 10 to 120 keV. To date, we have completed and published our study of the D(t,..cap alpha..)n reaction, have finished data-taking for the D(d,p)T and D(d,/sup 3/He)n reactions, and have nearly finished data-taking for the T(t,..cap alpha..)nn reaction. Here we describe the LEFCS facility, present final and preliminary results for these reactions, and compare them with R-matrix calculations. 16 refs., 10 figs.

Brown, R.E.; Jarmie, N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

and Enable Development of Fusion’s Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demonstrate advanced physics operation of a tokamak in steadystate with Burn – Utilize conservative expressions of all elements of Advanced Tokamak physics to produce 100-250 MW fusion power with modest energy gain (Q 2 weeks – Further develop all elements of Advanced Tokamak physics, qualifying them for an advanced performance DEMO Develop fusion’s nuclear technology – Test materials with high neutron fluence (3-6 MW-yr/m 2) with duty factor 0.3 on a year – Demonstrate Tritium self-sufficiency – Develop fusion blankets that make both tritium and electricity at 1-2 MW/m 2 neutron fluxes – Develop fusion blankets that produce hydrogen With ITER and IFMIF, provide the basis for a fusion DEMO Power Plant

R. D. Stambaugh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

SPIELMAN,RICK B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related FieldsFusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fieldscalled, in the magnetic fusion energy community, a tandem

Kwan, J.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

Prager, Stewart (PPPL)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

47

Demonstrating a Target Supply for Inertial Fusion Energy (A24816)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Science And Technology 47, 1131 (2005)16th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Madison Wisconsin, US, 2004999609940

Goodin, D.T.

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

RENEWABLE ENERGY GROUPS COVET FUSION'S BUDGET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY GROUPS COVET FUSION'S BUDGET A group called the Energy Efficiency Education Project (1333 H St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20005-4707; 202-682-1270), claiming to represent over 80 billion in the DOE budget out of fusion, fission and fossil energy research and into "more cost

49

Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of hydrogen (deuterium and tritium), are derived from water and the metal lithium, a relatively abundant resource. The fuels are virtually inexhaustible and they are available worldwide. Deuterium from one gallon of seawater would provide the equivalent energy of 300 gallons of gasoline, or over a half ton of coal. This energy is released when deuterium and tritium nuclei are fused together to form a helium nucleus and a neutron. The neutron is used to breed tritium from lithium. The energy released is carried by the helium nucleus (3.5 MeV) and the neutron (14 MeV). The energetic helium nucleus heats the fuel, helping to sustain the fusion reaction. Once the helium cools, it is collected and becomes a useful byproduct. A fusion power plant would produce no climate-changing gases.

Moses, E

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

50

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements for Science: Target 2014 Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy...

51

Fusion: an energy source for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fusion energy | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy energy Subscribe to RSS - Fusion energy The energy released when two atomic nuclei fuse together. This process powers the sun and stars. Read more Two PPPL-led teams win increased supercomputing time to study conditions inside fusion plasmas Researchers led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have won highly competitive allocations of time on two of the world's fastest supercomputers. The increased awards are designed to advance the development of nuclear fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity. Read more about Two PPPL-led teams win increased supercomputing time to study conditions inside fusion plasmas Two PPPL-led teams win increased supercomputing time to study conditions

53

Fusion Energy Division Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Agreement with UT-Battelle to collaborate with Japan's National Institute for Fusion Science. Division Director Stanley L. Milora Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box...

54

Accelerated plan to develop magnetic fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

We have shown that, despite funding delays since the passage of the Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980, fusion development could still be carried to the point of a demonstration plant by the year 2000 as called for in the Act if funding, now about $365 million per year, were increased to the $1 billion range over the next few years (see Table I). We have also suggested that there may be an economic incentive for the private sector to become in accelerating fusion development on account of the greater stability of energy production costs from fusion. Namely, whereas fossil fuel prices will surely escalate in the course of time, fusion fuel will always be abundantly available at low cost; and fusion technology poses less future risk to the public and the investor compared to conventional nuclear power. In short, once a fusion plant is built, the cost of generating electricity mainly the amortization of the plant capital cost - would be relatively fixed for the life of the plant. In Sec. V, we found that the projected capital cost of fusion plants ($2000 to $4000 per KW/sub e/) would probably be acceptable if fusion plants were available today.

Fowler, T.K.

1986-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Fusion energy development: Breakeven and beyond: Keynote address  

SciTech Connect

The scientific feasibility, technological inevitability, and economic necessity of fusion as an energy source are discussed.

Furth, H.P.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

HEDP and new directions for fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

The Quest for fusion energy has a long history and the demonstration of thermonuclear energy release in 1951 represented a record achievement for high energy density. While this first demonstration was in response to the extreme fears of mankind, it also marked the beginning of a great hope that it would usher in an era of boundless cheap energy. In fact, fusion still promises to be an enabling technology that can be compared to the prehistoric utilization of fire. Why has the quest for fusion energy been so long on promises and so short in fulfillment? This paper briefly reviews past approaches to fusion energy and suggests new directions. By putting aside the old thinking and vigorously applying our experimental, computational and theoretical tools developed over the past decades we should be able to make rapid progress toward satisfying an urgent need. Fusion not only holds the key to abundant green energy, but also promises to enable deep space missions and the creation of rare elements and isotopes for wide-ranging industrial applications and medical diagnostics.

Kirkpatrick, Ronald C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.3.3.4 Chamber Radius and Fusion Neutron Flux . . . . .1.1.3.2 Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . .1.1.3.3 Fission-Fusion Hybrids . . . . 1.2 Scope and Purpose

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Target Tracking and Engagement for Inertial Fusion Energy - A Tabletop Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Technology of Fusion Energy - Inertial Fusion Technology: Targets and Chambers

Lane Carlson; Mark Tillack; Thomas Lorentz; Jon Spalding; Neil Alexander; Graham Flint; Dan Goodin; Ronald Petzoldt

59

Systems Modeling for the Laser Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

W. R. Meier et al.

60

Molten Salt Fuel Version of Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

R. W. Moir; H. F. Shaw; A. Caro; Larry Kaufman; J. F. Latkowski; J. Powers; P. E. A. Turchi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Converting energy from fusion into useful forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If fusion power reactors are to be feasible, it will still be necessary to convert the energy of the nuclear reaction into usable form. The heat produced will be removed from the reactor core by a primary coolant, which might be water, helium, molten lithium-lead, molten lithium-containing salt, or CO2. The heat could then be transferred to a conventional Rankine cycle or Brayton (gas turbine) cycle. Alternatively it could be used for thermochemical processes such as producing hydrogen or other transport fuels. Fusion presents new problems because of the high energy neutrons released. These affect the selection of materials and the operating temperature, ultimately determining the choice of coolant and working cycle. The limited temperature ranges allowed by present day irradiated structural materials, combined with the large internal power demand of the plant, will limit the overall thermal efficiency. The operating conditions of the fusion power source, the materials, coolant, and energy conversion system w...

Kovari, M; Jenkins, I; Kiely, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Role of Fusion Energy in a Sustainable Global Energy Strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion energy is one of only a few truly long-term energy options. Since its inception in the 1950s, the vision of the fusion energy research program has been to develop a viable means of harnessing the virtually unlimited energy stored in the nuclei of light atoms--the primary fuel deuterium is present as one part in 6,500 of all hydrogen. This vision grew out of the recognition that the immense power radiated by the sun is fueled by nuclear fusion in its hot core. Such high temperatures are a prerequisite for driving significant fusion reactions. The fascinating fourth state of matter at high temperatures is known as plasma. It is only in this fourth state of matter that the nuclei of two light atoms can fuse, releasing the excess energy that was needed to separately bind each of the original two nuclei. Because the nuclei of atoms carry a net positive electric charge, they repel each other. Hydrogenic nuclei, such as deuterium and tritium, must be heated to approximately 100 million degrees Celsius to overcome this electric repulsion and fuse. There have been dramatic recent advances in both the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas and in the generation of fusion power in the laboratory. Today, there is little doubt that fusion energy production is feasible. For this reason, the general thrust of fusion research has focused on configuration improvements leading to an economically competitive product. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are among the reasons to pursue these opportunities [1]. In this paper we review the tremendous scientific progress in fusion during the last 10 years. We utilize the detailed engineering design activities of burning plasma experiments as well as conceptual fusion power plant studies to describe our visions of attractive fusion power plants. We use these studies to compare technical requirements of an attractive fusion system with present achievements to identify remaining technical challenges for fusion. We discuss scenarios for fusion energy deployment in the energy market.

Meier, W; Najmabadi, F; Schmidt, J; Sheffield, J

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) MFE--Plasma Systems (UC-20a) MFE Temperature Response 4-7 4.6 Thermal Storage Requirements 4-16 4.6.1 Pressurized Water/Steam System 4-19 4

Harilal, S. S.

64

Pulsed energy storage in fusion devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development on pulsed energy technologies, primarily for pulsed high-beta fusion systems, is described. Systems studies at Los Alamos and elsewhere have served to define these required technologies, which include fast discharging homopolar machines, pulsed superconducting coils, and the associated switching technology. Programs at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Westinghouse, and The University of Texas are described here.

Thomassen, K.I.; Rogers, J.D.; Ribe, F.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A Conceptual Study for a Feasible Fusion Energy Utilization Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plants, Demo, and Next Steps / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

Jung Hoon Han et al.

66

Compact, Efficient Laser Systems Required for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

A. Bayramian et al.

67

Timely Delivery of Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

M. Dunne et al.

68

LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Thomas M. Anklam; Mike Dunne; Wayne R. Meier; Sarah Powers; Aaron J. Simon

69

Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Jeffery F. Latkowski et al.

70

Assessment of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) program with guidance for future program strategy. The overall objective of this study is to prepare an independent assessment of the scientific quality of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences program at the Department of Energy. The Fusion Science Assessment Committee (FuSAC) has been appointed to conduct this study.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fusion reactors as future energy sources  

SciTech Connect

From conference on energy policies and the international system; New, Delhi, India (4 Dec 1973). The need is now apparent for a global energy policy with the following characteristics: Compatibility with environmental and economic factors; large fuel resources, the recovery and exploration of which have minimal environmental impact and which do not introduce disturbing factors into the world political situation. Fusion power in this context is discussed, including assessments of its potential and of the problems yet to be solved in achieving its realization. The proposition is advanced that fusion should be considered as the ultimate source of energy, and that other sources of energy, including conventional nuclear power, should be considered as interim sources. (auth)

Post, R.F.; Ribe, F.L.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The international magnetic fusion energy program  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1988, the long tradition of international cooperation in magnetic fusion energy research culminated in the initiation of design work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). If eventually constructed in the 1990s, ITER would be the world's first magnetic fusion reactor. This paper discusses the background events that led to ITER and the present status of the ITER activity. This paper presents a brief summary of the technical, political, and organizational activities that have led to the creation of the ITER design activity. The ITER activity is now the main focus of international cooperation in magnetic fusion research and one of the largest international cooperative efforts in all of science. 2 refs., 12 figs.

Fowler, T.K.

1988-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

NERSC Role in Fusion Energy Science Research Katherine Yelick  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Science Research Katherine Yelick NERSC Director Requirements Workshop NERSC Mission The mission of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...

74

Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu; Enguang Zhao

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

Energy for Future Centuries: Prospects for Fusion Power as a Future Energy Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

J. Ongena; G. Van Oost

76

Energy for Future Centuries: Prospects for Fusion Power as a Future Energy Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

J. Ongena; G. Van Oost

77

Strategic plan for the restructured US fusion energy sciences program  

SciTech Connect

This plan reflects a transition to a restructured fusion program, with a change in focus from an energy technology development program to a fusion energy sciences program. Since the energy crisis of the early 1970`s, the U.S. fusion program has presented itself as a goal- oriented fusion energy development program, with milestones that required rapidly increasing budgets. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 also called for a goal-oriented development program consistent with the Department`s planning. Actual funding levels, however, have forced a premature narrowing of the program to the tokamak approach. By 1995, with no clear, immediate need driving the schedule for developing fusion energy and with enormous pressure to reduce discretionary spending, Congress cut fusion program funding for FY 1996 by one-third and called for a major restructuring of the program. Based on the recommendations of the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC), the Department has decided to pursue a program that concentrates on world-class plasma, science, and on maintaining an involvement in fusion energy science through international collaboration. At the same time, the Japanese and Europeans, with energy situations different from ours, are continuing with their goal- oriented fusion programs. Collaboration with them provides a highly leveraged means of continued involvement in fusion energy science and technology, especially through participation in the engineering and design activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor program, ITER. This restructured fusion energy sciences program, with its focus on fundamental fusion science and technology, may well provide insights that lead to more attractive fusion power plants, and will make use of the scientific infrastructure that will allow the United States to launch a fusion energy development program at some future date.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale, Clean Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Signs U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.21.06 U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction November 21, 2006 PARIS, FRANCE - Representing the United States, Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Under Secretary for Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), today joined counterparts from China, the European Union, India, Japan, the

79

Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of $^{16}$O with $^{154,}$$^{144}$Sm,$^{186}$W and $^{208}$Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two $^{64}$Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

F. Muhammad Zamrun; K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fusion-supported decentralized nuclear energy system  

SciTech Connect

A decentralized nuclear energy system is proposed comprising mass-produced pressurized water reactors in the size range 10 to 300 MW (thermal), to be used for the production of process heat, space heat, and electricity in applications where petroleum and natural gas are presently used. Special attention is given to maximizing the refueling interval with no interim batch shuffling in order to minimize fuel transport, reactor downtime, and opportunity for fissile diversion. These objectives demand a substantial fissile enrichment (7 to 15%). The preferred fissile fuel is U-233, which offers an order of magnitude savings in ore requirements (compared with U-235 fuel), and whose higher conversion ratio in thermal reactors serves to extend the period of useful reactivity and relieve demand on the fissile breeding plants (compared with Pu-239 fuel). Application of the neutral-beam-driven tokamak fusion-neutron source to a U-233 breeding pilot plant is examined. This scheme can be extended in part to a decentralized fusion energy system, wherein remotely located large fusion reactors supply excess tritium to a distributed system of relatively small nonbreeding D-T reactors.

Jassby, D.L.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) facility point design is being developed at LLNL to support an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) based energy concept. This will build upon the technical foundation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system. NIF is designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. The LIFE control systems will have an architecture partitioned by sub-systems and distributed among over 1000's of front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. LIFE's automated control subsystems will require interoperation between different languages and target architectures. Much of the control system will be embedded into the subsystem with well defined interface and performance requirements to the supervisory control layer. An automation framework will be used to orchestrate and automate start-up and shut-down as well as steady state operation. The LIFE control system will be a high parallel segmented architecture. For example, the laser system consists of 384 identical laser beamlines in a 'box'. The control system will mirror this architectural replication for each beamline with straightforward high-level interface for control and status monitoring. Key technical challenges will be discussed such as the injected target tracking and laser pointing feedback. This talk discusses the the plan for controls and information systems to support LIFE.

Marshall, C; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Edwards, O; Lagin, L; Van Arsdall, P

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Optimized Data Fusion in Bandwidth and Energy Constrained Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimized Data Fusion in Bandwidth and Energy Constrained Sensor Networks Xianren Wu and Zhi Tian Abstract-- This paper considers the problem of decentralized data fusion (DDF) for large wireless sensor this setting, we derive the maximum likelihood (ML) data fusion rule for decentralized parameter estimation

Tian, Zhi "Gerry"

83

REP-Rated Target Injection for Inertial Fusion Energy (A24820)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Sci. And Technol. 47, 1143 (2005)16th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Madison Wisconsin, US, 2004999609950

Frey, D.T.

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electrical Energy Requirements for Accelerator and Fusion Neutrons  

SciTech Connect

The electrical energy requirements and costs of accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) and fusion plants designed to transmute nuclides of fission wastes are compared. Both systems use the same blanket concept, but tritium breeding is taken into account for the fusion system. The ATW and fusion plants are found to have the same electrical energy requirement per available blanket neutron when the blanket coverage is comparable and the fusion energy gain is near breakeven (Q {approx}1), but the fusion plant has only a fraction of the energy requirement when Q >> 1. If the blanket thermal energy is converted to electricity, the fusion plant and ATW have comparable net electrical energy outputs per available neutron when Q {approx}1.5 and the blanket neutron multiplication is large.

Jassby, Daniel L.; Schmidt, John A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States)

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme Scale PI Name: William Tang PI Email: tang@pppl.gov Institution: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Allocation...

86

International Atomic Energy Agency holds conference on fusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Atomic Energy Agency holds conference on fusion roadmap By John Greenwald November 8, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Hutch Neilson, third from left,...

87

Fusion Energy Greg Hammett & Russell Kulsred Princeton University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spitzer's 100th: Founding PPPL & Pioneering Work in Fusion Energy Greg Hammett & Russell Kulsred Princeton University Wednesday, Dec 4, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at...

88

Liquid Metal MHD Energy Conversion in Fusion Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Innovative Concepts for Power Conversion / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

L. Blumenau; H. Branover; A. El-Boher; E Spero; S. Sukoriansky; G. Talmage; E. Greenspan

89

In-Situ MHD Energy Conversion for Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Innovative Concepts for Power Conversion / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

R. B. Campbell; M. A. Hoffman; B. G. Logan

90

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

91

Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ceramic matrix composites are considered among the key enabling materials for advanced nuclear reactors and fusion energy systems. Silicon ...

92

Electrical energy requirements for ATW and fusion neutrons  

SciTech Connect

This note compares the electrical energy requirements of accelerator (ATW) and fusion plants designed to transmute nuclides of fission wastes. Both systems use the same blanket concept but for each source neutron the fusion system must utilize one blanket neutron for tritium breeding. The ATW and fusion plants are found to have the same electrical energy requirement per available blanket neutron when the blanket coverage is comparable and fusion Q {approx} 1, but the fusion plant has only a fraction of the energy requirement when Q {much{underscore}gt} 1. If the blanket thermal energy is converted to electricity, the fusion plant and ATW have comparable net electrical energy outputs per available neutron when Q {>=} 2.

Jassby, D.L.; Schmidt, J.A.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

93

Structural Materials for Fission and Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Structural materials represent the key for containment of nuclear fuel and fission products as well as reliable and thermodynamically efficient production of electrical energy from nuclear reactors. Similarly, high-performance structural materials will be critical for the future success of proposed fusion energy reactors, which will subject the structures to unprecedented fluxes of high-energy neutrons along with intense thermomechanical stresses. Advanced materials can enable improved reactor performance via increased safety margins and design flexibility, in particular by providing increased strength, thermal creep resistance and superior corrosion and neutron radiation damage resistance. In many cases, a key strategy for designing highperformance radiation-resistant materials is based on the introduction of a high, uniform density of nanoscale particles that simultaneously provide good high temperature strength and neutron radiation damage resistance.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

Kevin J. Kramer; Jeffery F. Latkowski; Ryan P. Abbott; John K. Boyd; Jeffrey J. Powers; Jeffrey E. Seifried

95

"50" Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Steady-state operation is a highly desirable characteristic for a magnetic fusion power plant with toroidal multipole at GA 1966 #12;Four New Superconducting Tokamaks will Address Steady- State Advanced by Sakharov in the early 50s). ­ Wave propagation became basis for RF heating · Experimental Progress (some

96

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Example of NIF fusion target hohlraum with multiple beamsimilar to those used on NIF. . . . . Overview of LFFHNES Nuclear Energy System NIF National Ignition Facility ODS

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1.3.1 Fission Energy . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3.21.1.3.3 Fission-Fusion Hybrids . . . . 1.2 Scope and Purposei CONTENTS Fission Blanket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Improved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics via Massive Resistive Electromagnets  

SciTech Connect

Abandoning superconductors for magnetic fusion reactors and instead using resistive magnet designs based on cheap copper or aluminum conductor material operating at "room temperature" (300 K) can reduce the capital cost per unit fusion power and simplify plant operations. By increasing unit size well beyond that of present magnetic fusion energy conceptual designs using superconducting electromagnets, the recirculating power fraction needed to operate resistive electromagnets can be made as close to zero as needed for economy without requiring superconductors. Other advantages of larger fusion plant size, such as very long inductively driven pulses, may also help reduce the cost per unit fusion power.

Woolley, R.D.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fusion utilization projections in the United States energy economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are discussed in some detail in this report: (1) applications of fusion energy, (2) fusion implementation in the US energy system, (3) reactor performance requirements, (4) technology for electric applications, and (5) technology for synthetic fuel/chemical applications. (MOW)

Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fusion Energy [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Fusion Energy Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Fusion Energy Bookmark and Share Since 1995, Argonne has had primary responsibility for the development of new design rules regarding various components in a fusion reactor, particularly those subject to irradiation embrittlement. During 1998, Argonne issued the final draft of the structural design criteria for in-vessel components in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER).

102

Fusion-fission energy systems evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as the basis for comparing the fusion-fission (hybrid) energy system concept with other advanced technology fissile fuel breeding concepts evaluated in the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). As such, much of the information and data provided herein is in a form that meets the NASAP data requirements. Since the hybrid concept has not been studied as extensively as many of the other fission concepts being examined in NASAP, the provided data and information are sparse relative to these more developed concepts. Nevertheless, this report is intended to provide a perspective on hybrids and to summarize the findings of the rather limited analyses made to date on this concept.

Teofilo, V.L.; Aase, D.T.; Bickford, W.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will present a uniform technical assessment of the benefits of the three approaches. The draft report will be presented and extensively discussed during the July meeting, leading to a final report. This report will provide critical fusion community input to the decision process of FESAC and DOE in 2002-2003, and to the review of burning plasma science by the National Academy of Sciences called for by FESAC and Energy Legislation which was passed by the House of Representatives [H.R. 4]. Members of the fusion community are encouraged to participate in the Snowmass working groups.

N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Vintage DOE: What is Fusion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vintage DOE: What is Fusion Vintage DOE: What is Fusion Vintage DOE: What is Fusion January 10, 2011 - 12:45pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs As our team works to build our new website and new content features over the coming months, we're also reviewing the Department's video archives. In the below piece, a narrator ask people on the street "what is fusion?" and then, around the 2-minute mark, kicks off a nice introduction to fusion science. It's worth a watch if you could use a brush up on the basic science, or if you'd just enjoy a reminder of what Americans were wearing a couple decades ago. With much research and development, scientists at the Department of Energy have done a great deal to advance our knowledge of fusion since the time

105

LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the case for early commercialization of laser inertial fusion energy (LIFE). Results taken from systems modeling of the US electrical generating enterprise quantify the benefits of fusion energy in terms of carbon emission, nuclear waste and plutonium production avoidance. Sensitivity of benefits-gained to timing of market-entry is presented. These results show the importance of achieving market entry in the 2030 time frame. Economic modeling results show that fusion energy can be competitive with other low-carbon energy sources. The paper concludes with a description of the LIFE commercialization path. It proposes constructing a demonstration facility capable of continuous fusion operations within 10 to 15 years. This facility will qualify the processes and materials needed for a commercial fusion power plant.

Anklam, T; Simon, A J; Powers, S; Meier, W R

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Culham Centre for Fusion Energy Fusion -A clean future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be expected, even if energy can be used more efficiently. At the same time, we need to find new ways; Governments are divided over whether to include nuclear fission in their energy portfolios; and renewable, lithium, which is abundant in the earth's crust; · An efficient way of making energy. Just one kilogram

107

Overview of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Devlopment and Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

This publication gives a comprehensive introduction to controlled fusion research. Topics covered in the discussion include the following: (1) fusion system engineering and advanced design, (2) plasma engineering, (3) magnetic systems, (4) materials, (5) environment and safety, and (6) alternate energy applications. (MOW)

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Applications of fusion thermal energy to industrial processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of applying fusion thermal energy as process heat in the iron-steel industry, petrochemical industry, cement industry, and in the production of acetylene fom coal via calcium carbide are discussed. These four industries were selected for analysis because they require massive amounts of energy. This preliminary study concludes that the production of synthetic fuels using fusion heat appears to be the most promising method of storing and transporting this heat. Of the four industries studied, the iron-steel and the petrochemical industries appear to be the most promising because they consume substantial amounts of hydrogen and oxygen as feedstocks. These can be produced from water using the high-temperature fusion heat. The production of hydrogen and oxygen using fusion heat will also reduce the capital investment required for these industries. These two industries also consume tremendous amounts of heat at temperatures which can be delivered from a fusion blanket via chemical heat pipes.

Bowman, R.M.; Jody, B.J.; Lu, K.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Inertial fusion: an energy-production option for the future  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the inertial-confinement approach to fusion energy. After explaining the fundamentals of fusion, they describe the state of the art of fusion experiments, emphasizing the results achieved through the use of neodymium-doped glass lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at other laboratories. They highlight recent experimental results confirming theoretical predictions that short-wavelength lasers have excellent energy absorption on fuel pellets. Compressions of deuterium-tritium fuel of over 100 times liquid density have been measured, only a factor of 10 away from the compression required for a commercial reactor. Finally, it is shown how to exploit the unique characteristics of inertial fusion to design reactor chambers that have a very high power density and a long life, features that the authors believe will eventually lead to fusion power at a competitive cost.

Hovingh, J.; Pitts, J.H.; Monsler, M.J.; Grow, G.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comparison of the systematics of fusion barrier with and without L-dependence has been presented.

S. V. S. Sastry; S. Kailas; A. K. Mohanty; A. Saxena

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Posted By Office of Public Affairs Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF) recently focused all

112

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Posted By Office of Public Affairs Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF) recently focused all

113

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

E. I. Moses

114

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategic plans. Large  Scale  Computing  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   DOE  

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Code MFE Magnetic Fusion Energy MOX Mixed Oxide NES Nuclearreprocessing mixed oxide (MOX) fuels, as will be discussedbegun using Mixed ox- ide or MOX fuel as a means of both

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Fusion energy science: Clean, safe, and abundant energy through innovative science and technology  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy science combines the study of the behavior of plasmas--the state of matter that forms 99% of the visible universe--with a vision of using fusion--the energy source of the stars--to create an affordable, plentiful, and environmentally benign energy source for humankind. The dual nature of fusion energy science provides an unfolding panorama of exciting intellectual challenge and a promise of an attractive energy source for generations to come. The goal of this report is a comprehensive understanding of plasma behavior leading to an affordable and attractive fusion energy source.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Understanding and accepting fusion as an alternative energy source  

SciTech Connect

Fusion, the process that powers our sun, has long promised to be a virtually inexhaustible source of energy for mankind. No other alternative energy source holds such bright promise, and none has ever presentd such formidable scientific and engineering challenges. Serious research efforts have continued for over 30 years in an attempt to harness and control fusion here on earth. Scientists have made considerable progress in the last decade toward achieving the conditions required for fusion power, and recent experimental results and technological progress have made the scientific feasibility of fusion a virtual certainty. With this knowledge and confidence, the emphasis can now shift toward developing power plants that are practical and economical. Although the necessary technology is not in hand today, the extension to an energy producing system in 20 years is just as attainable as was putting a man on the moon. In the next few decades, the world's population will likely double while the demand for energy will nearly quadruple. Realistic projections show that within the next generation a significant fraction of our electric power must come from alternative energy sources. Increasing environmental concerns may further accelerate this timetable in which new energy sources must be introduced. The continued development of fusion systems to help meet the energy needs of the future will require greater public understanding and support of this technology. The fusion community must do more to make the public aware of the fact that energy is a critical international issue and that fusion is a viable and necessary energy technology that will be safe and economical. 12 refs., 8 figs.

Goerz, D.A.

1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

Understanding and accepting fusion as an alternative energy source  

SciTech Connect

Fusion, the process that powers our sun, has long promised to be a virtually inexhaustible source of energy for mankind. No other alternative energy source holds such bright promise, and none has ever presentd such formidable scientific and engineering challenges. Serious research efforts have continued for over 30 years in an attempt to harness and control fusion here on earth. Scientists have made considerable progress in the last decade toward achieving the conditions required for fusion power, and recent experimental results and technological progress have made the scientific feasibility of fusion a virtual certainty. With this knowledge and confidence, the emphasis can now shift toward developing power plants that are practical and economical. Although the necessary technology is not in hand today, the extension to an energy producing system in 20 years is just as attainable as was putting a man on the moon. In the next few decades, the world's population will likely double while the demand for energy will nearly quadruple. Realistic projections show that within the next generation a significant fraction of our electric power must come from alternative energy sources. Increasing environmental concerns may further accelerate this timetable in which new energy sources must be introduced. The continued development of fusion systems to help meet the energy needs of the future will require greater public understanding and support of this technology. The fusion community must do more to make the public aware of the fact that energy is a critical international issue and that fusion is a viable and necessary energy technology that will be safe and economical. 12 refs., 8 figs.

Goerz, D.A.

1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluation of DD and DT fusion fuel cycles for different fusion-fission energy systems  

SciTech Connect

A study has been carried out in order to investigate the characteristics of an energy system to produce a new source of fissile fuel for existing fission reactors. The denatured fuel cycles were used because it gives additional proliferation resistance compared to other fuel cycles. DT and DD fusion drivers were examined in this study with a thorium or uranium blanket for each fusion driver. Various fuel cycles were studied for light-water and heavy-water reactors. The cost of electricity for each energy system was calculated.

Gohar, Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Dr. N. Anne Davies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy's Office of Science #12;Fusion is part of SC's part of the American Competitiveness Initiative is improved." - Energy Policy Act of 2005, Sec. 972(b)(1)(E) Outreach to S&T Communities #12;Outreach to S of science and technology ­ No direct incentive for broader communities to initiate ­ Energy Policy Act

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Thermonuclear Fusion Energy : Assessment and Next Step Ren Pellat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, will have to be properly considered in tokamak reactor design. MHD theory and modelling have been Atomic Energy Chairman of the CCE-FU Energy and environment. Nuclear and renewable energies 8 ­ 9 March allowed to continuously progress towards the fusion reactor which stays a physics and technology ambitious

122

A Pilot Plant: The Fastest Path to Commercial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Considerable effort has been dedicated to determining the possible properties of a magneticconfinement fusion power plant, particularly in the U.S.1, Europe2 and Japan3. There has also been some effort to detail the development path to fusion energy, particularly in the U.S.4 Only limited attention has been given, in Japan5 and in China6, to the options for a specific device to form the bridge from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, to commercial fusion energy. Nor has much attention been paid, since 2003, to the synergies between magnetic and inertial fusion energy development. Here we consider, at a very high level, the possibility of a Qeng ? 1 Pilot Plant, with linear dimensions ~ 2/3 the linear dimensions of a commercial fusion power plant, as the needed bridge. As we examine the R&D needs for such a system we find significant synergies between the needs for the development of magnetic and inertial fusion energy.

Robert J. Goldston

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Neutronics issues and inertial fusion energy: a summary of findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed and compared five major inertial fusion energy (IFE) and two representative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) power plant designs for their environment, safety, and health (ES&H) characteristics. Our work has focussed upon the neutronics of each of the designs and the resulting radiological hazard indices. The calculation of a consistent set of hazard indices allows comparisons to be made between the designs. Such comparisons enable identification of trends in fusion ES&H characteristics and may be used to increase the likelihood of fusion achieving its full potential with respect to ES&H characteristics. The present work summarizes our findings and conclusions. This work emphasizes the need for more research in low-activation materials and for the experimental measurement of radionuclide release fractions under accident conditions.

Latkowski, J. F., LLNL

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fusion dynamics of symmetric systems near barrier energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections was explained as the lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model. The numbers of nucleon transfer in the neck region are appreciably dependent on the incident energies, but strongly on the reaction systems. A comparison of the neck dynamics is performed for the symmetric reactions $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. An increase of the ratios of neutron to proton in the neck region at initial collision stage is observed and obvious for neutron-rich systems, which can reduce the interaction potential of two colliding nuclei. The distribution of the dynamical fusion barriers and the fusion excitation functions are calculated and compared them with the available experimental data.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement November 21, 2006 - 9:25am Addthis Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction PARIS, FRANCE - Representing the United States, Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Under Secretary for Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), today joined counterparts from China, the European Union, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea and the Russian Federation to sign an agreement to build the international fusion energy project known as ITER. "The energy that powers the stars is moving closer to becoming a new source of energy for the Earth through the technology represented by ITER," U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "The ITER Members represent over

126

Application of small-signal fusion energy gain  

SciTech Connect

The measured burnup fraction of the 1-MeV tritons produced in a deuterium tokamak plasma, multiplied by 17.5, is essentially the small-signal fusion energy gain g/sub T/ for an ideal 1-MeV triton beam injected into the deuterium plasma. The measured g/sub T/ can be converted directly into the two-component fusion energy gain that would be realized if a lower energy tritium beam were injected into the plasma, or if a deuterium beam were injected into a tritium target plasma having the same parameters as the acutal deuterium plasma. Under certain conditions, g/sub T/ greater than or equal to 1 can be obtained by injection of a low-current 225-keV tritium beam into a hot deuterium plasma, thereby verifying that the plasma has the essential characteristics needed for achieving macroscopic fusion energy ''break-even.''

Jassby, D.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Laser Intertial Fusion Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 {micro}m of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The {sub 17}Pb{sub 83} flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}, separated from the Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF{sub 2}), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles having a packing fraction of 20% in 2 cm diameter fuel pebbles. The fission blanket is cooled by the same radial flibe flow that travels through perforated ODS walls to the reflector blanket. This reflector blanket is 75 cm thick comprised of 2 cm diameter graphite pebbles cooled by flibe. The flibe extraction plenum surrounds the reflector bed. Detailed neutronics designs studies are performed to arrive at the described design. The LFFH engine thermal power is controlled using a technique of adjusting the {sup 6}Li/{sup 7}Li enrichment in the primary and secondary coolants. The enrichment adjusts system thermal power in the design by increasing tritium production while reducing fission. To perform the simulations and design of the LFFH engine, a new software program named LFFH Nuclear Control (LNC) was developed in C++ to extend the functionality of existing neutron transport and depletion software programs. Neutron transport calculations are performed with MCNP5. Depletion calculations are performed using Monteburns 2.0, which utilizes ORIGEN 2.0 and MCNP5 to perform a burnup calculation. LNC supports many design parameters and is capable of performing a full 3D system simulation from initial startup to full burnup. It is able to iteratively search for coolant {sup 6}Li enrichments and resulting material compositions that meet user defined performance criteria. LNC is utilized throughout this study for time dependent simulation of the LFFH engine. Two additional methods were developed to improve the computation efficiency of LNC calculations. These methods, termed adaptive time stepping and adaptive mesh refinement were incorporated into a separate stand alone C++ library name the Adaptive Burnup Library (ABL). The ABL allows for other client codes to call and utilize its functionality. Adaptive time stepping is useful for automatically maximizing the size of the depletion time step while maintaining a desired level of accuracy. Adaptive meshing allows for analysis of fixed fuel configurations that would normally require a computationally burdensome number of depletion zones. Alternatively, Adaptive M

Kramer, K

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

128

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

129

U.S. to Participate in Fusion Project Thursday, January 30, 2003 http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Fusion-Energy-Plan.html?pagewanted=  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. to Participate in Fusion Project Thursday, January 30, 2003 http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Fusion-Energy-range international collaboration to develop fusion energy as a commercial power source, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer-Plan.html?pagewanted= print&position=top Page: 1 January 30, 2003 U.S. to Participate in Fusion Project By THE ASSOCIATED

130

Inertial and inductive energy storage for fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy storage is necessary for all proposed fusion reactor systems. The plasma physics for confinement and primarily the energy transfer time determine the nature of the storage system. Discharge times vary from 0.7 ms for theta-pinch reactors to one to two seconds for tokamak reactors. Three classes of devices are available for energy storage--inductors, capacitors, and rotating machines. The transfer of the energy from the store imposes unusual switching requirements. The broad requirements for reactor energy stores and more specifically those for tokamak experimental power reactors (EPR) and for the Scyllac fusion test reactor (SFTR) will be presented. Assessments and comparisons of alternative energy storage and transfer systems for these devices are to be discussed. The state of the pulsed superconducting inductive energy storage coils and homopolar development programs will be emphasized. Plans for tokamak ohmic-heating systems will be discussed briefly.

Rogers, J.D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

Moses, E

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fusion: A necessary component of US energy policy  

SciTech Connect

US energy policy must ensure that its security, its economy, or its world leadership in technology development are not compromised by failure to meet the nation's electrical energy needs. Increased concerns over the greenhouse effect from fossil-fuel combustion mean that US energy policy must consider how electrical energy dependence on oil and coal can be lessened by conservation, renewable energy sources, and advanced energy options (nuclear fission, solar energy, and thermonuclear fusion). In determining how US energy policy is to respond to these issues, it will be necessary to consider what role each of the three advanced energy options might play, and to determine how these options can complement one another. This paper reviews and comments on the principal US studies and legislation that have addressed fusion since 1980, and then suggests a research, development, and demonstration program that is consistent with the conclusions of those prior authorities and that will allow us to determine how fusion technology can fit into a US energy policy that takes a balanced, long term view of US needs. 17 refs.

Correll, D.L. Jr.

1989-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

134

Perspective on Fusion Energy Presentation at TWAS-ARO Meeting Bibliotheca Alexandria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

major new (clean) energy sources (e.g. fusion) · Expand use of existing "clean" energy sources (e;Incentives for Developing Fusion Sustainable energy source (for DT cycle: provided that Breeding BlanketsPerspective on Fusion Energy Presentation at TWAS-ARO Meeting Bibliotheca Alexandria December 21

Abdou, Mohamed

135

LANL | Physics | Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inertial confinement and high density Inertial confinement and high density plasma physics Using the world's most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The experimental research of the Physics Division's Inertial Confinement Fusion program is conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester, and the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos. Within inertial confinement fusion and the high energy density area, Los Alamos specializes in hohlraum energetics, symmetry tuning, warm dense matter physics, and hydrodynamics in ultra-extreme conditions. When complete, this research will enable the exploitation of fusion as an energy resource and will enable advanced research in stockpile stewardship

136

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Fusion energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

signed by former Energy Secretary Steven Chu and presented by Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, cited Hawryluk for "applying his wealth of big-science project management experience...

137

Fusion Energy An Industry-Led Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Energy Supply and Needs Global per capita energy usage Global Per Capita energy usage will increase even will continueto bethe dominant sources of energy inthe U.S. during the next thirty years - Coal for electrical power production - Oil for transportation - Natural gas for heating/electrical power - Nuclear fission

138

Fusion Engineering and Design 42 (1998) 537548 Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy--three  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 650°C and has a low enough vapor pressure. Li and Li17Pb83 would also work but must be 1.5 m thick and increased pumping power features required by use of Li or Li17Pb83 suggest Flibe might be the lowest cost to a large variety of chamber design concepts for inertial fusion energy (IFE). Refs. [1­8] provide

Abdou, Mohamed

139

Determination of Atomic Data Pertinent to the Fusion Energy Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize progress that has been made on the determination of atomic data pertinent to the fusion energy program. Work is reported on the identification of spectral lines of impurity ions, spectroscopic data assessment and compilations, expansion and upgrade of the NIST atomic databases, collision and spectroscopy experiments with highly charged ions on EBIT, and atomic structure calculations and modeling of plasma spectra.

None

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

140

An Evaluation of Fusion Energy R&D Gaps Using Technology Readiness Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plants, Demo, and Next Steps / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

M. S. Tillack et al.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Project of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Reactor in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Maosheng Li; Rong Liu; Xueming Shi; Weiwei Yi; Yaosong Shen; Xianjue Peng

142

Senator Dianne Feinstein Statement on the Fusion Energy Sciences Act of 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and polluting. Beyond expanding renewable energy sources such as those from the sun and the wind, fusion holdsSenator Dianne Feinstein Statement on the Fusion Energy Sciences Act of 2001 June 28, 2001 Mr to accelerate the development of fusion energy as a practical and realistic alternative to fossil fuels for our

143

Inertial Fusion Energy and its Materials Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, IOMMMS Global Materials Forum: Materials in a Green Economy: An International ... Recent Development of Materials for Green Energy in Korea.

144

Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1665. [38] B G Logan, 1993 Fusion Engineering and Design 22,J Perkins, (June 2007), to be submitted to Nuclear Fusion. [36] M Tabak 1996 Nuclear Fusion 36, No 2. [37] S Atzeni, and

Logan, B.G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF. Journal of NuclearFusion reactors blanket nucleonics. In Progress in NuclearFusion-Fission hybrid reactors. In Advances in Nuclear

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32] E. Greenspan. Fusion reactors blanket nucleonics. Intemperature windows for fusion reactor structural materials.steels for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF. Journal of

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

January 25, 2008/ARR 1 Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

January 25, 2008/ARR 1 Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Energy Applications: from the "Very Cold, CA January 25, 2008 #12;January 25, 2008/ARR 2 Unique Set of Conditions Associated with Fusion · Realization of fusion energy imposes considerable challenges in the areas of engineering, physics and material

Raffray, A. René

148

Energy payback and CO{sub 2} gas emissions from fusion and solar photovoltaic electric power plants. Final report to Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cradle-to-grave net energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of a modern photovoltaic facility that produces electricity has been performed and compared to a similar analysis on fusion. A summary of the work has been included in a Ph.D. thesis titled ''Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis'' by Paul J. Meier, and a synopsis of the work was presented at the 15th Topical meeting on Fusion Energy held in Washington, DC in November 2002. In addition, a technical note on the effect of the introduction of fusion energy on the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States was submitted to the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

Kulcinski, G.L.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy payback and CO{sub 2} gas emissions from fusion and solar photovoltaic electric power plants. Final report to Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences  

SciTech Connect

A cradle-to-grave net energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of a modern photovoltaic facility that produces electricity has been performed and compared to a similar analysis on fusion. A summary of the work has been included in a Ph.D. thesis titled ''Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis'' by Paul J. Meier, and a synopsis of the work was presented at the 15th Topical meeting on Fusion Energy held in Washington, DC in November 2002. In addition, a technical note on the effect of the introduction of fusion energy on the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States was submitted to the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

Kulcinski, G.L.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Application of controlled thermonuclear reactor fusion energy for food production  

SciTech Connect

Food and energy shortages in many parts of the world in the past two years raise an immediate need for the evaluation of energy input in food production. The present paper investigates systematically (1) the energy requirement for food production, and (2) the provision of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy for major energy intensive sectors of food manufacturing. Among all the items of energy input to the ''food industry,'' fertilizers, water for irrigation, food processing industries, such as beet sugar refinery and dough making and single cell protein manufacturing, have been chosen for study in detail. A controlled thermonuclear power reactor was used to provide electrical and thermal energy for all these processes. Conceptual design of the application of controlled thermonuclear power, water and air for methanol and ammonia synthesis and single cell protein production is presented. Economic analysis shows that these processes can be competitive. (auth)

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Exploring the Fast Ignition Approach to Fusion Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Probably the most famous equation in physics is Einstein's E=mc{sup 2}, which was contained within his fifth and final paper that was published in 1905. It is this relationship between energy ( E) and mass ( m) that the fusion process exploits to generate energy. When two isotopes of hydrogen (normally Deuterium and Tritium (DT)) fuse they form helium and a neutron. In this process some of the mass of the hydrogen is converted into energy. In the fast ignition approach to fusion a large driver (such as the NIF laser) is used to compress the DT fuel to extremely high densities and then is ''sparked'' by a high intensity, short-pulse laser. The short-pulse laser energy is converted to an electron beam, which then deposits its energy in the DT fuel. The energy of the electrons in this beam is so large that the electron's mass is increased according to Einstein theory of relativity. Understanding the transport of this relativistic electron beam is critical to the success of fast ignition and is the subject of this poster.

Town, R J; Chung, H; Cottrill, L A; Foord, M; Hatchett, S P; Key, M H; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lund, S; Mackinnon, A J; McCandless, B C; Patel, P K; Sharp, W L; Snavely, R A; Still, C H; Tabak, M

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

152

Rugged Packaging for Damage Resistant Inertial Fusion Energy Optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of practical fusion energy plants based on inertial confinement with ultraviolet laser beams requires durable, stable final optics that will withstand the harsh fusion environment. Aluminum-coated reflective surfaces are fragile, and require hard overcoatings resistant to contamination, with low optical losses at 248.4 nanometers for use with high-power KrF excimer lasers. This program addresses the definition of requirements for IFE optics protective coatings, the conceptual design of the required deposition equipment according to accepted contamination control principles, and the deposition and evaluation of diamondlike carbon (DLC) test coatings. DLC coatings deposited by Plasma Immersion Ion Processing were adherent and abrasion-resistant, but their UV optical losses must be further reduced to allow their use as protective coatings for IFE final optics. Deposition equipment for coating high-performance IFE final optics must be designed, constructed, and operated with contamination control as a high priority.

Stelmack, Larry

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

July 31,2008 Dear members of the U.S. fusion energy sciences research community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 31,2008 Dear members of the U.S. fusion energy sciences research community: I will be leaving for Science Programs, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (patricia -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Dr. Raymond J. Fonck, Associate Director Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, U.S. Department Of Energy

154

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER Don Steiner, Jeffrey Freidberg Farrokh Najmabadi William Nevins , and John Perkins The Energy Issues Working Group on Long-Term Visions energy production in the next century? 2. What is fusion's potential for penetrating the energy market

Najmabadi, Farrokh

155

Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Programs » FES Home Programs » FES Home Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » Fusion Energy Sciences Plasma science forms the basis for research that is needed to establish our ability to harness the power of the stars in order to generate fusion energy on earth. The research required for fusion energy's success is intimately tied to rich scientific questions about some of nature's most extreme environments, inside and outside of stars, and has practical

156

Journul of Fusion Energy. Yo/. 5. No. 2. 1986 Introduction to Panel Discussions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journul of Fusion Energy. Yo/. 5. No. 2. 1986 -- Introduction to Panel Discussions Whither Fusion Research? Robert L. Hirsch' . An unnamed former fusion program director retired and felt he needed some friend appeared before the major monk for his annual two words, which were, " Room cold." The monk nodded

157

Summary for FT, IT and SE 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspects of Fusion Energy; ITER Activities Fusion Technology and Power Plant Design Summary and Conclusion of electricity generation; Through ITER the economically acceptable first generation fusion power plants could growing rapidly Predictions suggest strong growth will continue FPM/1 by C.M.Ferreira #12;Carbon dioxide

158

(MSIB) Examination of Inertial Fusion Energy Candidate Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is no source of fusion neutrons of adequate intensity currently available. Instead ... Evolution in High Purity Reference V-4Cr-4Ti Alloy for Fusion Reactor.

159

Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

On the nuclear interaction. Potential, binding energy and fusion reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear interaction is responsible for keeping neutrons and protons joined in an atomic nucleus. Phenomenological nuclear potentials, fitted to experimental data, allow one to know about the nuclear behaviour with more or less success where quantum mechanics is hard to be used. A nuclear potential is suggested and an expression for the potential energy of two nuclear entities, either nuclei or nucleons, is developed. In order to estimate parameters in this expression, some nucleon additions to nuclei are considered and a model is suggested as a guide of the addition process. Coulomb barrier and energy for the addition of a proton to each one of several nuclei are estimated by taking into account both the nuclear and electrostatic components of energy. Studies on the binding energies of several nuclei and on the fusion reaction of two nuclei are carried out.

I. Casinos

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On the nuclear interaction. Potential, binding energy and fusion reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear interaction is responsible for keeping neutrons and protons joined in an atomic nucleus. Phenomenological nuclear potentials, fitted to experimental data, allow one to know about the nuclear behaviour with more or less success where quantum mechanics is hard to be used. A nuclear potential is suggested and an expression for the potential energy of two nuclear entities, either nuclei or nucleons, is developed. In order to estimate parameters in this expression, some nucleon additions to nuclei are considered and a model is suggested as a guide of the addition process. Coulomb barrier and energy for the addition of a proton to each one of several nuclei are estimated by taking into account both the nuclear and electrostatic components of energy. Studies on the binding energies of several nuclei and on the fusion reaction of two nuclei are carried out.

Casinos, I

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Data management in a fusion energy research experiment  

SciTech Connect

Present-day fusion research requires extensive support for the large amount of scientific data generated, bringing about three distinct problems computer systems must solve: (1) the processing of large amounts of data in very small time frames; (2) the archiving, analyzing and managing of the entire data output for the project's lifetime; (3) the standardization of data for the exchange of information between laboratories. The computer system supporting General Atomic's Doublet III tokamak, a project funded by the United States Department of Energy, is the first to encounter and address these problems through a system-wide data base structure.

Glad, A.; Drobnis, D.; McHarg, B.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Krypton Fluoride (KrF) Laser Driver for Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Matthew F. Wolford; John D. Sethian; Matthew C. Myers; Frank Hegeler; John L. Giuliani; Stephen P. Obenschain

166

The Virtual Control Room for Fusion Energy Sciences (V3) (A24771)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of The Virtual Control Room For Fusion Energy Sciences (V3)US DOE National Collaboratories Program Meeting(2004) Champaign Illinois, US, 2004999610460

Schissel, D.P.

2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Inertial Fusion Energy Studies on an Earth Simulator-Class Computer  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. is developing fusion energy based on inertial confinement of the burning fusion fuel, as a complement to the magnetic confinement approach. DOE's Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) program within the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) is coordinated with, and gains leverage from, the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Advanced plasma and particle beam simulations play a major role in the IFE effort, and the program is well poised to benefit from an Earth Simulator-class resource. Progress in all key physics areas of IFE, including heavy-ion ''drivers'' which impart the energy to the fusion fuel, the targets for both ion- and laser-driven approaches, and an advanced concept known as fast ignition, would be dramatically accelerated by an Earth Simulator-class resource.

Friedman, A; Stephens, R

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

169

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 084001 (13pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/48/8/084001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 084001] and created a vacuum leak in the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) [4]. The damage was explained comparisons between theory and experiment [5­7], wave amplitudes an order of magnitude larger than

Heidbrink, William W.

170

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 45 (2005) 271275 doi:10.1088/0029-5515/45/4/008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion, 52.55.H 1. Introduction An economically viable fusion reactor must sustain high- pressure, stable discrepancy between theory and experiment is that slight variations in the boundary geometry can sufficiently

Hudson, Stuart

171

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at Lawrence Livermore's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 08/26/2013 | NR-13-08-04 High Resolution Image All NIF experiments are controlled and orchestrated by the integrated computer control system in the facility's control room. It consists of 950 front-end processors attached to about 60,000 control points, including mirrors, lenses, motors, sensors, cameras, amplifiers, capacitors and diagnostic instruments. Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov High Resolution Image The preamplifiers of the National Ignition Facility are the first step in increasing the energy of laser beams as they make their way toward the target chamber. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- In the early morning hours of Aug.13, Lawrence

172

Current Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of Discussion on Roadmap of Fusion Energyon Roadmap of Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Basic research of plasma science (small & med exp theory) acad Basic research of reactor eng. (advanced of fusion has dramatically changed since the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power stationnuclear energy of fast breeder reactor and fusion highnew energy, atomic energy of fast breeder reactor

173

Inertial fusion target development for ignition and energy  

SciTech Connect

The target needs of the next ICF experiments that will lead toward ignition and energy are different from those of today`s experiments. The future experiments on OMEGA Upgrade, GEKKO XII Upgrade, the National Ignition Facility and Megajoule will need large, precise, cryogenic targets. Development is needed on a number of aspects of these targets, including shell fabrication, characterization, cryogenic layering and target handling. However, coordinated R and D programs are in place and work is in process to carry out the needed development. It is vital to the success of inertial fusion that this work be sustained. Coordinated effort, like the National Cryogenic Target Program in the USA, will help make the development activities as efficient and effective as possible, and should be encouraged.

Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Norimatsu, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Nuclear Fusion (Nuclear Fusion ( )) as Clean Energy Source for Mankindas Clean Energy Source for Mankind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from renewables (wind power, solar power, hydropower, geothermal, ocean wave & tidal power, biomass energy resources (coal 43%, natural gas 19%, oil 6%, cogeneration 7%); ~21% by nuclear fission power) ~ 5 ~ 7 CO2 Emission (Tons/MW) Current Chinese plants 1.15 Current US plants 1.05 State of the art 0

Chen, Yang-Yuan

175

Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: A Path Towards Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Arial 18 pt bold Name here Title or division here Date 00, 2008 LLNL-PRES-407907 #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 2 Two major possibilities for fusion energy #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 3 The NIF is nearing completion and will be conducting

177

Study of fusion dynamics using Skyrme energy density formalism with different surface corrections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of Skyrme energy density formalism, we investigate the role of surface corrections on the fusion of colliding nuclei. For this, the coefficient of surface correction was varied between 1/36 and 4/36, and its impact was studied on about 180 reactions. Our detailed investigations indicate a linear relationship between the fusion barrier heights and strength of the surface corrections. Our analysis of the fusion barriers advocate the strength of surface correction of 1/36.

Ishwar Dutt; Narinder K. Dhiman

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Concepts for fabrication of inertial fusion energy targets  

SciTech Connect

Future inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will have a Target Fabrication Facility (TFF) that must produce approximately 500,000 targets per day. To achieve a relatively low cost of electricity, the cost to produce these targets will need to be less than approximately $0.25 per target. In this paper the status on the development of concepts for a TFF to produce targets for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) reactor, such as HYLIFE II, and a laser direct drive fusion reactor such as Sombrero, is discussed. The baseline target that is produced in the HIF TFF is similar to the close-coupled indirect drive target designed by Callahan-Miller and Tabak at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This target consists of a cryogenic hohlraum that is made of a metal case and a variety of metal foams and metal-doped organic foams. The target contains a DT-filled CH capsule. The baseline direct drive target is the design developed by Bodner and coworkers at Naval Research Laboratory. HIF targets can be filled with DT before or after assembly of the capsule into the hohlraum. Assembly of targets before filling allows assembly operations to be done at room temperature, but tritium inventories are much larger due to the large volume that the hohlraum occupies in the fill system. Assembly of targets cold after filling allows substantial reduction in tritium inventory, but this requires assembly of targets at cryogenic temperature. A model being developed to evaluate the tritium inventories associated with each of the assembly and fill options indicates that filling targets before assembling the capsule into the hohlraum, filling at temperatures as high as possible, and reducing dead-volumes in the fill system as much as possible offers the potential to reduce tritium inventories to acceptable levels. Use of enhanced DT ice layering techniques, such as infrared layering can reduce tritium inventories significantly by reducing the layering time and therefore the number of capsules being layered. Current processes for fabrication of ICF capsules can most likely be easily scaled up to produce capsules at rates needed for an IFE plant.

Nobile, A. (Arthur), Jr.; Hoffer, J. K. (James K.); Gobby, P. L. (Peter L.); Steckle, W. P. (Warren P.), Jr.; Goodin, D. T. (Daniel T.); Besenbruch, G. E. (Gottfried E.); Schultz, K. R. (Kenneth R.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fusion of $^{6}$Li with $^{159}$Tb} at near barrier energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete and incomplete fusion cross sections for $^{6}$Li+$^{159}$Tb have been measured at energies around the Coulomb barrier by the $\\gamma$-ray method. The measurements show that the complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies are suppressed by $\\sim$34% compared to the coupled channels calculations. A comparison of the complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies with the existing data of $^{11,10}$B+$^{159}$Tb and $^{7}$Li+$^{159}$Tb shows that the extent of suppression is correlated with the $\\alpha$-separation energies of the projectiles. It has been argued that the Dy isotopes produced in the reaction $^{6}$Li+$^{159}$Tb, at below-barrier energies are primarily due to the $d$-transfer to unbound states of $^{159}$Tb, while both transfer and incomplete fusion processes contribute at above-barrier energies.

M. K. Pradhan; A. Mukherjee; P. Basu; A. Goswami; R. Kshetri; R. Palit; V. V. Parkar; M. Ray; Subinit Roy; P. Roy Chowdhury; M. Saha Sarkar; S. Santra

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

180

Magnetic Fusion Energy Research: A Summary of Accomplishments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Some of the more important contributions of the research program needed to establish the scientific and technical base for fusion power production are discussed. (MOW)

1986-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Scientists discuss progress toward magnetic fusion energy at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

world's most populous nation is pushing ahead with plans for a device called China's Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) that would develop the technology for a...

182

Magnetic fusion energy research: A summary of accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

Some of the more important contributions of the research program needed to establish the scientific and technical base for fusion power production are discussed. (MOW)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

content emergency.pppl.gov Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting...

184

June 29, 2005 France Will Get Fusion Reactor To Seek a Future Energy Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's first large-scale, sustainable nuclear fusion reactor, an estimated $10 billion project that many than burning fossil fuels or even nuclear fission, which is used in nuclear reactors today but producesJune 29, 2005 France Will Get Fusion Reactor To Seek a Future Energy Source By CRAIG S. SMITH PARIS

185

Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of Fusion Energy Options for Commercial Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion energy options were reviewed to assess technical readiness levels for commercial electricity production for the power industry. Magnetic and inertial confinement systems, in addition to nontraditional fusion concepts, were reviewed by a technical panel of experts, based on workshop presentations by the proponents of each technology. The results are summarized in this ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

Richard J. Hawryluk

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Bold Step by the World to Fusion Energy: ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HISTORY OF INT'L COLLABORATION · 1958: WORLD-WIDE DECLASSIFICATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED FUSIONV TEMPERATURES [20 MILLION DEGREES F] · 1970'S: OIL CRISIS PROPELS MAJOR INVESTMENT IN FUSION RESEARCH FACILITIES HISTORY AND KEY FUSION SCIENCE ADVANCES 85 90 95 00 05 85 90 95 00 05 CDA EDA EDA -ext US out AT

189

FES Science Network Requirements - Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computingthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedDivision, and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences.

Dart, Eli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is unlikely that nuclear fission power plants willIn the case of nuclear fission reactions, the fundamentalaspects of nuclear fusion and fission. This approach, termed

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

CCFE is the fusion research arm of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority Fusion Technology at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Fusion first wall and blanket technology · Remote handling · Diagnostics for DEMO · Advanced magnet of 11 Focus on: Remote Handling · Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, and Inspectability · The lifetime in-vessel of current sensing systems and cameras is insufficient. Summary: Remote handling must

192

A Novel Supercritical CO2 Power Cycle for Energy Conversion in Fusion Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DEMO and Next-Step Facilities / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 2) Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

I. P. Serrano; J. I. Linares; A. Cantizano; B. Y. Moratilla

193

Z-inertial fusion energy: power plant final report FY 2006.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work conducted for the Z-inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) late start Laboratory Directed Research Project. A major area of focus was on creating a roadmap to a z-pinch driven fusion power plant. The roadmap ties ZIFE into the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative through the use of high energy fusion neutrons to burn the actinides of spent fuel waste. Transmutation presents a near term use for Z-IFE technology and will aid in paving the path to fusion energy. The work this year continued to develop the science and engineering needed to support the Z-IFE roadmap. This included plant system and driver cost estimates, recyclable transmission line studies, flibe characterization, reaction chamber design, and shock mitigation techniques.

Anderson, Mark (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kulcinski, Gerald (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Zhao, Haihua (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Olson, Craig Lee; Sierra, Dannelle P.; Meier, Wayne (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories); McConnell, Paul E.; Ghiaasiaan, M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kern, Brian (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tajima, Yu (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Campen, Chistopher (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Sketchley, Tomas (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Moir, R (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories); Bardet, Philippe M. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Durbin, Samuel; Morrow, Charles W.; Vigil, Virginia L (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Modesto-Beato, Marcos A.; Franklin, James Kenneth (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Smith, James Dean; Ying, Alice (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Cook, Jason T.; Schmitz, Lothar (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Abdel-Khalik, S. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Abdou, Mohamed A. (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Bonazza, Riccardo (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Sridharan, Kumar (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rochau, Gary Eugene; Gudmundson, Jesse (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Peterson, Per F. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marriott, Ed (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Oakley, Jason (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program: Past, Present, and Future...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Success Stories Contact Us Index Home | ORNL | Events and Conferences The U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program: Past, Present, and Future Jul 22 2013 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM...

195

A Plan for the Development of Magnetic Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seen fusion budgets rise and fall -- usually in sync with the price of oil. Expensive oil tends cards. "Nobody in the history of Texas Hold 'Em poker has ever won without some hole cards," he says

196

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010) 014003 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/1/014003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creation. References [1] Tamm I.E. 1959 Theory of the magnetic thermonuclear reactor, part I Plasma Physics.D. Theory of magnetic thermonuclear reactor, part 2 Plasma Physics and the Problem of ControlledIOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010) 014003

197

Commercial application of thermionic conversion using a fusion reactor energy source. A preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of using thermionic conversion as a topping cycle for fusion reactors is presented. Because of the absence of restrictive temperature limitations for fusion-reactor blankets, fusion reactors may offer significant advantages, compared to fission reactors and fossil-fuel energy sources, for utilizing thermionic topping cycles. A system with a thermionic topping cycle and a conventional steam-turbine generator that utilizes the heat rejected by the thermionic converters is presented for illustration. This system consists of conceptual laser-fusion reactors with high-temperature radiating reactor blankets serving as heat sources for the thermionic topping cycle. The design concept appears to be equally adaptable to magnetically confined fusion reactors. For the example analyzed, net conversion efficiencies of combined thermionic and steam-turbine cycles are high, exceeding 50 percent for some values of the operating parameters, and the cost of producing low-voltage direct current for electrochemical processing is low.

Frank, T.G.; Kern, E.A.; Booth, L.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Princeton University -Energy secretary announces U.S. participation in fusion research effort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Princeton University - Energy secretary announces U.S. participation in fusion research effort a tour of the lab facilities as Spencer Abraham, U.S. secretary of energy, looks on. photo: Elle Starkman feedback © 2002 The Trustees of Princeton University #12;Princeton - News - Energy secretary announces U.S

199

TabletopAccelerator Breaks`Cold Fusion'Jinx ButWon'tYield Energy,Physicists Say  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TabletopAccelerator Breaks`Cold Fusion'Jinx ButWon'tYield Energy,Physicists Say A crystal with a strange property is at the heart of a clever method for inducing nuclear fusion in a tabletop-sized device-rays for medical therapies. Although the field of room-temperature fusion is littered with scandals and dubious

200

Semiconductor Laser Diode Pumps for Inertial Fusion Energy Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-state lasers have been demonstrated as attractive drivers for inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and at the Omega Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in Rochester, NY. For power plant applications, these lasers must be pumped by semiconductor diode lasers to achieve the required laser system efficiency, repetition rate, and lifetime. Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require approximately 40-to-80 GW of peak pump power, and must operate efficiently and with high system availability for decades. These considerations lead to requirements on the efficiency, price, and production capacity of the semiconductor pump sources. This document provides a brief summary of these requirements, and how they can be met by a natural evolution of the current semiconductor laser industry. The detailed technical requirements described in this document flow down from a laser ampl9ifier design described elsewhere. In brief, laser amplifiers comprising multiple Nd:glass gain slabs are face-pumped by two planar diode arrays, each delivering 30 to 40 MW of peak power at 872 nm during a {approx} 200 {micro}s quasi-CW (QCW) pulse with a repetition rate in the range of 10 to 20 Hz. The baseline design of the diode array employs a 2D mosaic of submodules to facilitate manufacturing. As a baseline, they envision that each submodule is an array of vertically stacked, 1 cm wide, edge-emitting diode bars, an industry standard form factor. These stacks are mounted on a common backplane providing cooling and current drive. Stacks are conductively cooled to the backplane, to minimize both diode package cost and the number of fluid interconnects for improved reliability. While the baseline assessment in this document is based on edge-emitting devices, the amplifier design does not preclude future use of surface emitting diodes, which may offer appreciable future cost reductions and increased reliability. The high-level requirements on the semiconductor lasers involve reliability, price points on a price-per-Watt basis, and a set of technical requirements. The technical requirements for the amplifier design in reference 1 are discussed in detail and are summarized in Table 1. These values are still subject to changes as the overall laser system continues to be optimized. Since pump costs can be a significant fraction of the overall laser system cost, it is important to achieve sufficiently low price points for these components. At this time, the price target for tenth-of-akind IFE plant is $0.007/Watt for packaged devices. At this target level, the pumps account for approximately one third of the laser cost. The pump lasers should last for the life of the power plant, leading to a target component lifetime requirement of roughly 14 Ghosts, corresponding to a 30 year plant life and 15 Hz repetition rate. An attractive path forward involes pump operation at high output power levels, on a Watts-per-bar (Watts/chip) basis. This reduces the cost of pump power (price-per-Watt), since to first order the unit price does not increase with power/bar. The industry has seen a continual improvement in power output, with current 1 cm-wide bars emitting up to 500 W QCW (quasi-continuous wave). Increased power/bar also facilitates achieving high irradiance in the array plane. On the other hand, increased power implies greater heat loads and (possibly) higher current drive, which will require increased attention to thermal management and parasitic series resistance. Diode chips containing multiple p-n junctions and quantum wells (also called nanostack structures) may provide an additional approach to reduce the peak current.

Deri, R J

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fusion and Direct Reactions of Halo Nuclei at Energies around the Coulomb Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present understanding of reaction processes involving light unstable nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier is reviewed. The effect of coupling to direct reaction channels on elastic scattering and fusion is investigated, with the focus on halo nuclei. A list of definitions of processes is given, followed by a review of the experimental and theoretical tools and information presently available. The effect of couplings on elastic scattering and fusion is studied with a series of model calculations within the coupled-channels framework. The experimental data on fusion are compared to "bare" no-coupling one-dimensional barrier penetration model calculations. On the basis of these calculations and comparisons with experimental data, conclusions are drawn from the observation of recurring features. The total fusion cross sections for halo nuclei show a suppression with respect to the "bare" calculations at energies just above the barrier that is probably due to single neutron transfer reactions. The data for total fusion are also consistent with a possible sub-barrier enhancement; however, this observation is not conclusive and other couplings besides the single-neutron channels would be needed in order to explain any actual enhancement. We find that a characteristic feature of halo nuclei is the dominance of direct reactions over fusion at near and sub-barrier energies; the main part of the cross section is related to neutron transfers, while calculations indicate only a modest contribution from the breakup process.

N. Keeley; R. Raabe; N. Alamanos; J. L. Sida

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

Timely Delivery of Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Presentation prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acceptability Timely delivery NIF-1210-20673s2.ppt · Pinnacle West Capital Corp · PG&E Corporation · Mid Generation · Exelon Generation Company · Southern California Edison Electric Power Utility needs NIF-0611 on direct evidence of fusion performance (NIF). · Use of available technology and materials that can

203

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit ... NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog The NNSA's National Ignition Facility (NIF) surpassed a critical

204

Electra: An Electron Beam Pumped KrF Rep-Rate Laser System for Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Average Power Laser and Other IFE R&D / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

P. M. Burns et al.

205

Diode-Pumped Solid-State Lasers for Internal Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for inertial fusion research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule and megajoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary near-term performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 100J with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 mm wavelength. When completed, Mercury will allow rep-rated target experiments with multiple chambers for high energy density physics research.

Payne, S A; Bibeau, C; Beach, R J; Bayramian, A; Chanteloup, J C; Ebbers, C A; Emanuel, M A; Orth, C D; Rothenberg, J. E; Schaffers, K I; Skidmore, J A; Sutton, S B; Zapata, L E; Powell, H T

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mercury and Beyond: Diode-Pumped Solid-State Lasers for Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for inertial fusion research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 pm wavelength. When completed, Mercury will allow rep-rated target experiments with multiple target chambers for high energy density physics research.

Bibeau, C.; Beach, R.J.; Bayramian, A.; Chanteloup, J.C.; Ebbers, C.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Orth, C.D.; Rothenberg, J.E.; Schaffers, K.I.; Skidmore, J.A.; Sutton, S.B.; Zapata, L.E.; Payne, S.A.; Powell, H.T.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thursday, January 30, 2003 Energy Secretary Abraham Announces U.S. to Join Negotiations on Major International Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thursday, January 30, 2003 Energy Secretary Abraham Announces U.S. to Join Negotiations on Major of a major international magnetic fusion research project, U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham announced of the laboratory. The Bush administration believes that fusion is a key element in U.S. long-term energy plans

208

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the available energy is wasted and how that energy couldof the available energy is wasted and how that energy could

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fusion technology development. Annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

In FY97, the General Atomics (GA) Fusion Group made significant contributions to the technology needs of the magnetic fusion program. The work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, International and Technology Division, of the US Department of Energy. The work is reported in the following sections on Fusion Power Plant Studies (Section 2), Plasma Interactive Materials (Section 3), Magnetic Diagnostic Probes (Section 4) and RF Technology (Section 5). Meetings attended and publications are listed in their respective sections. The overall objective of GA`s fusion technology research is to develop the technologies necessary for fusion to move successfully from present-day physics experiments to ITER and other next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately to fusion power plants. To achieve this overall objective, we carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and we conduct research to develop basic knowledge about these technologies, including plasma technologies, fusion nuclear technologies, and fusion materials. We continue to be committed to the development of fusion power and its commercialization by US industry.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Proliferation Risks of Magneetic Fusion Energy: Clandestine Production, Covert Production and Breakout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to weapon-usable materials can be divided into three main categories: (1) clandestine production of weapon-usable material in an undeclared facility, (2) covert production of such material inn a declared facility, and (3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper we address each of these categories of risks from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if the fusion system is designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards.

A. Glaser and R.J. Goldston

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Energy Efficient Distributed Data Fusion In Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

addresses a transmission energy problem for wireless sensoranalog case. The energy planning problem will be formulatedrest of this paper. Energy Planning Problem Formulation and

Huang, Yi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Homepage | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

FESAC Home FESAC Home Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) FESAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (140KB) FES Committees of Visitors FES Home Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) has been Chartered .pdf file (140KB) pursuant to Section 14(a)(2)(A) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act Public Law 92-463, and Section 101-6.1015, title 41 Code of Federal Regulations. The committee provides independent advice to the Director of the Office of Science on complex scientific and technological issues that arise in the planning, implementation, and management of the fusion energy sciences program. The current charter is in effect until August 2015. Committee Members .pdf file (28KB) are drawn from universities, national

214

Inertial fusion energy: A clearer view of the environmental and safety perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If fusion energy is to achieve its full potential for safety and environmental (S&E) advantages, the S&E characteristics of fusion power plant designs must be quantified and understood, and the resulting insights must be embodied in the ongoing process of development of fusion energy. As part of this task, the present work compares S&E characteristics of five inertial and two magnetic fusion power plant designs. For each design, a set of radiological hazard indices has been calculated with a system of computer codes and data libraries assembled for this purpose. These indices quantify the radiological hazards associated with the operation of fusion power plants with respect to three classes of hazard: accidents, occupational exposure, and waste disposal. The three classes of hazard have been qualitatively integrated to rank the best and worst fusion power plant designs with respect to S&E characteristics. From these rankings, the specific designs, and other S&E trends, design features that result in S&E advantages have been identified. Additionally, key areas for future fusion research have been identified. Specific experiments needed include the investigation of elemental release rates (expanded to include many more materials) and the verification of sequential charged-particle reactions. Improvements to the calculational methodology are recommended to enable future comparative analyses to represent more accurately the radiological hazards presented by fusion power plants. Finally, future work must consider economic effects. Trade-offs among design features will be decided not by S&E characteristics alone, but also by cost-benefit analyses. 118 refs., 35 figs., 35 tabs.

Latkowski, J.F.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Fusion Implementation  

SciTech Connect

If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

J.A. Schmidt

2002-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream  

SciTech Connect

In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

Clayton, E.D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity for the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program  

SciTech Connect

This report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) has been prepared in response to a recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board that, ''Given the complex nature of the fusion effort, an integrated program planning process is an absolute necessity.'' We, therefore, undertook this activity in order to integrate the various elements of the program, to improve communication and performance accountability across the program, and to show the inter-connectedness and inter-dependency of the diverse parts of the national fusion energy sciences program. This report is based on the September 1999 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee's (FESAC) report ''Priorities and Balance within the Fusion Energy Sciences Program''. In its December 5,2000, letter to the Director of the Office of Science, the FESAC has reaffirmed the validity of the September 1999 report and stated that the IPPA presents a framework and process to guide the achievement of the 5-year goals listed in the 1999 report. The National Research Council's (NRC) Fusion Assessment Committee draft final report ''An Assessment of the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Program'', reviewing the quality of the science in the program, was made available after the IPPA report had been completed. The IPPA report is, nevertheless, consistent with the recommendations in the NRC report. In addition to program goals and the related 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year objectives, this report elaborates on the scientific issues associated with each of these objectives. The report also makes clear the relationships among the various program elements, and cites these relationships as the reason why integrated program planning is essential. In particular, while focusing on the science conducted by the program, the report addresses the important balances between the science and energy goals of the program, between the MFE and IFE approaches, and between the domestic and international aspects of the program. The report also outlines a process for establishing a database for the fusion research program that will indicate how each research element fits into the overall program. This database will also include near-term milestones associated with each research element, and will facilitate assessments of the balance within the program at different levels. The Office of Fusion Energy Sciences plans to begin assembling and using the database in the Spring of 2001 as we receive proposals from our laboratories and begin to prepare our budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2003.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Brief Historical Overview and Future Trends Ongoing Fusion Research: Evaluating Gaps in Fusion Energy Research Using Technology Readiness Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Firstly, the officers of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) and I would like to extend our warm wishes for a happy 2008 holiday season to all. Professional societies exist to serve their members and I have dedicated my tenure as the Chair of the FED to strongly champion our cause within the American Nuclear Society (ANS). I would like to discuss some of our initiatives below. ANS Fellows A longstanding tradition in any professional society is to recognize the hard work and effort of its members by electing them as a Fellow. Unfortunately, the number of “Fusion ” Fellows in the ANS has been dwindling in recent years. In addition, there had been some instances that nominations of deserving individuals were rejected by the ANS Honors and Awards Committee (some other ANS divisions have had similar experience). Several ANS Division Chairs and I raised this issue in the ANS Profession Division meeting as well as in a meeting with the ANS President. Subsequently, we had several interactions with members of the ANS Honors and Awards (H&A) Committee. I am happy to report that the ANS H&A Committee has taken several steps to streamline

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Hydroelectric 1.1.3 Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . .Gain GNEP Global Nuclear Energy Partnership HEU HighlyIn Progress in Nuclear Energy, 17. Pergamon Press, 1986.

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Recyclable transmission line concept for z-pinch driven inertial fusion energy.  

SciTech Connect

Recyclable transmission lines (RTL)s are being studied as a means to repetitively drive z pinches to generate fusion energy. We have shown previously that the RTL mass can be quite modest. Minimizing the RTL mass reduces recycling costs and the impulse delivered to the first wall of a fusion chamber. Despite this reduction in mass, a few seconds will be needed to reload an RTL after each subsequent shot. This is in comparison to other inertial fusion approaches that expect to fire up to ten capsules per second. Thus a larger fusion yield is needed to compensate for the slower repetition rate in a z-pinch driven fusion reactor. We present preliminary designs of z-pinch driven fusion capsules that provide an adequate yield of 1-4 GJ. We also present numerical simulations of the effect of these fairly large fusion yields on the RTL and the first wall of the reactor chamber. These simulations were performed with and without a neutron absorbing blanket surrounding the fusion explosion. We find that the RTL will be fully vaporized out to a radius of about 3 meters assuming normal incidence. However, at large enough radius the RTL will remain in either the liquid or solid state and this portion of the RTL could fragment and become shrapnel. We show that a dynamic fragmentation theory can be used to estimate the size of these fragmented particles. We discuss how proper design of the RTL can allow this shrapnel to be directed away from the sensitive mechanical parts of the reactor chamber.

De Groot, J. S. (University of California, Davis, CA); Olson, Craig Lee; Cochrane, Kyle Robert (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Peterson, Per F. (University of California, Berkeley, CA)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fusion Energy Sciences User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

FES User Facilities FES User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 FES User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Fusion Energy Sciences program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: DIII-D Tokamak Facility: External link DIII-D, located at General Atomics in San Diego, California, is the largest magnetic fusion facility in the U.S. and is operated as a DOE national user facility. DIII-D has been a major contributor to the world fusion program

222

Fusion cross sections for 6,7Li + 24Mg reactions at energies below and above the barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of fusion cross sections for the 6,7Li + 24Mg reactions by the characteristic gamma-ray method has been done at energies from below to well above the respective Coulomb barriers. The fusion cross sections obtained from these gamma-ray cross sections for the two systems are found to agree well with the total reaction cross sections at low energies. The decrease of fusion cross sections with increase of energy is consistent with the fact that other channels, in particular breakup open up with increase of bombarding energy. This shows that there is neither inhibition nor enhancement of fusion cross sections for these systems at above or below the barrier. The critical angular momenta (lcr) deduced from the fusion cross sections are found to have an energy dependence similar to other Li - induced reactions.

M. Ray; A. Mukherjee; M. K. Pradhan; Ritesh Kshetri; M. Saha Sarkar; R. Palit; I. Majumdar; P. K. Joshi; H. C. Jain; B. Dasmahapatra

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Collaborative Technologies for Distributed Science - Fusion Energy and High-Energy Physics (A25539)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Atomics Report GA-A25539 (2006)24th Symposium on Fusion Technology Warsaw, pl, 2006999613320

Schissel, D.P.

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Fusion breeder  

SciTech Connect

The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

Moir, R.W.

1982-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fusion breeder  

SciTech Connect

The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

Moir, R.W.

1982-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low- to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work.

Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

DANCING WITH THE STARSDANCING WITH THE STARS QUEST FOR FUSION ENERGYQUEST FOR FUSION ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AS A COAL POWER PLANTTHE SUN AS A COAL POWER PLANT What is the mass of the Sun ?? What is the power output of the Sun ?? How much energy is released in burning coal ?? #12;THE SUN AS A COAL POWER PLANTTHE SUN AS A COAL POWER PLANT 30 2 10 Ă?M kg Power output of the 264 10=Sun WattsĂ? 2 42 0 /C kgO CO MJ+ + Sun

228

Some Simple Arguments about Cost Externalization and its Relevance to the Price of Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of fusion energy research is to develop a source of energy that is less harmful to the environment than are the present sources. A concern often expressed by critics of fusion research is that fusion energy will never be economically competitive with fossil fuels, which in 1997 provided 75% of the world's energy. And in fact, studies of projected fusion electricity generation generally project fusion costs to be higher than those of conventional methods. Yet it is widely agreed that the environmental costs of fossil fuel use are high. Because these costs aren't included in the market price, and furthermore because many governments subsidize fossil fuel production, fossil fuels seem less expensive than they really are. Here we review some simple arguments about cost externalization which provide a useful background for discussion of energy prices. The collectively self-destructive behavior that is the root of many environmental problems, including fossil fuel use, was termed ''the tragedy of the commons'' by the biologist G. Hardin. Hardin's metaphor is that of a grazing commons that is open to all. Each herdsman, in deciding whether to add a cow to his herd, compares the benefit of doing so, which accrues to him alone, to the cost, which is shared by all the herdsmen using the commons, and therefore adds his cow. In this way individually rational behavior leads to the collective destruction of the shared resource. As Hardin pointed out, pollution is one kind of tragedy of the commons. CO{sub 2} emissions and global warming are in this sense classic tragedies.

Budny, R.; Winfree, R.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

229

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Studies of fast electron transport in the problems of inertial fusion energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the existing natural fusion reactors, stars, the gravityto the construction of the fusion reactor. In the magneticwould be for real fusion reactor conditions. The analysis of

Frolov, Boris K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Performance requirements of an inertial-fusion-energy source for hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance of an inertial fusion system for the production of hydrogen is compared to a tandem-mirror-system hydrogen producer. Both systems use the General Atomic sulfur-iodine hydrogen-production cycle and produce no net electric power to the grid. An ICF-driven hydrogen producer will have higher system gains and lower electrical-consumption ratios than the design point for the tandem-mirror system if the inertial-fusion-energy gain eta Q > 8.8. For the ICF system to have a higher hydrogen production rate per unit fusion power than the tandem-mirror system requires that eta Q > 17. These can be achieved utilizing realistic laser and pellet performances.

Hovingh, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Multimodal Options for Materials Research to Advance the Basis for Fusion Energy in the ITER Era  

SciTech Connect

Well-coordinated international fusion materials research on multiple fundamental feasibility issues can serve an important role during the next ten years. An overview is given of the current state-of-the-art of major materials systems that are candidates for next-step fusion reactors, including a summary of existing knowledge regarding operating temperature and neutron irradiation fluence limits due to high temperature strength and radiation damage considerations, coolant compatibility information, and current industrial manufacturing capabilities. There are two inter-related overarching objectives of fusion materials research to be performed in the next decade: 1) understanding materials science phenomena in the demanding DT fusion energy environment, and 2) Using this improved understanding to develop and qualify materials to provide the basis for next-step facility construction authorization by funding agencies and public safety licensing authorities. The critical issues and prospects for development of high performance fusion materials are discussed along with recent research results and planned activities of the international materials research community.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Möslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany; Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

TIMELY DELIVERY OF LASER INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY (LIFE)  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A key goal of the NIF is to demonstrate fusion ignition for the first time in the laboratory. Its flexibility allows multiple target designs (both indirect and direct drive) to be fielded, offering substantial scope for optimization of a robust target design. In this paper we discuss an approach to generating gigawatt levels of electrical power from a laser-driven source of fusion neutrons based on these demonstration experiments. This 'LIFE' concept enables rapid time-to-market for a commercial power plant, assuming success with ignition and a technology demonstration program that links directly to a facility design and construction project. The LIFE design makes use of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology. It adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units utilized on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. A demonstration LIFE plant based on these design principles is described, along with the areas of technology development required prior to plant construction. A goal-oriented, evidence-based approach has been proposed to allow LIFE power plant rollout on a time scale that meets policy imperatives and is consistent with utility planning horizons. The system-level delivery builds from our prior national investment over many decades and makes full use of the distributed capability in laser technology, the ubiquity of semiconductor diodes, high volume manufacturing markets, and U.S. capability in fusion science and nuclear engineering. The LIFE approach is based on the ignition evidence emerging from NIF and adopts a line-replaceable unit approach to ensure high plant availability and to allow evolution from available technologies and materials. Utilization of a proven physics platform for the ignition scheme is an essential component of an acceptably low-risk solution. The degree of coupling seen on NIF between driver and target performance mandates that little deviation be adopted from the NIF geometry and beamline characteristics. Similarly, the strong coupling between subsystems in an operational power plant mandates that a self-consistent solution be established via an integrated facility delivery project. The benefits of separability of the subsystems within an IFE plant (driver, chamber, targets, etc.) emerge in the operational phase of a power plant rather than in its developmental phase. An optimized roadmap for IFE delivery needs to account for this to avoid nugatory effort and inconsistent solutions. For LIFE, a system design has been established that could lead to an operating power plant by the mid-2020s, drawing from an integrated subsystem development program to demonstrate the required technology readiness on a time scale compatible with the construction plan. Much technical development work still remains, as does alignment of key stakeholder groups to this newly emerging development option. If the required timeline is to be met, then preparation of a viable program is required alongside the demonstration of ignition on NIF. This will enable timely analysis of the technical and economic case and establishment of the appropriate delivery partnership.

Dunne, A M

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Vintage DOE: What is Fusion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the time this video was made. Among the latest advancements, the Department of Energy's NIF laser located at the National Ignition Facility in California recently set two new...

235

Longitudinal Tracking of Direct Drive Inertial Fusion Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Technology of Fusion Energy - Inertial Fusion Technology: Targets and Chambers

J. D. Spalding; L. C. Carlson; M. S. Tillack; N. B. Alexander; D. T. Goodin; R. W. Petzoldt

236

Fusion scientists gear up to learn how to harness plasma energy | Princeton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Living on the edge Living on the edge Fusion scientists gear up to learn how to harness plasma energy By Kitta MacPherson March 30, 2011 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Researchers working on an advanced experimental fusion machine are readying experiments that will investigate a host of scientific puzzles, including how heat escapes as hot magnetized plasma, and what materials are best for handling intense plasma powers. Scientists conducting research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have mapped out a list of experiments to start in July and run for eight months. The experimental machine is designed to deepen understanding of how plasmas can be mined for energy. A major topic of investigation by scientists for the coming round of

237

DIRECT DRIVE FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUB-MJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates, S. P. Obenschain, and S. T. Zalesak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compresses and burns the relatively cold fuel around it, leading to a release of fusion energy. In the pastDIRECT DRIVE FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUB-MJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates 20375 R. Betti Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester

238

DIRECT DRIVE FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUBMJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates, S. P. Obenschain, and S. T. Zalesak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compresses and burns the relatively cold fuel around it, leading to a release of fusion energy. In the pastDIRECT DRIVE FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUB­MJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates 20375 R. Betti Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester

239

Systems Modeling For The Laser Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systems model has been developed for the Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) power plant. It combines cost-performance scaling models for the major subsystems of the plant including the laser, inertial fusion target factory, engine (i.e., the chamber including the fission and tritium breeding blankets), energy conversion systems and balance of plant. The LIFE plant model is being used to evaluate design trade-offs and to identify high-leverage R&D. At this point, we are focused more on doing self consistent design trades and optimization as opposed to trying to predict a cost of electricity with a high degree of certainty. Key results show the advantage of large scale (>1000 MWe) plants and the importance of minimizing the cost of diodes and balance of plant cost.

Meier, W R; Abbott, R; Beach, R; Blink, J; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Ladran, T; Latkowski, J; MacIntyre, A; Miles, R; Storm, E

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy absorption by laser fusion targets determined by ion calorimetry  

SciTech Connect

The absorbed energy determined by the ion calorimeters was used as a basis for computations of the target behavior. Both neutron yield and x-ray spectra thus obtained were in agreement with the measured values within the precision of both calculations and experiments. Some results are described. (MOW)

Rupert, V.C.; Gunn, S.R.; Holzrichter, J.F.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fusion reactor requirements and systems for energy storage and transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy storage and transfer requirements for many of the present day reactor systems are listed. Two ohmic heating (OH) requirements, those for toroidal Z-pinches and Tokamaks, are described in more detail. Technologies envisioned for the power conditioning circuitry are discussed.

Thomassen, K.I.; Hagenson, R.L.; Thullin, P.

1978-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fusion Simulation Project. Workshop sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Rockville, MD, May 16-18, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved forty-six physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from twenty-one institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a three-day workshop in May 2007.

None

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fusion Simulation Project. Workshop Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Rockville, MD, May 16-18, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved forty-six physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from twenty-one institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a three-day workshop in May 2007.

Kritz, A.; Keyes, D.

2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Future of Nuclear Energy: Facts and Fiction Chapter IV: Energy from Breeder Reactors and from Fusion?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accumulated knowledge and the prospects for commercial energy production from fission breeder and fusion reactors are analyzed in this report. The publicly available data from past experimental breeder reactors indicate that a large number of unsolved technological problems exist and that the amount of "created" fissile material, either from the U238 --> Pu239 or from the Th232 --> U233 cycle, is still far below the breeder requirements and optimistic theoretical expectations. Thus huge efforts, including many basic research questions with an uncertain outcome, are needed before a large commercial breeder prototype can be designed. Even if such efforts are undertaken by the technologically most advanced countries, it will take several decades before such a prototype can be constructed. We conclude therefore, that ideas about near-future commercial fission breeder reactors are nothing but wishful thinking. We further conclude that, no matter how far into the future we may look, nuclear fusion as an energy ...

Dittmar, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Proceedings of the Office of Fusion Energy/DOE workshop on ceramic matrix composites for structural applications in fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

A workshop to assess the potential application of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for structural applications in fusion reactors was held on May 21--22, 1990, at University of California, Santa Barbara. Participants included individuals familiar with materials and design requirements in fusion reactors, ceramic composite processing and properties and radiation effects. The primary focus was to list the feasibility issues that might limit the application of these materials in fusion reactors. Clear advantages for the use of CMCs are high-temperature operation, which would allow a high-efficiency Rankine cycle, and low activation. Limitations to their use are material costs, fabrication complexity and costs, lack of familiarity with these materials in design, and the lack of data on radiation stability at relevant temperatures and fluences. Fusion-relevant feasibility issues identified at this workshop include: hermetic and vacuum properties related to effects of matrix porosity and matrix microcracking; chemical compatibility with coolant, tritium, and breeder and multiplier materials, radiation effects on compatibility; radiation stability and integrity; and ability to join CMCs in the shop and at the reactor site, radiation stability and integrity of joints. A summary of ongoing CMC radiation programs is also given. It was suggested that a true feasibility assessment of CMCs for fusion structural applications could not be completed without evaluation of a material tailored'' to fusion conditions or at least to radiation stability. It was suggested that a follow-up workshop be held to design a tailored composite after the results of CMC radiation studies are available and the critical feasibility issues are addressed.

Jones, R.H. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Lucas, G.E. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Praise and suggestions for fusion research from a utility industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select and View High Resolution Images to Download Learn More Engineering Fusion energy Fusion reactor design Inertial confinement fusion Nuclear energy Plasma physics Tokamaks...

247

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 20, No. 3, September 2001 ( 2002) Report of the FESAC Panel on a Burning Plasma Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a Burning Plasma Program Strategy to Advance Fusion Energy Stewart Prager (Chair),1 Charles Baker,2 David a strategy for the study of burning fusion plasmas. Experimental study of a burning plasma has long been plasma state in the laboratory, uncover the new physics associated with the fusion burn, and develop

Najmabadi, Farrokh

248

Using MCNP for fusion neutronics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Any fusion reactor using tritium-deuterium fusion will be a prolific source of 14 MeV neutrons. In fact, 80% of the fusion energy will be carried… (more)

Wasastjerna, Frej

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Fusion-Fission of 16O+197Au at Sub-Barrier Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent discovery of heavy-ion fusion hindrance at far sub-barrier energies has focused much attention on both experimental and theoretical studies of this phenomenon. Most of the experimental evidence comes from medium-heavy systems such as Ni+Ni to Zr+Zr, for which the compound system decays primarily by charged-particle evaporation. In order to study heavier systems, it is, however, necessary to measure also the fraction of the decay that goes into fission fragments. In the present work we have, therefore, measured the fission cross section of 16O+197Au down to unprecedented far sub-barrier energies using a large position sensitive PPAC placed at backward angles. The preliminary cross sections will be discussed and compared to earlier studies at near-barrier energies. No conclusive evidence for sub-barrier hindrance was found, probably because the measurements were not extended to sufficiently low energies.

B. B. Back; C. L. Jiang; R. V. F. Janssens; D. J. Henderson; B. R. Shumard; C. J. Lister; D. Peterson; K. E. Rehm; I. Tanihata; X. Tang; X. Wang; S. Zhu

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fusion-Fission of 16 O+ 197 Au at Sub-Barrier Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The recent discovery of heavy-ion fusion hindrance at far sub-barrier energies has focused much attention on both experimental and theoretical studies of this phenomenon. Most of the experimental evidence comes from medium-heavy systems such as Ni+Ni to Zr+Zr, for which the compound system decays primarily by charged-particle evaporation. In order to study heavier systems, it is, however, necessary to measure also the fraction of the decay that goes into fission fragments. In the present work we have, therefore, measured the fission cross section of 16 O+ 197 Au down to unprecedented far sub-barrier energies using a large position sensitive PPAC placed at backward angles. The preliminary cross sections will be discussed and compared to earlier studies at near-barrier energies. No conclusive evidence for sub-barrier hindrance was found, probably because the measurements were not extended to sufficiently low energies. Keywords: Heavy-ion fusion, fission, cross section,S-factor PACS: 24.10.Eq, 25.70.Jj, 26.30.+k

B. B. Back A; C. L. Jiang A; R. V. F. Janssens A; D. J. Henderson A; B. R. Shumard A; C. J. Lister A; D. Peterson A; K. E. Rehm A; I. Tanihata A; X. Tang A; X. Wang A; S. Zhu A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

X-Ray Energy Responses of Silicon Tomography Detectors Irradiated with Fusion Produced Neutrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to clarify the effects of fusion-produced neutron irradiation on silicon semiconductor x-ray detectors, the x-ray energy responses of both n- and p-type silicon tomography detectors used in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak (n-type) and the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror (p-type) are studied using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory of the National Laboratory for High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The fusion neutronics source (FNS) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is employed as well-calibrated D-T neutron source with fluences from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2} onto these semiconductor detectors. Different fluence dependence is found between these two types of detectors; that is, (i) for the n-type detector, the recovery of the degraded response is found after the neutron exposure beyond around 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} onto the detector. A further finding is followed as a 're-degradation' by a neutron irradiation level over about 10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. On the other hand, (ii) the energy response of the p-type detector shows only a gradual decrease with increasing neutron fluences. These properties are interpreted by our proposed theory on semiconductor x-ray responses in terms of the effects of neutrons on the effective doping concentration and the diffusion length of a semiconductor detector.

Kohagura, J. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Hirata, M. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Numakura, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Yokoyama, N. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Fukai, T. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Tomii, Y. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Tokioka, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Miyake, Y. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kiminami, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Shimizu, K. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Miyoshi, S. [Plasma Research Centre, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Hirano, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan); Yoshida, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Kondoh, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Scenarios for multi-unit inertial fusion energy plants producing hydrogen fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work describes: (a) the motivation for considering fusion in general, and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) in particular, to produce hydrogen fuel powering low-emission vehicles; (b) the general requirements for any fusion electric plant to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis at costs competitive with present consumer gasoline fuel costs per passenger mile, for advanced car architectures meeting President Clinton`s 80 mpg advanced car goal, and (c) a comparative economic analysis for the potential cost of electricity (CoE) and corresponding cost of hydrogen (CoH) from a variety of multi-unit IFE plants with one to eight target chambers sharing a common driver and target fab facility. Cases with either heavy-ion or diode-pumped, solid-state laser drivers are considered, with ``conventional`` indirect drive target gains versus ``advanced, e.g. Fast Ignitor`` direct drive gain assumptions, and with conventional steam balance-of-plant (BoP) versus advanced MHD plus steam combined cycle BoP, to contrast the potential economics under ``conventional`` and ``advanced`` IFE assumptions, respectively.

Logan, B.G.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Novel Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Technique for Shutdown Dose Rate Analyses of Fusion Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

The rigorous 2-step (R2S) method uses three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport simulations to calculate the shutdown dose rate (SDDR) in fusion reactors. Accurate full-scale R2S calculations are impractical in fusion reactors because they require calculating space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes everywhere inside the reactor. The use of global Monte Carlo variance reduction techniques was suggested for accelerating the neutron transport calculation of the R2S method. The prohibitive computational costs of these approaches, which increase with the problem size and amount of shielding materials, inhibit their use in the accurate full-scale neutronics analyses of fusion reactors. This paper describes a novel hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic technique that uses the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) methodology but focuses on multi-step shielding calculations. The Multi-Step CADIS (MS-CADIS) method speeds up the Monte Carlo neutron calculation of the R2S method using an importance function that represents the importance of the neutrons to the final SDDR. Using a simplified example, preliminarily results showed that the use of MS-CADIS enhanced the efficiency of the neutron Monte Carlo simulation of an SDDR calculation by a factor of 550 compared to standard global variance reduction techniques, and that the increase over analog Monte Carlo is higher than 10,000.

Ibrahim, Ahmad M [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Next-Step Spherical Torus Experiment and Spherical Torus Strategy in the Fusion Energy Development Path  

SciTech Connect

A spherical torus (ST) fusion energy development path which is complementary to proposed tokamak burning plasma experiments such as ITER is described. The ST strategy focuses on a compact Component Test Facility (CTF) and higher performance advanced regimes leading to more attractive DEMO and Power Plant scale reactors. To provide the physics basis for the CTF an intermediate step needs to be taken which we refer to as the ''Next Step Spherical Torus'' (NSST) device and examine in some detail herein. NSST is a ''performance extension'' (PE) stage ST with the plasma current of 5-10 MA, R = 1.5 m, and Beta(sub)T less than or equal to 2.7 T with flexible physics capability. The mission of NSST is to: (1) provide a sufficient physics basis for the design of CTF, (2) explore advanced operating scenarios with high bootstrap current fraction/high performance regimes, which can then be utilized by CTF, DEMO, and Power Plants, and (3) contribute to the general plasma/fusion science of high beta toroidal plasmas. The NSST facility is designed to utilize the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (or similar) site to minimize the cost and time required for the design and construction.

M. Ono; M. Peng; C. Kessel; C. Neumeyer; J. Schmidt; J. Chrzanowski; D. Darrow; L. Grisham; P. Heitzenroeder; T. Jarboe; C. Jun; S. Kaye; J. Menard; R. Raman; T. Stevenson; M. Viola; J. Wilson; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

255

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 17, No. 4, 1998 Status and Objectives of Tokamak Systems for Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 major devices, in operation or station electrical generating plants. This report is devoted under unstable. (Specifically, there is a safety 1 Fusion Power Associates, 2 Professional Drive, Suite 249 vital. The relative advantages of neutral beam injection, adiabatic compression, wave, and turbulent

256

Review of fusion synfuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

Fillo, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Promise and Challenges of SiCf/SiC Composites for Fusion Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide fiber/silicon carbide matrix composites are a promising structural material for fusion energy applications. They have been specified in several recent fusion power plant design studies because of their high operating temperature (1000-1100?C) and hence high energy conversion efficiencies. Radiation resistance of the b-phase of SiC, excellent high-temperature fracture, creep, corrosion and thermal shock resistance and safety advantages arising from low induced radioactivity and afterheat are all positive attributes favoring the selection of SiCf/SiC composites. With the promise of these materials comes a number of challenges such as their thermal conductivity, radiation stability, gaseous transmutation rates, hermetic behavior and joining technology. Recent advances have been made in understanding radiation damage in SiC at the fundamental level through molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades. Radiation stability of composites made with the advanced fibers of Nicalon Type S and the UBE Tyranno SA, where no change in strength was observed up to 10 dpa at 800?C, in the development of materials with improved thermal conductivity, modeling of thermal conductivity, joining techniques and models for life-prediction. High transmutation rates of C and Si to form H, He, Mg, and Al continue to be a concern.

Jones, Russell H.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB); Giancarli, L. (CEA, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay) [CEA, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay; Hasegawa, Akira (UNKNOWN) [UNKNOWN; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, Akira (UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO) [UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO; Riccardi, B (ENEA-CR Frascati) [ENEA-CR Frascati; Snead, Lance L.(UNKNOWN) [UNKNOWN; Weber, William J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fusion Power: A Strategic Choice for the Future Energy Provision. Why is So Much Time Wasted for Decision Making?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a general analysis of the world energy issue, it is argued that an affordable, clean and reliable energy supply will have to consist of a portfolio of primary energy sources, a large fraction of which will be converted to a secondary carrier in large baseload plants. Because of all future uncertainties, it would be irresponsible not to include thermonuclear fusion as one of the future possibilities for electricity generation.The author tries to understand why nuclear-fusion research is not considered of strategic importance by the major world powers. The fusion programs of the USA and Europe are taken as prime examples to illustrate the 'hesitation'. Europe is now advocating a socalled 'fast-track' approach, thereby seemingly abandoning the 'classic' time frame towards fusion that it has projected for many years. The US 'oscillatory' attitude towards ITER in relation to its domestic program is a second case study that is looked at.From the real history of the ITER design and the 'siting' issue, one can try to understand how important fusion is considered by these world powers. Not words are important, but deeds. Fast tracks are nice to talk about, but timely decisions need to be taken and sufficient money is to be provided. More fundamental understanding of fusion plasma physics is important, but in the end, real hardware devices must be constructed to move along the path of power plant implementation.The author tries to make a balance of where fusion power research is at this moment, and where, according to his views, it should be going.

D'haeseleer, William D

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

Rainer W. Kuehne

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

Kuehne, R W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Continuous, In-Chamber Target Tracking and Engagement Approach for Laser Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Technology of Fusion Energy - Inertial Fusion Technology: Targets and Chambers

Ron Petzoldt; Neil Alexander; Lane Carlson; Graham Flint; Dan Goodin; Jon Spalding; Mark Tillack

262

To be presented at the Eighth Topical Meeting on Technology of Fusion Energy, Salt Lake City, UT,October 9-13, 1988.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To be presented at the Eighth Topical Meeting on Technology of Fusion Energy, Salt Lake City, UT fc rt,^ O U. S. Government purposes. *Work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion few microns (2 2 microns) to avoid sticking problems on the cold surfaces of the heat exchanger

Harilal, S. S.

263

Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrated process modeling for the laser inertial fusion Energy (LIFE) generation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept for a new fusion-fission hybrid technology is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary application of this technology is base-load electrical power generation. However, variants of the baseline technology can be used to 'burn' spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors or to perform selective transmutation of problematic fission products. The use of a fusion driver allows very high burn-up of the fission fuel, limited only by the radiation resistance of the fuel form and system structures. As a part of this process, integrated process models have been developed to aid in concept definition. Several models have been developed. A cost scaling model allows quick assessment of design changes or technology improvements on cost of electricity. System design models are being used to better understand system interactions and to do design trade-off and optimization studies. Here we describe the different systems models and present systems analysis results. Different market entry strategies are discussed along with potential benefits to US energy security and nuclear waste disposal. Advanced technology options are evaluated and potential benefits from additional R&D targeted at the different options is quantified.

Meier, W R; Anklam, T M; Erlandson, A C; Miles, R R; Simon, A J; Sawicki, R; Storm, E

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fusion energy applied to synthetic fuel production: a report to the DOE Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy based on a preliminary study by an ad-hoc advisory group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general conclusion is that the potential for utilization of fusion energy for synthetic fuel production is favorable. Three basic methods of hydrogen production are identified: high-temperature electrolysis, thermochemical cycles, and direct radiolysis. Combinations of these and their use as in combined cycles for electric power generation are considered.

Booth, L.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fusion Education | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Benefits of FES Fusion Education Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About FES Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Fusion Education Funding Opportunities...

268

'Optical' soft x-ray arrays for fluctuation diagnostics in magnetic fusion energy experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are developing large pixel count, fast ({>=}100 kHz) and continuously sampling soft x-ray (SXR) array for the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and turbulent fluctuations in magnetic fusion energy plasmas. The arrays are based on efficient scintillators, high thoughput multiclad fiber optics, and multichannel light amplification and integration. Compared to conventional x-ray diode arrays, such systems can provide vastly increased spatial coverage, and access to difficult locations with small neutron noise and damage. An eight-channel array has been built using columnar CsI:Tl as an SXR converter and a multianode photomultiplier tube as photoamplifier. The overall system efficiency is measured using laboratory SXR sources, while the time response and signal-to-noise performance have been evaluated by recording MHD activity from the spherical tori (ST) Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade and National Spherical Torus Experiment, both at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.; Johnson, D.; Majeski, R. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Plasma Spectroscopy Group, Bloomberg Center 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Photo of the Week: The Mirror Fusion Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Mirror Fusion Test Facility The Mirror Fusion Test Facility Photo of the Week: The Mirror Fusion Test Facility July 19, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis This 1981 photo shows the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an experimental magnetic confinement fusion device built using a magnetic mirror at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The MFTF functioned as the primary research center for mirror fusion devices. The design consisted of a 64-meter-long vacuum vessel fitted with 26 coil magnets bonding the center of the vessel and two 400-ton yin-yang magnet mirrors at either end. The first magnet produced a magnetic field force equal to the weight of 30 jumbo jets hanging from the magnet coil. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This 1981 photo shows the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an

270

Why and how of fusion  

SciTech Connect

The potential advantages of fusion power are listed. The approaches to plasma containment are mentioned and the status of the fusion program is described. The ERDA and EPRI programs are discussed. The Fusion Energy Foundation's activities are mentioned. Fusion research at the U. of Ill. is described briefly. (MHR)

Miley, G.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has adopted: achieving a fusion gain of 1 as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIF Project definition of Scientific Breakeven was given by the NIF Project Head Ed Moses when describing the NIF goal as : "..producing more energy than the energy in the laser pulse and achieving scientific breakeven." E. Moses, Status of the NIF Project, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Report

272

The Production and Delivery of an Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Fuel - The Cryogenic Target (A25529)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 24th Symposium On Fusion Technology, Warsaw, Poland (2006), To Be Published In Fusion Eng, And Design24th Symposium on Fusion Technology Warsaw, pl, 2006999612525

Bozek, A.S.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ORELA measurements to meet fusion energy neutron cross section needs. [2 to 80 MeV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major neutron cross section measurements made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) that are useful to the fusion energy program are reviewed. Cross sections for production of gamma rays with energies 0.3 < E/sub ..gamma../ < 10.5 MeV were measured as a function of neutron energy over the range 0.1 < E/sub n/ < 20.0 MeV for Li, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Nb, Mo, Ag, Sn, Ta, W, Au, Pb, and Th. Neutron emission cross sections have been measured for /sup 7/Li, Al, Ti, Cu, and Nb for 1 < E/sub n/ < 20 MeV. Some results of recent neutron total cross section measurements from 2 to 80 MeV for eleven materials (C, O, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Au, and Pb) of interest to the FMIT project are presented. Finally, future directions of the ORELA program are outlined. 4 figures, 3 tables.

Larson, D.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Automatic Mesh Adaptivity for Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Neutronics Modeling of Fusion Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to facilitate and expedite the use of the CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques in accurate full-scale neutronics simulations of fusion energy systems with immense sizes and complicated geometries. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility and resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation. Additionally, because of the significant increase in the efficiency of FW-CADIS simulations, the three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.

Ibrahim, Ahmad M [ORNL; Wilson, P. [University of Wisconsin; Sawan, M. [University of Wisconsin; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

None

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in expected un-served energy; how an increase in reserves would reduce the likelihood of a forced outage), the consequences of which are a reduction in the value of expected un-served energy based on a customer's outage cost. System reliability benefits were analyzed using a range of values for outage costs

Abdou, Mohamed

279

Taylor/FESAC Priorities/July 18, 2012 Fusion Energy Science Program Priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/FESAC Priorities/July 18, 2012 Burning Plasma Research In ITER Is the Top Priority On the Path to Magnetic Fusion

280

Proliferation Risks of Fusion Energy: Clandestine Production, Covert Production, and Breakout  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear proliferation risks from fusion associated with access to weapon-usable material can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper we address each of these categories of risk from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if commercial fusion systems are designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards.

R.J. Goldston, A. Glaser, A.F. Ross

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , “HYLIFE-II: a molten-salt inertial fusion energyjetted and free-?owing molten salts such as ?ibe (see, for

Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

today joined counterparts from China, the European Union, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea and the Russian Federation to sign an agreement to build the international fusion...

283

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

FEASIBILITY OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING LASER INERTIAL FUSION AS THE PRIMARY ENERGY SOURCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program is developing technology for Laser IFE with the goal of producing electricity from the heat generated by the implosion of deuterium-tritium (DT) targets. Alternatively, the Laser IFE device could be coupled to a hydrogen generation system where the heat would be used as input to a water-splitting process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. The production of hydrogen in addition to electricity would allow fusion energy plants to address a much wider segment of energy needs, including transportation. Water-splitting processes involving direct and hybrid thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis are currently being developed as means to produce hydrogen from high temperature nuclear fission reactors and solar central receivers. This paper explores the feasibility of this concept for integration with a Laser IFE plant, and it looks at potential modifications to make this approach more attractive. Of particular interest are: (1) the determination of the advantages of Laser IFE hydrogen production compared to other hydrogen production concepts, and (2) whether a facility of the size of FTF would be suitable for hydrogen production.

Gorensek, M

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

285

Radiation Effects on Structural Ceramics in Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Materials—Radiation Effects and Activation / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

G. R. Hopkins; R. J. Price; P. W. Trester

286

LLNL-PRES-463228 FUSION PERSPECTIVES*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LLNL-PRES-463228 FUSION PERSPECTIVES* LLNL Fusion Energy Sciences Program D.D. Ryutov Fusion, Novosibirsk, July 1988: working together with the LLNL team #12;Axisymmetric mirrors can serve as a basis

287

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 80 - SEPT. 81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were derived from a MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY STAFF W, Kunkel (H. 1. F. Staff, Heavy Ion Fusion Half-year Report October 1,LBL-12594 (1981). Heavy Ion Fusion Staff, Heavy Ion Fusion

Johnson Ed, R.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Time-Dependent Failure Mechanisms in Silicon Carbide Composites for Fusion Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide has many properties that are attractive for applications in fusion energy systems. The reliability of monolithic silicon carbide is insufficient for its use in large components, due to its brittle failure behavior and flaw sensitivity. Ceramic matrix composites, on the other hand, offer greater flaw tolerance and reliability, but their failure mechanisms are less well understood. This work has focussed on studying potential failure mechanisms in silicon carbide fiber-reinforced, silicon carbide matrix (SiCf/SiCm) composites. In the event of cracks caused by accidental overloads, excessive creep, thermal shock from plasma disruptions, handling during installation, or resulting from processing, subcritical crack growth will occur due to creep of fibers that bridge the crack faces. It is presumed that irradiation will enhance the creep rate of the fibers and, subsequently, the subcritical crack growth rate. At certain temperatures the presence of even small amounts of oxygen leads to oxidation of the interphase material to gaseous products. In this case, subcritical crack growth occurs by a separate mechanism. In addition, fiber shrinkage or weakening due to exposure to radiation can promote additional failure mechanisms, including embrittlement. These mechanisms, the conditions, under which they occur, and the current state of models of the crack growth mechanisms will be discussed.

Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Youngblood, Gerald E.; Henager, Charles H.; Simonen, Edward P.; Jones, Russell H.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Proposal to utilize fusion reactor energy sources for chemical process applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We propose to study the utilization of high-temperature (approximately 2000-2500K) process heat from fusion reactors for large-scale chemical process applications. Of particular interest is the decomposition reaction, CO/sub 2/ ..-->.. CO + /sup 1///sub 2/O/sub 2/, which at 2500K should yield approximately 60 percent conversion to CO if O/sub 2/ is partially removed through an oxide membrane. Hydrogen can be derived from CO at lower temperatures by reacting CO with steam, and C can also be derived from CO by a disproportionation into C and CO/sub 2/ at approximately 1000K. These chemicals, CO, H/sub 2/, and C, form the basis for a multitude of non-electrical energy applications in the areas of transportation, industrial processes, and residential and commercial uses. In addition to the CO/sub 2/ decomposition process, we propose to explore a variety of ideas and evaluate them for scientific and economic merit. A follow-on research and development program will be proposed if the ideas prove promising.

Krikorian, O. H.

1977-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Superresolution of a compact neutron spectrometer at energies relevant for fusion diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The ability to achieve resolution that is better than the instrument resolution (i.e., superresolution) is well known in optics, where it has been extensively studied. Unfortunately, there are only a handful of theoretical studies concerning superresolution of particle spectrometers, even though experimentalists are familiar with the enhancement of resolution that is achievable when appropriate methods of data analysis are used, such as maximum entropy and Bayesian methods. Knowledge of the superresolution factor is in many cases important. For example, in applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, the temperature of a burning plasma is an important physical parameter which may be inferred from the width of the peak of the neutron energy spectrum, and the ability to determine this width depends on the superresolution factor. Kosarev has derived an absolute limit for resolution enhancement using arguments based on a well known theorem of Shannon. Most calculations of superresolution factors in the literature, however, are based on the assumption of Gaussian, translationally invariant response functions and therefore not directly applicable to neutron spectrometers which typically have response functions not satisfying these requirements. In this work, we develop a procedure that allows us to overcome these difficulties and we derive estimates of superresolution for liquid scintillator spectrometers of a type commonly used for neutron measurements. Theoretical superresolution factors are compared to experimental results.

Reginatto, M.; Zimbal, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

Structural analysis of magnetic fusion energy systems in a combined interactive/batch computer environment  

SciTech Connect

A system of computer programs has been developed to aid in the preparation of input data for and the evaluation of output data from finite element structural analyses of magnetic fusion energy devices. The system utilizes the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program and a special set of interactive pre- and post-processor computer programs, and has been designed for use in an environment wherein a time-share computer system is linked to a batch computer system. In such an environment, the analyst must only enter, review and/or manipulate data through interactive terminals linked to the time-share computer system. The primary pre-processor programs include NASDAT, NASERR and TORMAC. NASDAT and TORMAC are used to generate NASTRAN input data. NASERR performs routine error checks on this data. The NASTRAN program is run on a batch computer system using data generated by NASDAT and TORMAC. The primary post-processing programs include NASCMP and NASPOP. NASCMP is used to compress the data initially stored on magnetic tape by NASTRAN so as to facilitate interactive use of the data. NASPOP reads the data stored by NASCMP and reproduces NASTRAN output for selected grid points, elements and/or data types.

Johnson, N.E.; Singhal, M.K.; Walls, J.C.; Gray, W.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Science towards inertial fusion energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant experimental and theoretical progress in the U.S heavy-ion fusion (HIF) program is reported in modeling and measurements of intense space-charge-dominated heavy ion and electron beams. Measurements of the transport of a well-matched and aligned high current (0.2A) 1.0 MeV potassium ion beam through 10 electric quadrupoles, with a fill factor of 60%, shows no emittance growth within experimental measurement uncertainty, as expected from the simulations. Another experiment shows that passing a beam through an aperture can reduce emittance to near the theoretical limits, and that plasma neutralization of the beam's space-charge can greatly reduce the focal spot radius. Measurements of intense beamlet current density, emittance, charge-state purity, and energy spread from a new, high-brightness, Argon plasma source for HIF experiments are described. New theory and simulations of neutralization of intense beam space charge with plasma in various focusing chamber configurations indicate that near-emittance-limited beam focal spot sizes can be obtained even with beam perveance an order of magnitude higher than in earlier HIF focusing experiments.

Logan, B.G.; Baca, D.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Burkhart, C.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Cohen, R.H.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion P.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Grisham, L.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; O'Shea, P.G.; Olson, C.; Olson, R.E.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Reiser, M.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.B.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Update on diode-pumped solid-state laser experiments for inertial fusion energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have completed the initial phase of the diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) experimental program to validate the expected pumping dynamics and extraction cross-sections of Yb{sup 3+}-doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F (Yb:S-FAP) crystals. Yb:S-FAP crystals up to 25 x 25 x 175 mm in size have been grown for this purpose which have acceptable loss characteristics (energy transmission properties of a Yb:S-FAP rod. The small signal gain under saturated pumping conditions was measured. These measurements imply an emission cross section of 6.0 x 10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2} that falls within error bars of the previously reported value of 7.3 x 10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2}, obtained from purely spectroscopic techniques. The effects of radiation trapping on the emission lifetime have been quantified. The long lifetime of Yb:S-FAP has beneficial effects for diode-pumped amplifier designs, relative to materials with equivalent cross sections but shorter lifetimes, in that less peak pump intensity is required (thus lower diode costs) and that lower spontaneous emission rates lead to a reduction in amplified spontaneous emission. Consequently, up to 1.7 J/cm{sup 3} of stored energy density was achieved in a 6x6x44 mm Yb:S-FAP amplifier rod; this stored energy density is large relative to typical flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass values of 0.3 to 0.5 J/cm{sup 3}. A 2.4 kW peak power InGaAs diode array has been fabricated by Beach, Emanuel, and co-workers which meets the central wavelength, bandwidth, and energy specifications for the author`s immediate experiments. These results further increase their optimism of being able to produce a {approximately} 10% efficient diode-pumped solid state laser for inertial fusion energy.

Marshall, C.; Smith, L.; Payne, S.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Flibe Coolant Cleanup and Processing in the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

In the HYLIFE-II chamber design, a thick flowing blanket of molten-salt (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) called flibe is used to protect structures from radiation damage. Since it is directly exposed to the fusion target, the flibe will absorb the target debris. Removing the materials left over from target explosions at the rate of {approx}6/s and then recycling some of these materials poses a challenge for the inertial fusion energy power plant. The choice of target materials derives from multi-disciplinary criteria such as target performance, fabricability, safety and environment, corrosion, and cost of recycle. Indirect-drive targets require high-2 materials for the hohlraum. Gold and gadolinium are favorite target materials for laboratory experiments but cost considerations may preclude their use in power plants or at least requires cost effective recycle because a year's supply of gold and gadolinium is estimated at 520 M$ and 40 M$. Environmental and waste considerations alone require recycle of this material. Separation by volatility appears to be the most attractive (e.g., Hg and Xe); centrifugation (e.g., Pb) is acceptable with some problems (e.g., materials compatibility) and chemical separation is the least attractive (e.g. Gd and Hf). Mercury, hafnium and xenon might be substituted with equal target performance and have advantages in removal and recycle due to their high volatility, except for hafnium. Alternatively, lead, tungsten and xenon might be used due to the ability to use centrifugation and gaseous separation. Hafnium or tantalum form fluorides, which will complicate materials compatibility, corrosion and require sufficient volatility of the fluoride for separation. Further complicating the coolant cleanup and processing is the formation of free fluorine due to nuclear transformation of lithium and beryllium in the flibe, which requires chemical control of the fluoride level to minimize corrosion. The study of the choice of target materials and the appropriate processing needs further study because we have not come up with choices which perform as well as gold and gadolinium and which have practical processes for recovery and recycle.

Moir, R W

2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Molten Salt Fuel Version of Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE)  

SciTech Connect

Molten salt with dissolved uranium is being considered for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) fission blanket as a backup in case a solid-fuel version cannot meet the performance objectives, for example because of radiation damage of the solid materials. Molten salt is not damaged by radiation and therefore could likely achieve the desired high burnup (>99%) of heavy atoms of {sup 238}U. A perceived disadvantage is the possibility that the circulating molten salt could lend itself to misuse (proliferation) by making separation of fissile material easier than for the solid-fuel case. The molten salt composition being considered is the eutectic mixture of 73 mol% LiF and 27 mol% UF{sub 4}, whose melting point is 490 C. The use of {sup 232}Th as a fuel is also being studied. ({sup 232}Th does not produce Pu under neutron irradiation.) The temperature of the molten salt would be {approx}550 C at the inlet (60 C above the solidus temperature) and {approx}650 C at the outlet. Mixtures of U and Th are being considered. To minimize corrosion of structural materials, the molten salt would also contain a small amount ({approx}1 mol%) of UF{sub 3}. The same beryllium neutron multiplier could be used as in the solid fuel case; alternatively, a liquid lithium or liquid lead multiplier could be used. Insuring that the solubility of Pu{sup 3+} in the melt is not exceeded is a design criterion. To mitigate corrosion of the steel, a refractory coating such as tungsten similar to the first wall facing the fusion source is suggested in the high-neutron-flux regions; and in low-neutron-flux regions, including the piping and heat exchangers, a nickel alloy, Hastelloy, would be used. These material choices parallel those made for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL. The nuclear performance is better than the solid fuel case. At the beginning of life, the tritium breeding ratio is unity and the plutonium plus {sup 233}U production rate is {approx}0.6 atoms per 14.1 MeV neutron.

Moir, R W; Shaw, H F; Caro, A; Kaufman, L; Latkowski, J F; Powers, J; Turchi, P A

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Use of Clearance Indexes to Assess Waste Disposal Issues for the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Design  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, waste management studies for fusion energy have used the Waste Disposal Rating (WDR) to evaluate if radioactive material from irradiated structures could qualify for shallow land burial. However, given the space limitations and the negative public perception of large volumes of waste, there is a growing international motivation to develop a fusion waste management system that maximizes the amount of material that can be cleared or recycled. In this work, we present an updated assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant, using the concept of Clearance Index (CI) for radioactive waste disposal. With that purpose, we have performed a detailed neutronics analysis of the HYLIFE-II design, using the TART and ACAB computer codes for neutron transport and activation, respectively. Whereas the traditional version of ACAB only provided the user with the WDR as an index for waste considerations, here we have modified the code to calculate Clearance Indexes using the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) clearance limits for radiological waste disposal. The results from the analysis are used to perform an assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II IFE design.

Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Sanz, J

2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

297

Developing a commercial production process for 500,000 targets per day: A key challenge for inertial fusion energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As is true for current-day commercial power plants, a reliable and economic fuel supply is essential for the viability of future Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) [Energy From Inertial Fusion, edited by W. J. Hogan (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995)] power plants. While IFE power plants will utilize deuterium-tritium (DT) bred in-house as the fusion fuel, the 'target' is the vehicle by which the fuel is delivered to the reaction chamber. Thus the cost of the target becomes a critical issue in regard to fuel cost. Typically six targets per second, or about 500 000/day are required for a nominal 1000 MW(e) power plant. The electricity value within a typical target is about $3, allocating 10% for fuel cost gives only 30 cents per target as-delivered to the chamber center. Complicating this economic goal, the target supply has many significant technical challenge - fabricating the precision fuel-containing capsule, filling it with DT, cooling it to cryogenic temperatures, layering the DT into a uniform layer, characterizing the finished product, accelerating it to high velocity for injection into the chamber, and tracking the target to steer the driver beams to meet it with micron-precision at the chamber center.

Goodin, D.T.; Alexander, N.B.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Bozek, A.S.; Brown, L.C.; Flint, G.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; McQuillan, B.W.; Nikroo, A.; Paguio, R.R.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Schroen, D.G.; Sheliak, J.D.; Vermillion, B.A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Carlson, L.C.; Goodman, P.; Maksaereekul, W.; Raffray, R.; Spalding, J.; Tillack, M.S. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92023 (United States)] (and others)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Prospects for inertial fusion energy based on a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver: Overview and development path  

SciTech Connect

It is now known with certainty that the type of fusion known as inertial fusion will work with sufficient energy input, so inertial fusion is really beyond the ``scientific breakeven`` point in many respects. The most important question that remains for inertial fusion energy (IFE) is whether this type of fusion can operate with sufficiently low input energy to make it economically feasible for energy production. The constraint for low input energy demands operation near the inertial fusion ignition threshold, and such operation creates enormous challenges to discover a target design that will produce sufficient energy gain. There are also multiple issues relating to the scientific feasibility of using a laboratory-type ``driver`` to energize a target, such as those concerning bandwidth and beam smoothing for ``direct drive,`` and extension of hohlraum plasma physics to the IFE scale for ``indirect drive.`` One driver that appears as though it will be able to meet the IFE requirements, assuming modest development and sufficient target gain, is a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL). We give an overview of this type of laser system, and explain what development remains for the economic production of electricity using this type of driver for IFE.

Orth, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fusion Power Deployment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Antiproton catalyzed fusion  

SciTech Connect

Because of the potential application to power production, it is important to investigate a wide range of possible means to achieve nuclear fusion, even those that may appear initially to be infeasible. In antiproton catalyzed fusion, the negative antiproton shields the repulsion between the positively charged nuclei of hydrogen isotopes, thus allowing a much higher level of penetration through the repulsive Coulomb barrier, and thereby greatly enhancing the fusion cross section. Because of their more compact wave function, the more massive antiprotons offer considerably more shielding than do negative muons. The effects of the shielding on fusion cross sections are most predominate, at low energies. If the antiproton could exist in the ground state with a nucleus for a sufficient time without annihilating, the fusion cross sections are so enhanced that at room temperature energies, values up to about 1,000 barns (that for d+t) would be possible. Unfortunately, the cross section for antiproton annihilation with the incoming nucleus is even higher. A model that provides an upper bound for the fusion to annihilation cross section for all relevant energies indicates that each antiproton will catalyze no more than about one fusion. Because the energy required to make one antiproton greatly exceeds the fusion energy that is released, this level of catalysis is far from adequate for power production.

Morgan, D.L. Jr.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.

1995-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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301

ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY IN A SUSTAINABLE GLOBAL ENERGY STRATEGY R LE DE L'NERGIE DE FUSION DANS UNE STRATGIE D'NERGIE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to continue increasing, in particular to meet the need for greater per capita energy consumption, is dependent on the continued availability of sufficient, reasonably priced energy. Per capita energy, and education in each region. World energy consumption has increased dramatically over time and is projected

302

ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY IN A SUSTAINABLE GLOBAL ENERGY STRATEGY RLE DE L'NERGIE DE FUSION DANS UNE STRATGIE D'NERGIE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to continue increasing, in particular to meet the need for greater per capita energy consumption, is dependent on the continued availability of sufficient, reasonably priced energy. Per capita energy, and education in each region. World energy consumption has increased dramatically over time and is projected

Najmabadi, Farrokh

303

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

Militzer, Burkhard

304

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

Militzer, Burkhard

305

Fusion reactors for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the types of processes now being considered for synthetic fuels production from fusion energy, together with an example of each type are listed. The process efficiency is defined as the chemical energy in the generated hydrogen (at the higher heating value (HHV)) divided by the total fusion energy release, including alpha particles and secondary neutron reactions in the blanket. Except where specifically noted, both high and low temperature blanket heats are counted as part of total fusion energy release.

Powell, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation  

SciTech Connect

Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R=1.0 to 3.0) requirements.

Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from a LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R = 1.0 to 3.0) requirements. These studies also indicate that masses on the order of 1.0 g at densities of rho greater than or equal to 500.0 g/cm/sup 3/ are required for a practical fusion-based fission product transmutation system.

Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Development of tritium technology for the United States magnetic fusion energy program  

SciTech Connect

Tritium technology development for the DOE fusion program is taking place principally at three laboratories, Mound Facility, Argonne National Laboratory and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This paper will review the major aspects of each of the three programs and look at aspects of the tritium technology being developed at other laboratories within the United States. Facilities and experiments to be discussed include the Tritium Effluent Control Laboratory and the Tritium Storage and Delivery System for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Mound Facility; the Lithium Processing Test Loop and the solid breeder blanket studies at Argonne; and the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos.

Anderson, J.L.; Wilkes, W.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility - Advanced Tokamak Option (A26932)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 19th Technology Of Fusion Energy, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2010; To Be Published In Fusion Science And Technology19th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Las Vegas Nevada, US, 2010999618795

Wong, C.P.C.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Path to Fusion Energy for Concepts Currently at the Concept Exploration Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needed? Advanced diagnostics Theory and simulation Support from base program, technology program BPX Non-nuclear phenomena. [FESAC Report on Alternate Concepts] · Innovation ­­ search for a better fusion reactor ­­ Upgrade path from CE-level MST · NCSX ­­ Built on theory and a strong international data base but no CE

311

Magnetic fusion energy. [Lectures on status of tokamak and magnetic mirror research  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of fusion research during the last 20 years is given. Some highlights of theoretical plasma physics are presented. The role that computational plasma physics is playing in analyzing and understanding the experiments of today is discussed. The magnetic mirror program is reviewed. (MOW)

McNamara, B.

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

Grid computing and collaboration technology in support of fusion energy sciencesa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Science research in general and magnetic fusion research in particular continue to grow in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. The simultaneous increase in wide area network speeds has made it practical to envision distributed working environments that are as productive as traditionally collocated work. In computing power

D. P. Schissel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Commercial application of laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

The fundamentals of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described.

Booth, L.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Accelerators for heavy ion fusion  

SciTech Connect

Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

Bangerter, R.O.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Particle beam fusion  

SciTech Connect

Today, in keeping with Sandia Laboratories` designation by the Department of Energy as the lead laboratory for the pulsed power approach to fusion, its efforts include major research activities and the construction of new facilities at its Albuquerque site. Additionally, in its capacity as lead laboratory, Sandia coordinates DOE-supported pulsed power fusion work at other government operated laboratories, with industrial contractors, and universities. The beginning of Sandia`s involvement in developing fusion power was an outgrowth of its contributions to the nation`s nuclear weapon program. The Laboratories` work in the early 1960`s emphasized the use of pulsed radiation environments to test the resistance of US nuclear weapons to enemy nuclear bursts. A careful study of options for fusion power indicated that Sandia`s expertise in the pulsed power field could provide a powerful match to ignite fusion fuel. Although creating test environments is an achieved goal of Sandia`s overall program, this work and other military tasks protected by appropriate security regulations will continue, making full use of the same pulsed power technology and accelerators as the fusion-for-energy program. Major goals of Sandia`s fusion program including the following: (1) complete a particle accelerator to deliver sufficient beam energy for igniting fusion targets; (2) obtain net energy gain, this goal would provide fusion energy output in excess of energy stored in the accelerator; (3) develop a technology base for the repetitive ignition of pellets in a power reactor. After accomplishing these goals, the technology will be introduced to the nation`s commercial sector.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Magnetic fusion reactor economics  

SciTech Connect

An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

FES Science Network Requirements - Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States of America. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In March 2008, ESnet and the Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Program Office of the DOE Office of Science organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by the FES Program Office. Most sites that conduct data-intensive activities (the Tokamaks at GA and MIT, the supercomputer centers at NERSC and ORNL) show a need for on the order of 10 Gbps of network bandwidth for FES-related work within 5 years. PPPL reported a need for 8 times that (80 Gbps) in that time frame. Estimates for the 5-10 year time period are up to 160 Mbps for large simulations. Bandwidth requirements for ITER range from 10 to 80 Gbps. In terms of science process and collaboration structure, it is clear that the proposed Fusion Simulation Project (FSP) has the potential to significantly impact the data movement patterns and therefore the network requirements for U.S. fusion science. As the FSP is defined over the next two years, these changes will become clearer. Also, there is a clear and present unmet need for better network connectivity between U.S. FES sites and two Asian fusion experiments--the EAST Tokamak in China and the KSTAR Tokamak in South Korea. In addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing the network requirements of the science endeavors funded by the FES Program Office, the workshop emphasized that there is a need for research into better ways of conducting remote collaboration with the control room of a Tokamak running an experiment. This is especially important since the current plans for ITER assume that this problem will be solved.

Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

319

Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

R. W. Moir; N. N. Martovetsky; A. W. Molvik; D. D. Ryutov; T. C. Simonen

320

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility - Advanced Tokamak Option  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant, Demo, and FNSF / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

C. P. C. Wong; V. S. Chan; A. M. Garofalo; J. A. Leuer; M. E. Sawan; J. P. Smith; R. D. Stambaugh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Super-high density laser fusion CTR  

SciTech Connect

From sixth European conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics; Moscow, USSR (30 Jul 1973). A basic discussion of laser-induced fusion is presented. Implosion development and applications are described. Implosion and thermonuclear physics are discussed in some detail along with laser technology, laser fusion reactors, and fusion energy conversion. (MOW)

Thiessen, A.; Zimmerman, G.; Weaver, T.; Emmett, J.; Nuckolls, J.; Wood, L.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Special Nuclear Materials Detection Using IEC Fusion Pulsed Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental Facilities and Nonelectric Applications / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

J. H. Sorebo; G. L. Kulcinski; R. F. Radel; J. F. Santarius

323

Impact of Burning Plasma on Fusion Technology Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Akio Sagara; Yasuji Kozaki; Masahiro Tanaka; Takuya Goto

324

ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY FOR THE 21 CENTURY ENERGY MARKET AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY WITH INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAR EXPERIMENTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactor /Commercial Reactor Engineering Design Expending Performance Phase High Working Rate CDA EDA are condensed under the Earth during a few hundred millions of year. This precious gift will be expired within.) Disposal cost for radioactive materials is one of important element for commercial use of fusion. Figure 9

325

Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

326

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 44 (2004) S254S265 PII: S0029-5515(04)88685-X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of the target supply in a fusion economy, and show that costs are within the range of commercial in the condensation reaction that builds a 1­5 µm polymer overcoat withnoreplicationofthefoamcellstructure the ablator, has a critical effect on the performance (gain) of the target. Layering requires establishing

Tillack, Mark

327

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 104010 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/49/10/104010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation (April 1988), Tore Supra remains the only large tokamak fully equipped for steady-state operation of steady- state tokamak operation, retains all its scientific interest and relevance to the fusion heating systems configuration. In the prospect of the ITER steady-state operation phase and of DEMO

�cole Normale Supérieure

328

COLLOQUIUM: DIII-D Explorations of Fusion Science to Prepare...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

officers retain the right to inspect vehicles and personal packages, such as briefcases, satchels, book bags, and purses. Learn More Fusion energy Fusion reactor design ITER...

329

Economic potential of inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents.

Nuckolls, J.H.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Measurements of Nonlinear Energy Transfer in Turbulence in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The application of a new bispectral analysis technique to density fluctuation measurements in the core of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor indicates that the peak in the autopower spectrum usually lies in a region of linear stability. Large changes in the linear and nonlinear characteristics of the turbulence are observed as the plasma toroidal rotation and/or confinement properties are varied, while estimates of the turbulence-driven diffusivity varies only slightly with rotation. These observations are consistent with the operation of a global organizing property that may be related to the observation of Bohm-like scaling of ion thermal transport. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Kim, J.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Durst, R.D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Fernandez, E.; Terry, P.W. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Paul, S.F.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including unenriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to diver

Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy  Sciences   8.2.3.4   Computational  and  Storage  Energy  Sciences   13.1.1.4   Computational  and  Storage  Energy  Sciences   8.2.4.4   Computational  and  Storage  

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cluster-Impact Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers the theoretical interpretation of cluster-impact fusion (CIF). The proton energy spectrum of CIF shows it to be hot fusion on a microscopic atomic scale. The temperature of the reaction can be determined by the Doppler-like broadening of the 3.025 MeV proton line. The spectrum also indicates that the high temperature results from a one-dimensional rather than a three-dimensional velocity distribution.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11, 1980, p. 725. MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY Staff W. Kunkel andsupport) Accelerator and Fusion Research Division N.Abt Y.Wong J. Zatver HEAVY ION FUSION Work continued during FY80

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Homodyne target tracking for direct drive laser inertial fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory. Inertial Fusion Energy: How IFE Works,Tracking of Direct Drive Inertial Fusion Targets."Fusion Science and Technology 52.3 (2007): 435-439. Tillack,

Spalding, Jon David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Component framework for coupled integrated fusion plasma simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, ... Keywords: components, coupled simulation, framework, fusion

Wael R. Elwasif; David E. Bernholdt; Lee A. Berry; Donald B. Batchelor

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Presented at the 14th ANS Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy, Park City Utah, October 15-19, 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented at the 14th ANS Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy, Park City Utah is based on the high operating temperature capabilities and the high atomic weight of tungsten. Higher operating temperatures improve thermal efficiencies of the power cycle and the higher atomic weight ensures

California at Los Angeles, University of

338

Topical Area MFE Title: Burning Plasma Science_____________________________________________ Description Fusion energy is released by burning light elements using nuclear reactions which consume mass and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Topical Area MFE Title: Burning Plasma Science_____________________________________________ · Description Fusion energy is released by burning light elements using nuclear reactions which consume mass-sustained purely by its alpha particle heating. The science of burning plasmas consists of: (1) the physics

339

Basics of Fusion-Fission Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Leonid E. Zakharov

340

Peaceful uses of fusion  

SciTech Connect

Applications a thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and when once brought under control are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low--specific-yield formations are also suggested.

Teller, E.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Vacuum insulation of the high energy negative ion source for fusion application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vacuum insulation on a large size negative ion accelerator with multiple extraction apertures and acceleration grids for fusion application was experimentally examined and designed. In the experiment, vacuum insulation characteristics were investigated in the JT-60 negative ion source with >1000 apertures on the grid with the surface area of {approx}2 m{sup 2}. The sustainable voltages varied with a square root of the gap lengths between the grids, and decreased with number of the apertures and with the surface area of the grids. Based on the obtained results, the JT-60SA (super advanced) negative ion source is designed to produce 22 A, 500 keV D{sup -} ion beams for 100 s.

Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Inoue, T.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Tobari, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Hilmi, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamano, Y. [Saitama University, Saitama, Saitama-ken, 338-8570 (Japan); Grisham, L. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

DEMONSTRATING A TARGET SUPPLY FOR INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D.T. Goodin,1 N.B. Alexander,1 L.C. Brown,1 D.A. Callahan,2 P. Ebey,3 D.T. Frey,1 R. Gallix,1 D. Geller,3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEMONSTRATING A TARGET SUPPLY FOR INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D.T. Goodin,1 N.B. Alexander,1 L.C. Brown-5608 A central feature of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant is a target that has been compressed and heated to fusion conditions by the energy input of the driver. The technology to economically manufacture

Raffray, A. René

343

Fusion Website  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Basics Fusion Intro Fusion Education Research DIII-D Internal Site Opportunities Virtual DIII-D Collaborators Countries Physics Eng Physics Operations Diagnostics Computing IFT IFT Site ITER ITER Site FDF Theory Collaborators Conferences GA-Hosted Room Reservations Fusion Meetings Plasma Publications Presentations Images Brochures Posters Movies Corporate General Atomics Products Visitor GA Fusion Hotels Internal Users GA Internal Site DIII-D General Experimental Science Experimental Science Home 2013 Experimental Campaign Burning Plasma Physics Dynamics & Control Boundary and Pedestal ELM Control Operations Diagnostics Computing Support Visitors DIII-D Web Access Help IFT ITER-GA Theory Research Highlights Personnel Links Policies Safety Comp Support Trouble Ticket Eng/Design Fusion Webmail Phone Book

344

Magnetic fusion: planning for the future  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of international cooperation in the fusion program is given. The author shares his views on the technical prospects and future potential of fusion as a practical energy source. (MOW)

Fowler, T.K.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Research on fusion neutron sources  

SciTech Connect

The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. 'Fusion for Neutrons' (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

Gryaznevich, M. P. [Tokamak Solutions UK, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON, OX133DB (United Kingdom)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume I. Summary, objectives and management. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This document defines a plan for conducting selected aspects of the engineering testing required for magnetic fusion reactor FWBS components and systems. The ultimate product of this program is an established data base that contributes to a functional, reliable, maintainable, economically attractive, and environmentally acceptable commercial fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield system. This program plan updates the initial plan issued in November of 1980 by the DOE/Office of Fusion Energy (unnumbered report). The plan consists of two parts. Part I is a summary of activities, responsibilities and program management including reporting and interfaces with other programs. Part II is a compilation of the Detailed Technical Plans for Phase I (1982 to 1984) developed by the participants during Phase 0 of the program (July to December 1981).

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

the fusion trend line Stan Milora (ORNL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://vlt.ornl.gov/ VLT Virtual Laboratory for Technology For Fusion Energy Science #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S For Fusion Energy Science #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Somebody For Fusion Energy Science #12;4 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Somebody

348

Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Inclusive distributions in p-p collisions at LHC energies compared with an adjusted DPMJET-III model with chain fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A DPMJET-III model (DPMJET-III-2011) with chain fusion adjusted to include energy.dependent parameters is used to calculate inclusive distributions in p-p collisions at LHC energies. Presented are charged hadrons rapidity distributions, transverse momentum distributions, multiplicity distributions as well as multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy. For hadrons with strangeness we present cms-rapidity distributions and transverse momentum distributions. With the considered merely energy-dependent adjustments the obtained agreement with the transversal \\Lambda and \\Xi distribution is not satisfactory.

F. Bopp; J. Ranft

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that will be co  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod A crucial challenge in magnetic fusion is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that is compatible with the engineering requirements of a fusion reactor. The triggering of edge transport barriers at the boundary of confined plasma is a common approach to obtaining high energy confinement, in a regime known as H-mode, which extrapolates to high performance in ITER and other burning plasma devices. However, barriers to energy transport can sometimes be self-defeating, since they also provide a strong barrier to particle transport. This can lead to enhanced confinement of impurities in the plasma core, excessive radiated power and deterioration of performance for a given

351

Fusion roadmapping | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion roadmapping Fusion roadmapping Subscribe to RSS - Fusion roadmapping The process of mapping a path to a commercial fusion reactor by planning a sequence of future machines. Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science Quest Magazine Summer 2013 Welcome to the premiere issue of Quest, the annual magazine of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Read more about Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and design Read more about PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and design

352

Atomic data for fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.) [eds.; Barnett, C.F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Assisted fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of nuclear fusion consisting of a wave packet impinging into a well located between square one dimensional barriers is treated analytically. The wave function inside the well is calculated exactly for the assisted tunneling induced by a perturbation mimicking a constant electric field with arbitrary time dependence. Conditions are found for the enhancement of fusion.

German Kälbermann

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

354

Fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included. (RME)

Fowler, T.K.

1977-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fusion pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Pappas, D.S.

1987-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Stockpile tritium production from fusion  

SciTech Connect

A fusion breeder holds the promise of a new capability - ''dialable'' reserve capacity at little additional cost - that offers stockpile planners a new way to deal with today's uncertainties in forecasting long range needs. Though still in the research stage, fusion can be developed in time to meet future military requirements. Much of the necessary technology will be developed by the ongoing magnetic fusion energy program. However, a specific program to develop the nuclear technology required for materials production is needed if fusion is to become a viable option for a new production complex around the turn of the century.

Lokke, W.A.; Fowler, T.K.

1986-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

Transportation Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar or nuclear power(from fission or fusion reactors), andand nuclear energy (from breeder reactors or possibly fusion

Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Civilian applications of laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. We have found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser fusion studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented.

Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

1978-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Overview of Fission Safety for Laser ICF Fission Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

Per F. Peterson; Edward Blandford; Christhian Galvez

360

Fusion power production in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

Up to 9.3 MW of fusion power has been produced from deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reactions in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The total fusion yield from a single plasma pulse has reached 6.5 MJ. The experiments in TFTR with deuterium-tritium plasmas fueled and heated by neutral beam injection span wide ranges in plasma and operating conditions. Through the use of lithium pellet conditioning to control the edge recycling, the plasma confinement in TFTR has been improved to the point where the stability of the plasma to pressure driven modes is limiting the fusion power for plasma currents up to 2.5 MA. The central energy and fusion power densities in these plasmas are comparable to those expected in a thermalized DT reactor, such as ITER.

Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1]could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Fusion in a Staged Z-pinch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York (1978) Teller, E. : Fusion. Academic Press, New York (O R I G I N A L A RT I C L E Fusion in a Staged Z-pinch H.U.implosion the sim- ulated fusion-energy yield is 7.6 MJ,

Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Rostoker, N.; Wessel, F. J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies Prepared for The President's Committee May 16,1995 #12;Page 2 White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies 1. Introduction Dramatic present our vision for the future of fusion energy research. In this white paper, following a summary

364

Neutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on lasers, direct drive targets and a dry wall chamber [1]. A primary focus is the development of a tungsten-armored-explosion. Only a thin region of the armor (10-100 µm) will experience the highly cyclic x-ray and ion energy deposition transients. The FW structure behind the armor as well as the blanket will operate under quasi

Raffray, A. René

365

Assessment of Chamber Concepts for Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plants The ARIES-IFE study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have selected heavy-ion indirect target designs of LLNL/LBL and direct-drive target design of NRL such as target injection and tracking, thermal response of the first wall, and laser or heavy-ion propagation to UC San Diego, are 1) Argonne National Laboratory, 2) Boeing High Energy Systems, 3) General Atomics

Tillack, Mark

366

Assessment of Chamber Concepts for Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plants The ARIES-IFE study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have selected heavy-ion indirect target designs of LLNL/LBL and direct-drive target designs of NRL such as target injection and tracking, thermal response of the first wall, and laser or heavy-ion propagation Diego, are 1) Argonne National Laboratory, 2) Boeing High Energy Systems, 3) General Atomics, 4) Georgia

Najmabadi, Farrokh

367

Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting March 1-2, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosphere Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics Center for Advanced Research of Energy for Environmental and Health Sciences Health Care Center Vicinity Map of Hokkaido University Sapporo Campus Hotel Gracery Sapporo Address Kita 4, Nishi 4, Chuo-ku, Sapporo TEL 81- (0)11-251-3211 A Keio Plaza Hotel

368

X-ray microscopy of laser fusion targets in four energy bands from 0.7 to 4.0 keV  

SciTech Connect

A grazing x-ray microscope was shown to be able to photograph the x-ray emission from laser-produced plasmas between 0.8 and 4.0 keV with a spatial resolution of approximately 3 microns. The calibration of the x-ray mirror energy response functions and the x-ray film allow absolute measurements of the spatial and spectral distribution of the x-ray emission from laser fusion targets. (MOW)

Boyle, M.J.; Seward, F.D.; Harper, T.L.; Koppel, L.N.; Pettipiece, K.J.; Ahlstrom, H.G.

1975-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

T-549: Adobe ColdFusion 9.0.1 CHF1 and earlier | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

549: Adobe ColdFusion 9.0.1 CHF1 and earlier 549: Adobe ColdFusion 9.0.1 CHF1 and earlier T-549: Adobe ColdFusion 9.0.1 CHF1 and earlier February 3, 2011 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe ColdFusion 9.0.1 CHF1 and earlier. PLATFORM: ColdFusion 9.0, 8.0.x and 7.0.2 ABSTRACT: Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Adobe ColdFusion before 9.0.1 CHF1 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via vectors involving a "tag script. reference LINKS CVE Details - CVE-2011-0736 MITRE Reference- CVE-2011-0736 National Cyber-Alert System - CVE-2011-0736 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: Adobe ColdFusion 9.0.1 CHF1 and earlier, when a web application is configured to use a DBMS, allows remote attackers to obtain potentially sensitive information about the database structure via an id=- query to a

370

A Continuous, In-Chamber Target Tracking and Engagement Approach for Laser Fusion (A25684)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 17th ANS Top. Mtg On Technology Of Fusion Energy (TOFE), Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2006; To Be Published In Fusion Sci. And Technol.17th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Albuquerque New Mexico, US, 2006999613570

Petzoldt, R.W.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Civilian applications of laser fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. It was found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented.

Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

1977-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Road map for a modular magnetic fusion program  

SciTech Connect

During the past several decades magnetic fusion has made outstanding progress in understanding the science of fusion plasmas, the achievement of actual fusion plasmas and the development of key fusion technologies. Magnetic fusion is now technically ready to take the next step: the study of high gain fusion plasmas, the optimization of fusion plasmas and the continued development and integration of fusion technology. However, each of these objectives requires significant resources since the tests are now being done at the energy production scale. This paper describes a modular approach that addresses these objectives in specialized facilities that reduces the technical risk and lowers cost for near term facilities needed to address critical issues.

Dale M. Meade

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Magneized target fusion: An overview of the concept  

SciTech Connect

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) seeks to take advantage of the reduction of thermal conductivity through the application of a strong magneticfield and thereby ease the requirements for reaching fusion conditions in a thermonuclear (TN) fusion fuel. A potentially important benefit of the strong field in the partial trapping of energetic charged particles to enhance energy deposition by the TN fusion reaction products. The essential physics is described. MTF appears to lead to fusion targets that require orders of magnitude less power and intensity for fusion ignition than currently proposed (unmagnetized) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets do, making some very energetic pulsed power drivers attractive for realizing controlled fusion.

Kirkpatrick, R.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Low-energy x-ray emission from magnetic-fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Complex, transient, spatially inhomogeneous tokamak plasmas require careful diagnosis. As the reactor regime is approached, soft x rays become more important as a versatile diagnostic tool and an energy-loss mechanism. Continuum emission provides a measure of electron temperature and light impurity content. Impurity lines serve as a probe for ion and electron temperature, impurity behavior, and radiative cooling. The entire spectrum yields vital information on instabilities and disruptions. The importance of impurities is illustrated by the extensive efforts toward understanding impurity production, effects, and control. Minute heavy impurity concentrations can prevent reactor ignition. Si(Li) - detector arrays give a broad overview of continuum and line x-ray emission (.3 to 50 keV) with moderate energy (200 eV) and time (50 ms) resolution. Bragg crystal and grating spectrometers provide detailed information on impurity lines with moderate to excellent (E/..delta..E = 100 to 23,000) resolving power and 1 to 50 ms time resolution. Imaging detector arrays measure rapid (approx. 10 ..mu..s) fluctuations due to MHD instabilities and probe impurity behavior and radiative cooling. Future tokamaks require more diagnostic channels to avoid spatial scanning, higher throughput for fast, single-shot diagnosis, increased spectral information per sample period via fast scanning or use of multi-element detectors with dispersive elements, and radiation shielding and hardening of detectors.

Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; Eames, D.; von Goeler, S.; Goldman, M.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Silver, E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Dynamic Instruction Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC INSTRUCTION FUSION A thesis submitted in4 2.2 Instruction Fusion & Complex10 3.1 Fusion Selection

Lee, Ian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Minimal fusion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We define minimal fusion systems in a way that every non-solvable fusion system has a section which is minimal. Minimal fusion systems can also be… (more)

Henke, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

EBIT Shines New Light on Nuclear Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of highly ionized particles in nuclear fusion reactors ... researchers recently confirmed a theory which predicted ... lead to more efficient energy production ...

378

: Fusion Wall Development Research by Neutron Depth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nano-sized cavities with the theory that the ... Formation,” Transaction of America Nuclear Society Summer ... in an Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor,” Nucl. ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Developments in Direct Drive Laser Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

J. L. Weaver et al.

380

Status of inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

The technology advancement to high-power beams has also given birth to new technologies. That class of Free Electron Lasers that employs rf linacs, synchrotrons, and storage rings - although the use the tools of High Energy Physics (HEP) - was developed well behind the kinetic energy frontier. The induction linac, however, is something of an exception; it was born directly from the needs of the magnetic fusion program, and was not motivated by a high-energy physics application. The heavy-ion approach to inertial fusion starts with picking from the rich menu of accelerator technologies those that have, ab initio, the essential ingredients needed for a power plant driver: multigap acceleration - which leads to reliability/lifetime; electrical efficiency; repetition rate; and beams that can be reliably focused over a suitably long distance. The report describes the programs underway in Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research as well as listing expected advances in driver, target, and beam quality areas in the inertial fusion power program.

Keefe, D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

FRC Based Fusion Neutron Source for Materials Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant, Demo, and FNSF / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

John Slough

382

Fission-Suppressed Fusion, Thorium-Cycle Breeder and Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

R. W. Moir

383

Fusion-Fission Blanket Options for the LIFE Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Kevin J. Kramer et al.

384

A Fusion Hybrid Reactor Based on the Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Terry Kammash

385

New Insight into Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternate Concepts & Magnets / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

G. L. Kulcinski et al.

386

Strategic Plans for the Fusion DEMO Program of Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant, Demo, and FNSF / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

Hyuck Jong Kim; Hyung Chan Kim; Chul-Sik Lee; Myeun Kwon; Gyung-Su Lee

387

Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

Kulsrud, R.M.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Visual data fusion for applications of high-resolution numerical weather prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: data fusion, demographics, energy demand prediction, graphics design, meteorology, user tasks, visualization, weather forecasting

Lloyd A. Treinish

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The IEC Fusion-Plasma Torch - A Path for Closing the Materials Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental Facilities and Nonelectric Applications / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

William C. Gough; George H. Miley

390

Nd:Glass Laser Design for Laser ICF Fission Energy (LIFE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

John Caird et al.

391

American Fusion News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Fusion News American Fusion News General Atomics (GA) December 4, 2012 The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" December 4, 2012 Frozen Bullets Tame Unruly Edge Plasmas in Fusion Experiment February 15, 2012 General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement See All Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) April 5, 2013 Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science February 22, 2013 A Tour of Plasma Physics in Downtown Cambridge December 4, 2012 Placing Fusion Power on a Pedestal September 21, 2012 MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTUE OF TECHNOLOGY See All National Ignition Facility February 22, 2013 Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy February 16, 2012 National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes

392

Search for fusion power  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the basics of fusion power is given. Both inertial confinement and magnetic confinement fusion are discussed.

Post, R.F.

1978-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010) 014005 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/1/014005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term sustainable economic develop- ment, it is necessary for China to exploit renewable energy 0029's Republic of China 2 Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China 3 Southwestern Institute of Physics, CNNC, Chengdu, 610041, People's Republic of China E-mail: j li

394

Commercial applications of inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the fundamentals of inertial-confinement fusion, some laser-fusion reactor (LFR) concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation. In addition, other commercial energy-related applications, such as the production of fissionable fuels, of synthetic hydrocarbon-based fuels, and of process heat for a variety of uses, as well as the environmental and safety aspects of fusion energy, are discussed. Finally, the requirements for commercialization of laser fusion technologies are described.

Booth, L.A.; Frank, T.G. (comps.)

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

L.E. Zakharov

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

396

Overview of nonelectrical applications of fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for, and importance of, nonelectrical applications of fusion energy is discussed. Three possibilities are reviewed in some detail: fusion-fission hybrids for fissile fuel production; high-temperature electrolysis and thermochemical processes for hydrogen production; and high-temperature steam for coal gasification. The hybrid could be an early application of fusion if this route is identified as a desirable goal. Hydrogen production and coal gasification processes appear feasible and could be developed as a part of the conventional fusion blanket research and development. The question of economics, particularly in view of the high capital cost of fusion plants, remains an open issue requiring more study.

Miley, G.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy.

Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between hydrogen and fusion-relevant materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In a thermonuclear reactor fusion between hydrogen isotopes takes place, producing helium and energy. The so-called divertor is the part of the fusion reactor vessel… (more)

Rooij, E.D. de

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Using Nuclear Fusion Reactions to Peer Inside the Core of a Dense...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Using Nuclear Fusion Reactions to Peer Inside the Core of a Dense Hot Plasma Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES...

400

Controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Controlled production of energy by fusion of light nuclei has been the goal of a large portion of the physics community since the 1950's. In order for a fusion reaction to take place, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. At this temperature, matter can exist only in the form of an almost fully ionized plasma. In order for the reaction to produce net power, the product of the density and energy confinement time must exceed a minimum value of 10/sup 20/ sec m/sup -3/, the so-called Lawson criterion. Basically, two approaches are being taken to meet this criterion: inertial confinement and magnetic confinement. Inertial confinement is the basis of the laser fusion approach; a fuel pellet is imploded by intense laser beams from all sides and ignites. Magnetic confinement devices, which exist in a variety of geometries, rely upon electromagnetic forces on the charged particles of the plasma to keep the hot plasma from expanding. Of these devices, the most encouraging results have been achieved with a class of devices known as tokamaks. Recent successes with these devices have given plasma physicists confidence that scientific feasibility will be demonstrated in the next generation of tokamaks; however, an even larger effort will be required to make fusion power commercially feasible. As a result, emphasis in the controlled thermonuclear research program is beginning to shift from plasma physics to a new branch of nuclear engineering which can be called fusion engineering, in which instrumentation and control engineers will play a major role. Among the new problem areas they will deal with are plasma diagnostics and superconducting coil instrumentation.

Walstrom, P.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fusion pumped laser  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Experiments in cold fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

Palmer, E.P.

1986-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

403

Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage ({approx}100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

Donovan, D. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boris, D. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, South West, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Piefer, G. R. [Phoenix Nuclear Labs, 2555 Industrial Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53713 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fusion Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

aboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the links to the formal position...

405

Magnetic fusion energy, 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics in plasma research: Ion Sources; Accelerators for Negative Ions; and Plasma Theory.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Advanced synfuel production with fusion  

SciTech Connect

An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers a nearly inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fusion Education | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits of FES » Fusion Benefits of FES » Fusion Education Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Fusion Education Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » Benefits of FES Fusion Education Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Fusion Energy Sciences Program includes a diverse set of disciplines - from modern plasma physics theories dealing with chaotic systems of energetic particles and waves to more conventional engineering problems of applied electromagnetism. Throughout the scientific programs supported by

408

Heavy-Ion-Fusion-Science: Summary of U.S. Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IAEA-06 Topic IF Heavy-Ion-Fusion-Science: Summary of U.S.W.L. Waldron, U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual NationalExperiment at PPPL. [1] Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Fusion power and the environment  

SciTech Connect

Environmental characteristics of conceptual fusion-reactor systems based on magnetic confinement are examined quantitatively, and some comparisons with fission systems are made. Fusion, like all other energy sources, will not be completely free of environmental liabilities, but the most obvious of these-- tritium leakage and activation of structural materials by neutron bombardment-- are susceptible to significant reduction by ingenuity in choice of materials and design. Large fusion reactors can probably be designed so that worst-case releases of radioactivity owing to accident or sabotage would produce no prompt fatalities in the public. A world energy economy relying heavily on fusion could make heavy demands on scarce nonfuel materials, a topic deserving further attention. Fusion's potential environmental advantages are not entirely ''automatic'', converting them into practical reality will require emphasis on environmental characteristics throughout the process of reactor design and engineering. The central role of environmental impact in the long-term energy dilemma of civilization justifies the highest priority on this aspect of fusion. (auth)

Holdren, J.P.; Fowler, T.K.; Post, R.F.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Data security on the national fusion grid  

SciTech Connect

The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Security on the US Fusion Grid  

SciTech Connect

The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fusion Links | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington,...

413

Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Inertial fusion: strategy and economic potential  

SciTech Connect

Inertial fusion must demonstrate that the high target gains required for practical fusion energy can be achieved with driver energies not larger than a few megajoules. Before a multi-megajoule scale driver is constructed, inertial fusion must provide convincing experimental evidence that the required high target gains are feasible. This will be the principal objective of the NOVA laser experiments. Implosions will be conducted with scaled targets which are nearly hydrodynamically equivalent to the high gain target implosions. Experiments which demonstrate high target gains will be conducted in the early nineties when multi-megajoule drivers become available. Efficient drivers will also be demonstrated by this time period. Magnetic fusion may demonstrate high Q at about the same time as inertial fusion demonstrates high gain. Beyond demonstration of high performance fusion, economic considerations will predominate. Fusion energy will achieve full commercial success when it becomes cheaper than fission and coal. Analysis of the ultimate economic potential of inertial fusion suggests its costs may be reduced to half those of fission and coal. Relative cost escalation would increase this advantage. Fusions potential economic advantage derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy (which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity).

Nuckolls, J.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

TWO IMPORTANT FUSION PROCESSES CREATING THE CONDITIONS FOR FUSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPORTANT FUSION PROCESSES CREATING THE CONDITIONS FOR FUSION F u s i o n Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source C o n f i n e m e n t Q u a l i t y , n τ ( m - 3 s ) 1970-75 1990s 1975-80 1980s Ion Temperature (K) 10 21 10 20 10 19 10 18 10 17 10 6 10 7 10 8 10 9 Inertial Magnetic Expected reactor regime Expected reactor regime Useful Nuclear Masses (The electron's mass is 0.000549 u.) Label Species Mass (u*) n ( 1 n) neutron 1.008665 p ( 1 H) proton 1.007276 D ( 2 H) deuteron 2.013553 T ( 3 H) triton 3.015500 3 He helium-3 3.014932 α ( 4 He) helium-4 4.001505 * 1 u = 1.66054 x 10 -27 kg = 931.466 MeV/c 2 Nuclear Mass (u) B i n d i n g E n e r g y P e r N u c l e o n ( M e V ) 1 200 150 100 50 10 0 5 62 Ni Fusion Reactions Release Energy Fission Reactions Release Energy EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS IN FUSION RESEARCH Fusion requires high tempera- ture plasmas confined long enough at high density

420

Optimization of an IEC Fusion Device to Increase Steady-State D-D Neutron Generation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental Facilities and Nonelectric Applications / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

D. C. Donovan; D. R. Boris; G. L. Kulcinski; J. F. Santarius

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fusion materials irradiations at MaRIE's fission fusion facility  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory's proposed signature facility, MaRIE, will provide scientists and engineers with new capabilities for modeling, synthesizing, examining, and testing materials of the future that will enhance the USA's energy security and national security. In the area of fusion power, the development of new structural alloys with better tolerance to the harsh radiation environments expected in fusion reactors will lead to improved safety and lower operating costs. The Fission and Fusion Materials Facility (F{sup 3}), one of three pillars of the proposed MaRIE facility, will offer researchers unprecedented access to a neutron radiation environment so that the effects of radiation damage on materials can be measured in-situ, during irradiation. The calculated radiation damage conditions within the F{sup 3} match, in many respects, that of a fusion reactor first wall, making it well suited for testing fusion materials. Here we report in particular on two important characteristics of the radiation environment with relevancy to radiation damage: the primary knock-on atom spectrum and the impact of the pulse structure of the proton beam on temporal characteristics of the atomic displacement rate. With respect to both of these, analyses show the F{sup 3} has conditions that are consistent with those of a steady-state fusion reactor first wall.

Pitcher, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

Latent Matcher Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Latent Matcher Fusion -- Lessons Learned IAI ... 14 Page 15. The Fusion was in Two Steps • Step 1 – a reduced working candidate list was ...

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor which will be completedDrivers and Reactors for Inertial Confinement Fusion, K.A.

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

THE GENERAL ATOMICS FUSION THEORY PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR GRANT YEAR 2004  

SciTech Connect

The dual objective of the fusion theory program at General Atomics (GA) is to significantly advance our scientific understanding of the physics of fusion plasmas and to support the DIII-D and other tokamak experiments. The program plan is aimed at contributing significantly to the Fusion Energy Science and the Tokamak Concept Improvement goals of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

PROJECT STAFF

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: DOE Fusion Energy Program BY: Dr. Edmund Synakowski, Associate Director Offfice of Fusion Energy Sciences Office of Science

426

PPPL Races Ahead with Fusion Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Power... the Power... PPPL Races Ahead with Fusion Research RESEARCH NEWS FROM PPPL uest Summer 2013, Issue 1 Contents 02 New Paths to Fusion Energy 09 ADVANCING FUSION THEORY 12 ADVANCING PLASMA SCIENCE 15 PARTNERSHIPS & COLLABORATIONS 19 EDUCATION & OUTREACH AWARDS Inside back cover Letter from the Director W elcome to the premiere issue of Quest, the annual magazine of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). We are pleased to provide this news of our strides in advancing research into fusion energy and plasma science-two topics of vital interest to the United States and the world. Fusion powers the sun and stars, and harnessing this power on Earth could provide a safe, clean and virtually limitless way to meet global electricity needs.

427

Nuclear fusion control-oriented plasma physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of control techniques for the efficient and reliable operation of a fusion reactor is one of the most challenging issues nowadays and it would provide great advantages over existing energy sources: Unlimited fuel availability, no greenhouse ... Keywords: fusion control, plasma physics, tokamak modeling and simulation

Aitor J. Garrido; Izaskun Garrido; M. Goretti Sevillano-Berasategui; Mikel Alberdi; Modesto Amundarain; Oscar Barambones; Itziar Martija

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Magnetic Confinement Fusion at the Crossroads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atoll: 15MT yield References - "Dark Sun" by Richard Rhodes, 1995 "History of Soviet Fusion", V = 12m ­ Pfusion = 880 MW Ref: V.D. Shafranov, "History of Soviet Fusion" Physics-Uspekhi 4 835, culminating in TFTR (US), JET (EU), JT-60 (Japan) #12;MGB / UT / 070307 19 1973 Oil Embargo - Energy R

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

429

Synfuel (hydrogen) production from fusion power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A potential use of fusion energy for the production of synthetic fuel (hydrogen) is described. The hybrid-thermochemical bismuth-sulfate cycle is used as a vehicle to assess the technological and economic merits of this potential nonelectric application of fusion power.

Krakowski, R.A.; Cox, K.E.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Booth, L.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fusion reactor design studies. [ARIES Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources. (LSP)

Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

COLLABORATIVE: FUSION SIMULATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, participated in the ���¢��������Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) Planning Activities���¢������� [http://www.pppl.gov/fsp], with C.S. Chang as the institutional PI. FSP���¢��������s mission was to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. Specific institutional goal of the New York University was to participate in the planning of the edge integrated simulation, with emphasis on the usage of large scale HPCs, in connection with the SciDAC CPES project which the PI was leading. New York University successfully completed its mission by participating in the various planning activities, including the edge physics integration, the edge science drivers, and the mathematical verification. The activity resulted in the combined report that can be found in http://www.pppl.gov/fsp/Overview.html. Participation and presentations as part of this project are listed in a separation file.

Chang, Choong Seock

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of “points ” highlighting the strategic-political and militarytechnical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and foster further nuclear proliferation throughout the world. The safety and environmental problems related to the operation of largescale fusion facilities such as ITER (which contain massive amounts of hazardous and/or radioactive materials such as tritium, lithium, and beryllium, as well as neutron-activated structural materials) are not addressed in this paper.

André Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Burnup Analysis of Thorium-Uranium Based Molten Salt Blanket in a Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Technologies: Heating and Fueling / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 2) Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Jing Zhao; Yongwei Yang; Sicong Xiao; Zhiwei Zhou

434

Edmund Synakowski | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Edmund Synakowski About Us Edmund Synakowski - Associate Director, Fusion Energy Science Edmund Synakowski is the Associate Director for Fusion Energy Science in the Office of...

435

Hydrogen production using fusion energy and thermochemical cycles. [Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/-FeO, CrCl/sub 3/-CrCl/sub 2/, and UCl/sub 4/-UCl/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical cycles for the production of synthetic fuels would be especially suited for operation in conjunction with controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors because of the very high temperature energy which such reactors could supply. Furthermore, fusion energy when developed is considered to be an inexhaustable supply of energy. Several high-temperature two-step thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen are examined. A thermodynamic analysis of the Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--FeO, CrCl/sub 3/--CrCl/sub 2/, and UCl/sub 4/--UCl/sub 3/ pairs reveals the feasibility of the process. A more detailed process analysis is given for the Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--FeO system using steam as the heat transfer medium for decomposing the higher valent metal oxide for oxygen production, and hydrolysing the lower oxide for hydrogen production. The steam could be heated to high temperatures by refractory materials absorbing the 14-MeV neutrons in the blanket region of a fusion reactor. Process heat transfer and recovery could be accomplished by regenerative reactors. Proposed operating conditions, the energy balance and the efficiency of the water decomposition process are presented. With a fusion blanket temperature of 2500/sup 0/K, thermal efficiencies for hydrogen production of 74.4% may be obtained.

Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fusion ProgramFusion Program Overview at Los Alamos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p Fusion Energy: Status & Prospects Washington DC Dec. 2, 2009 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated configuration plasma physics with the U of Washington, and field diagnostics to study radiation and plasma power windows ­ May produce technically viable design, but not with desired optimal economic

437

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Z Research: Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Fusion Sun Plasma The ultimate energy source Fusion occurs when two atomic nuclei are joined together. To fuse the atoms, the force that repels them as they come together must be overcome. Accelerators accomplish this by forcing molecules to collide with one another at very high temperatures (high temperatures are simply molecules moving at high speeds). When light nuclei are involved, fusion can produce more energy than was required to start the reaction. This process is the force that powers the Sun, whose source of energy is an ongoing fusion chain reaction. As an unconfined event, fusion was first developed for use in nuclear weapons. Fusion's great potential as a new energy source depends on scientists' ability to harness its power in laboratory events. The Z

438

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2007/08 2 General Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal, and equal to the UK's per capita electricity consumption for 30 years. Figure 2.2: Half a bath and increasing industrialisation, the world is desperate for large amounts of energy generated without greenhouse Introduction 2.1 FUSION ENERGY RESEARCH 2.1.1 FUSION FOR ENERGY PRODUCTION Fusion is the fundamental energy

440

Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2012/13 2 General Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal, and equal to the UK's per capita electricity consumption for 30 years. Figure 2.2: Half a bath). With climate change and the need for increasing energy resources moving to the top of the world's governmental Introduction 2.1 FUSION ENERGY RESEARCH 2.1.1 FUSION FOR ENERGY PRODUCTION Fusion is the fundamental energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fusedweb fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2008/09 2 General Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal, and equal to the UK's per capita electricity consumption for 30 years. Figure 2.2: Half a bath in MAST (right) With climate change and the need for increasing energy resources moving to the top Introduction 2.1 FUSION ENERGY RESEARCH 2.1.1 FUSION FOR ENERGY PRODUCTION Fusion is the fundamental energy

442

Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2011/12 2 General Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal, and equal to the UK's per capita electricity consumption for 30 years. Figure 2.2: Half a bath). With climate change and the need for increasing energy resources moving to the top of the world's governmental Introduction 2.1 FUSION ENERGY RESEARCH 2.1.1 FUSION FOR ENERGY PRODUCTION Fusion is the fundamental energy

443

Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2009/10 2 General Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal, and equal to the UK's per capita electricity consumption for 30 years. Figure 2.2: Half a bath) With climate change and the need for increasing energy resources moving to the top of the world's governmental Introduction 2.1 FUSION ENERGY RESEARCH 2.1.1 FUSION FOR ENERGY PRODUCTION Fusion is the fundamental energy

444

FES Science Network Requirements - Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientificthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedProgram Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences

Dart, Eli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The restructured fusion program and the role of alternative fusion concepts  

SciTech Connect

This testimony to the subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the U.S. House of Representatives`s Committee on Science pushes for about 25% of the fusion budget to go to alternative fusion concepts. These concepts are: low density magnetic confinement, inertial confinement fusion, high density magnetic confinement, and non- thermonuclear and miscellaneous programs. Various aspects of each of these concepts are outlined.

Perkins, L.J.

1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cold Fusion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Science can often result in technologies which can solve energy problems in societies. On March 23, 1989, two scientists Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann claimed… (more)

Chen, Cheng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Heavy-Ion Fusion Science (HIFS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gain of energy. Instead of using enormous lasers (as in laser fusion) or magnets (as in ITER) to cause the fuel pellet to compress, the idea is to use a very high-current particle...

448

Environmental impact of fusion power  

SciTech Connect

From 140th meeting on the American Association for the Advancement of Science; San Francisco, California, USA (24 Feb The environmental effects of fusion power is considered assuming as a typical model a conceptual design for a full-scale fusion power plant. The appraisal indlcates that such a system would yield plentiful, cheap power for all of the world's energy requirements and provide fine solutions to most of the environmental pollution problems if the uncertainties in the plasma physics can be resolved in the fashion that current experiments lead one to expect. (auth)

Fraas, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Non-electrical uses of thermal energy generated in the production of fissile fuel in fusion--fission reactors: a comparative economic parametric analysis for a hybrid with or without synthetic fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A parametric analysis has been carried out for testing the sensitivity of the synfuel production cost in relation to crucial economic and technologic quantities (investment costs of hybrid and synfuel plant, energy multiplication of the fission blanket, recirculating power fraction of the fusion driver, etc.). In addition, a minimum synfuel selling price has been evaluated, from which the fission--fusion--synfuel complex brings about a higher economic benefit than does the fusion--fission hybrid entirely devoted to fissile-fuel and electricity generation. Assuming an electricity cost of 2.7 cents/kWh, an annual investment cost per power unit of 4.2 to 6 $/GJ (132 to 189 k$/MWty) for the fission--fusion complex and 1.5 to 3 $/GJ (47 to 95 k$/MWty) for the synfuel plant, the synfuel production net cost (i.e., revenue = cost) varies between 6.5 and 8.6 $/GJ. These costs can compete with those obtained by other processes (natural gas reforming, resid partial oxidation, coal gasification, nuclear fission, solar electrolysis, etc.). This study points out a potential use of the fusion--fission hybrid other than fissile-fuel and electricity generation.

Tai, A.S.; Krakowski, R.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fusion of visual and thermal signatures with eyeglass removal for robust face recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract – This paper describes a fusion of visual and thermal infrared (IR) images for robust face recognition. Two types of fusion methods are discussed: data fusion and decision fusion. Data fusion produces an illumination-invariant face image by adaptively integrating registered visual and thermal face images. Decision fusion combines matching scores of individual face recognition modules. In the data fusion process, eyeglasses, which block thermal energy, are detected from thermal images and replaced with an eye template. Three fusion-based face recognition techniques are implemented and tested: Data fusion of visual and thermal images (Df), Decision fusion with highest matching score (Fh), and Decision fusion with average matching score (Fa). A commercial face recognition software FaceIt ® is used as an individual recognition module. Comparison results show that fusion-based face recognition techniques outperformed individual visual and thermal face recognizers under illumination variations and facial expressions. I.

Jingu Heo; Seong G. Kong; Besma R. Abidi; Mongi A. Abidi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

International information exchange in fusion research  

SciTech Connect

Formal and informal agreements exist between the US and several other countries, assuring the unrestricted exchange of magnetic fusion information. The Fusion Energy Library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory uses the US Department of Energy standard distribution system and exchange agreements to ensure the receipt of current reports. Selective dissemination of information, computer networks, and exchange programs are additional means for information gathering. The importance of these means as they relate to the fusion program in the US and specifically at ORNL is discussed.

Strickler, C.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

New Theoretical Model of the Complex Edge Region of Fusion Plasmas...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

a high pedestal is required for copious fusion energy production in ITER or a fusion power plant, and (2) the large free energy in the pedestal region can drive instabilities...

453

Improving particle confinement in inertial electrostatic fusion for spacecraft power and propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion energy is attractive for use in future spacecraft because of improved fuel energy density and reduced radioactivity compared with fission power. Unfortunately, the most promising means of generating fusion power on ...

Dietrich, Carl, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

DOE Science Showcase - Clean Fusion Power | OSTI, US Dept of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

projects, and scientific research data related to advanced systems for fusion energy and nuclear power, primary scientific challenges addressed through the Incite...

455

The next logical step in laser-fusion development  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the present and future facilities for laser produced fusion energy. Cost and efficiency is the major underlying topic discussed. (LSP)

Fenstermacher, C.A.; Harris, D.B.; Dudziak, D.J.; McDonald, T.E.; Cartwright, D.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Investing in Fusion Research Crucial to U.S. Competitiveness...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investing in Fusion Research Crucial to U.S. Competitiveness An Interview with Stewart Prager, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory...

457

An Inherently Safe Tandem Mirror Fusion Blanket Concept  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket Design and Evaluation / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

J.K. Garner; C.F. Carson; J.D. Gordon; R.H. Whitley

458

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma...

459

Uncertainties in Liquid Metal Fusion Blanket Design Windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid-Metal Blankets and Magnetohydrodynamic Effects / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

James K. Garner; Mohamed A. Abdou

460

Advanced Materials and Fuels Enabling Future Fusion, Fission and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the future, it is hoped that pure fusion systems can eventually provide for virtually all of our energy needs, while minimizing the types of radioactive wastes that ...

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461

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research> alcator> computers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Useful Links Computer & Data...

462

Influence of projectile - breakup threshold on complete fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete fusion excitations for 11,10B+159Tb have been measured at energies around the respective Coulomb barriers, and the existing complete fusion measurements for 7Li+159Tb have been extended to higher energies. The measurements show significant reduction of complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies for both the reactions, 10B+159Tb and 7Li+159Tb, when compared to those for 11B+159Tb. The comparison shows that the extent of suppression of complete fusion cross sections is correlated with the -separation energies of the projectiles. Also, the two reactions, 10B+159Tb and 7Li+159Tb were found to produce incomplete fusion products at energies near the respective Coulomb barriers, with the - particle emitting channel being the favoured incomplete fusion process in both the cases.

A. Mukherjee; Subinit Roy; M. K. Pradhan; M. Saha Sarkar; P. Basu; B. Dasmahapatra; T. Bhattacharya; S. Bhattacharya; S. K. Basu; A. Chatterjee; V. Tripathi; S. Kailas

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

463

Fusion pumped light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the lasing medium. 3 figs.

Pappas, D.S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fusion pumped light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Fusion for Earth and Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compact reactor concept (Williams, 2007) has the potential to provide clean, safe and unlimited supply of energy for Earth and Space applications. The concept is a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for individual home and space power. The concept also would make it possible for each plant or remote location to have it's own power source, on site, without the need for a connection to the power grid. This would minimize, or eliminate, power blackouts. The concept could replace large fission reactors and fossil fuel power plants plus provide energy for ships, locomotives, trucks and autos. It would make an ideal source of energy for space power applications and for space propulsion.

Williams, Pharis E

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

Fusion-Fission Hybrid Using a D-D Cylindrical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Driver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

George H. Miley; Bradley Boyer

467

Challenges of Fusion Power Plant Licensing: Differences and Commonalities with Existing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety & Environment / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

L. El-Guebaly; L. Cadwallader; W. Sowder; ARIES Team

468

Toward an Integrated Simulation Predictive Capability for Fusion Plasma Chamber Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plants, Demo, and Next Steps / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

A. Ying; M. Narula; M. Abdou; R. Munipalli; M. Ulrickson; P. Wilson

469

Critical Design Issues of the Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER's Fusion Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ITER Systems / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Seokho H. Kim; Jeanette B. Berry

470

Exploration of Clearance Strategy for an Advanced-Fuel Fusion Experimental Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Analysis & Experiments / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

Massimo Zucchetti

471

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) Before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant, Demo, and FNSF / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

Y. K. M. Peng et al.

472

Challenges Surrounding the Injection and Arrival of Targets at LIFE Fusion Chamber Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Robin Miles et al.

473

Assessment of the Surface Source Approach in 3-D Fusion Neutronics Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Analysis & Experiments / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

T. D. Bohm; B. Smith; M. E. Sawan; P. P. H. Wilson

474

Improved Algorithm Speeds Up Fusion Code by a Factor of 5 - NERSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights HPC Requirements...

475

Advanced fission and fossil plant economics-implications for fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order for fusion energy to be a viable option for electric power generation, it must either directly compete with future alternatives or serve as a reasonable backup if the alternatives become unacceptable. This paper discusses projected costs for the most likely competitors with fusion power for baseload electric capacity and what these costs imply for fusion economics. The competitors examined include advanced nuclear fission and advanced fossil-fired plants. The projected costs and their basis are discussed. The estimates for these technologies are compared with cost estimates for magnetic and inertial confinement fusion plants. The conclusion of the analysis is that fusion faces formidable economic competition. Although the cost level for fusion appears greater than that for fission or fossil, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion`s potential competitiveness.

Delene, J.G.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Fudge: a high-bandwidth fusion diagnostic of the NIF  

SciTech Connect

Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)/Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program must include good characterization of the fusion source. Ideally, diagnostics would measure the spatially-resolved history of the fusion reaction rate and temperature. Existing diagnostics can satisfy this goal only partially. One class of new techniques that could play a major role in high-yield diagnostics is measurements based on fusion {gamma} rays. The Fusion Diagnostic Gamma Experiment (FUDGE) can be used to perform energy-resolved measurements of (D,T) fusion reaction rates This diagnostic is based on the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays that are produced by (D,T) fusion. The {gamma} rays are free of spectral dispersion and can be detected with a high bandwidth Cherenkov detector. A simple magnetic monochromator selects signals from the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays and reduces background signals from non-fusion {gamma} rays.

Moran, M. J., LLNL

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

477

The Fast Track to Fusion Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World energy use is predicted to double in the next 40 years. Today, 80% is provided by burning fossil fuels, but this is not sustainable indefinitely because (i) it is driving climate change, and (ii) fossil fuels will eventually be exhausted (starting with oil). The resulting potential energy crisis requires increased investment in energy research and development (which is currently very small on the scale of the $3 trillion p.a. energy market, and falling). The wide portfolio of energy work that should be supported must include fusion, which is one of very few options that are capable in principle of supplying a large fraction of need in an environmentally responsible manner. The case for fusion has been strengthened by recent advances in plasma physics and fusion technology and by studies of fusion power plants that address safety and cost issues. The big questions are, 'How can we deliver fusion power as fast as possible?' and 'How long is it likely to take?' I will review progress in fusion, and argue for a focused fast-track program that could deliver a working prototype power station in less than 30 years.

Smith, Chris Llewellyn (UKAEA, Culham)

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

478

Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Energy and Environment BY: Dr. Edmund Synakowski, Associate Director Offfice of Fusion Energy Sciences Office of Science Subject: DOE Fusion Energy Program...