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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Ignition system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an ignition system of an internal combustion engine which consists of: a permanent magnet supported by a rotary member of the engine adapted to rotate in synchronism with a rotary shaft of the engine; a generating coil for generating an electromotive force to produce an electric current as the permanent magnet acts on the generating coil during the rotation of the rotary member; an ignition capacitor charged by the electric current generated by the generating coil; a thyristor caused to turn on by a counter electromotive force generated by the generating coil to thereby cause the ignition capacitor to begin to discharge; and an ignition coil generating a high voltage as the ignition capacitor begins to discharge, to cause a spark discharge to take place in an ignition plug of the internal combustion engine.

Kondo, T.; Ohno, S.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

2

Thermal ignition combustion system  

SciTech Connect

A thermal ignition combustion system adapted for use with an internal combustion engine is described comprising: (a) means for providing ignition chamber walls defining an ignition chamber, the chamber walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m/sup 0/C. and a specific heat greater than 480J/kg/sup 0/C., the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber; (b) means for maintaining the temperature of the chamber walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel; and (c) means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

4

Thermal ignition combustion system  

SciTech Connect

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

Kamo, Roy (Columbus, IN); Kakwani, Ramesh M. (Columbus, IN); Valdmanis, Edgars (Columbus, IN); Woods, Melvins E. (Columbus, IN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Variable frequency microwave furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Variable frequency microwave furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

Burner ignition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

Carignan, Forest J. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

9

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partners interested in implement- ing United States Patent Number 7,421,166 entitled "Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System." Disclosed in this patent is NETL's laser...

10

Optimized Utility Systems and Furnace Integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMIZED UTILITY SYSTEMS AND FURNACE INTEGRATION A. S. McMullan and H. D. Spriggs, Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, Va. ABSTRACT Conventional process design philosophy usually results in utility systems being designed after process design... defines the Process/Utility interface. Clearly, changing the process design can result in different utility demands and possibly in different utility system designs. This paper presents a procedure, using Pinch Technology, for the simultaneous design...

McMullan, A. S.; Spriggs, H. D.

11

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Distribution and Ignition System Spark Distribution and Ignition System Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implement- ing United States Patent Number 7,421,166 entitled "Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System." Disclosed in this patent is NETL's laser spark distribution and ignition system, which reduces the high-power optical requirements normally needed for such a system by using optical fibers to deliver low-peak-energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. Laser spark generators then produce a high-peak-power laser spark from a single low power pulse. The system has ap- plications in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

12

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet recommends installing waste heat recovery systems for fuel-fired furnaces to increase the energy efficiency of process heating systems.

13

Development of an energy efficient curtain flame ignition system for sintering of iron ore fines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research and Development Centre for Iron and Steel (RDCIS) of Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL) has developed a 'curtain flame' ignition system for sinter mix ignition. Conventionally, either horizontal fired burners or top fired or a combination of both are used for ignition of sinter mix. These burners big in size but few in number are mounted on a rectangular box type furnace. This is associated with non-uniform heating of sinter mix. In the new system, small capacity burners are installed on the roof across the sinter bed in a single row. Here, the top layer of the sinter bed gets heated by the direct impingement of the flame. This has resulted in reduction in specific fuel gas consumption by more than 30% and savings in refractory consumption. Implementation of the system led to reduction in green house gas (GHG) emission also.

V.T. Selvan; T.S. Reddy; A. Das

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Laser ignition of a heterogeneous nickel-aluminum system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ignition of a heterogeneous nickel—aluminum system by laser radiation is investigated experimentally. The ignition characteristics are investigated as a function of ... the samples. It is established that the...

Yu. S. Naiborodenko; V. M. Filatov

15

Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems  

SciTech Connect

Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

Westbrook, C.K.

2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Laser spark distribution and ignition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser spark distribution and ignition system that reduces the high power optical requirements for use in a laser ignition and distribution system allowing for the use of optical fibers for delivering the low peak energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. An optical distributor distributes and delivers optical pumping energy from an optical pumping source to multiple combustion chambers incorporating laser oscillators or laser amplifiers for inducing a laser spark within a combustion chamber. The optical distributor preferably includes a single rotating mirror or lens which deflects the optical pumping energy from the axis of rotation and into a plurality of distinct optical fibers each connected to a respective laser media or amplifier coupled to an associated combustion chamber. The laser spark generators preferably produce a high peak power laser spark, from a single low power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

Woodruff, Steven (Morgantown, WV); McIntyre, Dustin L. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

Ignitor with stable low-energy thermite igniting system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stable compact low-energy igniting system in an ignitor utilizes two components, an initiating charge and an output charge. The initiating charge is a thermite in ultra-fine powder form compacted to 50-70% of theoretical maximum density and disposed in a cavity of a header of the ignitor adjacent to an electrical ignition device, or bridgewire, mounted in the header cavity. The initiating charge is ignitable by operation of the ignition device in a hot-wire mode. The output charge is a thermite in high-density consoladated form compacted to 90-99% of theoretical maximum density and disposed adjacent to the initiating charge on an opposite end thereof from the electrical ignition device and ignitable by the initiating charge. A sleeve is provided for mounting the output charge to the ignitor header with the initiating charge confined therebetween in the cavity.

Kelly, Michael D. (West Alexandria, OH); Munger, Alan C. (Miamisburg, OH)

1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Status Of The National Ignition Campaign And National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that will contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an object-oriented, CORBA-based system distributed among over 1800 frontend processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. In the fall of 2010, a set of experiments began with deuterium and tritium filled targets as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). At present, all 192 laser beams routinely fire to target chamber center to conduct fusion and high energy density experiments. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of cryogenic target system and over 20 diagnostic systems to support fusion experiments were deployed and utilized in experiments in the past year. This talk discusses the current status of the NIC and the plan for controls and information systems to support these experiments on the path to ignition.

Lagin, L; Brunton, G; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Fisher, J; Fishler, B; Ludwigsen, P; Marshall, C; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Townsend, S

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

Molten metal holder furnace and casting system incorporating the molten metal holder furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom heated holder furnace (12) for containing a supply of molten metal includes a storage vessel (30) having sidewalls (32) and a bottom wall (34) defining a molten metal receiving chamber (36). A furnace insulating layer (42) lines the molten metal receiving chamber (36). A thermally conductive heat exchanger block (54) is located at the bottom of the molten metal receiving chamber (36) for heating the supply of molten metal. The heat exchanger block (54) includes a bottom face (65), side faces (66), and a top face (67). The heat exchanger block (54) includes a plurality of electrical heaters (70) extending therein and projecting outward from at least one of the faces of the heat exchanger block (54), and further extending through the furnace insulating layer (42) and one of the sidewalls (32) of the storage vessel (30) for connection to a source of electrical power. A sealing layer (50) covers the bottom face (65) and side faces (66) of the heat exchanger block (54) such that the heat exchanger block (54) is substantially separated from contact with the furnace insulating layer (42).

Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

20

Laser ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to their thermodynamic benefits, second-generation spark-ignition engines with gasoline direct injection systems have ... combination of a spray-guided combustion process with laser-induced ignition allows th...

Bernhard Geringer; Dominikus Klawatsch; Josef Graf; Hans Peter Lenz…

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Railplug Ignition System for Enhanced Engine Performance and Reduced Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress that was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project. The primary objectives of the project were to (1) develop an improved understanding of the spark ignition process, and (2) develop the railplug as an improved ignitor for large bore stationary natural gas engines. We performed fundamental experiments on the physical processes occurring during spark ignition and used the results from these experiments to aid our development of the most complete model of the spark ignition process ever devised. The elements in this model include (1) the dynamic response of the ignition circuit, (2) a chemical kinetics mechanism that is suitable for the reactions that occur in the plasma, (3) conventional flame propagation kinetics, and (4) a multi-dimensional formulation so that bulk flow through the spark gap can be incorporated. This model (i.e., a Fortran code that can be used as a subroutine within an engine modeling code such as KIVA) can be obtained from Prof. Ron Matthews at rdmatt{at}mail.utexas.edu or Prof. DK Ezekoye at dezekoye{at}mail.utexas.edu. Fundamental experiments, engine experiments, and modeling tasks were used to help develop the railplug as a new ignitor for large bore natural gas engines. As the result of these studies, we developed a railplug that could extend the Lean Stability Limit (LSL) of an engine operating at full load on natural gas from {phi} = 0.59 for operation on spark plugs down to {phi} = 0.53 using railplugs with the same delivered energy (0.7 J). However, this delivered energy would rapidly wear out the spark plug. For a conventional delivered energy (<0.05 J), the LSL is {phi} = 0.63 for a spark plug. Further, using a permanent magnet to aid the plasma movement, the LSL was extended to {phi} = 0.54 for a railplug with a delivered energy of only 0.15 J/shot, a typical discharge energy for commercial capacitive discharge ignition systems. Here, it should be noted that railplugs and the associated ignition circuit should not cost much more than a conventional spark ignition system. Additionally, it is believed that the railplug performance can be further improved via continued research and development.

DK Ezekoye; Matt Hall; Ron Matthews

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Exergy Analysis and Energy-Saving Evaluation of the Fuming Furnace Device in SKS Lead Smelting System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To highlight the energy-saving feature of the integral device of fuming furnace and waste heat boiler(referred to as ¡°the fuming furnace device¡± for short) in the Shuikoushan lead smelting system (hereinafter referred to as SKS system) and to ... Keywords: SKS lead smelting, fuming furnace, waste heat boiler, exergy analysis, energy-saving

Jiang Aihua; Mei Chi; Shi Zhangming; Wang Hongcai; Yu Huang; Zhu Xiaojun

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In two embodiments the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion

24

National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Cryogenic Target Handling Systems (NCTS) Program, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NCTS. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan (PEP) for NCTS has been initiated, and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National Ignition Facility is a multi-megajoule laser facility being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) by performing experiments studying weapons physics, including fusion ignition. NIF also supports the missions of weapons effects, inertial fusion energy, and basic science in high-energy-density physics. NIF will be operated by LLNL under contract to the University of California (UC) as a national user facility. NIF is a low-hazard, radiological facility, and its operation will meet all applicable federal, state, and local Environmental Safety & Health (ES&H) requirements. The NCTS Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NIF Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan. Overall scope content and execution schedules for the High Energy Density Physics Campaign (SSP Campaign 10) are currently undergoing rebaselining and will be brought into alignment with resources expected to be available throughout the NNSA Future Years National Security Plan (FYNSP). The revised schedule for delivering this system will be decided at the national level, based on experiment campaign requirement dates that will be derived through this process. The current milestone date for achieving indirect-drive ignition on the NIF is December 2010. Maintaining this milestone requires that the cryogenic systems be complete and available for fielding experiments early enough that the planned experimental campaigns leading up to ignition can be carried out. The capability of performing non-ignition cryogenic experiments is currently required by March 2006, when the NIF's first cluster of beams is operational. Plans for cryogenic and non-cryogenic experiments on the NIF are contained in NNSA's Campaign 10 Program Plans for Ignition (MTE 10.1) and High Energy Density Sciences (MTE 10.2). As described in this document, the NCTS Program Manager is responsible for managing NIF Cryogenic Target Systems development, engineering, and deployment. Through the NIF Director, the NCTS Program Manager will put in place an appropriate Program Execution Plan (draft attached) at a later time consistent with the maturing and funding these efforts. The PEP will describe management methods for carrying out these activities.

Warner, B

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Ceramic Waste Heat Recovery System on a Rotary Forge Furnace: An Installation and Operating History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy duty high temperature ceramic tube recuperator and five high temperature recirculating burners. The energy conservation system was retrofitted onto a rotary hearth furnace with an inside diameter of 11' 5'' (3.5m) and an available hearth area...

Young, S. B.; Campbell, T. E.; Worstell, T. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effect of ignition location on the in-process removal of combustion deposits from the output window of a gas turbine laser ignition system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of ignition location on the effectiveness of combustion deposit removal from the reverse side of an optical window in a laser ignition system for use in gas turbines is presented. Such deposits consist of carbon and other by-products which accumulate on the walls of the chamber as a result of incomplete combustion. In laser based ignition systems this accumulation of combustion deposits has the potential to reduce the transmissive properties of the output window required for transmission of the laser radiation into the combustion chamber, adversely affecting the likelihood of successful ignition. In this work, a full empirical study into the in-process removal of combustion deposits from the reverse side of the optical window in a laser ignition system using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is presented, with an emphasis on the effect of ignition location on the effectiveness of combustion deposit removal. In addition, the mechanism of deposit removal is discussed.

J. Griffiths; J. Lawrence; P. Fitzsimons

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Target diagnostic system for the national ignition facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect

A review of recent progress on the design of a diagnostic system proposed for ignition target experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be presented. This diagnostic package contains an extensive suite of optical, x ray, gamma ray, and neutron diagnostics that enable measurements of the performance of both direct and indirect driven NIF targets. The philosophy used in designing all of the diagnostics in the set has emphasized redundant and independent measurement of fundamental physical quantities relevant to the operation of the NIF target. A unique feature of these diagnostics is that they are being designed to be capable of operating in the high radiation, electromagnetic pulse, and debris backgrounds expected on the NIF facility. The diagnostic system proposed can be categorized into three broad areas: laser characterization, hohlraum characterization, and capsule performance diagnostics. The operating principles of a representative instrument from each class of diagnostic employed in this package will be summarized and illustrated with data obtained in recent prototype diagnostic tests. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Leeper, R.J.; Chandler, G.A.; Cooper, G.W.; Derzon, M.S.; Fehl, D.L.; Hebron, D.E.; Moats, A.R.; Noack, D.D.; Porter, J.L.; Ruggles, L.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Torres, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Cable, M.D.; Bell, P.M.; Clower, C.A.; Hammel, B.A.; Kalantar, D.H.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Lee, F.D.; Lerche, R.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Moran, M.J.; Nelson, M.B.; Olson, W.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Phillips, T.W.; Ress, D.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Trebes, J.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bartlett, R.J.; Berggren, R.; Caldwell, S.E.; Chrien, R.E.; Failor, B.H.; Fernandez, J.C.; Hauer, A.; Idzorek, G.; Hockaday, R.G.; Murphy, T.J.; Oertel, J.; Watt, R.; Wilke, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bradley, D.K.; Knauer, J. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Petrasso, R.D.; Li, C.K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility Loads Speaker(s): Bert Phillips Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: James Lutz Bert Phillips will talk about the impact of forced air system blower performance on furnace or heating performance and on utility loads, and what can be done to reduce blower power requirements. He will also briefly discuss a ground source heat pump monitoring study that he just finished. Mr. Phillips is a registered Professional Engineer in three Canadian provinces and part owner of UNIES Ltd., an engineering firm in Winnipeg, Manitoba (60 miles straight north of the North Dakota/Minnesota border). He does research and HVAC system design and investigates

30

Programmable Beam Spatial Shaping System for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A system of customized spatial light modulators has been installed onto the front end of the laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The devices are capable of shaping the beam profile at a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain. Their primary function is to introduce 'blocker' obscurations at programmed locations within the beam profile. These obscurations are positioned to shadow small, isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. The modulators were designed to enable a drop-in retrofit of each of the 48 existing Pre Amplifier Modules (PAMs) without compromising their original performance specifications. This was accomplished by use of transmissive Optically Addressable Light Valves (OALV) based on a Bismuth Silicon Oxide photoconductive layer in series with a twisted nematic liquid crystal (LC) layer. These Programmable Spatial Shaper packages in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy have provided a robust approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics on NIF.

Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Scanlan, M; Haynam, C; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Budge, T; Henesian, M; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J M

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

Final Scientific and Technical Report - Practical Fiber Delivered Laser Ignition Systems for Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Research has characterized advanced kagome fiber optics for their use in laser ignition systems. In comparison to past fibers used in laser ignition, these fibers have the important advantage of being relatively bend-insensitivity, so that they can be bent and coiled without degradation of output energy or beam quality. The results are very promising for practical systems. For pulse durations of ~12 ns, the fibers could deliver >~10 mJ pulses before damage onset. A study of pulse duration showed that by using longer pulse duration (~20 – 30 ns), it is possible to carry even higher pulse energy (by factor of ~2-3) which also provides future opportunities to implement longer duration sources. Beam quality measurements showed nearly single-mode output from the kagome fibers (i.e. M2 close to 1) which is the optimum possible value and, combined with their high pulse energy, shows the suitability of the fibers for laser ignition. Research has also demonstrated laser ignition of an engine including reliable (100%) ignition of a single-cylinder gasoline engine using the laser ignition system with bent and coiled kagome fiber. The COV of IMEP was <2% which is favorable for stable engine operation. These research results, along with the continued reduction in cost of laser sources, support our commercial development of practical laser ignition systems.

Yalin, Azer [Seaforth, LLC

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Target diagnostic system for the national ignition facility (invited) R. J. Leeper, G. A. Chandler, G. W. Cooper, M. S. Derzon, D. L. Fehl, D. E. Hebron,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a glass laser which will initially be used to demonstrate ignition and gain in an inertially confinedTarget diagnostic system for the national ignition facility (invited) R. J. Leeper, G. A. Chandler of a diagnostic system proposed for ignition target experiments on the National Ignition Facility NIF

36

Thermal-destruction products of coal in the blast-furnace gas-purification system  

SciTech Connect

The lean, poorly clinkering coal and anthracite used to replace coke in blast furnaces has a considerable content of volatile components (low-molecular thermaldestruction products), which enter the water and sludge of the blast-furnace gas-purification system as petroleum products. Therefore, it is important to study the influence of coal on the petroleum-product content in the water and sludge within this system. The liberation of primary thermal-destruction products is investigated for anthracite with around 4 wt % volatiles, using a STA 449C Jupiter thermoanalyzer equipped with a QMC 230 mass spectrometer. The thermoanalyzer determines small changes in mass and thermal effects with high accuracy (weighing accuracy 10{sup -8} g; error in measuring thermal effects 1 mV). This permits experiments with single layers of coal particles, eliminating secondary reactions of its thermal-destruction products.

A.M. Amdur; M.V. Shibanova; E.V. Ental'tsev [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Russia Institute of Metallurgy

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fast Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ignition. The approach being taken by the National Ignition Facility to achieve thermonuclear ignition and burn is called the "central hot spot" scenario. This technique relies...

38

Advanced furnace air staging and burner modifications for ultra-low NOx firing systems  

SciTech Connect

Overfire air is an effective means to reduce NOx emissions from coal fired furnaces. The current range of overfire air usage on wall-fired boilers in the US is in the range of 10 to 20%. In most cases this is enough to achieve current Title IV NOx reduction requirements. Future applications are likely to go beyond 20% Overfire Air to reduce NOx further for lower investment and operating costs of SCR retrofits. Summer ozone reduction requires NOx emissions of 0.15 lb/MBtu. Currently, industry is exploring the conditions under which this goal is attainable. The paper discussed the approach to achieve ultra-low NOx emissions by using advanced furnace air staging. It describes the unique approach of redesigning the burner to maintain low NOx burner performance when the overfire air system is added or increased in capacity. The impact on furnace corrosion and unburned carbon losses are presented. A case study is used to show the effects of overfire air both on emissions and unburned carbon.

McCarthy, K.; Laux, S.; Grusha, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a 3-year research program conducted by the Engines & Energy Conversion Laboratory (EECL) at Colorado State University (CSU) to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. Research activities for the overall program were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. An extensive state-of-art review was conducted to leverage the existing body of knowledge of micropilot ignition with respect to retrofit applications. Additionally, commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of micropilot ignition for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios under laboratory conditions at the EECL. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase I were to develop a single-cylinder test chamber to study the injection of pilot fuel into a combustion cylinder and to develop, install and test a multi-cylinder micropilot ignition system for a 4-cylinder, natural gas test engine. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support these two (2) primarily elements in a stepwise fashion. Task-specific approaches and results are documented in this report. The four-cylinder prototype data was encouraging for the micro-pilot ignition technology when compared to spark ignition. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system at the EECL for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase II were to evaluate the results for the 4-cylinder system prototype developed for Phase I, then optimize this system and prepare the technology for the field demonstration phase in Year 3. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support objectives in a stepwise fashion. The optimized four-cylinder system data demonstrated significant progress compared to Phase I results, as well as traditional spark ignition systems. These laboratory results were enhanced, then verified via a field demonstration project during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program. An Implementation Team of qualified engine retrofit service providers was assembled to install the retrofit micropilot ignition system on an engine operated by El Paso Pipeline Group at a compressor station near Window Rock, Arizona. Testing of this demonstration unit showed that the same benefits identified by laboratory testing at CSU, i.e., reduced fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (NOx, THC, CO, and CH2O). Commercialization of the retrofit micropilot ignition technology is awaiting a ''market pull'', which is expected to materialize as the results of the field demonstration become known and accepted. The Implementation Team, comprised of Woodward Governor Company, Enginuity LLC, Hoerbiger Corporation of America, and DigiCon Inc., has direct experience with the technology development and implementation, and stands ready to promote and commercialize the retrofit micropilot ignition system.

Scott Chase; Daniel Olsen; Ted Bestor

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM-PHASE I  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the first year's effort towards a 3-year program to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. In essence, all Phase I goals and objectives were met. We intend to proceed with the Phase II research plan, as set forth by the applicable Research Management Plan. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of micropilot ignition for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase I were to develop a single-cylinder test chamber to study the injection of pilot fuel into a combustion cylinder and to develop, install and test a multi-cylinder micropilot ignition system for a 4-cylinder, natural gas test engine. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support these two (2) primarily elements in a stepwise fashion. Task-specific approaches and results are documented in this report. Research activities for Micropilot Phase I were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are expected to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. An extensive state-of-art review was conducted to leverage the existing body of knowledge of micropilot ignition with respect to retrofit applications. Additionally, commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. The four-cylinder prototype data was encouraging for the micro-pilot ignition technology when compared to spark ignition. Initial testing results showed: (1) Brake specific fuel consumption of natural gas was improved from standard spark ignition across the map, 1% at full load and 5% at 70% load. (2) 0% misfires for all points on micropilot ignition. Fuel savings were most likely due to this percent misfire improvement. (3) THC (Total Hydrocarbon) emissions were improved significantly at light load, 38% at 70% load. (4) VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) emissions were improved above 80% load. (5) Coefficient of Variance for the IMEP (Indicated Mean Effective Pressure) was significantly less at lower loads, 76% less at 70%. These preliminary results will be substantiated and enhanced during Phase II of the Micropilot Ignition program.

Ted Bestor

2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. The beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being recombined with the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

44

The National Ignition Facility: The world's largest optical system  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 192-beam fusion laser, is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with an expected completion in 2008. The facility contains 7,456 meter-scale optics for amplification, beam steering, vacuum barriers, focusing, polarization rotation, and wavelength conversion. A multiphase program was put in place to increase the monthly optical manufacturing rate by up to 20x while simultaneously reducing cost by up to 3x through a sub-scale development, full-scale facilitization, and a pilot production phase. Currently 80% of the optics are complete with over 50% installed. In order to manufacture the high quality optics at desired manufacturing rate of over 100 precision optics per month, new more deterministic advanced fabrication technologies had to be employed over those used to manufacture previous fusion lasers.

Stolz, C J

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Trends in furnace control  

SciTech Connect

This paper relates Italimpianti's experiences over the past few years in the area of control of reheat furnaces for the steel industry. The focus is on the level 1 area; specifically on the use of PLC-based systems to perform both combustion control and mechanical/hydraulic control. Some topics to be discussed are: overview of reheat furnace control system requirements; PLC only control vs separate PLC and DCS systems; PLC hardware requirements; man machine interface (MMI) requirements; purge, light-on and safety logic; implementation of more sophisticated level 1 control algorithms; furnace temperature optimization: look up tables vs full thermal modeling; and recent trends including integrated PLC/DCS system.

McDonald, T.J.; Keefe, M.D. (Italimpianti of America, Inc., Coraopolis, PA (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Dept.)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A microprocessor-based data acquisition and instrumentation system for the control of a rice-husk furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of efficient combustion systems burning solid agricultural wastes for heat and power generation requires well designed microprocessor-controlled systems. This paper describes the development of a cost-effective system to control the stable and clean combustion of rice husks in a vertical cyclone furnace. Such a system is shown to be economically feasible.

Mashkuri Yaacob; Baharuddin Ali

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

WaterFurnace Renewable Energy Inc formerly WaterFurnace Industries Inc WFI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WaterFurnace Renewable Energy Inc formerly WaterFurnace Industries Inc WFI WaterFurnace Renewable Energy Inc formerly WaterFurnace Industries Inc WFI Jump to: navigation, search Name WaterFurnace Renewable Energy Inc (formerly: WaterFurnace Industries, Inc (WFI)) Place Indiana Zip 46809 Sector Geothermal energy Product WaterFurnace develops and manufactures geothermal heating and cooling systems. References WaterFurnace Renewable Energy Inc (formerly: WaterFurnace Industries, Inc (WFI))[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. WaterFurnace Renewable Energy Inc (formerly: WaterFurnace Industries, Inc (WFI)) is a company located in Indiana . References ↑ "WaterFurnace Renewable Energy Inc (formerly: WaterFurnace Industries, Inc (WFI))"

48

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable...

49

Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the above premise. The application of vortex stabilized high intensity burners for reformer furnaces in the petrochemical industry is then reviewed and emphasized....

Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection System Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection System Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment June 2000 U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein

51

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In the embodiment of the invention claimed herein, the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being combined with either the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Target Diagnostic Control System Implementation for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Windows XP processor and Java application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in XML. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

Shelton, R T; Kamperschroer, J H; Lagin, L J; Nelson, J R; O'Brien, D W

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

54

Tube furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

Foster, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA); Frohwein, Eugene J. (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Bowen, David W. (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Control System For Cryogenic THD Layering At The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world largest and most energetic laser system for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In 2010, NIF began ignition experiments using cryogenically cooled targets containing layers of the tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) fuel. The 75 {micro}m thick layer is formed inside of the 2 mm target capsule at temperatures of approximately 18 K. The ICF target designs require sub-micron smoothness of the THD ice layers. Formation of such layers is still an active research area, requiring a flexible control system capable of executing the evolving layering protocols. This task is performed by the Cryogenic Target Subsystem (CTS) of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The CTS provides cryogenic temperature control with the 1 mK resolution required for beta-layering and for the thermal gradient fill of the capsule. The CTS also includes a 3-axis x-ray radiography engine for phase contrast imaging of the ice layers inside of the plastic and beryllium capsules. In addition to automatic control engines, CTS is integrated with the Matlab interactive programming environment to allow flexibility in experimental layering protocols. The CTS Layering Matlab Toolbox provides the tools for layer image analysis, system characterization and cryogenic control. The CTS Layering Report tool generates qualification metrics of the layers, such as concentricity of the layer and roughness of the growth boundary grooves. The CTS activities are automatically coordinated with other NIF controls in the carefully orchestrated NIF Shot Sequence.

Fedorov, M; Blubaugh, J; Edwards, O; Mauvais, M; Sanchez, R; Wilson, B

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

56

Furnace assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

Panayotou, Nicholas F. (Kennewick, WA); Green, Donald R. (Richland, WA); Price, Larry S. (Pittsburg, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Furnace and Boiler Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

either hot water or steam for heating. Furnaces Furnaces are the most common heating systems used in homes in the United States. They can be all electric, gas-fired (including...

58

Use of the target diagnostic control system in the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated, time resolved and gated X-ray sensors, laser velocity interferometry, and neutron time of flight. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions have been developed. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Window XP processor and Java application. Instruments are aggregated as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. During the past several years, over thirty-six diagnostics have been deployed using this architecture in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The DCS architecture facilitates the expected additions and upgrades to diagnostics as more experiments are performed. This paper presents the DCS architecture, framework and our experiences in using it during the NIC to operate, upgrade and maintain a large set of diagnostic instruments.

Shelton, R; Lagin, L; Nelson, J

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

59

Furnaces and Boilers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces and Boilers June 24, 2012 - 4:56pm Addthis Upgrading to a high efficiency furnace or boiler is an effective way to save money on home heating. Upgrading to a high efficiency furnace or boiler is an effective way to save money on home heating. What does this mean for me? To maintain your heating system's efficiency and ensure healthy indoor air quality, it's critical to maintain the unit and its venting mechanism. Proper maintenance extends the life of your furnace or boiler and saves you money. Most U.S. homes are heated with either furnaces or boilers. Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through the house using ducts. Boilers heat water, and provide either hot water or steam for heating. Steam is distributed via pipes to steam radiators, and hot water can be distributed

60

Direct thermal to electrical energy conversion using very low bandgap TPV cells in a gas-fired furnace system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, electricity generation using very low bandgap InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells whose bandgap is 0.53 eV was investigated in a gas-fired furnace system where thermal radiation was emitted from a metal alloy emitter. The electric output of the InGaAsSb TPV cells was characterized under various operating conditions. The cell short circuit density was measured to be 3.01 A/cm2 at an emitter temperature of 1197 °C. At this emitter temperature, an electric power density of 0.65 W/cm2 was produced by the TPV cells. Experimental results show that direct thermal to electrical energy conversion was achieved in a gas-fired heating furnace system. Such a system could be employed to form a micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) process where exhaust heat is utilized for home heating needs. The TPV integrated energy system provides an effective means for primary energy savings.

K. Qiu; A.C.S. Hayden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Furnaces | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Add description List of Furnaces Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFurnaces&oldid267167" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

62

2011 Status of the Automatic Alignment System for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Automated alignment for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is accomplished using a large-scale parallel control system that directs 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path. The beams are then focused down to a 50-micron spot in the middle of the target chamber. The entire process is completed in less than 50 minutes. The alignment system commands 9,000 stepping motors for highly accurate adjustment of mirrors and other optics. 41 control loops per beamline perform parallel processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze high-resolution images of the beams and their references. This paper describes the status the NIF automatic alignment system and the challenges encountered as NIF development has transitioned from building the laser, to becoming a research project supporting a 24 hour, 7 day laser facility. NIF is now a continuously operated system where performance monitoring is increasingly more critical for operation, maintenance, and commissioning tasks. Equipment wear and the effects of high energy neutrons from fusion experiments are issues which alter alignment efficiency and accuracy. New sensors needing automatic alignment assistance are common. System modifications to improve efficiency and accuracy are prevalent. Handling these evolving alignment and maintenance needs while minimizing the impact on NIF experiment schedule is expected to be an on-going challenge for the planned 30 year operational life of NIF.

Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Burkhart, S; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V M; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; Wilson, R

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

COTTON WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS WITH IGNITE. P. A. Dotray, T. A. Baughman, K.M McCormick, and J. W. Keeling. Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Lubbock;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COTTON WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS WITH IGNITE. P. A. Dotray, T. A. Baughman, K.M McCormick, and J. WLink cotton will be an option for growers in 2004. Ignite is a postemergence herbicide that has broad that has limited systemic movement in plants. Previous studies have shown that cotton tolerance to Ignite

Mukhtar, Saqib

64

Integrated emissions control system for residential CWS furnace. Annual status report number 1, 20 September 1989--30 September 1990  

SciTech Connect

One of the major obstacles to the successful development and commercialization of a coal-fired residential furnace is the need for a reliable, cost-effective emission control system. Tecogen Inc. is developing a novel, integrated emission control system to control NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. A reactor provides high sorbent particle residence time within the reactor to control SO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a means of extracting a substantial amount of the particulates present in the combustion gases. Final cleanup of any flyash exiting the reactor is completed with the use of high-efficiency bag filters. Tecogen Inc. developed a residential-scale Coal Water Slurry (CWS) combustor which makes use of centrifugal forces to separate and confine larger unburned coal particles in the furnace upper chamber. Various partitions are used to retard the axial, downward flow of these particles, and thus maximize their residence time in the hottest section of the combustor. By operating this combustor under staged conditions, the local stoichiometry in the primary zone can be controlled to minimize NO{sub x} emissions. During the first year of the program, work encompassed a literature search, developing an analytical model of the SO{sub 2} reactor, fabricating and assembling the initial prototype components, testing the prototype component, and estimating the operating and manufacturing costs.

Balsavich, J.C.; Breault, R.W.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ignition Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Experiments The goal of many NIF experiments is to create a self-sustaining "burn" of fusion fuel (the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium) that produces as much or...

66

Ignition reactor and pump pulse parameters in a reactor–laser system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experience gained in operating a demonstration nuclear-pumped laser in stand B (Physics and Power- Engineering Institute (FEI)) with a pulsed ignition reactor based on the 235U BARS-6 reactor is analyzed. It ...

P. P. D’yachenko; G. N. Fokin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Performance Improvements to the Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A team headed by LANL and including many members from LLNL and NSTec LO and NSTec LAO fielded a neutron imaging system (NIS) at the National Ignition Facility at the start of 2011. The NIS consists of a pinhole array that is located 32.5 cm from the source and that creates an image of the source in a segmented scintillator 28 m from the source. The scintillator is viewed by two gated, optical imaging systems: one that is fiber coupled, and one that is lens coupled. While there are a number of other pieces to the system related to pinhole alignment, collimation, shielding and data acquisition, those pieces are discussed elsewhere and are not relevant here. The system is operational and has successfully obtained data on more that ten imaging shots. This remainder of this whitepaper is divided in five main sections. In Section II, we identify three critical areas of improvement that we believe should be pursued to improve the performance of the system for future experiments: spatial resolution, temporal response and signal-to-noise ratio. In Section III, we discuss technologies that could be used to improve these critical performance areas. In Section IV, we describe a path to evolve the current system to achieve improved performance with minimal impact on the ability of the system to operate on shots. In Section V, we discuss the abilities, scope and timescales of the current teams and the Commissariat energie atomique (CEA). In Section VI, we summarize and make specific recommendations for collaboration on improvements to the NIS.

Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Hatarik, R; Merrill, F E; Grim, G P; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C; Landoas, O; Caillaud, T; Bourgade, J; Buckles, R A; Lee, J; Weiss, P B

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

68

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science What  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is NiF? the national ignition Facility: bringing star Power to earth The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and highest energy laser system. NIF is an...

69

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program Hot Oxygen Injection Into The Blast Furnace  

SciTech Connect

Increased levels of blast furnace coal injection are needed to further lower coke requirements and provide more flexibility in furnace productivity. The direct injection of high temperature oxygen with coal in the blast furnace blowpipe and tuyere offers better coal dispersion at high local oxygen concentrations, optimizing the use of oxygen in the blast furnace. Based on pilot scale tests, coal injection can be increased by 75 pounds per ton of hot metal (lb/thm), yielding net savings of $0.84/tm. Potential productivity increases of 15 percent would yield another $1.95/thm. In this project, commercial-scale hot oxygen injection from a ''thermal nozzle'' system, patented by Praxair, Inc., has been developed, integrated into, and demonstrated on two tuyeres of the U.S. Steel Gary Works no. 6 blast furnace. The goals were to evaluate heat load on furnace components from hot oxygen injection, demonstrate a safe and reliable lance and flow control design, and qualitatively observe hot oxygen-coal interaction. All three goals have been successfully met. Heat load on the blowpipe is essentially unchanged with hot oxygen. Total heat load on the tuyere increases about 10% and heat load on the tuyere tip increases about 50%. Bosh temperatures remained within the usual operating range. Performance in all these areas is acceptable. Lance performance was improved during testing by changes to lance materials and operating practices. The lance fuel tip was changed from copper to a nickel alloy to eliminate oxidation problems that severely limited tip life. Ignition flow rates and oxygen-fuel ratios were changed to counter the effects of blowpipe pressure fluctuations caused by natural resonance and by coal/coke combustion in the tuyere and raceway. Lances can now be reliably ignited using the hot blast as the ignition source. Blowpipe pressures were analyzed to evaluate ht oxygen-coal interactions. The data suggest that hot oxygen increases coal combustion in the blow pipe and tuyere by 30, in line with pilot scale tests conducted previously.

Michael F. Riley

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fast Ignition Program Presented at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser drive Direct Laser drive #12;Fast Ignition may allow longer wavelength laser implosion systemsFast Ignition Program Presented at FESAC Development Path Panel General Atomics January 14, 2003 E. Michael Campbell ·Promise ·Status ·Challenges ·Implementation ·Plan #12;The original FI concept uses laser

71

Thermal Imaging Control of Furnaces and Combustors  

SciTech Connect

The object if this project is to demonstrate and bring to commercial readiness a near-infrared thermal imaging control system for high temperature furnaces and combustors. The thermal imaging control system, including hardware, signal processing, and control software, is designed to be rugged, self-calibrating, easy to install, and relatively transparent to the furnace operator.

David M. Rue; Serguei Zelepouga; Ishwar K. Puri

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Furnace and Boiler Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Furnace and Boiler Basics Furnace and Boiler Basics Furnace and Boiler Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:50pm Addthis Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts; boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Furnaces Furnaces are the most common heating systems used in homes in the United States. They can be all electric, gas-fired (including propane or natural gas), or oil-fired. Boilers Boilers consist of a vessel or tank where heat produced from the combustion of such fuels as natural gas, fuel oil, or coal is used to generate hot water or steam. Many buildings have their own boilers, while other buildings have steam or hot water piped in from a central plant. Commercial boilers are manufactured for high- or low-pressure applications.

73

List of Furnaces Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Furnaces Incentives Furnaces Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 688 Furnaces Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-688) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Furnaces Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Roofs Windows Yes AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit

74

A polar-drive shock-ignition design for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007)] is being pursued as a viable option to achieve ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Shock-ignition target designs use a high-intensity laser spike at the end of a low-adiabat assembly pulse to launch a spherically convergent strong shock to ignite the hot spot of an imploding capsule. A shock-ignition target design for the NIF is presented. One-dimensional simulations indicate an ignition threshold factor of 4.1 with a gain of 58. A polar-drive beam-pointing configuration for shock-ignition experiments on the NIF at 750 kJ is proposed. The capsule design is shown to be robust to the various one- and two-dimensional effects and nonuniformities anticipated on the NIF. The target is predicted to ignite with a gain of 38 when including all anticipated levels of nonuniformity and system uncertainty.

Anderson, K. S.; McKenty, P. W.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Shvydky, A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States) [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Theobald, W.; Lafon, M.; Nora, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States) [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Paired Straight Hearth Furnace  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A coal based dri and molten metal process for long range replacement of blast furnaces and coke ovens

76

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R D plan to develop the concept further. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Heat treatment furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a step towards laser fusion ignition, Nature, 412 (2001),tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisionedmodified. Full scale fast ignition laser systems of 100 kJ

Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

Sopori, Bhushan L.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Laboratory Induction Furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... supplied at 10,000 volts by a suitable transformer. It is controlled either by a contactor or by push buttons on the furnace table.

1930-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

Condensing heat exchanger systems for residential/commercial furnaces and boilers. Phase IV  

SciTech Connect

The development of condensing heat exchanger systems is studied. In the work reported here, the focus is on the corrosion resistance of materials to condensate produced by gas-fired heating equipment, and the characterization of the spatial variation of condensation corrosivity in condensing heat exchangers.

Razgaitis, R.; Payer, J.H.; Talbert, S.G.; Hindin, B.; White, E.L.; Locklin, D.W.; Cudnik, R.A.; Stickford, G.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Performance and exhaust emissions of a two-stroke spark-ignition engine with a direct-injection system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A direct fuel-injection system has been adapted to a small two-stroke spark-ignition engine to prevent the charge from flowing through the cylinder during the scavenging process. The injection system consists of a jerk-type pump and a single-hole nozzle which supplies gasoline to the cylinder. Engine tests were carried out for comparison with the carburettor version of the same engine. The results show that the direct-injection version can achieve greatly improved thermal efficiency and lower HC and CO emissions without intake throttling. In addition, NOx can be reduced to a much lower level than that of the ordinary four-stroke engine. Heat release analysis and high-speed photography indicate that stratified charge combustion takes place in the direct-injection engine.

Yasuhiro Daisho; Takeshi Saito; Noriaki Ishibe; Mitsuhiro Tsukada; Masashi Yukawa

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Near-frictionless carbon coatings for spark-ignited direct-injected fuel systems. Final report, January 2002.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an investigation by the Tribology Section of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) into the use of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coatings for spark-ignited, direct-injected (SIDI) engine fuel systems. Direct injection is being pursued in order to improve fuel efficiency and enhance control over, and flexibility of, spark-ignited engines. SIDI technology is being investigated by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) as one route towards meeting both efficiency goals and more stringent emissions standards. Friction and wear of fuel injector and pump parts were identified as issues impeding adoption of SIDI by the OTT workshop on ''Research Needs Related to CIDI and SIDI Fuel Systems'' and the resulting report, Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Argonne's NFC coatings consistently reduced friction and wear in existing and reformulated gasolines. (2) Compared to three commercial DLC coatings, NFC provided the best friction reduction and protection from wear in gasoline and alternative fuels. (3) NFC was successfully deposited on production fuel injectors. (4) Customized wear tests were performed to simulate the operating environment of fuel injectors. (5) Industry standard lubricity test results were consistent with customized wear tests in showing the friction and wear reduction of NFC and the lubricity of fuels. (6) Failure of NFC coatings by tensile crack opening or spallation did not occur, and issues with adhesion to steel substrates were eliminated. (7) This work addressed several of the current research needs of the OAAT SIDI program, as defined by the OTT report Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines.

Hershberger, J.; Ozturk, O.; Ajayi, O. O.; Woodford, J. B.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Advanced steel reheat furnace  

SciTech Connect

Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science NIF AT A GLANCe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Photon Science NIF AT A GLANCe the national ignition Facility at a glance The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest laser system, housed in a 10-story building...

87

Furnace Black Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Black Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher 005F 2 Definitions Particle Aggregate = 20nm to 100nm "Diameter" = 200nm to 1,000nm "Length" = Set of Percolated Aggregates Particle (?) Aggregate Agglomerate Constituents Size = Tech/Scientific Challenge 005F 3 Furnace Process High Temperature Refractory Feedstock Oil Air Natural Gas Reaction Zone Quench 005F 4 Specific Surface Area 005F 5 Structure 3-D Morphology Key Characteristic Summary of Crystallographic Studies 005F 7 Methodologies 005F 8 Summary * For all furnace carbon black 12Å < L C < 17Å * Crystallite L a ≈ 25Å * Amorphous Carbon * No micropores * Very few surface groups (hetero atoms) { 005F 9 Effect of Heat Treatment on Amorphous Carbon

88

Paired Straight Hearth Furnace  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PSH will use two linear tunnel hearth furnaces that share a common translating pallet train and which are aligned in parallel and run in opposite directions. Pellets are loaded...

89

A Furnace Temperature Regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synopsis.—By making the heating coil of an electric furnace one arm of a wheatstone bridge, and combining this with a galvanometer regulator, thus keeping constant the resistance of the coil, we can, regardless of variations in the current supply, and with no attention, maintain constant the temperature of furnaces not too directly influenced by the temperature of the room, or where the surrounding air is kept constant. The power available in this regulator is relatively very great indeed; nothing has to be inserted within the furnace cavity, and the lag is practically nothing; the regulator is often almost at its best under conditions most unfavorable to other regulators. It has held a small furnace constant to 0.1° for hours at temperatures from 500° to 1400°.

Walter P. White and Leason H. Adams.

1919-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Thermonuclear Ignition of Dark Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermonuclear ignition of stars by nuclear fission, and the corollary, non-ignition of stars. The possibility of

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Laser preheat enhanced ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Laser preheat enhanced ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided. 11 figs.

Early, J.W.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Burner control system  

SciTech Connect

A burner control apparatus for use with a furnace installation that has an operating control to produce a request for burner operation, a flame sensor to produce a signal when flame is present in the monitored combustion chamber, and one or more devices for control of ignition and/or fuel flow. The burner control apparatus comprises lockout apparatus for de-energizing the control apparatus, a control device for actuating the ignition and/or fuel control devices, and a timing circuit that provides four successive and partially overlapping timing intervals of precise relation, including a purge timing interval, a pilot ignition interval, and a main fuel ignition interval. The present invention further includes a burner control system which verifies the proper operation of certain sensors in a burner or furnace including particularly the air flow sensor. Additionally, the present system also prevents an attempt to ignite a burner if a condition is detected which indicates that the air flow sensor has been bypassed or wedged in the actuated position.

Cade, P.J.

1981-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Status of the National Ignition Campaign Prof. R. Paul Drake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition Campaign has the goal of producing net en- ergy gain in a laser-fusion system. I have been keeping Status of the National Ignition Campaign Prof. R. Paul Drake Joint Seminar with Atmospheric progress on the National Ignition Campaign, from a recent conference. This includes a discussion

Shyy, Wei

95

Ignition problems in scramjet testing  

SciTech Connect

Ignition of H{sub 2} in heated air containing H{sub 2}O, radicals, and dust was investigated for scramjet testing. Using a reduced kinetic model for H{sub 2}{minus}O{sub 2} systems, the effects of H{sub 2}O and radicals in nozzles are discussed in relation to engine testing with vitiation heaters. Analysis using linearized rate-equations suggested that the addition of O atoms was 1.5 times more effective than the addition of H atoms for ignition. This result can be applied to the problem of premature ignition caused by residual radicals and to plasma-jet igniters. Thermal and chemical effects of dust, inevitable in storage air heaters, were studied next. The effects of heat capacity and size of dust were expressed in terms of an exponential integral function. It was found that the radical termination on the surface of dust produces an effect equivalent to heat loss. The inhibition of ignition by dust may result, if the mass fraction of dust becomes 10{sup {minus}3}.

Mitani, Tohru [National Aerospace Lab., Miyagi (Japan)] [National Aerospace Lab., Miyagi (Japan)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Confinement of ignition and yield on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility Target Areas and Experimental Systems has reached mid-Title I design. Performance requirements for the Target Area are reviewed and design changes since the Conceptual Design Report are discussed. Development activities confirm a 5-m radius chamber and the viability of a boron carbide first wall. A scheme for cryogenic target integration with the NIF Target Area is presented.

Tobin, M.; Karpenko, V.; Foley, D.; Anderson, A.; Burnham, A.; Reitz, T.; Latkowski, J.; Bernat, T.

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

97

Furnace | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Furnace Furnace Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

98

Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of the Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to improve furnace energy efficiency. Fuel-fired furnaces discharge combustion products through a stack or a chimney. Hot furnace gases are less dense and more buoyant than ambient air, so they rise, creating a differential pressure between the top and the bottom of the furnace. This differential, known as thermal head, is the source of a natural draft or negative pressure in furnaces and boilers. A well-designed furnace (or boiler) is built to avoid air leakage into the furnace or leakage of flue gases from the furnace to the ambient. However, with time, most furnaces develop cracks or openings around doors, joints, and hearth seals. These openings (leaks) usually appear small compared with the overall dimensions of the furnace, so they are often ignored. The negative pressure created by the natural draft (or use of an induced-draft fan) in a furnace draws cold air through the openings (leaks) and into the furnace. The cold air becomes heated to the furnace exhaust gas temperature and then exits through the flue system, wasting valuable fuel. It might also cause excessive oxidation of metals or other materials in the furnaces. The heat loss due to cold air leakage resulting from the natural draft can be estimated if you know four major parameters: (1) The furnace or flue gas temperature; (2) The vertical distance H between the opening (leak) and the point where the exhaust gases leave the furnace and its flue system (if the leak is along a vertical surface, H will be an average value); (3) The area of the leak, in square inches; and (4) The amount of operating time the furnace spends at negative pressure. Secondary parameters that affect the amount of air leakage include these: (1) The furnace firing rate; (2) The flue gas velocity through the stack or the stack cross-section area; (3) The burner operating conditions (e.g., excess air, combustion air temperature, and so on). For furnaces or boilers using an induced-draft (ID) fan, the furnace negative pressure depends on the fan performance and frictional losses between the fan inlet and the point of air leakage. In most cases, it would be necessary to measure or estimate negative pressure at the opening. The amount of air leakage, the heat lost in flue gases, and their effects on increased furnace or boiler fuel consumption can be calculated by using the equations and graphs given in Industrial Furnaces (see W. Trinks et al., below). Note that the actual heat input required to compensate for the heat loss in flue gases due to air leakage would be greater than the heat contained in the air leakage because of the effect of available heat in the furnace. For a high-temperature furnace that is not maintained properly, the fuel consumption increase due to air leakage can be as high as 10% of the fuel input.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Improved graphite furnace atomizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

Siemer, D.D.

1983-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

102

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

103

Residential Condensing Gas Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Gas Furnaces Residential Condensing Gas Furnaces Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results residentialcondensinggasfurnacev1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications...

104

Cogeneration from glass furnace waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

In glass manufacturing 70% of the total energy utilized is consumed in the melting process. Three basic furnaces are in use: regenerative, recuperative, and direct fired design. The present paper focuses on secondary heat recovery from regenerative furnaces. A diagram of a typical regenerative furnace is given. Three recovery bottoming cycles were evaluated as part of a comparative systems analysis: steam Rankine Cycle (SRC), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and pressurized Brayton cycle. Each cycle is defined and schematicized. The net power capabilities of the three different systems are summarized. Cost comparisons and payback period comparisons are made. Organic Rankine cycle provides the best opportunity for cogeneration for all the flue gas mass flow rates considered. With high temperatures, the Brayton cycle has the shortest payback period potential, but site-specific economics need to be considered.

Hnat, J.G.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Laser-induced ignition by optical breakdown  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is an experimental work of the applied methodical character in which as an attempt to optimize a laser ignition system a systematic study of the best incoupling geometry for the employed Nd:YAG laser w...

E. Schwarz; I. Muri; J. Tauer; H. Kofler; E. Wintner

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Thermal Issues Associated with the Lighting Systems, Electronics Racks, and Pre-Amplifier Modules in the National Ignition System  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an investigation of the thermal issues related to the National Ignition Facility. The influence of heat sources such as lighting fixtures, electronics racks, and pre-amplifier modules (PAMs) on the operational performance of the laser guide beam tubes and optical alignment hardware in the NE laser bays were investigated with experiments and numerical models. In particular, empirical heat transfer data was used to establish representative and meaningful boundary conditions and also serve as bench marks for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Numerical models, constructed with a commercial CFD code, were developed to investigate the extent of thermal plumes and radiation heat transfer from the heat sources. From these studies, several design modifications were recommended including reducing the size of all fluorescent lights in the NIF laser bays to single 32 W bulb fixtures, maintaining minimum separation distances between light fixtures/electronics racks and beam transport hardware, adding motion sensors in areas of the laser bay to control light fixture operation during maintenance procedures, properly cooling all electronics racks with air-water heat exchangers with heat losses greater than 25 W/rack to the M1 laser bay, ensuring that the electronics racks are not overcooked and thus maintain their surface temperatures to within a few degrees centigrade of the mean air temperature, and insulating the electronic bays and optical support structures on the PAMs.

A. C. Owen; J. D. Bernardin; K. L. Lam

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Aluminum Bronze Alloys to Improve the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs and Side Vents.  

SciTech Connect

Energy Industries of Ohio was the lead organization for a consortium that examined the current situation involving the service life of electric arc and basic oxygen furnace hoods, roofs and side vents. Republic Engineered Products (REP), one of the project partners, installed a full-scale Al-Bronze “skirt” in their BOF at their Lorain OH facility, believed to be the first such installation of this alloy in this service. In 24 months of operation, the Al-Bronze skirt has processed a total of 4,563 heats, requiring only 2 shutdowns for maintenance, both related to physical damage to the skirt from operational mishaps. Yearly energy savings related to the REP facility are projected to be ~ 10 billion Btu's with significant additional environmental and productivity benefits. In recognition of the excellent results, this project was selected as the winner of the Ohio’s 2006 Governor’s Award for Excellence in Energy, the state’s award for outstanding achievements in energy efficiency.

Lawrence C. Boyd Jr.; Dr. Vinod K. Sikka

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

Target area acquisition and control system survivability for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The hardening of instruments to survive NIF target emission environments presents a significant challenge. Neutron flux is predicted to be as much as six orders of magnitude greater than the highest achieved neutron flux on NOVA. Not withstanding the high prompt radiation fields, the specifications for the instruments are demanding; requiring high resolution imaging and sub nanosecond transient measurements. We present an analysis of the sensitivity of the proposed NIF instrumentation design to EMP, X-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons. Major components assessed include fiber optic cable transport, high bandwidth cable and charge coupled detector (CCD) imaging systems.

Hagans, K.; Stathis, P.; Wiedwald, J.; Campbell, D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Target diagnostic control system implementation for the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser is observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A diagnostic control system (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost WINDOWS XP processor and JAVA application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The JAVA framework provides data management, control services, and operator graphical user interface generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in extensible markup language. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

Shelton, R. T.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Lagin, L. J.; Nelson, J. R.; O'Brien, D. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Effects of temperature on laser diode ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the effects of temperature on laser diode ignition and the resulting consequences were discussed in detail through theoretical analysis, experiments and numerical calculations. The results indicated that the output power of laser diode decreases and the wavelength of laser redshifts with elevated working temperature under a certain condition. The threshold conditions of ignition for powders are easily satisfied with increase in ambient temperature. While the temperature reaches a high enough level, ignition can occur and also the self-combustion or thermal induced explosion can do, even if laser power is very low. Therefore, it is of great importance to carefully control the working temperature of laser diode and the ambient temperature of powder system, and in the meanwhile, to install necessary insurance apparatus in order to ensure the normal and safe operation of the ignition system.

Shi-Biao Xiang; Xu Xiang; Chang-Gen Feng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

designed consumes power and fuel that yields an energy efficiency of approximately 40% (Total Btu’s required to reduce to elemental form/ Btu Input). The vast majority of heat is lost to the atmosphere or cooling water system. The furnaces can be modified...

O'Brien, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Non-carbon induction furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an induction furnace for melting and casting highly pure metals and alloys such as uranium and uranium alloys in such a manner as to minimize contamination of the melt by carbon derived from the materials and the environment within the furnace. The subject furnace is constructed of non-carbon materials and is housed within a conventional vacuum chamber. The furnace comprises a ceramic oxide crucible for holding the charge of metal or alloys. The heating of the crucible is achieved by a plasma-sprayed tungsten susceptor surrounding the crucible which, in turn, is heated by an rf induction coil separated from the susceptor by a cylinder of inorganic insulation. The furnace of the present invention is capable of being rapidly cycled from ambient temperatures to about 1650/sup 0/C for effectively melting uranium and uranium alloys without the attendant carbon contamination problems previously encountered when using carbon-bearing furnace materials.

Holcombe, C.E.; Masters, D.R.; Pfeiler, W.A.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 4, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

J. Griffiths; M.J.W. Riley; A. Borman; C. Dowding; A. Kirk; R. Bickerton

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet describes how to save process heating energy and costs by reducing air infiltration in industrial furnaces; tips include repairing leaks and increasing insulation.

116

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Furnace  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility * NSTTF * Parabolic Dish * Renewable Energy * SAND 2011-4654W * solar * Solar Energy * Solar Furnace * solar power * Solar Research Comments are closed. Renewable...

117

Blast furnace taphole drill  

SciTech Connect

A blast furnace taphole drill has a flaring head with cutting edges at its cutting end formed by intersecting angled faces. A central bore carries cleaning air to the cutting end. To prevent blockage of the cleaning air bore by debris and possible jamming of the drill, the head has deep radial grooves formed at the bottoms of the valley shapes between the cutting edges. The grooves extend radially from the air bore and conduct the air so that it can get behind or under jammed debris. Reduced taphole drilling times can be achieved.

Gozeling, J.A.; de Boer, S.; Spiering, A.A.

1984-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 3, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R & D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Laser ignition studies  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work is to study the details of laser induced ignition and combustion of high-temperature condensed-phase exothermic reactions. In this work high-speed photography (HSP) and real-time optical pyrometry have been combined to provide a diagnostic tool with a 1 ms temporal resolution for studying laser ignition and combustion wave propagation. Previous experiments have involved the use of HSP for studying combustion wave propagation (1) Real-time pyrometry studies of the ignition process have also been performed previously. The present paper describes how HSP has been expanded to include three-view split-frame photography to allow the ignition and combustion processes to be recorded and studied simultaneously. 2 refs., 3 figs.

Fredin, L.; Hansen, G.P.; Margrave, J.L.; Behrens, R.G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

New Energy Efficiency Standards for Furnace Fans to Reduce Carbon...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

by at least 3 billion metric tons in total by 2030, equal to more than a year's carbon pollution from the entire U.S. electricity system. Furnace fans are used to circulate air...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Ignition Facility May 29, 1997 Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility Livermore, CA Secretary Pena participates in the ground breaking ceremony for the National Ignition...

122

The National Ignition Facility: A New Era in High Energy Density Science  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility, the world's most energetic laser system, is now operational. This talk will describe NIF, the ignition campaign, and new opportunities in fusion energy and high energy density science enabled by NIF.

Moses, E

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

Laser ignition of flammable mixtures via a solid core optical fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To date no commercial fiber coupled laser systems have reached the irradiance and pulse energy required for flammable mixtures ignition. In this work we report preliminary results on the ignition of two-phase mix...

H. El-Rabii; G. Gaborel

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

125

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger targets and longer pulse lengths produce unique plasma conditions for laser-plasma instabilities that could reduce hohlraum coupling efficiency. Initial experiments have demonstrated efficient coupling of laser energy to x-rays. X-ray drive greater than 300 eV has been measured in gas-filled ignition hohlraum and shows the expected scaling with laser energy and hohlraum scale size. Experiments are now optimizing capsule implosions for ignition. Ignition conditions require assembling the fuel with sufficient density and temperature for thermonuclear burn. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, accelerating and spherically compressing the capsule for assembling the fuel. The implosion stagnates, heating the central core and producing a hot spot that ignites and burns the surrounding fuel. The four main characteristics of the implosion are shell velocity, central hot spot shape, fuel adiabat, and mix. Experiments studying these four characteristics of implosions are used to optimize the implosion. Integrated experiments using cryogenic fuel layer experiments demonstrate the quality of the implosion as the optimization experiments progress. The final compressed fuel conditions are diagnosed by measuring the x-ray emission from the hot core and the neutrons and charged particles produced in the fusion reactions. Metrics of the quality of the implosion are the neutron yield and the shell areal density, as well as the size and shape of the core. The yield depends on the amount of fuel in the hot core and its temperature and is a gauge of the energy coupling to the fuel. The areal density, the density of the fuel times its thickness, diagnoses the fuel assembly, which is measured using the fraction of neutrons that are down scattered passing through the dense shell. The yield and fraction of down scattered neutrons, or shell rho-r, from the cryogenic layered implosions are shown in Figure 3. The different sets of data represent results after a series of implosion optimization experiments. Both yield and areal density show significant increases as a result of the optimiza

Kauffman, R L

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

127

A neural network based approach to estimate of power system harmonics for an induction furnace under the different load conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents an artificial neural network based intelligent monitoring algorithm to detect of a power system harmonics. The proposed approach was tested on the current and voltage data of an induction furn...

Hayrettin Gokozan; Sezai Taskin; Serhat Seker; Huseyin Ekiz

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Voltage flicker prediction for two simultaneously operated ac arc furnaces  

SciTech Connect

An EMTP-based arc furnace model was developed for evaluation of flicker concerns associated with supplying a large integrated steel mill as they go from one to two furnace operation and as system changes are implemented that will affect the short circuit capacity at the 230 kV power supply substation. The model includes a dynamic arc representation which is designed to be characteristic of the initial portions of the melt cycle when the arc characteristics are the most variable (worst flicker conditions). The flicker calculations are verified using previous measurements with one furnace operation. Flicker simulations were then performed to evaluate a variety of different possible system strengths with both one and two furnaces in operation. The primary flicker measure used for this study is the unweighted rms value of the fluctuation envelope, expressed as a percentage of the rms line-to-ground voltage magnitude.

Tang, L. [ABB Power T and D Co., Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States)] [ABB Power T and D Co., Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Kolluri, S. [Entergy Services, New Orleans, LA (United States)] [Entergy Services, New Orleans, LA (United States); McGranaghan, M.F. [Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fundamental Studies of Ignition Process in Large Natural Gas Engines Using Laser Spark Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Past research has shown that laser ignition provides a potential means to reduce emissions and improve engine efficiency of gas-fired engines to meet longer-term DOE ARES (Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems) targets. Despite the potential advantages of laser ignition, the technology is not seeing practical or commercial use. A major impediment in this regard has been the 'open-path' beam delivery used in much of the past research. This mode of delivery is not considered industrially practical owing to safety factors, as well as susceptibility to vibrations, thermal effects etc. The overall goal of our project has been to develop technologies and approaches for practical laser ignition systems. To this end, we are pursuing fiber optically coupled laser ignition system and multiplexing methods for multiple cylinder engine operation. This report summarizes our progress in this regard. A partial summary of our progress includes: development of a figure of merit to guide fiber selection, identification of hollow-core fibers as a potential means of fiber delivery, demonstration of bench-top sparking through hollow-core fibers, single-cylinder engine operation with fiber delivered laser ignition, demonstration of bench-top multiplexing, dual-cylinder engine operation via multiplexed fiber delivered laser ignition, and sparking with fiber lasers. To the best of our knowledge, each of these accomplishments was a first.

Azer Yalin; Bryan Willson

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Utilization of computational fluid dynamics technique in low NOx burner/furnace retrofits  

SciTech Connect

A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique has been utilized to provide design guidance for retrofitting low NOx combustion systems and incorporating associated furnace modifications into existing utility boilers. The CFD program utilized is FW-FIRES (Fossil fuel, Water-walled Furnace Integrated Reaction and Emission Simulation) which simulates furnace combustion, heat transfer and pollutant formation based on fundamental principals of mass, momentum and energy conservations. The program models the gas flow field as a three-dimensional turbulent reacting continuum and the particle flow as a series of discrete particle trajectories through the gas continuum. Chemical reaction, heat transfer, and pollutant formation mechanisms are incorporated in the program. FW-FIRES furnace simulation of low NOx combustion system retrofits has been performed for various furnace configurations including front wall-fired, front and real wall-fired, and tangentially-fired furnaces, to determine the effects of burner/furnace modifications on the NOx emission, furnace exit gas temperature, furnace heat absorption, unburned carbon, and furnace wall corrosion. For front wall-fired, and front and real wall-fired furnaces, the NOx emission requirement is met by the use of Foster Wheeler lox NOx burners and overfire air (OFA) staging. Studies of burner and OFA quantify and spacing are conducted to limit NOx emission and unburned carbon to acceptable levels. A major concern in once-through supercritical units with OFA is furnace wall corrosion which is caused by high furnace wall metal temperature and corrosive hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) created in a reducing atmosphere from part of coal sulfur. The FW-FIRES code is used to minimize this corrosion potential by selecting the proper location and quantity of boundary air. A simulation of tangentially-fired unit, which has been retrofitted with low NOx burners, is used to study the effect of the burner tilt on the furnace exit gas temperature. This paper details the basis and results of several CFD analyses conducted for potential retrofit programs.

Cho, S.M.; Seltzer, A.H.; Ma, J.; Steitz, T.H.; Grusha, J.; Cole, R.W.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 National Ignition Facility & Photon Science how do Lasers work? how Do Lasers work? A laser can be as small as a microscopic computer chip or as immense as the National Ignition...

132

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 7, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) is leading a team of companies involved in this effort. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown in Figure 1.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Review of the National Ignition Campaign 2009-2012  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) was a multi-institution effort established under the National Nuclear Security Administration of DOE in 2005, prior to the completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in 2009. The scope of the NIC was the planning and preparation for and the execution of the first 3 yr of ignition experiments (through the end of September 2012) as well as the development, fielding, qualification, and integration of the wide range of capabilities required for ignition. Besides the operation and optimization of the use of NIF, these capabilities included over 50 optical, x-ray, and nuclear diagnostic systems, target fabrication facilities, experimental platforms, and a wide range of NIF facility infrastructure. The goal of ignition experiments on the NIF is to achieve, for the first time, ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory via inertial confinement fusion and to develop a platform for ignition and high energy density applications on the NIF. The goal of the NIC was to develop and integrate all of the capabilities required for a precision ignition campaign and, if possible, to demonstrate ignition and gain by the end of FY12. The goal of achieving ignition can be divided into three main challenges. The first challenge is defining specifications for the target, laser, and diagnostics with the understanding that not all ignition physics is fully understood and not all material properties are known. The second challenge is designing experiments to systematically remove these uncertainties. The third challenge is translating these experimental results into metrics designed to determine how well the experimental implosions have performed relative to expectations and requirements and to advance those metrics toward the conditions required for ignition. This paper summarizes the approach taken to address these challenges, along with the progress achieved to date and the challenges that remain. At project completion in 2009, NIF lacked almost all the diagnostics and infrastructure required for ignition experiments. About half of the 3 yr period covered in this review was taken up by the effort required to install and performance qualify the equipment and experimental platforms needed for ignition experiments. Ignition on the NIF is a grand challenge undertaking and the results presented here represent a snapshot in time on the path toward that goal. The path forward presented at the end of this review summarizes plans for the Ignition Campaign on the NIF, which were adopted at the end of 2012, as well as some of the key results obtained since the end of the NIC.

Lindl, John; Landen, Otto; Edwards, John; Moses, Ed [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Collaboration: NIC Team

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Steam Cracker Furnace Energy Improvements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Channel, ~ 25 mi. east of Houston ? Includes 4 manufacturing sites, 2 technology/engineering offices ?Significant community involvement Baytown Refinery Page 4 Steam Cracking to Olefins ? Process 60+ years old; ExxonMobil one of pioneers... Steam Cracker Furnace Energy Improvements Tim Gandler Energy Coordinator Baytown Olefins Plant, Baytown Tx 2010 Industrial Energy Technology Conference May, 2010 Page 2 ? Baytown Complex ? Steam Cracking to Olefins ? Furnace overview...

Gandler, T.

135

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Exergy-based analysis and efficiency evaluation for an aluminum melting furnace in a die-casting plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficiency of a natural gas-fired aluminum melting furnace in a die-casting plant is examined using energy and exergy methods, to improve understanding of the burner system in the furnace and so that potential improvements can be identified. Such ... Keywords: aluminum, die-casting, efficiency, energy, exergy, melting furnace

Marc A. Rosen; Dennis L. Lee

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Review and recent developments of laser ignition for internal combustion engines applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance of future ignition system for internal combustion engines should be reliable and efficient to enhance and sustain combustion stability, since ignition not only initiates combustion but also influences subsequent combustion. Lean burn systems have been regarded as an advanced combustion approach that could improve thermal efficiency while reducing exhaust gas emissions. However, current engines cannot be operated sufficiently lean due to ignition related problems such as the sluggish flame initiation and propagation along with potential misfiring. A high exhaust gas recirculation engines also has similar potential for emissions improvement, but could also experience similar ignition problems, particularly at idle operation. Similarly, ignition is an important design factor in gas turbine and rocket combustor. Recently, non-conventional ignition techniques such as laser-induced ignition methods have become an attractive field of research in order to replace the conventional spark ignition systems. The fundamentals of conventional laser-induced spark ignition have been previously reviewed. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review progress on the use of such innovative techniques of laser-induced ignition including laser-induced cavity ignition and laser-induced multi-point ignition. In addition, emphasis is given to recent work to explore the feasibility of this interesting technology for practical applications concerning internal combustion engines.

Mohamed H. Morsy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

Potter, D

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

BPM Motors in Residential Gas Furnaces: What are the Savings?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standby power consumption in BPM furnaces is significantlytotal electricity consumption by BPM furnaces. This is notOverall, it appears the BPM motors used in furnaces offer

Lutz, James; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

BPM Motors in Residential Gas Furnaces: What are the Savings?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the total electricity consumption by BPM furnaces. Thisbecause furnace electricity consumption is significant.of furnace electricity consumption. Therefore, accurate

Lutz, James; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inc. Pigg, Scott. 2003. Electricity Use by New Furnaces: Astage furnaces offer national electricity savings, but withABORATORY Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Philadelhia Gas Works (PGW) Doe Furnace Rule | Department of...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Philadelhia Gas Works (PGW) Doe Furnace Rule Philadelhia Gas Works (PGW) Doe Furnace Rule DOE Furnace Rule More Documents & Publications Focus Series: Philadelphia Energyworks: In...

143

UCRL-PRES-225531 National ignition facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title Page UCRL-PRES-225531 #12;National ignition facility #12;NIF is 705,000 #12;NIF laser system #12;NIF us 885 #12;NIF-0506-11956 Laser bay 2 #12;Switchyard 2 #12;Target chamber in the air #12;Target chamber #12;Target chamber national geographic #12;Target chamber inside #12;Warehouse of laser

144

Advanced aircraft ignition CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect

Conventional commercial and military turbo-jet aircraft engines use capacitive discharge ignition systems to initiate fuel combustion. The fuel-rich conditions required to ensure engine re-ignition during flight yield less than optimal engine performance, which in turn reduces fuel economy and generates considerable pollution in the exhaust. Los Alamos investigated two approaches to advanced ignition: laser based and microwave based. The laser based approach is fuel ignition via laser-spark breakdown and via photo-dissociation of fuel hydrocarbons and oxygen. The microwave approach involves modeling, and if necessary redesigning, a combustor shape to form a low-Q microwave cavity, which will ensure microwave breakdown of the air/fuel mixture just ahead of the nozzle with or without a catalyst coating. This approach will also conduct radio-frequency (RF) heating of ceramic elements that have large loss tangents. Replacing conventional systems with either of these two new systems should yield combustion in leaner jet fuel/air mixtures. As a result, the aircraft would operate with (1) considerable less exhaust pollution, (2) lower engine maintenance, and (3) significantly higher fuel economy.

Early, J.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Ignition Engines Spark Ignition Engines Thomas Wallner and omni engine Thomas Wallner and the omnivorous engine Background Today the United States import more than 60% of its crude oil and petroleum products. Transportation accounts for a major portion of these imports. Research in this field is focused on reducing the dependency on foreign oil by increasing the engine efficiency on the one hand and blending gasoline with renewable domestic fuels, such as ethanol, on the other. Argonne's Research The main focus of research is on evaluation of advanced combustion concepts and effects of fuel properties on engine efficiency, performance and emissions. The platforms used are a single-cylinder research engine as well as an automotive-size four-cylinder engine with direct fuel injection.

146

Comparative experimental evaluation of performance, combustion and emissions of laser ignition with conventional spark plug in a compressed natural gas fuelled single cylinder engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laser is emerging as a strong concept for alternative ignition in spark ignition engine. Laser ignition has potential advantages over conventional spark plug ignition. Laser ignition system is free from spark electrodes hence there is no loss of spark energy to the electrodes, which are also free from erosion effect. In addition, there is flexibility in choosing spark location and it offers excellent performance under high in-cylinder pressures. In this paper, performances of laser ignition and conventional spark ignition systems are comparatively evaluated in terms of in-cylinder pressure variation, combustion stability, fuel consumption, power output and exhaust emissions at similar operating conditions of the engine.

Dhananjay Kumar Srivastava; Avinash Kumar Agarwal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cement advanced furnace and process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a suspension shaft furnace for producing discrete cement clinkers from discrete pellets of cement-forming batch materials which are gravity-migrated therethrough. It comprises a vertical furnace housing enclosing a top pellet-feeding and preheating zone comprising an elongate vertical shaft section opening into an intermediate fluidized bed section comprising fuel inlet conduits, an air-permeable clinker-impermeable support; a lower clinker-cooling section beneath the fluidized bed section; clinker-discharge means communicating between the fluidized bed section and the cooling section and air inlet means.

Litka, A.F.; Cohen, S.M.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF and plans for the NIF ignition experimental program. A brief summary of the overall NIF experimental program is also presented.

Moses, E

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

COLLOQUIUM: In Pursuit of Ignition on the National Ignition Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with the goal of igniting a propagating thermonuclear burn wave in DT fuel leading to energy gain (defined as fusion yieldinput laser...

150

Effect of Combustion Air Preheat on a Forged Furnace Productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to determine are the effects of combustion air preheat on four additional furnace operating characteristics. These characteristics are: (1) fuel utilization of a furnace operating cycle; (2) time to heat the furnace load; (3) scale production; and (4) furnace...

Ward, M. E.; Bohn, J.; Davis, S. R.; Knowles, D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Breakthrough Furnace Can Cut Solar Industry Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace can Cut Solar Industry Costs A game-changing Optical Cavity Furnace (OCF)-developed by the National Renew- able Energy Laboratory (NREL) with funding from the U.S....

152

Central ignition scenarios for TFTR  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of obtaining ignition in TFTR by means of very centrally peaked density profiles is examined. It is shown that local central alpha heating can be made to exceed local central energy losses (''central ignition'') under global conditions for which Q greater than or equal to 1. Time dependent 1-D transport simulations show that the normal global ignition requirements are substantially relaxed for plasmas with peaked density profiles. 18 refs., 18 figs.

Zweben, S.J.; Redi, M.H.; Bateman, G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces isthe total furnace electricity consumption and are primarilyto calculate the electricity consumption during cooling

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Ignition enhancement for scramjet combustion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The process of shock-induced ignition has been investigated both computa- tionally and experimentally, with particular emphasis on the concept of radical farming. The first component… (more)

McGuire, Jeffrey Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

X-ray Streak Camera Cathode Development and Timing Accuracy of the 4w UV Fiducial System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4-{omega} (263nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, Titanium, Gold and Silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data was analyzed to determine the centroiding a statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps respectively.

Opachich, Y P; Palmer, N; Homoelle, D; Hatch, B W; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Kalantar, D; Browning, D; Landen, O

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

X-ray streak camera cathode development and timing accuracy of the 4{omega} ultraviolet fiducial system at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4{omega} (263 nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, titanium, gold, and silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest relative quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data were analyzed to determine the centroiding statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps, respectively.

Opachich, Y. P.; Palmer, N.; Homoelle, D.; Hatch, B.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Kalantar, D.; Browning, D.; Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zuegel, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Laser Ignition of Single Magnesium Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The minimum ignition temperature and minimum ignition energy of single magnesium particles was determined ... levitated ultrasonically and was ignited by a short laser pulse. The temperature transient of the part...

J. F. Zevenbergen; A. E. Dahoe…

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - National Ignition Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national-ignition-facility National Ignition Facility en Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy http:www.pppl.govnode1361

159

Laser-induced spark ignition fundamental and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser ignition has become an active research topic in recent years because it has the potential to replace the conventional electric spark plugs in engines that are required to operate under much higher compression ratios, faster compression rates, and much leaner fuel-to-air ratios than gas engines today. It is anticipated that the igniter in these engines will face with pressures as high as 50 MPa and temperatures as high as 4000 K. Using the conventional ignition system, the required voltage and energy must be greatly increased (voltages in excess of 40 kV) to reliably ignite the air and fuel mixture under these conditions. Increasing the voltage and energy does not always improve ignitability but it does create greater reliability problem. The objective of this paper is to review past work to identify some fundamental issues underlying the physics of the laser spark ignition process and research needs in order to bring the laser ignition concept into the realm of reality.

Tran X. Phuoc

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: a path towards inertial fusion energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8?MJ, 500?TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351?nm. The NIF project is scheduled for completion in March 2009. Currently, all 192 beams have been operationally qualified and have produced over 4.0?MJ of light at the fundamental wavelength of 1053?nm, making NIF the world's first megajoule laser. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium–tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader scientific applications.The plan is to begin 96-beam symmetric indirect-drive ICF experiments early in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). This national effort to achieve fusion ignition is coordinated through a detailed plan that includes the science, technology and equipment such as diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator and user optics required for ignition experiments. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility soon after project completion and to conduct a credible ignition campaign in 2010. When the NIF is complete, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustaining nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory will be much closer to realization.Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of inertial fusion energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed (Lindl 1998 Inertial Confinement Fusion: the Quest for Ignition and Energy Gain Using Indirect Drive (New York: American Institute of Physics)) and has a high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and fast ignition concepts (Tabak et al 1994 Phys. Plasmas 1 1626–34, Tabak et al 2005 Phys. Plasmas 12 057305). Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science.This paper summarizes the design, performance and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present laser inertial confinement fusion–fission energy (LIFE) as a path to achieve carbon-free sustainable energy.

Edward I. Moses

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ignition distributor voltage generator  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a voltage pulse generator and ignition distributor comprising, a base, a shaft rotatably supported by the base, a distributor cap supported by the base having a center electrode and circumferentially spaced outer electrodes. The pulse generator and ignition distribution also include a first rotor driven by the shaft formed of electrical insulating material having electrically conductive means connected to the center terminal and a portion that rotates past the outer electrodes. The portion of the electrically conductive means that rotates past the outer electrodes is spaced from the outer electrodes to form a gap therebetween. A voltage pulse generator comprises a second rotor driven by the shaft, at least one permanent magnet and an annular pickup coil supported by the base. The pickup coil has inner turns and outer turns, the beginning turn of the inner turns connected to a first lead and the last turn of the outer turns connected to a second lead, the outer turns enclosing the inner turns. The pickup coil also has a circuit connected directly between the second lead and ground which is operative to provide a direct conductive path to ground for high frequency energy capacitively coupled to the outer turns from the gap discharge between the electrically conductive means of the first rotor and an outer electrode, the outer turns forming a grounded shield for the inner turns.

Boyer, J.A.

1986-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

162

Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the door or wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy. The quartz for the diffuser plate is surface etched (to give the quartz diffusive qualities) in the furnace during a high intensity burn-in process.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Plastic ablator ignition capsule design for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes current efforts to develop a plastic ablator capsule design for the first ignition attempt on the National Ignition Facility. The trade-offs in capsule scale and laser energy that must be made to achieve ignition probabilities comparable to those with other candidate ablators, beryllium and high-density carbon, are emphasized. Large numbers of 1-D simulations, meant to assess the statistical behavior of the target design, as well as 2-D simulations to assess the target's susceptibility to Rayleigh-Taylor growth are discussed.

Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Salmonson, J D; Callahan, D A; Town, R J

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-conditioners furnaces air Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by connecting it to a leaky duct system. By decreasing the leakage... condensing unit of a split system air conditioner or heat pump, cooling or heating coil, or the furnace...

165

Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Advanced ignition options for laser ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced ignition options for laser ICF FPA Meeting, Washington DC, December 1-3, 2010 R. Betti shock) · Fast Ignition requires major hardware upgrades: 100kJ-class multi-PW laser [also talk by P explore high-gain shock ignition - Polar Shock Ignition (uses half the NIF beams to drive the implosion

167

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Delay for Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility 15 μm * Low emission combustion systems have been carefully optimized for natural gas * Future fuel diversity (including H2 containing fuels) may generate auto-ignition damage * Existing theories vary in predicting propensity for auto-ignition damage * Theory A vs Theory B shows factor of 100 difference-which is right? * UC Irvine improved and validated design tools for ignition delay allow designers to evaluate the risk for auto-ignition in advanced combustion systems with future fuels * Models are available to engine OEM's to shorten design cycle time and save $$ UC Irvine Scott Samuelsen / Vince McDonell #112 1000/T (1/K) 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 τ [O 2 ] 0.5 [F] 0.25 (sec(mol/cm 3 ) 0.75 ) 10 -10 10 -9 10 -8 10 -7 10 -6 10 -5

168

The National Ignition Facility and the Ignition Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

February 14-18, 2013 Debra A. Callahan Group Leader for ICF/IFE Target design Lawrence Livermore National(atm-s) Indirect drive on the NIF is within a factor of 2-3 of the conditions required for ignition Callahan -- AAAS, February 14-18, 2013 82013-047661s2.ppt NIF Ignition #12;2013-047661s2.ppt Callahan -- AAAS

169

What Steps Do You Take to Maintain Your Furnace? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steps Do You Take to Maintain Your Furnace? Steps Do You Take to Maintain Your Furnace? What Steps Do You Take to Maintain Your Furnace? January 7, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis This week, Chris told you about his plans to maintain his furnace to keep it running efficiently. Proper maintenance is key to ensuring your heating and cooling systems are in working order. No one wants to wake up on the coldest day of the year to find that they have no heat! What steps do you take to maintain your furnace? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Brrrrr. It's Cold In There! Saving Energy and Money Starts at Home 31,000 Homes Weatherized in June

170

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … High-Performance Furnace Blowers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Fuel Utilization Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency [AFUE] and Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio [SEER] and at real installed conditions. A testing program was undertaken at two laboratories to compare the performance of furnace blowers over a range of static pressure differences that included standard rating points and measured field test pressures. Three different combinations of blowers and residential furnaces were tested. The laboratory test results for blower power and airflow were combined with DOE2 models of building loads, models of air conditioner performance, standby power, and igniter, and combustion air blower power to determine potential energy and peak demand impacts. BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE Recognizing Top Innovations in Building Science - The U.S. Department of Energy's

171

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … High-Performance Furnace Blowers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

annual fuel utilization annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) and seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) and at real installed conditions. A testing program was undertaken at two laboratories to compare the performance of furnace blowers over a range of static pressure differences that included standard rating points and measured field test pressures. Three different combinations of blowers and residential furnaces were tested. The laboratory test results for blower power and airflow were combined with DOE2 models of building loads, models of air conditioner performance, standby power, and igniter and combustion air blower power to determine potential energy and peak demand impacts. BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE Recognizing Top Innovations in Building Science - The U.S. Department of Energy's

172

Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to examine the impact that common installation practices and age-induced equipment degradation may have on the installed performance of natural gas furnaces, as measured by steady-state efficiency and AFUE. PARR identified twelve furnaces of various ages and efficiencies that were operating in residential homes in the Des Moines Iowa metropolitan area and worked with a local HVAC contractor to retrieve them and test them for steady-state efficiency and AFUE in the lab. Prior to removal, system airflow, static pressure, equipment temperature rise, and flue loss measurements were recorded for each furnace. After removal from the field the furnaces were transported to the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) laboratory, where PARR conducted steady-state efficiency and AFUE testing. The test results show that steady-state efficiency in the field was 6.4% lower than that measured for the same furnaces under standard conditions in the lab, which included tuning the furnace input and air flow rate. Comparing AFUE measured under ASHRAE standard conditions with the label value shows no reduction in efficiency for the furnaces in this study over their 15 to 24 years of operation when tuned to standard conditions. Further analysis of the data showed no significant correlation between efficiency change and the age or the rated efficiency of the furnace.

Rothgeb, S.; Brand, L.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Crystal growth furnace with trap doors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved furnace is provided for growing crystalline bodies from a melt. The improved furnace is characterized by a door assembly which is remotely controlled and is arranged so as to selectively shut off or permit communication between an access port in the furnace enclosure and a hot zone within that enclosure. The invention is especially adapted to facilitate use of crystal growing cartridges of the type disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,118,197.

Sachs, Emanual M. (Watertown, MA); Mackintosh, Brian H. (Lexington, MA)

1982-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Furnace Litigation Settled | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

energy conservation standards for residential furnaces, central air conditioners, and heat pumps, including regional standards for different product types in indicated States....

175

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

select products that feature sealed combustion. Condensing furnaces should not use indoor air, which frequently contains contaminants from common household products, for...

176

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

177

TOWARD A STANDARD IGNITION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ignited with a small propane torch. The top center ofhead is supplied with propane. In these experiments allin the pre-mixed mode with propane alone to simulate trash

Volkingburg, David R. Van

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Collection and conversion of silicon furnace waste gas into higher value products: Phase 3, 6 MW pilot plant dc closed furnace technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The construction and operation of a 6 MW, closed dc furnace for smelting silicon was the primary focus of Phase 3. A 6 MW, dc closed furnace pilot plant was built in East Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada. The furnace is equipped with world`s most modern automatic control system used to control and monitor the process variables and operational data. This control system is suitable for commercial applications and could be used with either closed or open dc furnaces for smelting silicon or ferrosilicon. The construction was started in September 1990, and the facility was operational within 18 months. Following successful commissioning of the pilot plant in June 1992, twelve smelting test campaigns were conducted through November 1994.

Dosaj, V.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes Record American Fusion News Category: National Ignition Facility Link: National Ignition Facility (NIF):...

180

National Ignition Campaign Hohlraum Energetics  

SciTech Connect

The first series of experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, 'The National Ignition Facility: ushering in a new age for high energy density science,' Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] tested ignition hohlraum 'energetics,' a term described by four broad goals: (1) Measurement of laser absorption by the hohlraum; (2) Measurement of the x-ray radiation flux (T{sub RAD}{sup 4}) on the surrogate ignition capsule; (3) Quantitative understanding of the laser absorption and resultant x-ray flux; and (4) Determining whether initial hohlraum performance is consistent with requirements for ignition. This paper summarizes the status of NIF hohlraum energetics experiments. The hohlraum targets and experimental design are described, as well as the results of the initial experiments. The data demonstrate low backscattered energy (< 10%) for hohlraums filled with helium gas. A discussion of our current understanding of NIF hohlraum x-ray drive follows, including an overview of the computational tools, i.e., radiation-hydrodynamics codes, that have been used to design the hohlraums. The performance of the codes is compared to x-ray drive and capsule implosion data from the first NIF experiments. These results bode well for future NIF ignition hohlraum experiments.

Meezan, N B; Atherton, L J; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Dzenitis, E G; Edwards, M J; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Jones, O S; Landen, O; London, R A; Michel, P A; Moody, J D; Milovich, J L; Schneider, M B; Thomas, C A; Town, R J; Warrick, A L; Weber, S V; Widmann, K; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; MacGowan, B J; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Nikroo, A

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

Jason M. Keith

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The National Ignition Campaign: status and progress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and a variety of experiments have been completed and many more are planned in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with nearly 60 x-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. The NIF has also been qualified for the use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high-yield experiments and classified experiments. Implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 7.5 ? 1014 neutrons have been achieved. NIF, a Nd?:?Glass laser facility, is routinely operating at 1.6 MJ of ultraviolet (3?) light on target with very high reliability. It recently reached its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3? light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort with the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory, is making steady progress towards achieving ignition. Other experiments have been completed in support of high-energy science, materials equation of state, and materials strength. In all cases, records of extreme temperatures and pressures, highest neutron yield and highest energy densities have been achieved. This paper describes the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path towards ignition.

E.I. Moses; the NIC Collaborators

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

BPM Motors in Residential Gas Furnaces: What are theSavings?  

SciTech Connect

Residential gas furnaces contain blowers to distribute warm air. Currently, furnace blowers use either a Permanent Split Capacitor (PSC) or a Brushless Permanent Magnet (BPM) motor. Blowers account for the majority of furnace electricity consumption. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important for understanding electricity consumption of furnaces. The electricity consumption of blower motors depends on the static pressure across the blower. This paper examines both types of blower motors in non-condensing non-weatherized gas furnaces at a range of static pressures. Fan performance data is based on manufacturer product literature and laboratory tests. We use field-measured static pressure in ducts to get typical system curves to calculate how furnaces would operate in the field. We contrast this with the electricity consumption of a furnace blower operating under the DOE test procedure and manufacturer rated conditions. Furnace electricity use is also affected by operating modes that happen at the beginning and end of each furnace firing cycle. These operating modes are the pre-purge and post-purge by the draft inducer, the on-delay and off-delay of the blower, and the hot surface ignitor operation. To accurately calculate this effect, we use the number of firing cycles in a typical California house in the Central Valley of California. Cooling hours are not considered in the DOE test procedure. We also account for furnace blower use by the air conditioner and stand-by power. Overall BPM motors outperform PSC motors, but the total electricity savings are significantly less than projected using the DOE test procedure conditions. The performance gains depend on the static pressure of the household ducts, which are typically much higher than in the test procedures.

Lutz, James; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Experimenting with concentrated sunlight using the DLR solar furnace  

SciTech Connect

The high flux solar furnace that is operated by the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) at Cologne was inaugurated in June 1994 and we are now able to look back onto one year of successful operation. The solar furnace project was founded by the government of the State Northrhine Westfalia within the Study Group AG Solar. The optical design is a two-stage off-axis configuration which uses a flat 52 m{sup 2} heliostat and a concentrator composed of 147 spherical mirror facets. The heliostat redirects the solar light onto the concentrator which focuses the beam out of the optical axis of the system into the laboratory building. At high insolation levels (>800W/m{sup 2}) it is possible to collect a total power of 20 kW with peak flux densities of 4 MW/m{sup 2}. Sixteen different experiment campaigns were carried out during this first year of operation. The main research fields for these experiments were material science, component development and solar chemistry. The furnace also has its own research program leading to develop sophisticated measurement techniques like remote infrared temperature sensing and flux mapping. Another future goal to be realized within the next five years is the improvement of the performance of the furnace itself. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Neumann, A.; Groer, U. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt Linder Hoehe, Koeln (Germany)] [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt Linder Hoehe, Koeln (Germany)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Existing and prospective blast-furnace conditions  

SciTech Connect

Blast-furnace conditions are investigated by means of a multizone model. The expected performance of prospective technologies is assessed, as well as the trends in blast-furnace processes. The model permits the identification of means of overcoming practical difficulties.

I.G. Tovarovskii; V.I. Bol'shakov; V.P. Lyalyuk; A.E. Merkulov; D. V. Pinchuk [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine). Institute of Ferrous Metallurgy

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Furnaces Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement

187

Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines Injection Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines...

188

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions...

189

Exergy transfer analysis of an aluminum holding furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study presents the unsteady exergy transfer analysis of an aluminum holding furnace with new heating resistance scheme. This holding system consists of four multilayer refractory walls and one resistance heating system which is responsible of maintaining the appropriate aluminum temperature and composition for further casting. The purpose of this analysis is to understand and identify heat losses and irreversibilities of the holding process of an aluminum furnace by means of the First and Second Law of Thermodynamics. In this study, bi-dimensional temperature and exergy fields during heat and exergy transfer processes are presented. The exergy balance is completely computed for this system, obtaining: exergy transfer, exergy variation rate, and destroyed exergy rate.

Luis Acevedo; Sergio Usón; Javier Uche

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Coke battery with 51-m{sup 3} furnace chambers and lateral supply of mixed gas  

SciTech Connect

The basic approaches employed in the construction of coke battery 11A at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat are outlined. This battery includes 51.0-m{sup 3} furnaces and a dust-free coke-supply system designed by Giprokoks with lateral gas supply; it is heated exclusively by low-calorific mixed gas consisting of blast-furnace gas with added coke-oven gas. The 82 furnaces in the coke battery are divided into two blocks of 41. The gross coke output of the battery (6% moisture content) is 1140000 t/yr.

V.I. Rudyka; N.Y. Chebotarev; O.N. Surenskii; V.V. Derevich [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nationâ??s energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, â??implicitness and fluid modeling,â? can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

Dr. Rodney J. Mason

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lean burn limit and time to light characteristics of laser ignition in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work details a study of laser ignition in a low pressure combustion test rig, representative of an industrial gas turbine (SGT-400, Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd.) and for the first time investigates the effect of air mass flow rate on combustion characteristics at air/fuel ratios at the lean burn limit. Both the lean burn limit and time taken to light are essential in determining the suitability of a specified air/fuel ratio, especially in multi-chamber ignition applications. Through extension of the lean burn limit and reduction of the time taken to light, the operating window for ignition with regards to the air/fuel ratio can be increased, leading to greater reliability and repeatability of ignition. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using both a standard high energy igniter and a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 1064 nm wavelength. A detailed comparison of the lean burn limit and time taken to light for standard ignition and laser ignition is presented.

J. Griffiths; M. Riley; A. Kirk; A. Borman; J. Lawrence; C. Dowding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Laser Ignition of Alternative Liquid Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within a research project at the TU Vienna, the potential and mechanism of laser-induced ignition with respect to mixture inflammation and combustion were investigated compared to conventional spark ignition. A s...

Dr. Josef Graf; Dr. Thomas Lauer; Univ.-Prof. Dr. Bernhard Geringer

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

State of Development of Laser Ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A holistic optimization of combustion engines with the aim of conserving resources has to include an improvement of the ignition mechanism as well. In the field of spark-ignition combustion engines the developmen...

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Dieter Brüggeman; Dipl.-Ing. Christian Hüttl

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Thermonuclear Ignition of Dark Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark matter is thought to be at least an order of magnitude more abundant than luminous matter in the Universe, but there has yet to be an unambiguous identification of a wholly dark, galactic-scale structure. There is, however, increasing evidence that VIRGOHI 21 may be a dark galaxy. If VIRGOHI 21 turns out to be composed of dark stars, having approximately the same mass of stars found in luminous galaxies, it will pose an enigma within the framework of current astrophysical models, but will provide strong support for my concept, published in 1994 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, of the thermonuclear ignition of stars by nuclear fission, and the corollary, non-ignition of stars. The possibility of galactic thermonuclear ignition is discussed from that framework and leads to my suggestion that the distribution of luminous stars in a galaxy may simply be a reflection of the galactic distribution of the heavy elements.

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

June 11, 1999: National Ignition Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

June 11, 1999Secretary Richardson dedicates the National Ignition Facility target chamber at DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

198

Heating National Ignition Facility, Realistic Financial Planning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOEEIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic...

199

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Furnace Blower Performance Improvements- Building America Top Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Top Innovation profile describes Building America research into improving efficiency of furnace fan blowers.

202

Symmetry tuning for ignition capsules via the symcap technique  

SciTech Connect

Symmetry of an implosion is crucial to get ignition successfully. Several methods of control and measurement of symmetry have been applied on many laser systems with mm size hohlraums and ns pulses. On the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] we have large hohlraums of cm scale, long drive pulses of 10 s of ns, and a large number of beams with the option to tune their wavelengths. Here we discuss how we used the x-ray self-emission from imploding surrogates to ignition capsules (symcaps) to measure the symmetry of the implosion. We show that symcaps are good surrogates for low order symmetry, though having lower sensitivity to distortions than ignition capsules. We demonstrate the ability to transfer energy between laser beams in a gas-filled hohlraum using wavelength tuning, successfully tuning the lowest order symmetry of the symcaps in different size hohlraums at different laser energies within the specification established by calculations for successful ignition.

Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS E-526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Dixit, S.; Glenzer, S.; Kalantar, D.; Bradley, D.; Izumi, N.; Meezan, N.; Landen, O.; Callahan, D.; Weber, S. V.; Holder, J. P.; Glenn, S.; Edwards, M. J.; Koch, J.; Suter, L. J.; Haan, S. W.; Town, R. P. J.; Michel, P.; Jones, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sustainable Electric Arc Furnace Steel Production: GREENEAF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generally speaking, in the electric furnace, coal (and consequently char) can be used as injected powder or charged into the basket. The syngas can be used for EAF burners.

Loris Bianco; Giulia Baracchini…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Furnace Blower Performance Improvements - Building America Top...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in preparation for cold weather, they may be unaware of how furnace blowers can impact HVAC efficiency. In fact, studies show that the most common blowers have efficiencies of...

205

Energy Assessment Protocol for Glass Furnaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy funded development of a methodology that could be used by glass producers to increase furnace efficiency, and that could serve as a model for other energy-intensive industries. Accordingly, a team comprising PPG Industries...

Plodinec, M. J.; Kauffman, B. M.; Norton, O. P.; Richards, C.; Connors, J.; Wishnick, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

DOE Furnace Rule Ex Parte Communication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Philadelphia Gas Works (POW), the largest municipally-owned  gas utility in the United States, is concerned about the impact that a new furnace efficiency rule could have on POW, its customers, the...

207

Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $6,000 Program Info Funding Source New Hampshire Renewable Energy Fund (FY 2013) Start Date 04/14/2010 Expiration Date When progr State New Hampshire Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 30% Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is offering rebates of 30% of the installed cost of qualifying new residential bulk-fed, wood-pellet central heating boilers or furnaces. The maximum rebate is $6,000. To qualify, systems must (1) become operational on or after May 1,

209

Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Dale Meade Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Abstract Understanding the properties of high gain (alpha­dominated) fusion plasmas in an advanced toroidal configuration­dominated plasmas in advanced toroidal systems. Technical Challenges for Major Next Steps in Magnetic Fusion Energy

210

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

Development of Reduced Combustion Mechanisms for Premixed Flame Modeling in Steam Cracking Furnaces with Emphasis on NO Emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic reduction of the detailed combustion chemistry based on the application of quasi steady state (QSS) approximation for some species leads to several reduced mechanisms (7- to 12-step) for a hydrocarbon?hydrogen fuel with a composition representative for industrial steam cracking furnaces. ... The basis for the construction of all reduced mechanisms is a skeletal mechanism obtained from the detailed GRI-Mech 3.0 and consisting of 223 elementary reaction steps. ... for the near-ignition state based on both mechanisms identified the deficiencies of the 1998-mechanism, in particular, the specifics of the low-temp. ...

G. D. Stefanidis; G. J. Heynderickx; G. B. Marin

2005-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Diagnostics for Fast Ignition Science  

SciTech Connect

The concept for Electron Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion demands sufficient laser energy be transferred from the ignitor pulse to the assembled fuel core via {approx}MeV electrons. We have assembled a suite of diagnostics to characterize such transfer. Recent experiments have simultaneously fielded absolutely calibrated extreme ultraviolet multilayer imagers at 68 and 256eV; spherically bent crystal imagers at 4 and 8keV; multi-keV crystal spectrometers; MeV x-ray bremmstrahlung and electron and proton spectrometers (along the same line of sight); nuclear activation samples and a picosecond optical probe based interferometer. These diagnostics allow careful measurement of energy transport and deposition during and following laser-plasma interactions at extremely high intensities in both planar and conical targets. Augmented with accurate on-shot laser focal spot and pre-pulse characterization, these measurements are yielding new insight into energy coupling and are providing critical data for validating numerical PIC and hybrid PIC simulation codes in an area that is crucial for many applications, particularly fast ignition. Novel aspects of these diagnostics and how they are combined to extract quantitative data on ultra high intensity laser plasma interactions are discussed, together with implications for full-scale fast ignition experiments.

MacPhee, A; Akli, K; Beg, F; Chen, C; Chen, H; Clarke, R; Hey, D; Freeman, R; Kemp, A; Key, M; King, J; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; Nakamura, N; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Phillips, T; Stephens, R; Town, R; Wei, M; VanWoerkom, L; Mackinnon, A

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion targets  

SciTech Connect

Results of studies on fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are reviewed. The aspects of the fast ignition concept, which consists in the separation of the processes of target ignition and compression due to the synchronized action of different energy drivers, are considered. Criteria for the compression ratio and heating rate of a fast ignition target, the energy balance, and the thermonuclear gain are discussed. The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the heating of a compressed target by various types of igniting drivers, namely, beams of fast electrons and light ions produced under the action of a petawatt laser pulse on the target, a heavy-ion beam generated in the accelerator, an X-ray pulse, and a hydrodynamic flow of laser-accelerated matter, are analyzed. Requirements to the igniting-driver parameters that depend on the fast ignition criteria under the conditions of specific target heating mechanisms, as well as possibilities of practical implementation of these requirements, are discussed. The experimental programs of various laboratories and the prospects of practical implementation of fast ignition of ICF targets are reviewed. To date, fast ignition is the most promising method for decreasing the ignition energy and increasing the thermonuclear gain of an ICF plasma. A large number of publications have been devoted to investigations of this method and adjacent problems of the physics of igniting drivers and their interaction with plasma. This review presents results of only some of these studies that, in the author's opinion, allow one to discuss in detail the main physical aspects of the fast ignition concept and understand the current state and prospects of studies in this direction.

Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

First Hot Electron Measurements in Near-ignition Scale Hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

On the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the hot electrons generated in laser heated hohlraums are inferred from the >20 keV bremsstrahlung emission measured with the FFLEX broadband spectrometer. New high energy (>200 keV) time resolved channels were added to meet requirements for ignition and to infer the generated >170 keV hot electrons that can cause ignition capsule preheat. First hot electron measurements in near ignition scaled hohlraums heated by 96-192 NIF laser beams are presented.

Dewald, E L; Suter, L J; Thomas, C; Hunter, S; Meeker, D; Meezan, N; Glenzer, S H; Bond, E; Kauffman, R L; Kilkenny, J; Landen, O

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High-Average-Power Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High hole shields SSD, Polarization smoothing Improvements in ignition point designs have reduced laser Campaign NIF-0905-11310 09EIM/dj 1997 1.7 MJ ignition point design 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 0 0.5 1 1.5 Laser

216

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Home - combustion, compression ignition,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Combustion Visualization * Combustion Visualization * Compression-Ignition * Emissions Control * Fuel Injection and Sprays * Idling * Multi-Dimensional Modeling * Particulate Matter * Spark Ignition Green Racing GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Engines Omnivorous engine tested by Thomas Wallner Thomas Wallner tests the omnivorous engine, a type of spark-ignition engine. Argonne's engine research is contributing to advances in technology that will impact the use of conventional and alternative fuels and the design of advanced technology vehicles. Compression Ignition

217

Stoichiometric Compression Ignition (SCI) Engine Concept | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications An Experimental Investigation of the Origin of Increased NOx Emissions When Fueling a Heavy-Duty Compression-Ignition Engine with...

218

Physics Guidelines for the Compact Ignition Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Compact Ignition Tokamak Program / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

J. Sheffield; R. A. Dory; W. A. Houlberg; N. A. Uckan; M. Bell; P. Colestock; J. Hosea; S. Kaye; M. Petravic; D. Post; S. D. Scott; K. M. Young; K. H. Burrell; N. Ohyabu; R. Stambaugh; M. Greenwald; P. Liewer; D. Ross; C. Singer; H. Weitzner

219

Achieving laser ignition using zero index metamaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of laser ignition using zero index metamaterials (ZIM) is investigated theoretically. Using this method, multiple laser beams can be focused automatically regardless of...

Zhai, Tianrui; Shi, Jinwei; Chen, Shujing; Liu, Dahe; Zhang, Xinping

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Laser Fusion: The Uncertain Road to Ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In early 2014, the U.S. National Ignition Facility announced that it had achieved a fusion reaction that produced net positive energy. Fusion scientists have applauded that...

Rose, Melinda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

other ICF high energy density facilities leading to demonstrate fusion ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The NIF is also being used to support basic science and...

222

Fast Ignition Program in Japan "Progress of Fast Ignition Project; FIREX"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Fast Ignition Program in Japan "Progress of Fast Ignition Project; FIREX" Fast Ignition.4 Fusion , Laser Astrophysics, EUV, and so on are main projects Laser Spectroscopy NIFS, Okayama Univ., High Pressure EOS AIST Tokyo Inst. Tech Laser Acceleration, Terahertz Coherent X-Ray JAEA KPRI Fusion

223

Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

Measure Guideline: High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces  

SciTech Connect

This Measure Guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces. Topics covered include when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure, how to identify and address risks, and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

Brand, L.; Rose, W.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. Balance of plant impacts, primarily on the ESP particulate control device, were also determined during both tests. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

Gary M. Blythe

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assessment of Potential for Ion Driven Fast Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mm radius ion beams Fast Ignition (laser or fast ion pulse)deg half cone angle Fast Ignition (laser or fast ion pulse)ion beam pulses for fast ignition, laser generated ion beams

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development and Validation of a 3-Dimensional CFB Furnace Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At Foster Wheeler, a three-dimensional CFB furnace model is essential part of knowledge development of CFB furnace process regarding solid mixing, combustion, ... Analyses of field-test results in industrial-scal...

Arl Vepsäläinen; Karl Myöhänen…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Residential Two-Stage Gas Furnaces - Do They Save Energy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of two-stage furnaces with BPM motors provides electricityof two-stage furnaces with BPM motors provides electricityPSC) and brushless permanent magnet (BPM) 1 . PSC motors are

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Lutz, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

Lewis, Raymond (Raymond A.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

DOE Publishes Final Rule for Residential Furnace Fan Test Procedure...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE Publishes Final Rule for Residential Furnace Fan Test Procedure DOE Publishes Final Rule for Residential Furnace Fan Test Procedure January 3, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The...

231

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Energy Center ABSTRACT Currently, total electricity consumption of furnacesFurnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential Victor Franco, James Lutz, Alex Lekov, and Lixing Gu (Florida Solar

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Residential Two-Stage Gas Furnaces - Do They Save Energy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total fuel and electricity consumption under laboratoryto decrease the electricity consumption of furnaces, mainlytotal fuel and electricity consumption under laboratory

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Lutz, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

DOE Publishes Final Rule for Residential Furnace Fan Test Procedure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has published a final rule regarding test procedures for residential furnace fans.

234

High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition Engines High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition Engines Presentation given at DEER 2006,...

235

Improving the Efficiency of Spark Ignited, Stoichiometric Natural...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Spark Ignited, Stoichiometric Natural Gas Engines Improving the Efficiency of Spark Ignited, Stoichiometric Natural Gas Engines This work focused on using camless engine technology...

236

Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

237

Effect of focal size on the laser ignition of compressed natural gas–air mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laser ignition of compressed natural gas–air mixtures was investigated in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC) as well as in a single cylinder engine. Laser ignition has several potential advantages over conventional spark ignition system. Laser ignition relies on the fact that optical breakdown (plasma generation) in gases occurs at high intensities of ?1011 W/cm2. Such high intensities can be achieved by focusing a pulsed laser beam to small focal sizes. The focal spot size depends on several parameters such as laser wavelength, beam diameter at the converging lens, beam quality and focal length. In this investigation, the focal length of the converging lens and the beam quality were varied and the corresponding effects on minimum ignition energy as well as pressure rise were recorded. The flame kernel was visualized and correlated with the rate of pressure rise inside the combustion chamber. This investigation will be helpful in the optimization of laser and optics parameters in laser ignition. It was found that beam quality factor and focal length of focusing lens have a strong impact on the minimum ignition energy required for combustion. Combustion duration depends on the energy density at the focal spot and size of the flame kernel.

Dhananjay Kumar Srivastava; Ernst Wintner; Avinash Kumar Agarwal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential gas furnaces, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

239

Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect

The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of feed composition variations on process operating conditions and slag product performance; and collecting mass balance and operating data to support equipment and instrument design.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Optimized Design of a Furnace Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of global climate change and a greater awareness of consumer based economics, there is a drive to reform industrial consumption habits. Energy geared towards industrial applications is projected to rise by approximately 0.3% per year from 2010 to 2035.... (2012, March 31). Annual Energy Outlook. Available: http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/MT_energydemand.cfm [2] U. S. E. I. Administration. (2012, March 21). Annual Energy Outlook 2012. Available: http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/MT_energydemand.cfm [3...

Morelli, F.; Bretschneider, R.; Dauzat, J.; Guymon, M.; Studebaker, J.; Rasmussen, B. P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Feasibility Study for Recycling Used Automotive Oil Filters In A Blast Furnace  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study has indicated that of the approximately 120,000 tons of steel available to be recycled from used oil filters (UOF's), a maximum blast furnace charge of 2% of the burden may be anticipated for short term use of a few months. The oil contained in the most readily processed UOF's being properly hot drained and crushed is approximately 12% to 14% by weight. This oil will be pyrolized at a rate of 98% resulting in additional fuel gas of 68% and a condensable hydrocarbon fraction of 30%, with the remaining 2% resulting as carbon being added into the burden. Based upon the writer's collected information and assessment, there appears to be no operational problems relating to the recycling of UOF's to the blast furnace. One steel plant in the US has been routinely charging UOF's at about 100 tons to 200 tons per month for many years. Extensive analysis and calculations appear to indicate no toxic consideration as a result of the pyrolysis of the small contained oil ( in the 'prepared' UOFs) within the blast furnace. However, a hydrocarbon condensate in the ''gasoline'' fraction will condense in the blast furnace scrubber water and may require additional processing the water treatment system to remove benzene and toluene from the condensate. Used oil filters represent an additional source of high quality iron units that may be effectively added to the charge of a blast furnace for beneficial value to the operator and to the removal of this resource from landfills.

Ralph M. Smailer; Gregory L. Dressel; Jennifer Hsu Hill

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

243

Target Diagnostics Supports NIF's Path to Ignition  

SciTech Connect

The physics requirements derived from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experimental campaigns are leading to a wide variety of target diagnostics. Software development for the control and analysis of these diagnostics is included in the NIF Integrated Computer Control System, Diagnostic Control System and Data Visualization. These projects implement the configuration, controls, data analysis and visual representation of most of these diagnostics. To date, over 40 target diagnostics have been developed to support NIF experiments. In 2011 diagnostics were developed or enhanced to measure Ignition performance in a high neutron yield environment. Performance is optimized around four key variables: Adiabat (a) which is the strength and timing of four shocks delivered to the target, Velocity (V) of the imploding target, Mix (M) is the uniformity of the burn, and the Shape (S) of the imploding Deuterium Tritium (DT) hot spot. The diagnostics used to measure each of these parameters is shown in figure 1. Adiabat is measured using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) diagnostic consisting of three streak cameras. To provide for more accurate adiabat measurements the VISAR streak cameras were enhanced in FY11 with a ten comb fiducial signal controller to allow for post shot correction of the streak camera sweep non-linearity. Mix is measured by the Neutron Time of Flight (NTOF) and Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostics. To accommodate high neutron yield shots, NTOF diagnostic controls are being modified to use Mach Zehnder interferometer signals to allow the digitizers to be moved from near the target chamber to the neutron shielded diagnostic mezzanine. In December 2011 the first phase of RAGS diagnostic commissioning will be completed. This diagnostic will analyze the tracers that are added to NIF target capsules that undergo nuclear reactions during the shot. These gases are collected and purified for nuclear counting by the RAGS system. Three new instrument controllers were developed and commissioned to support this diagnostic. A residual-gas analyzer (RGA) instrument measures the gas content at various points in the system. The Digital Gamma Spectrometer instrument measures the radiological spectrum of the decaying gas isotopes. A final instrument controller was developed to interface to a PLC based Gas collection system. In order to support the implosion velocity measurements an additional Gated X-ray Detector (GXD) diagnostic was tested and commissioned. This third GXD views the target through a slit contained in its snout and allows the other GXD diagnostics to be used for measuring the shape on the same shot. In order to measure the implosion shape in a high neutron environment, Actide Readout In A Neutron Environment (ARIANE) and Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostics were commissioned. The controls for ARIANE, a fixed port gated x-ray imager, contain a neutron shielded camera and micro channel plate pulser with its neutron sensitive electronics located in the diagnostic mezzanine. The NI diagnostic is composed of two Spectral Instruments SI-1000 cameras located 20M from the target and provides neutron images of the DT hot spot for high yield shots. The development and commissioning of these new or enhanced diagnostics in FY11 have provided meaningful insight that facilitates the optimization of the four key Ignition variables. In FY12 they will be adding three new diagnostics and enhancing four existing diagnostics in support of the continuing optimization series of campaigns.

Shelton, R

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

244

Refinery Furnaces Retrofit with Gas Turbines Achieve Both Energy Savings and Emission Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A., Rome, Italy ABSTRACT Integrating gas turbines with refinery furnaces can be a cost effective means of reducing NO emissions while also generating electricity ~t an attractive heat rate. Design considerations and system costs are presented..., described in Figure 1, 2. The combustion oxygen is carried by a more I I i I' has been used as a design basis. The heater is based on the actual design of a unit built by KTI SpA. The furnace does not include air preheater or steam generation...

Giacobbe, F.; Iaquaniello, G.; Minet, R. G.; Pietrogrande, P.

245

Combustion process in a biomass grate fired industry furnace: a CFD study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a CFD investigation of the combustion process in a 50 MW grate fired furnace. The CFD results were compared with available experimental data at the furnace outlet to validate the models for the volatile oxidation and NOx formation. The models were then used to predict the effect of an 'ECO' tube system on NOx emissions. It was shown that with an improved flow structure and air distribution, 30% NOx reduction can be obtained. CFD results revealed the impact of load and fuel moisture on the flow structure, the temperature distribution and the flow residence time.

T. Klason; X.S. Bai

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Inertial Confinement Fusion: steady progressInertial Confinement Fusion: steady progress towards ignition and high gaintowards ignition and high gain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Vilamoura, Portugal. #12;Main route to ignition: indirect laser drive with central hot-spot ignition and ignition implosion DT capsule hohlraum case ~ 30 m of Au (or Pb)µ laser beams 5.5 mm 9.5 mm ablator DT ice constantly accumulated on currently operating non- ignition-scale lasers at Rochester, LANL, ILE, UK

247

Fast Ignition: Nuclear Fusion with UltraFast Ignition: Nuclear Fusion with Ultra--intenseintense LASERsLASERs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pellet composed of deuterium and tritium. In the fast ignition regime a secondy p g g p p g g laser, nearly limitless, fuel source. Fusion via Fast Ignition MethodUltra-Intense Laser Research atFusion via Direct Drive Method U Strathclyde IgnitionCompression IgnitionCompression · Very intense lasers (shown

Strathclyde, University of

248

Hot electron measurements in ignition relevant Hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

On the National Ignition Facility (NIF), hot electrons generated in laser heated Hohlraums are inferred from the >20 keV bremsstrahlung emission measured with the time integrated FFLEX broadband spectrometer. New high energy (>200 keV) time resolved channels were added to infer the generated >170 keV hot electrons that can cause ignition capsule preheat. First hot electron measurements in near ignition scaled Hohlraums heated by 96-192 NIF laser beams are presented.

Dewald, E. L.; Thomas, C.; Hunter, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Bond, E.; Celeste, J.; Bradley, D.; Bell, P.; Kauffman, R. L.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Model of Phosphorus Precipitation and Crystal Formation in Electric Arc Furnace Steel Slag Filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Model of Phosphorus Precipitation and Crystal Formation in Electric Arc Furnace Steel Slag Filters ... Phosphorus is generally the limiting nutrient in freshwater systems and its discharge from wastewaters favors eutrophication. ... (1) Stricter regulations for phosphorus discharges to smaller treatment plants creates a need for the development of new and extensive (requiring minimal operation) treatment technologies. ...

Dominique Claveau-Mallet; Scott Wallace; Yves Comeau

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Inertial-confinement fusion with fast ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...achieve ignition and thermonuclear burn. For a fusion power plant, gains...the ratio of the thermonuclear energy to the initial...released by the thermonuclear burn in unit mass...compressed spherical fusion fuel. Higher gain...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

History of the approach to ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor...recommended. plasma|fusion|tokamak|ignition...density plasma to thermonuclear temperatures...in the quest for fusion power. Such an...temperatures of thermonuclear interest, this...for an acceptable fusion reactor. By a...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ignition with Laser Break-Down  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is considered that ignition with laser break-down is one of the applications of solid-state lasers. This paper shows basic experimental results indicating the advantages of laser...

Furutani, Hirohide; Saito, Takeshi

253

Focus issue introduction: Laser Ignition Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this feature issue is to share information on laser ignition and related sciences and technologies. This feature offers five papers in the field that cover aspects of...

Taira, Takunori; Furutani, Hirohide; Guo, Chunlei; Wintner, Ernst; Akamatsu, Fumiteru; Lucht, Robert; Washio, Kunihiko

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Confinement scaling and ignition in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

A drift wave turbulence model is used to compute the scaling and magnitude of central electron temperature and confinement time of tokamak plasmas. The results are in accord with experiment. Application to ignition experiments shows that high density (1 to 2) . 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, high field, B/sub T/ > 10 T, but low temperature T approx. 6 keV constitute the optimum path to ignition.

Perkins, F.W.; Sun, Y.C.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The National Ignition Facility: Status of Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bruce Warner Deputy Associate Director, NIF Programs Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory October 11, 2005 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L2 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL P9266 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L28 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL National Ignition FacilityNational Ignition Facility P9292 San

256

Laser Ignition in Internal Combustion Engines- a Novel Approach Based on Advanced Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser ignition with its many potential advantages in comparison to conventional spark plug ignition has been investigated in detail. As ignition source several, to a certain extent...

Weinrotter, Martin; Kopecek, Herbert; Graf, Josef; Klausner, Johann; Herdin, Günther; Wintner, Ernst

257

Transonic Combustion ?- Injection Strategy Development for Supercritical Gasoline Injection-Ignition in a Light Duty Engine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Novel fuel injection equipment enables knock-free ignition with low noise and smoke in compression-ignition engines and low-particulates in spark-ignition engines.

258

Dofasco`s No. 4 blast furnace hearth breakout, repair and rescue  

SciTech Connect

On May 5, 1994, after producing 9.5 million metric tons of iron, Dofasco`s No. 4 Blast Furnace experienced a hearth breakout 250 millimeters below the west taphole. The hot metal spill caused a fire resulting in severe damage and 33 days of lost production. During a 26-day period, electrical wiring, water drainage systems and both tapholes were repaired. Recovery from an unprepared furnace stop of this length, with the deadman depleted is difficult. To aid with the rescue Hoogovens-designed oxygen/fuel lances were commissioned. The furnace recovery began with a lance in each taphole and all tuyeres plugged. Six days after startup the furnace was casting into torpedo cars, and after nine days operation had returned to normal. This incident prompted Dofasco to expand the hearth monitoring system to detect and prevent similar occurrences. During the repair, 203 new thermocouples were installed in the hearth, concentrating on the tapholes and elephant foot areas. These thermocouples were installed at various depths and locations to allow heat flux calculations. This hearth monitoring system has already identified other problem areas and provided valuable information about hearth drainage patterns. This information has allowed them to develop control strategies to manage localized problem areas.

Donaldson, R.J.; Fischer, A.J.; Sharp, R.M.; Stothart, D.W. [Dofasco Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Modeling of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) of methane  

SciTech Connect

The operation of piston engines on a compression ignition cycle using a lean, homogeneous charge has many potential attractive features. These include the potential for extremely low NO{sub x} and particulate emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency and not requiring the expensive high pressure injection system of the typical modem diesel engine. Using the HCT chemical kinetics code to simulate autoignition of methane-air mixtures, we have explored the ignition timing, burn duration, NO{sub x} production, indicated efficiency and power output of an engine with a compression ratio of 15:1 at 1200 and 2400 rpm. HCT was modified to include the effects of heat transfer. This study used a single control volume reaction zone that varies as a function of crank angle. The ignition process is controlled by varying the intake equivalence ratio and varying the residual gas trapping (RGT). RGT is internal exhaust gas recirculation which recycles both heat and combustion product species. It is accomplished by varying the timing of the exhaust valve closure. Inlet manifold temperature was held constant at 330 Kelvins. Results show that there is a narrow range of operational conditions that show promise of achieving the control necessary to vary power output while keeping indicated efficiency above 50% and NO{sub x} levels below 100 ppm.

Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.M.; Westbrook, C.; Pitz, W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Residential Two-Stage Gas Furnaces - Do They Save Energy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE test procedure for several furnace efficiency levels (80%, 81%, 90%,ASHRAE Test Procedure 80% AFUE (Two-stage, BPM) 81% AFUE (Two-stage, BPM) 90%

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Lutz, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nitrogen oxide emissions from a kraft recovery furnace  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions from a rebuilt kraft recovery furnace slightly exceeded the specified limit of 1.1 lb/ton (0.55 kg/metric ton) of black-liquor solids. Mill trials were undertaken to determine whether NOx emissions could be minimized by modifying furnace operation. NOx emissions increased when secondary air was shifted to tertiary ports. NOx emissions fell when the amounts of primary and total air were decreased, but this increased emissions of other pollutants. After demonstrating that best operation of the furnace could not meet the permit with an emissions limit that matched the furnace's performance at best operation.

Prouty, A.L.; Stuart, R.C. (James River Corp., Camas, WA (United States)); Caron, A.L. (NCASI West Coast Regional Office, Corvallis, OR (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Implementation of an Organic Rankine cycle on a Stepping furnace.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this master thesis an implementation of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) on a stepping furnace in a steel mill is modeled and proposed.… (more)

Pižorn, Žiga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Breakthrough Furnace Can Cut Solar Industry Costs (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

A game-changing Optical Cavity Furnace (OCF), developed by NREL, uses optics to heat and purify solar cells at unmatched precision, while also boosting the cells' efficiency.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Thermophotovoltaic furnace–generator for the home using low bandgap GaSb cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that distributed combined heat and power (CHP) systems for commercial and industrial buildings are economically desirable because they conserve energy. Here, a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) unit is described that brings CHP into the home providing both heat and electric power by replacing the typical home heating furnace with a combined TPV furnace–generator. First, the design of a 1.5 kWelectric/12.2 kWthermal TPV furnace–generator is described along with the key components that make it possible. Diffused junction GaSb cells are one of these key components. Secondly, an economic cost target is determined for this system where the cost of the photovoltaic array will be key to the economical implementation of this concept. Finally, it is argued that the GaSb cells and arrays can be manufactured at the required low cost. The cost target can be reached because the GaSb cells in the TPV furnace–generator can produce an electrical power density of 1 W cm?2 which is 100 times higher than the typical solar cell. The cost target can also be reached because the GaSb cell fabrication process parallels the silicon solar cell process where no toxic gases are used, no wafer polish is required and cast polycrystalline cells can be used.

L M Fraas; J E Avery; H X Huang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The role of the National Ignition Facility in energy production from inertial fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in IFE attractive. inertial fusion energy|laser fusion|ignition (lasers)|thermonuclear gain|National Ignition Facility...inertial fusion energy; laser fusion; ignition (lasers); thermonuclear gain; National Ignition Facility...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analytical model for fast-shock ignition  

SciTech Connect

A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ?4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ?0.3??micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

Ghasemi, S. A., E-mail: abo.ghasemi@yahoo.com; Farahbod, A. H. [Plasma Physics Research School, NSTRI, North Kargar Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sobhanian, S. [Department of Physics, Tabriz University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Thermonuclear supernova simulations with stochastic ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply an ad hoc model for dynamical ignition in three-dimensional numerical simulations of thermonuclear supernovae assuming pure deflagrations. The model makes use of the statistical description of temperature fluctuations in the pre-supernova core proposed by Wunsch & Woosley (2004). Randomness in time is implemented by means of a Poisson process. We are able to vary the explosion energy and nucleosynthesis depending on the free parameter of the model which controls the rapidity of the ignition process. However, beyond a certain threshold, the strength of the explosion saturates and the outcome appears to be robust with respect to number of ignitions. In the most energetic explosions, we find about 0.75 solar masses of iron group elements. Other than in simulations with simultaneous multi-spot ignition, the amount of unburned carbon and oxygen at radial velocities of a few 1000 km/s tends to be reduced for an ever increasing number of ignition events and, accordingly, more pronounced layering results.

W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

268

Processing automotive shredder fluff for a blast furnace injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Processing automotive shredder fluff for a blast furnace injection S. GUIGNOT* , M. GAMET, N. *Corresponding author: s.guignot@brgm.fr, (+33)238643485 Abstract Automotive shredder fluff is a byproduct. Keywords: automotive shredder residues, fluff, iron recovery, process, blast furnace hal-01017129

Boyer, Edmond

269

Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement January 6, 2010 - 8:26am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory For the past few weeks, my forced-air gas furnace has been on the fritz. I blame this on the fact that I haven't been as diligent as I should have been with regular furnace maintenance, which includes: Checking the condition of the vent connection pipe and chimney Checking the physical integrity of the heat exchanger Adjusting the controls to provide optimum water and air temperature settings for both efficiency and comfort Having a technician perform a combustion-efficiency test Checking the combustion chamber for cracks. Testing for carbon monoxide

270

ENERGY STAR Qualified Gas Furnaces | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Furnaces Gas Furnaces Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data ENERGY STAR Qualified Gas Furnaces Dataset Summary Description Gas Furnaces that have earned the ENERGY STAR are more efficient than standard models. ENERGY STAR is the trusted symbol for energy efficiency helping consumers save money and protect the environment through energy-efficient products and practices. More information on ENERGY STAR is available at www.energystar.gov. Tags {Furnaces,"Energy Star",products,"energy efficiency",efficient,"greenhouse gas emissions",climate,utility,utilities,household,savings,labels,partners,certification} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility

271

Furnace Standards Enforcement Policy Statement | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Standards Enforcement Policy Statement Furnace Standards Enforcement Policy Statement Furnace Standards Enforcement Policy Statement On January 11, 2013, the Department of Justice, on behalf of DOE, and the American Public Gas Association (APGA) filed a joint motion asking the court to enter an agreement to settle APGA's challenge to DOE's June 27, 2011 Direct Final Rule. The settlement agreement would, among other things, vacate the energy conservation standards applicable to non-weatherized gas furnaces established in the DFR. In an exercise of its enforcement discretion, DOE will, during the pendency of the litigation, act in a manner consistent with the terms of the settlement agreement with regard to the enforcement of the standards. Furnace Standards Enforcement Policy Statement - April 5, 2013

272

Method of operating a centrifugal plasma arc furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A centrifugal plasma arc furnace is used to vitrify contaminated soils and other waste materials. An assessment of the characteristics of the waste is performed prior to introducing the waste into the furnace. Based on the assessment, a predetermined amount of iron is added to each batch of waste. The waste is melted in an oxidizing atmosphere into a slag. The added iron is oxidized into Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Time of exposure to oxygen is controlled so that the iron does not oxidize into Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Slag in the furnace remains relatively non-viscous and consequently it pours out of the furnace readily. Cooled and solidified slag produced by the furnace is very resistant to groundwater leaching. The slag can be safely buried in the earth without fear of contaminating groundwater. 3 figs.

Kujawa, S.T.; Battleson, D.M.; Rademacher, E.L. Jr.; Cashell, P.V.; Filius, K.D.; Flannery, P.A.; Whitworth, C.G.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

Method of operating a centrifugal plasma arc furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A centrifugal plasma arc furnace is used to vitrify contaminated soils and other waste materials. An assessment of the characteristics of the waste is performed prior to introducing the waste into the furnace. Based on the assessment, a predetermined amount of iron is added to each batch of waste. The waste is melted in an oxidizing atmosphere into a slag. The added iron is oxidized into Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4. Time of exposure to oxygen is controlled so that the iron does not oxidize into Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3. Slag in the furnace remains relatively non-viscous and consequently it pours out of the furnace readily. Cooled and solidified slag produced by the furnace is very resistant to groundwater leaching. The slag can be safely buried in the earth without fear of contaminating groundwater.

Kujawa, Stephan T. (Butte, MT); Battleson, Daniel M. (Butte, MT); Rademacher, Jr., Edward L. (Butte, MT); Cashell, Patrick V. (Butte, MT); Filius, Krag D. (Butte, MT); Flannery, Philip A. (Ramsey, MT); Whitworth, Clarence G. (Butte, MT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fuel effects in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogenous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion is a new method of burning fuel in internal combustion (IC) engines. In an HCCI engine, the fuel and air are premixed prior to combustion, like in a spark-ignition ...

Angelos, John P. (John Phillip)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Numerical simulation of laser ignition of a liquid fuel film  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were used to examine a set of interrelated physicochemical processes involved in the ignition of a liquid fuel film by a low-power laser beam. The delay time of ignition of a liquid fuel fil...

G. V. Kuznetsov; P. A. Strizhak

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Laser ignition in internal-combustion engines: Sparkless initiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser ignition has been implemented in a single-cylinder ... pressure versus crank angle) were obtained for laser ignition with nano- and microsecond pulses of an Nd:YAG laser. The maximum power of microsecond pu...

A. A. Andronov; V. A. Gurin; A. V. Marugin; A. P. Savikin…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science NIF Fun Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 National Ignition Facility & Photon Science NIF Fun Facts niF Fun Facts The National Ignition Facility (NIF), became operational in march 2009. Planning began in the early 1990s,...

278

The velocity campaign for ignition on NIF  

SciTech Connect

Achieving inertial confinement fusion ignition requires a symmetric, high velocity implosion. Experiments show that we can reach 95 {+-} 5% of the required velocity by using a 420 TW, 1.6 MJ laser pulse. In addition, experiments with a depleted uranium hohlraum show an increase in capsule performance which suggests an additional 18 {+-} 5 {mu}m/ns of velocity with uranium hohlraums over gold hohlraums. Combining these two would give 99 {+-} 5% of the ignition velocity. Experiments show that we have the ability to tune symmetry using crossbeam transfer. We can control the second Legendre mode (P2) by changing the wavelength separation between the inner and outer cones of laser beams. We can control the azimuthal m = 4 asymmetry by changing the wavelength separation between the 23.5 and 30 degree beams on NIF. This paper describes our 'first pass' tuning the implosion velocity and shape on the National Ignition Facility laser [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 041006 (2009)].

Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celeste, J. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Glenn, S.; Haan, S. W.; Haynam, C. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; London, R. A.; MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc furnace dust Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Renewable Energy 2 The Effec' of Furnace Design and Operation on Air Pollution Summary: chemical constituents in furnace gases arc very malodorous, or toxic, when...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development of coke properties during the descent in the blast furnace.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The efficiency in use of reducing agents in blast furnace (BF) ironmaking has been significantly improved over the years. At most blast furnaces, auxiliary fuels… (more)

Maria Lundgren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Air Charge Control for Turbocharged Spark Ignition Engines with Internal Exhaust Gas Recirculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the turbocharger wastegate, and the Variable Valve Timing (VVT) system are three actuators in the air path systemAir Charge Control for Turbocharged Spark Ignition Engines with Internal Exhaust Gas Recirculation of transient cylin- der charge control, based on a cycle-averaged mean-value model for a turbocharged spark

Stefanopoulou, Anna

283

DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

DOEEIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic...

284

Shock Ignition: A New Approach to High Gain Inertial Confinement Fusion on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shock ignition, an alternative concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, is explored as a new approach to high gain, inertial confinement fusion targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results indicate thermonuclear yields of ?120–250??MJ may be possible with laser drive energies of 1–1.6 MJ, while gains of ?50 may still be achievable at only ?0.2??MJ drive energy. The scaling of NIF energy gain with laser energy is found to be G?126E??(MJ)0.510. This offers the potential for high-gain targets that may lead to smaller, more economic fusion power reactors and a cheaper fusion energy development path.

L. J. Perkins; R. Betti; K. N. LaFortune; W. H. Williams

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

Scaling laws for ignition at the National Ignition Facility from first principles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed an analytical physics model from fundamental physics principles and used the reduced one-dimensional model to derive a thermonuclear ignition criterion and implosion energy scaling laws applicable to inertial confinement fusion capsules. The scaling laws relate the fuel pressure and the minimum implosion energy required for ignition to the peak implosion velocity and the equation of state of the pusher and the hot fuel. When a specific low-entropy adiabat path is used for the cold fuel, our scaling laws recover the ignition threshold factor dependence on the implosion velocity, but when a high-entropy adiabat path is chosen, the model agrees with recent measurements.

Baolian Cheng; Thomas J. T. Kwan; Yi-Ming Wang; Steven H. Batha

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

A comparative study of laser ignition and spark ignition with gasoline–air mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The ignition probability and minimum ignition energy (MIE) of premixed gasoline–air mixture for different equivalence ratio was experimentally studied using a nanosecond pulse at 532 nm and 1064 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in a constant-volume combustion chamber (CVCC) The result was compared with the spark ignition. The initial pressure and temperature of the mixture was 0.1 MP and 363 K, respectively. The research indicates that within the flammable range, the probability increases when the ignition energy increases and the distribution of MIE with the equivalence ratios is U-shape for both laser and spark ignition. For laser ignition with 532 nm, when the incident energy is higher than 110 mJ or the absorbed energy is high than 31 mJ, 100% of ignition could be obtained within equivalence ratios of 0.8–1.6. For 1064 nm it is 235 mJ and 30 mJ. To get the same ignition probability of mixture with identical equivalence ratio, the incident energy of 1064 nm is twice more than the incident energy of 532 nm, while the absorbed energy values are virtually the same. It indicates that significant wavelength dependence is expected for the initial free electrons but irrelevant for the process of absorbing energy. The initial free electrons are produced from impurities in gasoline–air mixture because the intensity in the focus (1012 W/cm2) is too low to ionize gas molecules via the multi-photon ionization process, which requires higher irradiance (?1014 W/cm2). The MIE obtained with a laser-spark ignition is greater than that measured by electrical sparks. The MIE for laser ignition was obtained at equivalence ratio of 1.0 both of 532 nm and 1064 nm, and it was 13.5 mJ and 9.5 mJ, respectively. But for spark ignition, the MIE is 3.76 mJ with equivalence ratio of 1.6. What?s more, laser ignition extends the lean flammability limit from 0.8 to 0.6.

Cangsu Xu; Donghua Fang; Qiyuan Luo; Jian Ma; Yang Xie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Experimental basis for laser-plasma interactions in ignition hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A series of laser plasma interaction experiments at OMEGA (LLE, Rochester) using gas-filled hohlraums shed light on the behavior of stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering at various plasma conditions encountered in indirect drive ignition designs. We present detailed experimental results that quantify the density, temperature, and intensity thresholds for both of these instabilities. In addition to controlling plasma parameters, the National Ignition Campaign relies on optical beam smoothing techniques to mitigate backscatter. We show that polarization smoothing is effective at controlling backscatter. These results provide an experimental basis for forthcoming experiments on National Ignition Facility.

Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Doeppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

288

Laser-Plasma Coupling with Ignition-Scale Targets: New Regimes and Frontiers on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is very exciting that the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is now operational and being used to irradiate ignition-scale hohlraums. As discussed in the last ... Summer School in Physics on the topic of laser-p...

William L. Kruer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Free Piston Linear Alternator  

SciTech Connect

An experimental and theoretical investigation of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) free piston powered linear alternator has been conducted to determine if improvements can be made in the thermal and conversion efficiencies of modern electrical generator systems. Performance of a free piston engine was investigated using a rapid compression expansion machine and a full cycle thermodynamic model. Linear alternator performance was investigated with a computer model. In addition linear alternator testing and permanent magnet characterization hardware were developed. The development of the two-stroke cycle scavenging process has begun.

Janson Wu; Nicholas Paradiso; Peter Van Blarigan; Scott Goldsborough

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ignition and Flame Quenching of Quiescent Fuel Mists  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ignition and Flame Quenching of Quiescent Fuel Mists D. R. Ballal A. H. Lefebvre A...the ignition of quiescent multidroplet fuel mists which assumes that chemical reaction...spark, of an adequate concentration of fuel vapour in the ignition zone. From analysis...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Thermite powder ignition by localized microwaves Yehuda Meir, Eli Jerby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there is a considerable motivation to develop practical means to ignite pure thermites. Laser beams were found effectiveThermite powder ignition by localized microwaves Yehuda Meir, Eli Jerby Faculty of Engineering 2012 Keywords: Thermite Microwave heating Hotspots Thermal runaway Ignition a b s t r a c t This paper

Jerby, Eli

292

Planning for the National Ignition Campaign on NIF Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

yields>1 MJ (an ignition margin >1) with the expected precision of target experiments, laser performance by melting with the first shock ·We predict an ignition margin >1 at the point design laser energy #12;A CH that roll up to set the ignition conditions ~150 lower parameters 1D quantities, e.g: Peak Laser Power Foot

293

Thermite powder ignition by localized microwaves Yehuda Meir, Eli Jerby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there is a considerable motivation to develop practical means to ignite pure thermites. Laser beams were found effectiveThermite powder ignition by localized microwaves Yehuda Meir, Eli Jerby Faculty of Engineering Keywords: Thermite Microwave heating Hotspots Thermal runaway Ignition a b s t r a c t This paper presents

Jerby, Eli

294

Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to redirect High Average Power Lasers to be synergistic with NIF ignition and other defense missions #12 · Predicted gains (fusion energy produced/laser energy input) have increased · Direct drive ignition shows) Project has begun · Will add two high-energy petawatt lasers for OMEGA for advanced backlighting and fast-ignition

295

Status of Experiments on National Ignition Facility Presented to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the hohlraum temperature range for ignition experiments at 280-300 eV · The laser, diagnostic, targetStatus of Experiments on National Ignition Facility Presented to 31st Annual Meeting and Symposium Associates 4NIF­1110-20542.ppt #12;National Ignition Campaign goals Moses - 31st Annual Meeting and Symposium

296

Large eddy simulation of forced ignition of an annular bluff-body burner  

SciTech Connect

The optimization of the ignition process is a crucial issue in the design of many combustion systems. Large eddy simulation (LES) of a conical shaped bluff-body turbulent nonpremixed burner has been performed to study the impact of spark location on ignition success. This burner was experimentally investigated by Ahmed et al. [Combust. Flame 151 (2007) 366-385]. The present work focuses on the case without swirl, for which detailed measurements are available. First, cold-flow measurements of velocities and mixture fractions are compared with their LES counterparts, to assess the prediction capabilities of simulations in terms of flow and turbulent mixing. Time histories of velocities and mixture fractions are recorded at selected spots, to probe the resolved probability density function (pdf) of flow variables, in an attempt to reproduce, from the knowledge of LES-resolved instantaneous flow conditions, the experimentally observed reasons for success or failure of spark ignition. A flammability map is also constructed from the resolved mixture fraction pdf and compared with its experimental counterpart. LES of forced ignition is then performed using flamelet fully detailed tabulated chemistry combined with presumed pdfs. Various scenarios of flame kernel development are analyzed and correlated with typical flow conditions observed in this burner. The correlations between, velocities and mixture fraction values at the sparking time and the success or failure of ignition, are then further discussed and analyzed. (author)

Subramanian, V.; Domingo, P.; Vervisch, L. [CORIA-CNRS and INSA de Rouen, Technopole du Madrillet, BP 8, 76801 Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Characterisation of laser ignition in hydrogen–air mixtures in a combustion bomb  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser-induced spark ignition of lean hydrogen–air mixtures was experimentally investigated using nanosecond pulses generated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm) at initial pressure of 3 MPa and temperature 323 K in a constant volume combustion chamber. Laser ignition has several advantages over conventional ignition systems especially in internal combustion engines, hence it is necessary to characterise the combustion phenomena from start of plasma formation to end of combustion. In the present experimental investigation, the formation of laser plasma by spontaneous emission technique and subsequently developing flame kernel was measured. Initially, the plasma propagates towards the incoming laser. This backward moving plasma (towards the focusing lens) grows much faster than the forward moving plasma (along the direction of laser). A piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the pressure rise in the combustion chamber. Hydrogen–air mixtures were also ignited using a spark plug under identical experimental conditions and results are compared with the laser ignition ones.

Dhananjay Kumar Srivastava; Martin Weinrotter; Kurt Iskra; Avinash Kumar Agarwal; Ernst Wintner

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparative studies of methane and propane as fuels for spark ignition and compression ignition engines  

SciTech Connect

The paper reviews the combustion characteristics of the two fuels and sets out to consider their respective performance in both spark ignition and compression ignition engines. Results of comparative tests involving spark ignition engines over a wide range of operating conditions are presented and discussed. Some of the performance characteristics considered are those relating to power output, efficiency, tendency to knock, cyclic variations, optimum spark requirements and exhaust emissions. Similarly, some of the performance characteristics in compression ignition engines considered include power output, efficiency, tendency towards knock and autoignition, exhaust emissions and low operational temperature problems. Finally, the relative operational safety aspects of the two fuels are evaluated. It is then suggested that in this regard, methane has some excellent physical, chemical and combustion characteristics that makes it a particularly safe fuel.

Karim, G.A.; Wierzba, I.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes 'day one' NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM INTEGRATION *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an arrangement that allows remote maintenance of in-vessel components and hands-on maintenance by integrating the two components into a single module. This was done to increase the baffle heat. An in­vessel remote maintenance module is also shown attached to one port. Figure 2 highlights

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan  

SciTech Connect

This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed.

Kumpan, S

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impacts assessment for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the economic and other impacts that will be created by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction and ongoing operation, as well as the impacts that may be created by new technologies that may be developed as a result of NIF development and operation.

Bay Area Economics

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. Science-based weapons and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) extends HEDP under extreme conditions that approach the high energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear

304

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability models that are used to assess and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition that approach the high-energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear explosion. Virtually all

305

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility May 29, 1997 Livermore, CA Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility

306

FY2001 Progress Report for the Spark Ignition Direct Injection R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPARK IGNITION, SPARK IGNITION, DIRECT INJECTION ENGINE R&D 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and Computer Systems Management, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for the Spark Ignition Direct Injection R&D Program

307

X-ray driven implosions at ignition relevant velocities on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Backlit convergent ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are indirect drive implosions that study the inflight dynamics of an imploding capsule. Side-on, backlit radiography provides data used by the National Ignition Campaign to measure time-dependent properties of the capsule ablator including its center of mass radius, velocity, and unablated mass. Previously, Callahan [D. A. Callahan et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056305 (2012)] and Hicks [D. H. Hicks et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 122702 (2012)] reported backlit convergent ablator experiments demonstrating velocities approaching those required for ignition. This paper focuses on implosion performance data in the “rocket curve” plane, velocity vs. ablator mass. These rocket curve data, along with supporting numerical simulations, show that the nominal 195 ?m-thick ignition capsule would reach the ignition velocity goal V = 370 km/s with low ablator mass remaining–below the goal of M = 0.25 mg. This finding led to experiments with thicker capsule ablators. A recent symmetry capsule experiment with a 20 ?m thicker capsule driven by 520 TW, 1.86 MJ laser pulse (along with a companion backlit convergent ablator experiment) appears to have demonstrated V?350 km/s with ablator mass remaining above the ignition goal.

Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Le Pape, S.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Farley, D. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Di Nicola, P.; Callahan, D. A.; Robey, H. F.; Thomas, C. A.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Clark, D. S.; Eder, D. C.; Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Point design targets, specifications, and requirements for the 2010 ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Point design targets have been specified for the initial ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. The targets contain D-T fusion fuel in an ablator of either CH with Ge doping, or Be with Cu. These shells are imploded in a U or Au hohlraum with a peak radiation temperature set between 270 and 300 eV. Considerations determining the point design include laser-plasma interactions, hydrodynamic instabilities, laser operations, and target fabrication. Simulations were used to evaluate choices, and to define requirements and specifications. Simulation techniques and their experimental validation are summarized. Simulations were used to estimate the sensitivity of target performance to uncertainties and variations in experimental conditions. A formalism is described that evaluates margin for ignition, summarized in a parameter the Ignition Threshold Factor (ITF). Uncertainty and shot-to-shot variability in ITF are evaluated, and sensitivity of the margin to characteristics of the experiment. The formalism is used to estimate probability of ignition. The ignition experiment will be preceded with an experimental campaign that determines features of the design that cannot be defined with simulations alone. The requirements for this campaign are summarized. Requirements are summarized for the laser and target fabrication.

Haan, S. W.; Lindl, J. D.; Callahan, D. A.; Clark, D. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Hammel, B. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Cook, R. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenzer, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Moses, E. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

Stolz, C J

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

A study of ignition of oil shale and char  

SciTech Connect

The ignition characteristics of Fushun, Maoming and Jordan oil shale samples have been determined experimentally by using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and CO/CO{sub 2} analyzer. Their chars have been investigated, too. Two ignition mechanisms for oil shale and shale char are suggested. One is called heterogeneous, according to which, the ignition takes place on the surface of the oil shale and/or shale char sample. Another is called homogeneous, the ignition occurring in the gas phase surrounding the particles. The ignition mechanism occurred mainly depends on the condition of the combustion, physical properties of samples and the rate of volatile release. The experimental equations of ignition for three kinds of oil shale and their char particles (Fushun, Maoming and Jordan) are given. The difference of ignition temperatures for these oil shale and their char particles are compared in terms of chemical compositions and physical properties.

Min, L.; Changshan, L. (Fushun Research Institute of Petroleum and Petrochemicals, Sinopec (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Strategic evaluation of investments in coal-dust fuel for blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the evaluation of venture investment projects in pulverized coal injection into blast furnaces.

S.V. Bogdanov; S.M. Kornilaev [State University of Management, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

An Application of the Electric Resistance Furnace to the Determination of Oxygen in Iron and Steel.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Application of the Electric Resistance Furnace to the Determination of Oxygen in Iron and Steel. ...

R. H. McMillen

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

IMPLODING IGNITION WAVES. I. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We show that converging spherical and cylindrical shock waves may ignite a detonation wave in a combustible medium, provided the radius at which the shocks become strong exceeds a critical radius, R{sub crit}. An approximate analytic expression for R{sub crit} is derived for an ideal gas equation of state and a simple (power-law-Arrhenius) reaction law, and shown to reproduce the results of numerical solutions. For typical acetylene-air experiments we find R{sub crit} {approx} 100 {mu}m (spherical) and R{sub crit} {approx} 1 mm (cylindrical). We suggest that the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) observed in these systems may be due to converging shocks produced by the turbulent deflagration flow, which reaches sub- (but near) sonic velocities on scales >>R{sub crit}. Our suggested mechanism differs from that proposed by Zel'dovich et al., in which a fine-tuned spatial gradient in the chemical induction time is required to be maintained within the turbulent deflagration flow. Our analysis may be readily extended to more complicated equations of state and reaction laws. An order of magnitude estimate of R{sub crit} within a white dwarf at the pre-detonation conditions believed to lead to Type Ia supernova explosions is 0.1 km, suggesting that our proposed mechanism may be relevant for DDT initiation in these systems. The relevance of our proposed ignition mechanism to DDT initiation may be tested by both experiments and numerical simulations.

Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Livne, Eli [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Visualization of Target Inspection data at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the target capsules used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure capsule surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. These instruments produce multi-gigabyte datasets which consist of tens to hundreds of files. Existing software can handle viewing a small subset of an entire dataset, but none can view a dataset in its entirety. Additionally, without an established mode of transport that keeps the target capsules properly aligned throughout the assembly process, a means of aligning the two dataset coordinate systems is needed. The goal of this project is to develop web based software utilizing WebGL which will provide high level overview visualization of an entire dataset, with the capability to retrieve finer details on demand, in addition to facilitating alignment of multiple datasets with one another based on common features that have been visually identified by users of the system.

Potter, D; Antipa, N

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

The National Ignition Facility: enabling fusion ignition for the 21st century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8?MJ, 500?TW, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10?m diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is housed in a 26?000?m2 environmentally controlled building and is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system. NIF provides a scientific centre for the study of inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures and pressures approaching 108?K and 1011?bar, respectively, conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF is currently configured with four laser beams activated in late 2002. These beams are being regularly used for laser performance and physics experiments, and to date nearly 250 system shots have been conducted. NIF's laser beams have generated 106?kJ in 23?ns pulses of infrared light and over 16?kJ in 3.5?ns pulses at the third harmonic (351?nm). A number of target experimental systems are being commissioned in support of experimental campaigns. This paper provides a detailed look at the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from laser commissioning shots. We also discuss NIF's high-energy density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

George H. Miller; Edward I. Moses; Craig R. Wuest

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Laser-induced spark ignition of H2/O2/Ar mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser-induced spark ignition of hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures was experimentally investigated using a Q-swiched Nd:YAG laser to break down the gas at 532 nm. The laser-based high-speed schlieren system was emplo...

ChangJian Wang; ShengLi Xu; GuangMing Jia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Furnaces Gas Furnaces Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces October 7, 2013 - 10:39am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential gas furnaces, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

318

Legendary West Virginia Senior Citizen Stays Warm With New Furnace |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legendary West Virginia Senior Citizen Stays Warm With New Furnace Legendary West Virginia Senior Citizen Stays Warm With New Furnace Legendary West Virginia Senior Citizen Stays Warm With New Furnace April 1, 2010 - 7:16pm Addthis Joshua DeLung For the last 56 years, Beulah Sisk has lived in the same house in Princeton, W.Va. Beulah, who worked for 25 years at Lloyd's Pastry Shop, is well known in Princeton. People still see her on the streets today and recognize her as an icon in the community. After a wind storm damaged Beulah's home last year, it came as no surprise when a senior center employee, concerned for Beulah's safety, told her about the weatherization assistance program. "A tree fell on my house and damaged a lot of things, including my furnace," Beulah says. "I tried to have it repaired, but it still

319

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. What does this mean for me? If you have an oil furnace or boiler, you can now burn oil blended

320

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Oil-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. Diagram of an oil boiler. New tanks are generally double-wall or have a spill container built underneath to reduce the chances of an oil spill. Typically, the tank drip pan shown here is required only for single-wall tanks and would extend the full width of the tank. | Photo courtesy State of Massachusetts. What does this mean for me? If you have an oil furnace or boiler, you can now burn oil blended

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DOE Increases Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Furnaces &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Increases Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Furnaces DOE Increases Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Furnaces & Boilers DOE Increases Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Furnaces & Boilers November 19, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has increased the energy efficiency standards for residential furnaces and boilers, underscoring the Department's commitment to meet its aggressive, five-year appliance standard rulemaking schedule, as established in its January 31, 2006, Report to Congress. The Department estimates that these amended standards, which become effective in 2015, will save the equivalent of the total amount of energy consumed by 2.5 million American households in one year, or approximately 0.25 quadrillion (10x15) British thermal

322

DOE Increases Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Furnaces &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Increases Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Furnaces DOE Increases Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Furnaces & Boilers DOE Increases Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Furnaces & Boilers November 19, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has increased the energy efficiency standards for residential furnaces and boilers, underscoring the Department's commitment to meet its aggressive, five-year appliance standard rulemaking schedule, as established in its January 31, 2006, Report to Congress. The Department estimates that these amended standards, which become effective in 2015, will save the equivalent of the total amount of energy consumed by 2.5 million American households in one year, or approximately 0.25 quadrillion (10x15) British thermal

323

American Gas Association (AGA) for DOE Furnace Product Class  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Thank you for the opportunity to brief your staff in recent weeks on an impact analysis of a national condensing furnace standard, which was conducted jointly by the American Gas Association (AGA),...

324

Mathematical Modeling of Pottery Production in Different Industrial Furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional process for pottery production was analyzed in this work by developing a fundamental mathematical model that simulates the operation of rustic pottery furnaces as employed by natives of village...

Marco Aurelio Ramírez Argáez…

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hydronic Heating Coil Versus Propane Furnace, Rehoboth Beach...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

source heat pump (ASHP) with supplemental propane furnace heating. The Building America test house uses the same ASHP unit, but supplemental heat is provided by a combined DHW and...

326

Valorization of Automotive Shredder Residues in metallurgical furnaces Project REFORBA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and the electric arc furnace (EAF) routes, P1 could be used as substitute for coal or coke, and P2 could replace with raw materials cheaper than coke. As additional potential benefits the amount of CO2 generated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

327

Paired Straight Hearth Furnace-Transformational Ironmaking Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

based on the Paired Straight Hearth Furnace (PSH) for iron ore reduction y PSH is a coal and natural gas coke-free process most suitable for American fine concentrates y PSH...

328

Image-Based Filtering and Control of Tubular Furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, an image based advanced control strategies for controling combustion processes and temperature regimes of two flows tubular furnaces in petroluem refinery has been developed as a new approach and design principles have been targeted. In ...

A. G. Abilov; O. Tuzunalp; Z. Telatar

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Energy expenditures and carbon-dioxide emissions at blast furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic analysis of the reduction of iron and the material balances of carbon shows that the CO2 levels in the blast-furnace gas may be maintained by lowering the carbon consumption in the direct reduction ...

G. V. Korshikov; V. N. Titov; V. G. Mikhailov

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Use of refractory coatings on linings of electric resistance furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of experimental and theoretical studies of the reduction of power consumption in furnaces with a lining covered by IVAKS-2 and IVA-2 intensifying refractory coatings are presented. The heating curves o...

A. V. Aksenov; V. A. Belyakov

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24 24 Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. Homes James Lutz, Camilla Dunham-Whitehead, Alex Lekov, and James McMahon Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 February 2004 This work was supported by the Office of Building Technologies and Community Systems of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. ABSTRACT In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an

332

Laboratory Evaluation of Residential Furnace BlowerPerformance  

SciTech Connect

A testing program was undertaken at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an electric utility (Pacific Gas and Electric Co.) to compare the performance of furnace blowers. This laboratory testing program was undertaken to support potential changes to California Building Standards regarding in-field furnace blower energy use. This technical support includes identifying suitable performance metrics and target performance levels for use in standards. Five different combinations of blowers and residential furnaces were tested for air moving performance. Three different types of blower and motor combinations were tested in two different furnace cabinets. The blowers were standard forward--curved impellors and a prototype impeller with reverse-inclined blades. The motors were two 6-pole permanent split capacitor (PSC) single-phase induction motors, a brushless permanent magnet (BPM) motor and a prototype BPM designed for use with a prototype reverse-inclined impellor. The laboratory testing operated each blower and furnace combination over a range of air flows and pressure differences to determine air flow performance, power consumption and efficiency. Additional tests varied the clearance between the blower housing and the furnace cabinet, and the routing of air flow into the blower cabinet.

Walker, Iain S.; Lutz, Jim D.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Precision Diagnostic System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precision Diagnostic System For NIF to reach the goal of ignition, it needs to produce highly shaped pulses that are precisely controlled. NIF's precision diagnostic system (PDS)...

334

Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Optical and electrical investigations into cathode ignition and diode closure  

SciTech Connect

The temporal behavior of high-power diodes is closely related to the impedance collapse caused by the movement of the cathode and/or anode plasmas. This impedance collapse can be especially problematic when a constant power electron beam is required. This is the case for the very large area (square meters) diodes used to pump the amplifiers within the Aurora KrF laser system. The electron beam technology development program at Los Alamos utilizes the Electron Beam Test Facility (EGTF) to study diode physics in an attempt to better understand the basic phenomenology of ignition and closure. A combination of optical and electric diagnostics has been fielded on the Electron Beam Test Facility to study ignition and closure in large area electron beam diodes. A four-channel framing camera is used to observe the formation of microplasmas on the surface of the cathode and the subsequent movement of these plasmas toward the anode. Additionally, a perveance model is used to extract information about this plasma from voltage and current profiles. Results from the two diagnostics are compared. Closure velocity measurements are presented showing little dependence on applied magnetic field for both velvet and carbon felt emitters. We also report the first observation of the screening effect in large area cold cathode diodes. 13 refs., 11 figs.

Coogan, J.J.; Rose, E.A.; Shurter, R.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Neutron source reconstruction from pinhole imaging at National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the ignition stage of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF. Since the neutron source is small (?100 ?m) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-?m resolution are 20-cm long, single-sided tapers in gold. These apertures, which have triangular cross sections, produce distortions in the image, and the extended nature of the pinhole results in a non-stationary or spatially varying point spread function across the pinhole field of view. In this work, we have used iterative Maximum Likelihood techniques to remove the non-stationary distortions introduced by the aperture to reconstruct the underlying neutron source distributions. We present the detailed algorithms used for these reconstructions, the stopping criteria used and reconstructed sources from data collected at NIF with a discussion of the neutron imaging performance in light of other diagnostics.

Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Warrick, A. L. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

National Ignition Campaign (NIC) Precision Tuning Series Shock Timing Experiments  

SciTech Connect

A series of precision shock timing experiments have been performed on NIF. These experiments continue to adjust the laser pulse shape and employ the adjusted cone fraction (CF) in the picket (1st 2 ns of the laser pulse) as determined from the re-emit experiment series. The NIF ignition laser pulse is precisely shaped and consists of a series of four impulses, which drive a corresponding series of shock waves of increasing strength to accelerate and compress the capsule ablator and fuel layer. To optimize the implosion, they tune not only the strength (or power) but also, to sub-nanosecond accuracy, the timing of the shock waves. In a well-tuned implosion, the shock waves work together to compress and heat the fuel. For the shock timing experiments, a re-entrant cone is inserted through both the hohlraum wall and the capsule ablator allowing a direct optical view of the propagating shocks in the capsule interior using the VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) diagnostic from outside the hohlraum. To emulate the DT ice of an ignition capsule, the inside of the cone and the capsule are filled with liquid deuterium.

Robey, H F; Celliers, P M

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures. 18 figs.

Early, J.W.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Laser-induced ignition modeling of HMX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The laser-induced ignition response of HMX has been investigated using a detailed numerical model. The model is one-dimensional, fully transient, and solves the conservation equations for both the condensed and gas phases. The condensed phase representation includes radiation absorption, solid-phase transitions, melting, evaporation, and distributed semi-global decomposition kinetics. The gas phase utilizes a detailed kinetic mechanism to predict species formation and destruction. Ignition occurs in the gas phase and the flame propagates back toward the surface of the HMX in what is known as the ‘snap-back’ effect. The model then transitions to steady-state combustion. Calculations were performed in which the solid HMX is irradiated with heat fluxes ranging from 50 to 1600 W/cm2. Results are compared to empirical data for the laser-induced ignition of HMX. Good agreement with these data and other steady-state data (burning rate, surface temperature, melt thickness) provide the necessary validation of the developed model.

Karl V. Meredith; Matthew L. Gross; Merrill W. Beckstead

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fireside carburization of stainless steel furnace tubes  

SciTech Connect

Most heavy Venezuelan crudes are recognized for having a high total acid number (TAN) that is usually associated with a high tendency to produce naphthenic acid corrosion. To resist this type of corrosion in vacuum heaters, 9Cr-1Mo steel and stainless steels containing molybdenum are usually recommended. In 1993 the original 5Cr-1/2Mo roof tubes of the furnace in a vacuum unit were replaced by stainless steel 316Ti to minimize tube replacement and increase heater reliability. Unexpectedly, some of the new tubes failed after only three years of service, and just one year after undergoing the last turnaround inspection. The damage occurred in the form of deep holes and perforations, starting from the outside tube surface on the fireside. Coke build-up occurred due to severe operating conditions, overheating the tubes on the fireside, above 675 C (1250 F). Metallographic and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) examination revealed internal and external carburization of the material due to the presence of coke and combustion ashes, respectively. The increase in the skin metal temperature facilitated the diffusion of carbon from these carbon-rich deposits into the low carbon content material (0.023 O/O).Depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries due to the massive formation of chromium carbides, resulted in a severe intergranular corrosion attack by molten salts rich in vanadium and sulfur due to asphalt burning. Normal operating practice demands the use of steam for the heater tubes to control coke build-up. This practice had been first reduced and then eliminated, during the past two years prior to the failure, because of economic incentives. This paper describes the root cause analysis conducted to account for these premature tube failures.

Mirabal, E.; Molina, C. [PDVSA-Refineria Isla, Curayao (Netherlands); Mayorga, A.; Hau, J.L. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF  

SciTech Connect

The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

Ma, T

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

Capsule performance optimization in the National Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition by laser-driven hohlraums [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the OMEGA facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

Landen, O. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. K.; Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Capsule Performance Optimization in the National Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the Omega facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Haan, S W; Edwards, J

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

346

High resolution simulations of ignition capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Ignition capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)] have continued to evolve in light of improved physical data inputs, improving simulation techniques, and - most recently - experimental data from a growing number of NIF sub-ignition experiments. This paper summarizes a number of recent changes to the cryogenic capsule design and some of our latest techniques in simulating its performance. Specifically, recent experimental results indicated harder x-ray drive spectra in NIF hohlraums than were predicted and used in previous capsule optimization studies. To accommodate this harder drive spectrum, a series of high-resolution 2-D simulations, resolving Legendre mode numbers as high as two thousand, were run and the germanium dopant concentration and ablator shell thicknesses re-optimized accordingly. Simultaneously, the possibility of cooperative or nonlinear interaction between neighboring ablator surface defects has motivated a series of fully 3-D simulations run with the massively parallel HYDRA code. These last simulations include perturbations seeded on all capsule interfaces and can use actual measured shell surfaces as initial conditions. 3-D simulations resolving Legendre modes up to two hundred on large capsule sectors have run through ignition and burn, and higher resolution simulations resolving as high as mode twelve hundred have been run to benchmark high-resolution 2-D runs. Finally, highly resolved 3-D simulations have also been run of the jet-type perturbation caused by the fill tube fitted to the capsule. These 3-D simulations compare well with the more typical 2-D simulations used in assessing the fill tube's impact on ignition. Coupled with the latest experimental inputs from NIF, our improving simulation capability yields a fuller and more accurate picture of NIF ignition capsule performance.

Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Cook, A W; Edwards, M J; Hammel, B A; Koning, J M; Marinak, M M

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Joshua D. Taylor - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Stuart Neill, Hailin Li - National Research Council Canada...

348

HEC-DPSSL 2012 Workshop, Directions: National Ignition Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Keep left at the fork Destination will be on the right Directions to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the National Ignition Facility can be found on the...

349

Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake:...

350

Advanced CFD Models for High Efficiency Compression Ignition Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Advanced CFD models for high efficiency compression-ignition engines can be used to show how turbulence-chemistry interactions influence autoignition and combustion.

351

Simulation of Landfill Gas Performance in a Spark Ignited Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Computer simulations were performed using KIVA-4 code to determine performance of a spark ignited engine fueled by methane diluted with carbon dioxide to approximate… (more)

Swain, Daniel P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Synthesizing aluminum particles towards controlling electrostatic discharge ignition sensitivity  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum particles were synthesized with shell thicknesses ranging from 2.7 to 8.3 nm and a constant diameter of 95 nm. These fuel particles were combined with molybdenum trioxide particles and the electrostatic discharge (ESD) sensitivity of the mixture was measured. Results show ignition delay increased as the alumina shell thickness increased. These results correlated with electrical resistivity measurements of the mixture which increased with alumina concentration. A model was developed using COMSOL for ignition of a single Al particle. The ignition delay in the model was consistent with the experimental results suggesting that the primary ESD ignition mechanism is joule heating.

Eric S. Collins; Jeffery P. Gesner; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael A. Daniels

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Pulsed Laser Ignition Thresholds of Energetic Multilayer Foils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ignition thresholds for energetic multilayer foils comprised of aluminum (Al) and platinum (Pt) layers are presented as a function of foil properties for laser pulse durations of 100...

McDonald, Joel P; Picard, Yoosuf N; Yalisove, Steven M; Adams, David P

354

HEC-DPSSL 2012 Workshop, NIF Tour: National Ignition Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deadline: August 10, 2012 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is home to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a national resource a unique experimental facility...

355

Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection study in which high ignition quality fuel was found avoid NO X , PM, THC and CO emissions while maintaining...

356

High power fiber delivery for laser ignition applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present contribution provides a concise review of high power fiber delivery research for laser ignition applications. The fiber delivery requirements are discussed in terms of exit...

Yalin, Azer P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Advanced CFD Models for High Efficiency Compression Ignition...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for high efficiency compression-ignition engines can be used to show how turbulence-chemistry interactions influence autoignition and combustion. p-19raja.pdf More Documents &...

358

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential Title Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-417E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Franco, Victor H., James D. Lutz, Alexander B. Lekov, and Lixing Gu Document Number LBNL-417E Pagination 14 Date Published August 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces is unregulated, tested at laboratory conditions using the DOE test procedure, and is reported in the GAMA directory as varying from 76 kWh/year to 1,953 kWh/year. Furnace blowers account for about 80% of the total furnace electricity consumption and are primarily used to distribute warm air throughout the home during furnace operation as well as distribute cold air during air conditioning operation. Yet the furnace test procedure does not provide a means to calculate the electricity consumption during cooling operation or standby, which account for a large fraction of the total electricity consumption. Furthermore, blower electricity consumption is strongly affected by static pressure. Field data shows that static pressure in the house distribution ducts varies widely and that the static pressureused in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important to address electricity consumption of furnaces and air conditioners. This paper compares the potential regional and national energy savings of two-stage brushless permanent magnet (BPM) blower motors (the blower design option with the most potential savings that is currently available in the market) to single-stage permanent split capacitor (PSC) blower motors (the most common blower design option). Computer models were used to generate the heating and cooling loads for typical homes in 16 different climates which represent houses throughout the United States. The results show that the potential savings of using BPM motors vary by region and house characteristics, and are very strongly tied to improving house distribution ducts. Savings decrease dramatically with increased duct pressure. Cold climate locations will see savings even in the high static pressure duct situations, whilewarm climate locations will see less savings overall and negative savings in the high static pressure duct situations. Moderate climate locations will see little or no savings.

359

A new compact fixed-point blackbody furnace  

SciTech Connect

More and more NMIs are realizing their primary scale themselves with fixed-point blackbodies as their reference standard. However, commercially available fixed-point blackbody furnaces of sufficient quality are not always easy to obtain. CHINO Corp. and NMIJ, AIST jointly developed a new compact fixed-point blackbody furnace. The new furnace has such features as 1) improved temperature uniformity when compared to previous products, enabling better plateau quality, 2) adoption of the hybrid fixed-point cell structure with internal insulation to improve robustness and thereby to extend lifetime, 3) easily ejectable and replaceable heater unit and fixed-point cell design, leading to reduced maintenance cost, 4) interchangeability among multiple fixed points from In to Cu points. The replaceable cell feature facilitates long term maintenance of the scale through management of a group of fixed-point cells of the same type. The compact furnace is easily transportable and therefore can also function as a traveling standard for disseminating the radiation temperature scale, and for maintaining the scale at the secondary level and industrial calibration laboratories. It is expected that the furnace will play a key role of the traveling standard in the anticipated APMP supplementary comparison of the radiation thermometry scale.

Hiraka, K.; Oikawa, H.; Shimizu, T.; Kadoya, S.; Kobayashi, T. [CHINO CORPORATION, Itabashi, Tokyo (Japan)] [CHINO CORPORATION, Itabashi, Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, Y.; Ishii, J. [National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modeling the Fuel Spray and Combustion Process of the Ignition Quality Tester with KIVA-3V  

SciTech Connect

Discusses the use of KIVA-3V to develop a model that reproduces ignition behavior inside the Ignition Quality Tester, which measures the ignition delay of low-volatility fuels.

Bogin, G. E. Jr.; DeFilippo, A.; Chen, J. Y.; Chin, G.; Luecke, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Zigler, B. T.; Dean, A. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Investigation of proton focusing and conversion efficiency for proton fast ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a step towards laser fusion ignition,” nature, vol. 412,laser in order for the ignition laser to be absorbed in areason being that the ignition laser energy would otherwise

Bartal, Teresa Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Ignition of Isomers of Pentane: An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon ignition is an important element in many practical combustion systems, including internal combustion engines, detonations, pulse combustors, and flame initiation. The rapid compression machine (RCM) is used frequently to study the kinetics of hydrocarbon autoignition [e.g., 1-7], since the reactive gas temperatures and time histories are similar to those seen in automotive engines during Diesel ignition and end gas autoignition leading to engine knock in spark-ignition engines. The RCM provides a rich environment for study of the theory of hydrocarbon oxidation, including degenerate chain branching, alkylperoxy radical isomerization and effects of thermal feedback [8]. The literature of hydrocarbon oxidation studies in the RCM has been summarized recently [9,10], and many classes of fuels have been studied. Detailed kinetic modeling is another tool available to study hydrocarbon oxidation in the RCM [4,11]. The aim of the present work is to determine experimentally the influence of variations in fuel molecular structure on autoignition, and to use a kinetic model to understand the reasons for those variations. This study is unique in that while other studies have addressed variations in pressure and equivalence ratio on ignition [11], this work addresses effects of variations in fuel molecular structure for all of the isomers of a single fuel formula, pentane, in a RCM. The three isomers of pentane possess many of the structural elements that determine such autoignition characteristics as octane number and variability in cool flame production, so this study will benefit our efforts to describe these effects.

Ribaucour, M; Minetti, R; Sochet, L R; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational. The NIF is the world's most energetic laser system capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in planetary interiors and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, the first integrated ignition experiment was conducted, demonstrating the successful coordination of the laser, cryogenic target system, array of diagnostics and infrastructure required for ignition demonstration. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and international communities are examining the implication of NIF ignition for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a laser with 10% electrical-optical efficiency, as well as further development and advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in the 10- to 15-year time frame. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) concept and examining in detail various technology choices, as well as the advantages of both pure fusion and fusion-fission schemes. This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition. The paper will conclude with a discussion about the need to build on the progress on NIF to develop an implementable and effective plan to achieve the promise of LIFE as a source of carbon-free energy.

Moses, E I

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Agency/Company /Organization: CONEG Policy Research Center Inc. Partner: Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, Rick Handley and Associates, Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, Economic Development Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.mass.gov/Eoeea/docs/doer/renewables/biomass/DOER%20Biomass%20Emiss Country: United States

365

Semicoke production and quality at Chinese vertical SJ furnaces  

SciTech Connect

In Russia there has been little interest on the thermal processing of non-sintering coal. However it may be used to obtain many special types of coke and semicoke that are necessary for processes other than blast furnace smelting and employing small metallurgical coke fractions that do not meet the relevant quality requirements. China has recently made great progress in developing the thermal processing of coal (mainly energy coal) to obtain a highly effective product, semicoke, primarily used in metallurgy and adsorption process. The article considers the operation of a Chinese semicoking plant equipped with vertical SJ furnaces. The plant is in the Shenmu district of Shanxi province (Inner Mongolia). The enterprise includes two furnaces of total output of about 100,000 t/yr of semicoke.

V.M. Strakhov; I.V. Surovtseva; A.V. D'yachenko; V.M. Men'shenin [Kuznetsk Center, Eastern Coal-Chemistry Institute (Russian Federation)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Diesol: an alternative fuel for compression ignition engines  

SciTech Connect

Physical properties including specific gravity, kinematic viscosity, heat of combustion, flash point, cetane number and distillation curves are presented for several blends of No. 2 diesel fuel and soybean oil. The mixture is referred to as Diesol. The soybean oil received a minimal amount of refining by water-washing to remove most of the lecithin type gums. The Diesol fuels were tested in a Cooperative Fuel Research single cylinder diesel test engine to determine the short time engine performance using soybean oil as a diesel fuel extender. Brake specific fuel consumption, volumetric fuel consumption, exhaust smoke opacity and power were determined. Various blends of Diesol were also tested in a multicylinder diesel commercial power system. Results are presented to show the comparison between Diesol blends and diesel fuel. The fuel properties and engine performance test results indicate that soybean oil would be a viable extender of diesel fuel for compression-ignition engines.

Cochran, B.J.; Baldwin, J.D.C.; Daniel, L.R. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

SciTech Connect

Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces is unregulated, tested at laboratory conditions using the DOE test procedure, and is reported in the GAMA directory as varying from 76 kWh/year to 1,953 kWh/year. Furnace blowers account for about 80percent of the total furnace electricity consumption and are primarily used to distribute warm air throughout the home during furnace operation as well as distribute cold air during air conditioning operation. Yet the furnace test procedure does not provide a means to calculate the electricity consumption during cooling operation or standby, which account for a large fraction of the total electricity consumption. Furthermore, blower electricity consumption is strongly affected by static pressure. Field data shows that static pressure in the house distribution ducts varies widely and that the static pressure used in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important to address electricity consumption of furnaces and air conditioners. This paper compares the potential regional and national energy savings of two-stage brushless permanent magnet (BPM) blower motors (the blower design option with the most potential savings that is currently available in the market) to single-stage permanent split capacitor (PSC) blower motors (the most common blower design option). Computer models were used to generate the heating and cooling loads for typical homes in 16 different climates which represent houses throughout the United States. The results show that the potential savings of using BPM motors vary by region and house characteristics, and are very strongly tied to improving house distribution ducts. Savings decrease dramatically with increased duct pressure. Cold climate locations will see savings even in the high static pressure duct situations, while warm climate locations will see less savings overall and negative savings in the high static pressure duct situations. Moderate climate locations will see little or no savings.

Florida Solar Energy Center; Franco, Victor; Franco, Victor; Lutz, Jim; Lekov, Alex; Gu, Lixing

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

Recent progress on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work done on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), both at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and at other fusion laboratories in the United States. The goal of CIT is to reach ignition in a tokamak fusion device in the mid-1990's. Scientific and engineering features of the design are described, as well as projected cost and schedule.

Ignat, D.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Estimation of Fuel Savings by Recuperation of Furnace Exhausts to Preheat Combustion Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of waste energy in furnace exhaust gases is gaining in importance as fuel costs continue to escalate. Installation of a recuperator in the furnace exhaust stream to preheat the combustion air can result in considerable savings in fuel...

Rebello, W. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Phipps, H. R., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Conceptual design of fast-ignition laser fusion reactor FALCON-D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new conceptual design of the laser fusion power plant FALCON-D (Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept with a Dry wall chamber) has been proposed. The fast-ignition method can achieve sufficient fusion gain for a commercial operation (~100) with about 10 times smaller fusion yield than the conventional central ignition method. FALCON-D makes full use of this property and aims at designing with a compact dry wall chamber (5–6?m radius). 1D/2D simulations by hydrodynamic codes showed a possibility of achieving sufficient gain with a laser energy of 400?kJ, i.e. a 40?MJ target yield. The design feasibility of the compact dry wall chamber and the solid breeder blanket system was shown through thermomechanical analysis of the dry wall and neutronics analysis of the blanket system. Moderate electric output (~400?MWe) can be achieved with a high repetition (30?Hz) laser. This dry wall reactor concept not only reduces several difficulties associated with a liquid wall system but also enables a simple cask maintenance method for the replacement of the blanket system, which can shorten the maintenance period. The basic idea of the maintenance method for the final optics system has also been proposed. Some critical R&D issues required for this design are also discussed.

T. Goto; Y. Someya; Y. Ogawa; R. Hiwatari; Y. Asaoka; K Okano; A. Sunahara; T. Johzaki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Status of the National Ignition Facility project  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate goal of worldwide research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to develop fusion as an inexhaustible, economic, environmentally safe source of electric power. Following nearly thirty years of laboratory and underground fusion experiments, the next step toward this goal is to demonstrate ignition and propagating burn of fusion fuel in the laboratory. The National Ignition Facility(NIF) Project is being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), for just this purpose. NIF will use advanced Nd-glass laser technology to deliver 1.8 MJ of 0.35-um laser light in a shaped pulse, several nanoseconds in duration, achieving a peak power of 500 TW. A national community of U.S. laboratories is participating in this project, now in its final design phase. Franceand the United Kingdom are collaborating on development of required technology under bilateral agreements with the US. This paper presents thestatus of the laser design and development of its principal components and optical elements.

Paisner, J.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Boyes, J.D.; Sorem, M.S.; Soures, J.M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

Callaghan, R.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Residential Furnace Fans Energy Conservation Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy has published a notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for residential furnace fans.

374

ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE I TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further evaluation of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid1, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters for the melter flammability models o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species Prior to startup, a number of improvements and modifications were made to the CEF, including addition of cameras, vessel support temperature measurement, and a heating element near the pour tube. After charging the CEF with cullet from a previous Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) run, the melter was slurry-fed with SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 6 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation variables and off-gas chemistry. In order to satisfy the objective of Phase I testing, vapor space steady testing in the range of ~300°C-700°C was conducted without argon bubbling to baseline the melter data to the existing DWPF melter flammability model. Adjustments to heater outputs, air flows and feed rate were necessary in order to achieve the vapor space temperatures in this range. The results of the Phase I testing demonstrated that the CEF is capable of operating under the low vapor space temperatures A melter pressure of -5 inches of water was not sustained throughout the run, but the melter did remain slightly negative even with the maximum air flows required for the lowest temperature conditions were used. The auxiliary pour tube heater improved the pouring behavior at all test conditions, including reduced feed rates required for the low vapor space testing. Argon bubbling can be used to promote mixing and increase feed rate at multiple conditions. Improvements due to bubbling have been determined previously; however, the addition of the cameras to the CEF allows for visual observation during a range of bubbling configurations. The off-gas analysis system proved to be robust and capable of operating for long durations. The total operational hours on the melter vessel are approximately 385 hours. Dimensional measurements taken prior to Phase I testing and support block temperatures recorded during Phase I testing are available if an extension of service life beyond 1250 hours is desired in the future.

Johnson, F.; Miller, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Lambert, D.

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Evaluation of Retrofit Variable-Speed Furnace Fan Motors  

SciTech Connect

In conjunction with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and Proctor Engineering Group, Ltd. (PEG), the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) has evaluated the Concept 3 (tm) replacement motors for residential furnaces. These brushless, permanent magnet (BPM) motors can use much less electricity than their PSC (permanent split capacitor) predecessors. This evaluation focuses on existing homes in the heating-dominated climate of upstate New York with the goals of characterizing field performance and cost-effectiveness. The results of this study are intended to be useful to home performance contractors, HVAC contractors, and home efficiency program stakeholders. The project includes eight homes in and near Syracuse, NY. Tests and monitoring was performed both before and after fan motors were replaced. Average fan power reductions were approximately 126 Watts during heating and 220 Watts during cooling operation. Over the course of entire heating and cooling seasons, these translated into average electric energy savings of 163 kWh. Average cost savings were $20 per year. Homes where the fan was used outside of heating and cooling mode saved an additional $42 per year on average. Results indicate that BPM replacement motors will be most cost-effective in HVAC systems with longer run times and relatively low duct static pressures. More dramatic savings are possible if occupants use the fan-only setting when there is no thermal load. There are millions of cold-climate, U.S. homes that meet these criteria, but the savings in most homes tested in this study were modest.

Aldrich, R.; Williamson, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Vacuum arc ignition by penning discharge in a strong magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum arc with cathode spots on the cold electrode is widely used as a plasma generator in a such kind of devices like metal ion sources, plasma cathode electron guns, thing films deposition facilities and others. Most vacuum arc devices utilize a high voltage discharge across an insulator surface to provide a trigger plasma which in turn initiates the main arc discharge. Operation of vacuum arc in a repetitively pulsed mode required a stable triggering system for the long time. But with a discharge across the insulators the number of stable pulses is limited by 100,000 or little bit more. The better method for vacuum arc ignition is low pressure discharge. As shown in this paper it is possible to increase the lifetime of the ignition system in 10 times at least, but negative characteristic of this system is a relatively high pressure (about 0.1 mtorr). In some kinds of vacuum arc applications it is impermissible because it leads to the {open_quotes}contamination{close_quotes} of the metal plasma by the gaseous one. In order to decrease the background pressure, using the gas discharge ignition system for vacuum arc, Penning discharge is suggested. The main new feature of this system is an applying the strong magnetic field not only for stabilization of the cathode spot moving and for the rise the high charge states of ions in metal plasma, but also for the essential decrease the lowest point of the background gas pressure when the Penning discharge is still in a stable operation. Under the stable mode of Penning discharge there was always a stable vacuum arc ignition.

Nikolaev, A.G.; Schanin, P.M.; Yushkov, G.Yu. [High Current Electronics Inst., Tomsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

High temperature furnaces for small and large angle neutron scattering of disordered materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

725 High temperature furnaces for small and large angle neutron scattering of disordered materials and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments respectively. They are vacuum furnaces with a thin maintained in a tantalum box. In a neutron beam, the furnaces produce a very low scattering level (without

Boyer, Edmond

378

Electrode Arrangement As Substitute Bottom For An Electrothermic Slag Smelting Furnace.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electrode arrangement uses vertically oriented electrodes with side wall contacts for an electrothermic smelting furnace for aluminum production. The side wall contacts are radially moveable into the furnace to compensate for wear on the contacts. The side wall contacts can be hollow to allow a slag forming charge to be fed to the furnace.

Aune, Jan Arthur (Enebakk, NO); Brinch, Jon Christian (Oslo, NO); Johansen, Kai (Kristiansand, NO)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coke mineral transformations in the experimental blast furnace  

SciTech Connect

Blast furnace efficiency may be improved by optimizing coke reactivity. Some but not all forms of mineral matter in the coke modify its reactivity, but changes in mineral matter that occur within coke while in the blast furnace have not been fully quantified. To determine changes in mineral matter forms in the blast furnace, coke samples from a dissection study in the LKAB experimental blast furnace (EBF) were characterized using SEM/EDS analysis, EPMA (microprobe), and low-temperature ashing/quantitative XRD analysis. Variations in alkali concentration, particularly potassium, dominated the compositional changes. At high concentrations of potassium, the mineral matter was largely potassium-bearing but even more potassium was diffused throughout the coke and not associated with mineral matter. There was little difference in potassium concentration between the core and surface of the coke pieces, suggesting that potassium diffused rapidly through the whole coke. Iron, calcium, silicon, and aluminum concentrations were relatively constant in comparison, although the mineralogy of all elements changed significantly with changing temperature. 23 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.

Kelli Kazuberns; Sushil Gupta; Mihaela Grigore; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Mats Hallin; Bo Lindblom; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Coke quality for blast furnaces with coal-dust fuel  

SciTech Connect

Recently, plans have been developed for the introduction of pulverized coal injection (PCI) at various Russian metallurgical enterprises. The main incentive for switching to PCI is the recent price rises for Russian natural gas. The paper discusses the quality of coke for PCI into blast furnaces.

Y.A. Zolotukhin; N.S. Andreichikov [Eastern Coal-Chemistry Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The National Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Facility Data Requirements Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL SC08 BOF: Computing with Massive and Persistent Data LLNL-PRES-408909. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344 2 Target chamber One Terabyte of data to be downloaded in ~50 Minutes for each shot. 5 Full Aperture Backscatter Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) X-ray imager Streaked x-ray detector VISAR Velocity Measurements Static x-ray imager FFLEX Hard x-ray spectrometer Near Backscatter Imager DANTE Soft x-ray temperature Diagnostic Alignment System Cross Timing System Each Diagnostic Produces Data that Requires Analysis 6 Tools are being built to manage and integrate:

382

Catalytic igniters and their use to ignite lean hydrogen-air mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic igniter which can ignite a hydrogen-air mixture as lean as 5.5% hydrogen with induction times ranging from 20 s to 400 s, under conditions which may be present during a loss-of-liquid-coolant accident at a light water nuclear reactor comprises (a) a perforate catalytically active substrate, such as a platinum coated ceramic honeycomb or wire mesh screen, through which heated gases produced by oxidation of the mixture can freely flow and (b) a plurality of thin platinum wires mounted in a thermally conductive manner on the substrate and positioned thereon so as to be able to receive heat from the substrate and the heated gases while also in contact with unoxidized gases.

McLean, William J. (Oakland, CA); Thorne, Lawrence R. (Livermore, CA); Volponi, Joanne V. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Investigation of ignition of thermoplastics through the Hot Wire Ignition Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . , . . . . , . Ignition Temperature Ranges of PMMA, PE, Nylon and PC ' . . . Plot of Temperature Measurements for Plexiglas 1/16". . . . . . . . . . . . . Plot of Temperature Measurements for Plexiglas 1/8". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plot of Temperature Measurements... and Quintiere Materials PMMA Nylon Polyethylene Polypropylene Description Polycast, black, polymethylmeth acr ylate, 2. 5 cm Polypenco, extruded, unfilled, type 6/6, 2. 5 cm Allied Resinous products, Inc. , type tO', 2. 5 cm Poly-Hi, clear, high...

De Araujo, Luiz Claudio Bonilla

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Catalytic ignition of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures over platinum  

SciTech Connect

Ignition of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures over platinum wire is experimentally studied by using microcalorimetry and by restricting the flow to the low Reynolds number range so that axisymmetry prevails. The fuels studied are propane, butane, propylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen. Parameters investigated include flow velocity, fuel type and concentration, and oxygen concentration. The catalytic ignition temperatures of the various fuels are accurately determined over extensive ranges of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen concentrations. Results show two distinctly opposite ignition trends depending on the nature of the fuel. That is, the ignition temperature of lean propane/air and butane/air mixtures decreases as their fuel concentration is increased, while the reverse trend is observed for lean mixtures of propylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen with air. Furthermore, the ignition of propane depends primarily on fuel concentration, while the ignition of carbon monoxide depends on fuel and oxygen concentrations to a comparable extent. These results are explained on the basis of hierarchical surface adsorption strengths of the different reactants in effecting catalytic ignition. Additional phenomena of interest are observed and discussed.

Cho, P.; Law, C.K.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO{sub 2} lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO{sub 3} at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

EFFECT OF FUEL TYPE ON FLAME IGNITION BY TRANSIENT PLASMA Jianbang Liu1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to electrical energy consumed to produce the discharge.) Consequently, ignition by laser sources has beenEFFECT OF FUEL TYPE ON FLAME IGNITION BY TRANSIENT PLASMA DISCHARGES Jianbang Liu1,2 , Fei Wang1 with air ignited by transient plasma discharge were investigated and compared with spark discharge ignition

387

Laser ignition of dust clouds INERIS, BP. 2, F-60550 Vemeuil-en-Halatte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser ignition of dust clouds Ch. PROUST INERIS, BP. 2, F-60550 Vemeuil-en-Halatte ineris-00961863.1051/jp4:20020269 #12;Abstract. In a previous paper [1], the possibility of igniting a combustible dust the scope of the investigated ignition phenomena. In particular a relationship between the standard ignition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

On the mechanism of aluminum ignition in steam explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An available theory [Epstein, M., Fauske, H.K., 1994. A crystallization theory of underwater aluminum ignition. Nucl. Eng. Des. 146, 147–164] of the ignition of aluminum melt drops under water, which is based on the assumption that the aluminum oxide (Al2O3) drop-surface skin first appears in a metastable molten state, is compared with existing experimental data on the ignition of aluminum drops behind shock waves in water [Theofanous, T.G., Chen, X., DiPiazza, P., Epstein, M., Fauske, H.K., 1994. Ignition of aluminum droplets behind shock waves in water, Phys. Fluids 6, 3513–3515]. The predicted and measured ignition temperature of about 1770 K coincides approximately with the spontaneous nucleation temperature of supercooled liquid Al2O3 (1760 K). This suggests that the crystallization of the oxide layer represents a strong ‘barrier’ to aluminum drop ignition under water. Apparently a similar interpretation is applicable to aluminum drop ignition in gaseous oxidizing atmospheres. We conclude from the theory that the low-temperature aluminum ignitions (in the range 1100–1600 K) that have been observed during steam explosions are a consequence of the short aluminum drop oxidation times in this environment relative to the characteristic time for Al2O3 crystallization. Several aspects of the aluminum drop/shock interaction experiments besides ignition are discussed in the paper. In particular, the experiments provide strong evidence that during the course of a vapor explosion metal fragmentation occurs via a thermal mechanism at low pressure and precedes the development of a high-pressure shock.

M Epstein; H.K Fauske; T.G Theofanous

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Instrumentation and controls of an ignited tokamak  

SciTech Connect

The instrumentation and controls (I and C) of an ignited plasma magnetically confined in a tokamak configuration needs increased emphasis in the following areas: (1) physics implications for control; (2) plasma shaping/position control; and (3) control to prevent disruptive instabilities. This document reports on the FY 1979 efforts in these and other areas. Also presented are discusssions in the areas of: (1) diagnostics suitable for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF); and (2) future research and development (R and D) needs. The appendices focus attention on some preliminary ideas about the measurement of the deuteron-triton (D-T) ratio in the plasma, synchrotron radiation, and divertor control. Finally, an appendix documenting the thermal consequences to the first wall of a MPD is presented.

Becraft, W.R.; Golzy, J.; Houlberg, W.A.; Kukielka, C.A.; Onega R.J.; Raju, G.V.S.; Stone, R.S.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Edward Moses Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

391

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2011 3307 Microwave-Plasma-Coupled Re-Ignition of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ignition phenomenon is observed when fuel/ oxidizer is re-introduced into an atmospheric-pressure plasma dischargeIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2011 3307 Microwave-Plasma generated by cutting off the gas flow in a re-entrant microwave-plasma applicator system used for plasma

Lee, Tonghun

392

Load Preheating Using Flue Gases from a Fuel-Fired Heating System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet discusses how the thermal efficiency of a process heating system can be improved significantly by using heat contained in furnace flue gases to preheat the furnace load.

393

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science - Bringing Star Power to Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF Go NIF Go LLNL Logo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL Home NIF Home LIFE Home Jobs Site Map Contact News Press Releases In the News Status Update Media Assistance About Us National Ignition Facility About NIF How NIF Works The Seven Wonders of NIF Building NIF An Engineering Marvel NIFFY Early Light Collaborators Status Visiting NIF Missions National Security Energy for the Future Understanding the Universe People The People of NIF Awards NIF Professor Sabbatical Opportunities NIF Online Store Programs National Ignition Campaign How to Make a Star (ICF) Target Physics Target Fabrication Cryogenic Target System Diagnostics Participants Photon Science & Applications Advanced Optics Advanced Radiography Directed Energy Fusion Energy Inertial Fusion Energy How IFE Works Science at the Extremes

394

Effects of Fuel Ignition Quality on Critical Equivalence Ratio for Autoignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This hypothesis is based on the work of Musculus et al.,(2) who introduced the concept of a “critical” equivalence ratio (?), below which fuel in localized regions of the chamber is a potential source for incomplete combustion. ... The evaporative steam cooling system, used to maintain water jacket temperatures of the engine in the standard CFR engine design,(12) was replaced with an 8 L 1000 W refrigerated/heating circulator. ... Musculus et al.,(2) who first presented the concept of critical ?, stated that “UHC emissions may arise from jets that ignite before EOI (negative ignition dwell) if the mixtures near the injector become too lean either to autoignite in the time available or to support propagation of the downstream reaction zone into the near-injector region.” ...

Gregory K. Lilik; André L. Boehman

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

Independent Validation and Verification of Process Design and Optimization Technology Diagnostic and Control of Natural Gas Fired Furnaces via Flame Image Analysis Technology  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program has invested in emerging Process Design and Optimizations Technologies (PDOT) to encourage the development of new initiatives that might result in energy savings in industrial processes. Gas fired furnaces present a harsh environment, often making accurate determination of correct air/fuel ratios a challenge. Operation with the correct air/fuel ratio and especially with balanced burners in multi-burner combustion equipment can result in improved system efficiency, yielding lower operating costs and reduced emissions. Flame Image Analysis offers a way to improve individual burner performance by identifying and correcting fuel-rich burners. The anticipated benefit of this technology is improved furnace thermal efficiency, and lower NOx emissions. Independent validation and verification (V&V) testing of the FIA technology was performed at Missouri Forge, Inc., in Doniphan, Missouri by Environ International Corporation (V&V contractor) and Enterprise Energy and Research (EE&R), the developer of the technology. The test site was selected by the technology developer and accepted by Environ after a meeting held at Missouri Forge. As stated in the solicitation for the V&V contractor, 'The objective of this activity is to provide independent verification and validation of the performance of this new technology when demonstrated in industrial applications. A primary goal for the V&V process will be to independently evaluate if this technology, when demonstrated in an industrial application, can be utilized to save a significant amount of the operating energy cost. The Seller will also independently evaluate the other benefits of the demonstrated technology that were previously identified by the developer, including those related to product quality, productivity, environmental impact, etc'. A test plan was provided by the technology developer and is included as an appendix to the summary report submitted by Environ (Appendix A). That plan required the V&V contractor to: (1) Establish the as-found furnace operating conditions; (2) Tune the furnace using currently available technology to establish baseline conditions; (3) Tune the furnace using the FIA technology; and (4) Document the improved performance that resulted from application of the FIA technology. It is important to note that the testing was not designed to be a competition or comparison between two different methodologies that could be used for furnace tuning. Rather, the intent was to quantify improvements in furnace performance that could not be achieved with existing technology. Therefore, the measure of success is improvement beyond the furnace efficiency obtainable using existing furnace optimization methods rather than improvement from the as found condition.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Experimental characterization of an industrial pulverized coal-fired furnace under deep staging conditions  

SciTech Connect

Measurements have been performed in a 300 MWe, front-wall-fired, pulverized-coal, utility boiler. This boiler was retrofitted with boosted over fire air injectors that allowed the operation of the furnace under deeper staging conditions. New data are reported for local mean gas species concentration of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NOx, gas temperatures and char burnout measured at several ports in the boiler including those in the main combustion and staged air regions. Comparisons of the present data with our previous measurements in this boiler, prior to the retrofitting with the new over fire system, show lower O{sub 2} and higher CO concentrations for the new situation as a consequence of the lower stoichiometry in the main combustion zone associated with the present boiler operating condition. Consistently, the measured mean NOx concentrations in the main combustion zone are now lower than those obtained previously, yielding emissions below 500 mg/Nm{sup 3}at 6% O{sub 2}. Finally, the measured values of particle burnout at the furnace exit are acceptable being those measured in the main combustion zone comparable with those obtained with the conventional over fire system.

Costa, M.; Azevedo, J.L.T. [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests  

SciTech Connect

The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ignition of gas mixtures containing natural gas and oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gases released during the thermal treatment of a coal-gas suspension exhibit a strong inhibiting effect on the self-ignition of natural gas but have a minor influence on the...

N. M. Rubtsov; B. S. Seplyarskii; G. I. Tsvetkov…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The National Ignition Facility and Laser Fusion Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This talk provides an update of the NIC on the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the roadmap to demonstrate laser fusion as a viable source...

Moses, E I

400

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science HOW NIF WORKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF WORKS beam me up: how niF works In the National Ignition Facility (NIF), 192 laser beams travel a long path, about 1,500 meters, from their birth at the master oscillator-a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Laser ignition of hypersonic air–hydrogen flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of the behaviour of laser-induced ignition in a hypersonic air–hydrogen flow is ... /s. This study is the first comprehensive laser spark study in a hypersonic flow and demonstrates ...

S. Brieschenk; H. Kleine; S. O’Byrne

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Detonation along laser generated micropinch for fast ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed fast ignition of highly compressed deuterium-tritium (DT) targets by petawatt lasers requires energy of about 100kJ. To lower the power of the laser, it is proposed to accomplish fast ignition with two lasers, one with lower power in the infrared, and a second one with high power in the visible to ultraviolet region. The infrared laser of lower power shall by its radiation pressure drive a large current in a less than solid density plasma placed inside a capillary, while the second high power-shorter wave length-laser shall ignite at one end of the capillary a magnetic field supported thermonuclear detonation wave in a blanket made from solid DT along the outer surface of the capillary. The other end of the capillary, together with its DT blanket, is stuck in the DT target, where following the compression of the target the detonation wave ignites the target.

Winterberg, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Laser-Matter Interaction Above the Plasma Ignition Threshold Intensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter we present the process of laser-matter interaction above the plasma ignition threshold intensity. The physics of the pulsed laser ablation process at high intensities is very complex since it invo...

Mihai Stafe; Aurelian Marcu; Niculae N. Puscas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Relativistic electron beam transport for fast ignition relevant scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A crucial issue surrounding the feasibility of fast ignition, an alternative inertial confinement fusion scheme, is the ability to efficiently couple energy from an incident short-pulse laser to a high-density, pre-compressed ...

Cottrill, Larissa A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Application of laser ignition on laminar flame front investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first stages of laser-induced spark ignition were investigated as a function of time....4/air burner. Laser-induced breakdown was achieved by focusing a ... nanosecond pulse from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. An...

J.-L. Beduneau; Y. Ikeda

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fast ignition of fusion targets by laser-driven electrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present hybrid PIC simulations of fast electron transport and energy deposition in pre-compressed fusion targets, taking full account of collective magnetic effects and the hydrodynamic response of the background plasma. Results on actual ignition of an imploded fast ignition configuration are shown accounting for the increased beam divergence found in recent experiments [J.S. Green et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 015003 (2008)] and the reduction of the electron kinetic energy due to profile steepening predicted by advanced PIC simulations [B. Chrisman et al. Phys. Plasmas 15, 056309 (2008)]. Target ignition is studied as a function of injected electron energy, distance of cone-tip to dense core, initial divergence and kinetic energy of the relativistic electron beam. We found that beam collimation reduces substantially the ignition energies of the cone-guided fuel configuration assumed here.

Honrubia, J J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Laser-Matter Interaction Below the Plasma Ignition Threshold Intensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter we present the process of laser-matter interaction below the plasma ignition threshold intensity. When the high power laser radiation characterized by electric field intensities around ...

Mihai Stafe; Aurelian Marcu; Niculae N. Puscas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most accurate and detailed chemical kinetic models for fuels of practical interest to engine manufacturers and fuels developers are applied for high fidelity engine analysis of premixed charge compression ignition engines.

409

Plasma-assisted ignition and deflagration-to-detonation transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Forman A. Williams Plasma-assisted ignition...correspondence ( astariko@princeton.edu ). 1 Mechanical...Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, , Princeton, NJ-08544, USA...Non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Theory of Fast Electron Transport for Fast Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion is a variant of inertial fusion in which DT fuel is first compressed to high density and then ignited by a relativistic electron beam generated by a fast (laser pulse, which is usually brought in to the dense plasma via the inclusion of a re-entrant cone. The transport of this beam from the cone apex into the dense fuel is a critical part of this scheme, as it can strongly influence the overall energetics. Here we review progress in the theory and numerical simulation of fast electron transport in the context of Fast Ignition. Important aspects of the basic plasma physics, descriptions of the numerical methods used, a review of ignition-scale simulations, and a survey of schemes for controlling the propagation of fast electrons are included. Considerable progress has taken place in this area, but the development of a robust, high-gain FI `point design' is still an ongoing challenge.

Robinson, A P L; Davies, J R; Gremillet, L; Honrubia, J J; Johzaki, T; Kingham, R J; Sherlock, M; Solodov, A A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Low NOx nozzle tip for a pulverized solid fuel furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle tip [100] for a pulverized solid fuel pipe nozzle [200] of a pulverized solid fuel-fired furnace includes: a primary air shroud [120] having an inlet [102] and an outlet [104], wherein the inlet [102] receives a fuel flow [230]; and a flow splitter [180] disposed within the primary air shroud [120], wherein the flow splitter disperses particles in the fuel flow [230] to the outlet [104] to provide a fuel flow jet which reduces NOx in the pulverized solid fuel-fired furnace. In alternative embodiments, the flow splitter [180] may be wedge shaped and extend partially or entirely across the outlet [104]. In another alternative embodiment, flow splitter [180] may be moved forward toward the inlet [102] to create a recessed design.

Donais, Richard E; Hellewell, Todd D; Lewis, Robert D; Richards, Galen H; Towle, David P

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

Combustion Air Preheat on Steam Cracker Furnaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 17-20, 1983 FIGURE 6 TYPICAL SEAL ARRANGEMENT FIGURE 1 TYPICAL CHANGEOVER PATTERN 50 GAS TURBlNEICRACKlNO FOONACE SYSTEM GTE/AIR FLOW VI nME O...-_T.,.;'..;.;,M;,;;;E;.:"? .;;.S...

Kenney, W. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 25 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation parameters and off-gas chemistry. In order to generate off-gas data in support of the flammability model development for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, vapor space steady state testing in the range of ~300-750°C was conducted under the following conditions, (i) 100% (nominal and excess antifoam levels) and 125% stoichiometry feed and (ii) with and without argon bubbling. Adjustments to feed rate, heater outputs and purge air flow were necessary in order to achieve vapor space temperatures in this range. Surge testing was also completed under nominal conditions for four days with argon bubbling and one day without argon bubbling.

Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Laser Spark Ignition of Premixed Methane-Air Mixtures: Parameter Measurements and Determination of Key Factors for Ultimate Ignition Results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we present an experimental investigation of the parameters of the laser spark ignition of premixed methane-air mixtures and the determination of the key factors for the...

Li, Xiaohui; Smith, Benjamin W; Omenetto, Nicoló

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Management Of Experiments And Data At The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Experiments, or 'shots', conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are discrete events that occur over a very short time frame (tens of nanoseconds) separated by many hours. Each shot is part of a larger campaign of shots to advance scientific understanding in high-energy-density physics. In one campaign, scientists use energy from the 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule pulsed laser in the NIF system to symmetrically implode a hydrogen-filled target, thereby creating conditions similar to the interior of stars in a demonstration of controlled fusion. Each NIF shot generates gigabytes of data from over 30 diagnostics that measure optical, x-ray, and nuclear phenomena from the imploding target. We have developed systems to manage all aspects of the shot cycle. Other papers will discuss the control of the lasers and targets, while this paper focuses on the setup and management of campaigns and diagnostics. Because of the low duty cycle of shots, and the thousands of adjustments for each shot (target type, composition, shape; laser beams used, their power profiles, pointing; diagnostic systems used, their configuration, calibration, settings) it is imperative that we accurately define all equipment prior to the shot. Following the shot, and capture of the data by the automatic control system, it is equally imperative that we archive, analyze and visualize the results within the required 30 minutes post-shot. Results must be securely archived, approved, web-visible and downloadable in order to facilitate subsequent publication. To-date NIF has successfully fired over 2,500 system shots, as well as thousands of test firings and dry-runs. We will present an overview of the highly-flexible and scalable campaign management systems and tools employed at NIF that control experiment configuration of the facility all the way through presentation of analyzed results.

Azevedo, S; Casey, A; Beeler, R; Bettenhausen, R; Bond, E; Chandrasekaran, H; Foxworthy, C; Hutton, M; Krammen, J; Liebman, J; Marsh, A; Pannell, T; Rhodes, J; Tappero, J; Warrick, A

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces  

SciTech Connect

The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain in effect, although deeper powder beds (up to 2 inches) also yielded temperatures of greater than 950 C for longer than 2 hours.

COMPTON, J.A.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

418

Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8?MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6?×?10{sup 13} and ?0.3?g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and requirements that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment during activities performed on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project Site Safety Program (NPSSP) requires that activities at the NIF Project site be performed in accordance with the ''LLNL ES&H Manual'' and the augmented set of controls and processes described in this NIF Project Site Safety Program. Specifically, this document: (1) Defines the fundamental NIF site safety philosophy. (2) Defines the areas covered by this safety program (see Appendix B). (3) Identifies management roles and responsibilities. (4) Defines core safety management processes. (5) Identifies NIF site-specific safety requirements. This NPSSP sets forth the responsibilities, requirements, rules, policies, and regulations for workers involved in work activities performed on the NIF Project site. Workers are required to implement measures to create a universal awareness that promotes safe practice at the work site and will achieve NIF management objectives in preventing accidents and illnesses. ES&H requirements are consistent with the ''LLNL ES&H Manual''. This NPSSP and implementing procedures (e.g., Management Walkabout, special work procedures, etc.,) are a comprehensive safety program that applies to NIF workers on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project site includes the B581/B681 site and support areas shown in Appendix B.

Dun, C

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Multi-strike ignition to improve performance, reduce misfiring of large gas engines  

SciTech Connect

New product and application information is now available on the advanced `CPU-2OOO` digital ignition system introduced by Altronic earlier this year for large-bore gas engines and integral compressors. The system is designed to improve performance, reduce misfiring, and be easily retrofitted to existing large-bore engines. including those that are being converted to lean-burn combustion in order to reduce emissions. To do this, the CPU-2OOO system features a selectable multi-striking mode, a selectable energy level and second spark plug cut-off control, a choice of global or individual cylinder timing control, and a high-energy long-duration spark. The 24 Vdc-powered system also offers comprehensive display and communications capabilities, plus system diagnostics and self-test functions. The system uses existing Altronic II-CPU coils, pickups, primary wiring harnesses and other hardware, allowing for easy upgrades of existing II-CPU installations. Also, a detonation avoidance system is being developed as an option for engine protection. Altronic says the field tests have demonstrated the ability of the CPU-20OO system to ignite extra-lean mixtures created when turbochargers are added to engines that previously operated at much richer levels. NO{sub x} emissions have been reduced by as much as 88%, to less than 2.7 g/kWh.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Furnace control apparatus using polarizing interferometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

Schultz, Thomas J. (Maumee, OH); Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Microsoft Word - ACEEE_06_FurnaceBlower_Paper413_lbl.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPM Motors in Residential Gas Furnaces: What are the Savings? BPM Motors in Residential Gas Furnaces: What are the Savings? James Lutz, Victor Franco, Alex Lekov, and Gabrielle Wong-Parodi Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California ABSTRACT Residential gas furnaces contain blowers to distribute warm air. Currently, furnace blowers use either a Permanent Split Capacitor (PSC) or a Brushless Permanent Magnet (BPM) motor. Blowers account for the majority of furnace electricity consumption. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important for understanding electricity consumption of furnaces. The electricity consumption of blower motors depends on the static pressure across the blower. This paper examines both types of blower motors in non-condensing non-weatherized

423

A polar-drive-ignition design for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Polar drive [Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] will enable direct-drive experiments to be conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], while the facility is configured for x-ray drive. A polar-drive ignition design for the NIF has been developed that achieves a gain of 32 in two-dimensional (2-D) simulations, which include single- and multiple-beam nonuniformities and ice and outer-surface roughness. This design requires both single-beam UV polarization smoothing and one-dimensional (1-D) multi-frequency modulator (MFM) single-beam smoothing to achieve the required laser uniformity. The multi-FM smoothing is employed only during the low-intensity portion of the laser pulse, allowing for the use of sufficient smoothing-by-spectral-dispersion bandwidth while maintaining safe laser operations during the high-intensity part of the pulse. This target is robust to all expected sources of perturbations.

Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Anderson, K. S.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Zuegel, J. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250E. River Rd, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250E. River Rd, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives  

SciTech Connect

Powder energetic materials are highly sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) ignition. This study shows that small concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to the highly reactive mixture of aluminum and copper oxide (Al + CuO) significantly reduces ESD ignition sensitivity. CNT act as a conduit for electric energy, bypassing energy buildup and desensitizing the mixture to ESD ignition. The lowest CNT concentration needed to desensitize ignition is 3.8 vol.% corresponding to percolation corresponding to an electrical conductivity of 0.04 S/cm. Conversely, added CNT increased Al + CuO thermal ignition sensitivity to a hot wire igniter.

Kade H. Poper; Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael Daniels

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Optical design of a high radiative flux solar furnace for Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work, the optical design of a new high radiative flux solar furnace is described. Several optical configurations for the concentrator of the system have been considered. Ray tracing simulations were carried out in order to determine the concentrated radiative flux distributions in the focal zone of the system, for comparing the different proposals. The best configuration was chosen in terms of maximum peak concentration, but also in terms of economical and other practical considerations. It consists of an arrangement of 409 first surface spherical facets with hexagonal shape, mounted on a spherical frame. The individual orientation of the facets is corrected in order to compensate for aberrations. The design considers an intercepted power of 30 kW and a target peak concentration above 10,000 suns. The effect of optical errors was also considered in the simulations.

D. Riveros-Rosas; J. Herrera-Vázquez; C.A. Pérez-Rábago; C.A. Arancibia-Bulnes; S. Vázquez-Montiel; M. Sánchez-González; F. Granados-Agustín; O.A. Jaramillo; C.A. Estrada

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Interated Intelligent Industrial Process Sensing and Control: Applied to and Demonstrated on Cupola Furnaces  

SciTech Connect

The final goal of this project was the development of a system that is capable of controlling an industrial process effectively through the integration of information obtained through intelligent sensor fusion and intelligent control technologies. The industry of interest in this project was the metal casting industry as represented by cupola iron-melting furnaces. However, the developed technology is of generic type and hence applicable to several other industries. The system was divided into the following four major interacting components: 1. An object oriented generic architecture to integrate the developed software and hardware components @. Generic algorithms for intelligent signal analysis and sensor and model fusion 3. Development of supervisory structure for integration of intelligent sensor fusion data into the controller 4. Hardware implementation of intelligent signal analysis and fusion algorithms

Mohamed Abdelrahman; roger Haggard; Wagdy Mahmoud; Kevin Moore; Denis Clark; Eric Larsen; Paul King

2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

427

Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged practice current flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved.

Pollock, George G. (San Ramon, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

Pollock, G.G.

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium–tritium implosions on OMEGA  

SciTech Connect

Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of ? ? 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8?×?10{sup 7}?cm/s, and a laser intensity of ?10{sup 15}?W/cm{sup 2}. These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Flame kernel characterization of laser ignition of natural gas–air mixture in a constant volume combustion chamber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, laser-induced ignition was investigated for compressed natural gas–air mixtures. Experiments were performed in a constant volume combustion chamber, which simulate end of the compression stroke conditions of a SI engine. This chamber simulates the engine combustion chamber conditions except turbulence of air–fuel mixture. It has four optical windows at diametrically opposite locations, which are used for laser ignition and optical diagnostics simultaneously. All experiments were conducted at 10 bar chamber pressure and 373 K chamber temperature. Initial stage of combustion phenomena was visualized by employing Shadowgraphy technique using a high speed CMOS camera. Flame kernel development of the combustible fuel–air mixture was investigated under different relative air–fuel ratios (?=1.2?1.7) and the images were interrogated for temporal propagation of flame front. Pressure-time history inside the combustion chamber was recorded and analyzed. This data is useful in characterizing the laser ignition of natural gas–air mixture and can be used in developing an appropriate laser ignition system for commercial use in SI engines.

Dhananjay Kumar Srivastava; Kewal Dharamshi; Avinash Kumar Agarwal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blowerto the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance.not account for the electricity consumption of the appliance

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James E.; McNeil, Michael; Lutz, Jim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Co-gasification of biomass with coal and oil sands coke in a drop tube furnace.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Chars were obtained from individual fuels and blends with different blend ratios of coal, coke and biomass in Drop Tube Furnace at different temperatures. Based… (more)

Gao, Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Theoretical and experimental foundations for preparing coke for blast-furnace smelting  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the preparation of coke for blast-furnace smelting by a method that most fully meets the requirements of blast-furnace technology: screening of the -36 mm fraction, the separation of nut coke of the 15-36 mm fraction, and its charging into the furnace in a mixture with the iron-ore-bearing charge components. An analysis is made of trial use of coke of the Premium class on blast furnace No. 5 at the Enakievo Metallurgical Plant. Use of this coke makes it possible to reduce the consumption of skip coke by 3.2-4.1%.

A.L. Podkorytov; A.M. Kuznetsov; E.N. Dymchenko; V.P. Padalka; S.L. Yaroshevskii; A.V. Kuzin [Enakievo Metallurgical Plant, Enakievo (Ukraine)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Characterization of Coke Properties at Tuyere Level of an Operating Blast Furnace.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coke performance in an operating blast furnace is often empirically related to popular bench-scale tests, which are performed at relative much lower temperatures. Due to… (more)

Ye, Zhuozhu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic wood furnaces Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bagasse. 3. The total cost of the boiler island including stoker, furnace, boiler, economizer... , feeders and bins for handling bark and wood, while experience in dealing with...

436

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offsets the sizable electricity savings. References TitleElectricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements forfueled by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James E.; McNeil, Michael; Lutz, Jim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc plasma furnace Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PLASMA PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING Summary: replace costly traditional technologies as incineration and conventional plasma arc furnaces, and provide... ASSOCIATED LABORATORY ON...

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc furnace steelmaking Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the furnace cavity. This special ... Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fossil Energy Program; Pint, Bruce A. - Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge...

439

Mathematical modelling of the flow and combustion of pulverized coal injected in ironmaking blast furnace.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pulverized coal injection (PCI) technology is widely practised in blast furnace ironmaking due to economic, operational and environmental benefits. High burnout of pulverized coal in… (more)

Shen, Yansong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - air furnace design Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IN MUNICIPAL INCINERATOR Summary: cal to good furnace performance and to mainten ance of air pollution control. Early in 1967 the writer... of the grate roughly equivalent to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Small Glass-Melting Furnaces for Clear, Tinted, and Specialized Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the design and application areas of small-sized glass-melting furnaces for melting various-purpose glasses are supplied.

A. A. Dymov; V. A. Fedorova

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This report describes calculation of equipment energy consumption (fuel and electricity) based on estimated conditions in a sample of homes that are representative of expected furnace and boiler installations. To represent actual houses with furnaces and boilers in the United States, we used a set of houses from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of 1997 conducted by the Energy Information Administration. Our calculation methodology estimates the energy consumption of alternative (more-efficient) furnaces, if they were to be used in each house in place of the existing equipment. We developed the method of calculation described in this report for non-weatherized gas furnaces. We generalized the energy consumption calculation for this product class to the other furnace product classes. Fuel consumption calculations for boilers are similar to those for the other furnace product classes. The electricity calculations for boilers are simpler than for furnaces, because boilers do not provide thermal distribution for space cooling as furnaces often do.

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc furnaces Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Solar Energy for the Production of Fullerenes and Summary: with the Odeillo (finance) solar furnace facilities, can be used to vaporize graphite in inert gas atmosphere......

444

Evaluating the ignition sensitivity of thermal battery heat pellets  

SciTech Connect

Thermal batteries are activated by the ignition of heat pellets. If the heat pellets are not sensitive enough to the ignition stimulus, the thermal battery will not activate, resulting in a dud. Thus, to assure reliable thermal batteries, it is important to demonstrate that the pellets have satisfactory ignition sensitivity by testing a number of specimens. There are a number of statistical methods for evaluating the sensitivity of a device to some stimulus. Generally, these methods are applicable to the situation in which a single test is destructive to the specimen being tested, independent of the outcome of the test. In the case of thermal battery heat pellets, however, tests that result in a nonresponse do not totally degrade the specimen. This peculiarity provides opportunities to efficiently evaluate the ignition sensitivity of heat pellets. In this paper, a simple strategy for evaluating heat pellet ignition sensitivity (including experimental design and data analysis) is described. The relatively good asymptotic and small-sample efficiencies of this strategy are demonstrated.

Thomas, E.V.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

THE AUTOIGNITION OF CYCLOPENTANE IN AN IGNITION QUALITY TESTER  

SciTech Connect

Cyclopentane, a flammable hydrocarbon, is being considered as a working fluid for waste heat recovery applications using Organic Rankine Cycles with Direct Evaporators. A postulated failure mode consisting of a pinhole leak in a heat exchanger tube raises safety concerns due to autoignition of the working fluid. The ignition delay time (IDT) of cyclopentane was measured using an Ignition Quality Test™ (IQT™) device. Hot, vitiated air was used to simulate turbine exhaust gas (TEG). Experiments were conducted in accordance with ASTM D6890 (with exception to charge pressure and temperature) to determine ignition delay of the fuel at atmospheric pressure for vitiated air (13.3% oxygen). The test matrixencompassed equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 5.0 and chamber temperatures ranging from 673 to 823 K to establish a set of ignition delay curves. IDT was observed to decrease with increasing temperature and equivalence ratio. For the cases tested, no ignition was observed at temperatures at or below 723 K or at an equivalence ratio of 0.5.

Donna Post Guillen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Heat Recovery From Arc Furnaces Using Water Cooled Panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to maintain a constant cooling water supply temperature in the cold well. The cooling tower fans can be manually reversed on slow speed for de-icing the cooling tower in winter to remove ice buildup on the slats. Level controller LL-2 shuts down pumps PI...HEAT RECOVERY FROM ARC FURNACES USING WATER COOLED PANELS D. F. Darby Deere & Company Moline, Illinois ABSTRACT In 1980-81, the John Deere Foundry at East Moline underwent an expansion program that in creased its capacity by over 60...

Darby, D. F.

447

Variation in coke properties within the blast-furnace shop  

SciTech Connect

In active production at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (MMK), samples of melt materials were taken during shutdown and during planned repairs at furnaces 1 and 8. In particular, coke was taken from the tuyere zone at different distances from the tuyere tip. The mass of the point samples was 2-15 kg, depending on the sampling zone. The material extracted from each zone underwent magnetic separation and screening by size class. The resulting coke sample was averaged out and divided into parts: one for determining the granulometric composition and mechanical strength; and the other for technical analysis and determination of the physicochemical properties of the coke.

E.N. Stepanov; I.I. Mel'nikov; V.P. Gridasov; A.A. Stepanova [OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (MMK), Magnitogorsk, (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Conversion of a diesel engine to a spark ignition natural gas engine  

SciTech Connect

Requirements for alternatives to diesel-fueled vehicles are developing, particularly in urban centers not in compliance with mandated air quality standards. An operator of fleets of diesel- powered vehicles may be forced to either purchase new vehicles or equip some of the existing fleets with engines designed or modified to run on alternative fuels. In converting existing vehicles, the operator can either replace the existing engine or modify it to burn an alternative fuel. Work described in this report addresses the problem of modifying an existing diesel engine to operate on natural gas. Tecogen has developed a technique for converting turbocharged automotive diesel engines to operate as dedicated spark-ignition engines with natural gas fuel. The engine cycle is converted to a more-complete-expansion cycle in which the expansion ratio of the original engine is unchanged while the effective compression ratio is lowered, so that engine detonation is avoided. The converted natural gas engine, with an expansion ratio higher than in conventional spark- ignition natural gas engines, offers thermal efficiency at wide-open- throttle conditions comparable to its diesel counterpart. This allows field conversion of existing engines. Low exhaust emissions can be achieved when the engine is operated with precise control of the fuel air mixture at stoichiometry with a 3-way catalyst. A Navistar DTA- 466 diesel engine with an expansion ratio of 16.5 to 1 was converted in this way, modifying the cam profiles, increasing the turbocharger boost pressure, incorporating an aftercooler if not already present, and adding a spark-ignition system, natural gas fuel management system, throttle body for load control, and an electronic engine control system. The proof-of-concept engine achieved a power level comparable to that of the diesel engine without detonation. A conversion system was developed for the Navistar DT 466 engine. NOx emissions of 1.5 g/bhp-h have been obtained.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Ignition characteristics of methane/air premixed mixture by microwave-enhanced laser-induced breakdown plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microwave-enhanced plasma generation technique was combined with laser-induced ignition to improve ignition characteristics. A locally intensified microwave field was formed near the...

Nishiyama, Atsushi; Moon, Ahsa; Ikeda, Yuji; Hayashi, Jun; Akamatsu, Fumiteru

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Planetary and Protostellar Nuclear Fission: Implications for Planetary Change, Stellar Ignition and Dark Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...changes in the geomagnetic field. The concept that thermonuclear fusion reactions in stars are ignited by nuclear fission...protostellar nuclear fission reactors failed to ignite thermonuclear fusion reactions. The Royal Society is collaborating...

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Closed-loop, variable-valve-timing control of a controlled-auto-ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a closed-loop controller for use on a Controlled-Auto- Ignition (CAI) / Spark-Ignition (SI) mixed mode engine equipped with a variable-valve-timing (VVT) mechanism. The controller ...

Matthews, Jeffrey A., 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The effects of EGR and ignition timing on emissions of GDI engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of EGR and ignition timing on engine emissions and combustion were studied through an experiment carried out on an air-guided GDI engine. The test results showed that the ignition timing significantly...

LiFeng Zhao; XiuMin Yu; DingChao Qian; Wei Dong…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Laser induced spark ignition of coaxial methane/oxygen/nitrogen diffusion flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the laser induced spark ignition (LSI) of coaxial methane/oxygen/nitrogen diffusion flames using the 1064 nm output of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The minimum ignition energy...

Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Yang; Yu, Xin; Liu, Chang; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Laser ablation ignition of premixed methane and oxygen-enriched air mixtures using a tantalum target  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the laser ablation ignition of premixed methane and oxygen-enriched air mixtures using a tantalum target. The minimum laser pulse energy (MPE) of the ablation ignition was...

Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Yu, Yang; Liu, Chang; Chen, Deying

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ignition of a stoichiometric CH4: O2 mixture by a laser spark excited in the reactor volume is ... which indicates fast (involving branching chain reactions) ignition of the gas mixture. A conclusion is ... regar...

S. Yu. Kazantsev; I. G. Kononov; I. A. Kossyi; N. M. Tarasova…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Laser-induced ignition and combustion in a SI engine with direct injection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser-induced ignition has shown huge advantages for the combustion ... (KIT) to investigate the potential of the laser-induced ignition. The emphasis was on improving combustion initiation...

Dipl.-Ing. Volker Gross; Dr.-Ing. Heiko Kubach…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines - Direct Injection - Omnivorous Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Omnivorous Engine Omnivorous Engine Setup Omnivorous Engine Setup New engine technology has made possible engines that will operate on a wide variety of fuel inputs, from gasoline to naptha to ethanol to methanol, without driver intervention. Although flexible fuel vehicles have been produced in the millions, their engines have always been optimized for gasoline operation while accepting significant performance and efficiency degradations when using the alternative fuel. This project seeks to combine in-cylinder measurement technology, and advanced controls to optimize spark timing, the quantity and timing of injected fuel, to produce an "omnivorous engine"--one that will be able to run on any liquid spark ignition fuel with optimal efficiency and low

458

Diagnosing and controlling mix in National Ignition Facility implosion experiments  

SciTech Connect

High mode number instability growth of ''isolated defects'' on the surfaces of National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] capsules can be large enough for the perturbation to penetrate the imploding shell, and produce a jet of ablator material that enters the hot-spot. Since internal regions of the CH ablator are doped with Ge, mixing of this material into the hot-spot results in a clear signature of Ge K-shell emission. Evidence of jets entering the hot-spot has been recorded in x-ray images and spectra, consistent with simulation predictions [Hammel et al., High Energy Density Phys. 6, 171 (2010)]. Ignition targets have been designed to minimize instability growth, and capsule fabrication improvements are underway to reduce ''isolated defects.'' An experimental strategy has been developed where the final requirements for ignition targets can be adjusted through direct measurements of mix and experimental tuning.

Hammel, B. A.; Scott, H. A.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Suter, L. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R. [University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Kyrala, G. A.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Peterson, K. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled “WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard” (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their home’s vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.

Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Ignition Delay Times of Kerosene(Jet-A)/Air Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition of Jet-A/air mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves. Heating of shock tube at temperature of 150 C was used to prepare a homogeneous fuel mixture. Ignition delay times were measured from OH emission at 309 nm and from absorption of He-Ne laser radiation at 3.3922 micrometers. The conditions behind shock waves were calculated by one-dimensional shock wave theory from initial conditions T1, P1, mixture composition and incident shock wave velocity. The ignition delay times were obtained at two fixed pressures 10, 20 atm for lean, stoichiometric and rich mixtures (ER=0.5, 1, 2) at an overall temperature range of 1040-1380 K.

Zhukov, V P; Starikovskii, A Yu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "furnace ignition system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First Experiments  

SciTech Connect

An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a reentrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

Celliers, P M; Robey, H F; Boehly, T R; Alger, E; Azevedo, S; Berzins, L V; Bhandarkar, S D; Bowers, M W; Brereton, S J; Callahan, D; Castro, C; Chandrasekaran, H; Choate, C; Clark, D; Coffee, K R; Datte, P S; Dewald, E L; DiNicola, P; Dixit, S; Doeppner, T; Dzenitis, E; Edwards, M J; Eggert, J H; Fair, J; Farley, D R; Frieders, G; Gibson, C R; Giraldez, E; Haan, S; Haid, B; Hamza, A V; Haynam, C; Hicks, D G; Holunga, D M; Horner, J B; Jancaitis, K; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kline, J L; Krauter, K G; Kroll, J J; LaFortune, K N; Pape, S L; Malsbury, T; Maypoles, E R; Milovich, J L; Moody, J D; Moreno, K; Munro, D H; Nikroo, A; Olson, R E; Parham, T; Pollaine, S; Radousky, H B; Ross, G F; Sater, J; Schneider, M B; Shaw, M; Smith, R F; Thomas, C A; Throop, A; Town, R J; Trummer, D; Van Wonterghem, B M; Walters, C F; Widmann, K; Widmayer, C; Young, B K; Atherton, L J; Collins, G W; Landen, O L; Lindl, J D; MacGowan, B J; Meyerhofer, D D; Moses, E I

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects such as ion beam divergence not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point have been analysed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

Honrubia, J J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Reconfigurable Assembly Station for Precision Manufacture of Nuclear Fusion Ignition Targets  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the design and testing of a reconfigurable assembly station developed for assembling the inertial confinement nuclear fusion ignition targets that will be fielded in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [1]. The assembly station, referred to as the Flexible Final Assembly Machine (FlexFAM) and shown in Figure 1, is a companion system to the earlier Final Assembly Machine (FAM) [2]. Both machines consist of a manipulator system integrated with an optical coordinate measuring machine (OCMM). The manipulator system has six groups of stacked axis used to manipulate the millimeter-sized target components with submicron precision, and utilizes the same force and torque feedback sensing as the FAM. Real-time dimensional metrology is provided by the OCMM's vision system and through-the-lens (TTL) laser-based height measuring probe. The manually actuated manipulator system of the FlexFAM provides a total of thirty degrees-of-freedom to the target components being assembled predominantly in a cubic centimeter work zone.

Castro, C; Montesanti, R C; Taylor, J S; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, E G

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

464

A TUTORIAL ON IGNITION AND GAIN FOR SMALL FUSION TARGETS  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fusion was discovered experimentally in 1933-34 and other charged particle nuclear reactions were documented shortly thereafter. Work in earnest on the fusion ignition problem began with Edward Teller's group at Los Alamos during the war years. His group quantified all the important basic atomic and nuclear processes and summarized their interactions. A few years later, the success of the early theory developed at Los Alamos led to very successful thermonuclear weapons, but also to decades of unsuccessful attempts to harness fusion as an energy source of the future. The reasons for this history are many, but it seems appropriate to review some of the basics with the objective of identifying what is essential for success and what is not. This tutorial discusses only the conditions required for ignition in small fusion targets and how the target design impacts driver requirements. Generally speaking, the driver must meet the energy, power and power density requirements needed by the fusion target. The most relevant parameters for ignition of the fusion fuel are the minimum temperature and areal density (rhoR), but these parameters set secondary conditions that must be achieved, namely an implosion velocity, target size and pressure, which are interrelated. Despite the apparent simplicity of inertial fusion targets, there is not a single mode of fusion ignition, and the necessary combination of minimum temperature and areal density depends on the mode of ignition. However, by providing a magnetic field of sufficient strength, the conditions needed for fusion ignition can be drastically altered. Magnetized target fusion potentially opens up a vast parameter space between the extremes of magnetic and inertial fusion.

Kirkpatrick, R. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 087545 (United States)

2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

465

National Ignition Facility core x-ray streak camera  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) core x-ray streak camera will be used for laser performance verification experiments as well as a wide range of physics experiments in the areas of high-energy-density science, inertial confinement fusion, and basic science. The x-ray streak camera system is being designed to record time-dependent x-ray emission from NIF targets using an interchangeable family of snouts for measurements such as one-dimensional (1D) spatial imaging or spectroscopy. the NIF core x-ray streak camera will consist of an x-ray-sensitive photocathode that detects x rays with 1D spatial resolution coupled to an electron streak tube to detect a continuous time history of the x rays incident on the photocathode over selected time periods. A charge-coupled-device (CCD) readout will record the signal from the streak tube. The streak tube, CCD, and associated electronics will reside in an electromagnetic interference, and electromagnetic pulse protected, hermetically sealed, temperature-controlled box whose internal pressure is approximately 1 atm. The streak tube itself will penetrate through the wall of the box into the target chamber vacuum. We are working with a goal of a spatial resolution of 15 lp/mm with 50% contrast transfer function at the photocathode and adjustment sweep intervals of 1--50 ns. The camera spectral sensitivity extends from soft x rays to 20 keV x rays, with varying quantum efficiency based on photocathode selection. The system will have remote control, monitoring, and Ethernet communications through an embedded controller. The core streak camera will be compatible with the instrument manipulators at the OMEGA (University of Rochester) and NIF facilities.

Kimbrough, J. R.; Bell, P. M.; Christianson, G. B.; Lee, F. D.; Kalantar, D. H.; Perry, T. S.; Sewall, N. R.; Wootton, A. J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Numerical Study of Transient Ignition in a Counter ow Nonpremixed Methane-Air Flame using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrocarbon fuels, for example in diesel engines or in knocking of spark-ignition engines. Such processes

Petzold, Linda R.

467

Ignition and combustion drive by powerful laser radiation acting on a water surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ignition and combustion effects in water vapor generated...2-laser radiation on a water surface are investigated...

G. I. Kozlov; V. A. Kuznetsov

468

Device for use in a furnace exhaust stream for thermoelectric generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for generating voltage or electrical current includes an inner elongated member mounted in an outer elongated member, and a plurality of thermoelectric modules mounted in the space between the inner and the outer members. The outer and/or inner elongated members each include a plurality of passages to move a temperature altering medium through the members so that the device can be used in high temperature environments, e.g. the exhaust system of an oxygen fired glass melting furnace. The modules are designed to include a biasing member and/or other arrangements to compensate for differences in thermal expansion between the first and the second members. In this manner, the modules remain in contact with the first and second members. The voltage generated by the modules can be used to power electrical loads.

Polcyn, Adam D.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

469

Blast furnace coke quality in relation to petroleum coke addition  

SciTech Connect

The incorporation of petroleum coke as an additive in industrial coking coal blends is a practice often used by steel companies. A suitable blast furnace coke produced by replacing part of the coking coal blend with a suitable petroleum coke (addition of 5 to 15%), was made by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation and successfully tested at several blast furnaces. This coke had lower reactivity, less ash and slightly higher sulfur content than coke made without the addition of petroleum coke. In contrast with these results, it has been reported in a BCRA study that additions of petroleum coke to a strong coking coal, above 5 wt%, increased coke reactivity. These differences may be explained on the basis of the coal or blend characteristics to which petroleum coke is added. Petroleum coke addition seems to give better results if the coal/blend has high fluidity. The present situation in Spain is favorable for the use of petroleum coke. So, a study of laboratory and semi-industrial scale was made to assess the possibility of using petroleum coke as an additive to the typical industrial coal blend coked by the Spanish Steel Company, ENSIDESA. The influence of the petroleum coke particle size was also studied to semi-industrial scale.

Alvarez, R.; Diez, M.A.; Menendez, J.A.; Barriocanal, C.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Sirgado, M. [ENSIDESA, Aviles (Spain)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Determination of heliostat and concentrator size for solar furnace facilities  

SciTech Connect

There are basically two types of solar furnaces -- a vertical-beam or a horizontal-beam facility. A vertical-beam facility uses movable heliostats to redirect the incoming solar energy vertically upward to a stationary parabolid. A horizontal-beam furnace uses the heliostat to redirect the incoming energy horizontally to the paraboloid. This paper presents a method to determine the optimum size of the heliostat and/or concentrator to meet predetermined design criteria. Usually the concentrator size is fixed by the temperature and flux-density required at the test plane and the problem is to size the heliostat so the facility can be used for a certain length of time each day during the entire year. However, the method can also be used when the heliostat size is fixed and the concentrator size must be determined. The analysis considers energy incident from the sun being reflected from a flat spectral surface (heliostat) onto a concentrating surface (concentrator), which then redirects the energy to a focal spot that can then be used as a high temperature, high-flux density source. The analysis uses the basic relations of geometric optics and considers only the central ray of the incoming cone of energy from the sun. Errors involved with this assumption will be minimal for most cases, but if deemed necessary, the reflected cone can be accounted for in the reflected ray from the heliostat.

Mulholland, G.P.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Features of a point design for fast ignition  

SciTech Connect

Fast Ignition is an inertial fusion scheme in which fuel is first assembled and then heated to the ignition temperature with an external heating source. In this note we consider cone and shell implosions where the energy supplied by short pulse lasers is transported to the fuel by electrons. We describe possible failure modes for this scheme and how to overcome them. In particular, we describe two sources of cone tip failure, an axis jet driven from the compressed fuel mass and hard photon preheat leaking through the implosion shell, and laser prepulse that can change the position of laser absorption and the angular distribution of the emitted electrons.

Tabak, M; Clark, D; Town, R J; Key, M H; Amendt, P; Ho, D; Meeker, D J; Shay, H D; Lasinski, B F; Kemp, A; Divol, L; Mackinnon, A J; Patel, P; Strozzi, D; Grote, D P

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

472

Progress toward Ignition with Noncryogenic Double-Shell Capsules  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion implosions using capsules with two concentric shells separated by a low density region (double shells) are reported which closely follow one dimensional (1D) radiatively driven hydrodynamics simulations. Capsule designs which mitigate Au M -band radiation asymmetries appear to correspond more closely to 1D simulations than targets lacking mitigation of hohlraum drive M -band nonuniformities. One capsule design achieves over 50% of the unperturbed 1D calculated yield at a convergence ratio of 25.5, comparable to that of a double-shell design for an ignition capsule at the National Ignition Facility. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Varnum, W. S.; Delamater, N. D.; Evans, S. C.; Gobby, P. L.; Moore, J. E.; Wallace, J. M.; Watt, R. G.; Colvin, J. D.; Turner, R.; Glebov, V. (and others) [and others

2000-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

473

High Performance Imaging Streak Camera for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

An x-ray streak camera platform has been characterized and implemented for use at the National Ignition Facility. The camera has been modified to meet the experiment requirements of the National Ignition Campaign and to perform reliably in conditions that produce high EMI. A train of temporal UV timing markers has been added to the diagnostic in order to calibrate the temporal axis of the instrument and the detector efficiency of the streak camera was improved by using a CsI photocathode. The performance of the streak camera has been characterized and is summarized in this paper. The detector efficiency and cathode measurements are also presented.

Opachich, Y. P. [LLNL; Kalantar, D. [LLNL; MacPhee, A. [LLNL; Holder, J. [LLNL; Kimbrough, J. [LLNL; Bell, P. M. [LLNL; Bradley, D. [LLNL; Hatch, B. [LLNL; Brown, C. [LLNL; Landen, O. [LLNL; Perfect, B. H. [LLNL, HMC; Guidry, B. [LLNL; Mead, A. [NSTec; Charest, M. [NSTec; Palmer, N. [LLNL; Homoelle, D. [LLNL; Browning, D. [LLNL; Silbernagel, C. [NSTec; Brienza-Larsen, G. [NSTec; Griffin, M. [NSTec; Lee, J. J. [NSTec; Haugh, M. J. [NSTec

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

475

ICDERS July 2429, 2011 Irvine, USA An Empirical Model for the Ignition of Aluminum Particle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23rd ICDERS July 24­29, 2011 Irvine, USA An Empirical Model for the Ignition of Aluminum Particle of aluminum particle clouds is developed and applied to the study of particle ignition and combustion behavior as cloud concentration effects on ignition. The total mass of aluminum that burns is found to depend

476

Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary...55,257-268 Time-dependent laser ignition of a combustible stagnant boundary...examines the conditions for laser ignition of a number of industrial gases......

J. ADLER

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Initial experiments on the shock-ignition inertial confinement fusion concepta...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ignition is a concept for direct-drive laser inertial confinement fusion ICF Refs. 1­3 that was recently for conven- tional ignition to occur. Then a strong shock wave launched at the end of the laser pulseInitial experiments on the shock-ignition inertial confinement fusion concepta... W. Theobald,1,b R

478

Plasma channel from EP beam Direct-drive ignition is the main thrust in LLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ignition and radiography I2094 The OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for LaserPlasma channel from EP beam #12;Direct-drive ignition is the main thrust in LLE fusion research activities I2092 · FusionresearchatLLEisfocusedonbuildingthefoundations for a direct-drive­ignition

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