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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization Print Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization Print Polyketide natural products produced by bacteria and fungi are often characterized by the presence of multiple aromatic rings that are responsible for the activity of polyketides as both beneficial antibiotic and anticancer agents and as dangerous toxic compounds, such as the highly carcinogenic aflatoxins that are produced by fungal species from the Aspergillus family of molds. Polyketide ring formation by fungal enzymes called polyketide synthases (PKSs) is mediated by the enzyme's product template (PT) domain. However, the mechanism for aromatic ring formation from a linear intermediate with high fidelity has remained unclear. To reveal the cyclization mechanism, researchers at the University of California, Irvine, and The Johns Hopkins University solved the structure of the isolated PT domain of the PKS involved in aflatoxin production (PksA) to 1.8 Å using data from ALS Beamline 8.2.2 and SSRL Beamline 9-1. The crystal structure, along with biochemical studies, provides a paradigm for polyketide cyclization by fungal PKSs, an event that is necessary for imparting biological activity to this large class of clinically relevant natural products.

2

Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure Illuminates Mechanism Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization Print Wednesday, 31 March 2010 00:00 Polyketide natural products produced by bacteria and fungi are often characterized by the presence of multiple aromatic rings that are responsible for the activity of polyketides as both beneficial antibiotic and anticancer agents and as dangerous toxic compounds, such as the highly carcinogenic aflatoxins that are produced by fungal species from the Aspergillus family of molds. Polyketide ring formation by fungal enzymes called polyketide synthases (PKSs) is mediated by the enzyme's product template (PT) domain. However, the mechanism for aromatic ring formation from a linear intermediate with high fidelity has remained unclear. To reveal the cyclization mechanism, researchers at the University of California, Irvine, and The Johns Hopkins University solved the structure of the isolated PT domain of the PKS involved in aflatoxin production (PksA) to 1.8 Å using data from ALS Beamline 8.2.2 and SSRL Beamline 9-1. The crystal structure, along with biochemical studies, provides a paradigm for polyketide cyclization by fungal PKSs, an event that is necessary for imparting biological activity to this large class of clinically relevant natural products.

3

Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization Print Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization Print Polyketide natural products produced by bacteria and fungi are often characterized by the presence of multiple aromatic rings that are responsible for the activity of polyketides as both beneficial antibiotic and anticancer agents and as dangerous toxic compounds, such as the highly carcinogenic aflatoxins that are produced by fungal species from the Aspergillus family of molds. Polyketide ring formation by fungal enzymes called polyketide synthases (PKSs) is mediated by the enzyme's product template (PT) domain. However, the mechanism for aromatic ring formation from a linear intermediate with high fidelity has remained unclear. To reveal the cyclization mechanism, researchers at the University of California, Irvine, and The Johns Hopkins University solved the structure of the isolated PT domain of the PKS involved in aflatoxin production (PksA) to 1.8 Å using data from ALS Beamline 8.2.2 and SSRL Beamline 9-1. The crystal structure, along with biochemical studies, provides a paradigm for polyketide cyclization by fungal PKSs, an event that is necessary for imparting biological activity to this large class of clinically relevant natural products.

4

Deadly Carcinogen Unraveled: The Molecular Origami of Fungal Polyketide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deadly Carcinogen Unraveled: The Molecular Origami Deadly Carcinogen Unraveled: The Molecular Origami of Fungal Polyketide Aflatoxin is an unavoidable food contaminant in grains and nuts produced in developing countries. Chronic ingestion of nuts and grains contaminated with aflatoxin-producing molds such as Aspergillus parasiticus leads to a high rate of liver cancer, and is a large problem in developing countries. Aflatoxins belong to a class of natural products called polyketides, which are biosynthesized in many bacteria and fungi (1,2). Polyketide natural products produced by bacteria and fungi are often characterized by the presence of multiple aromatic rings that are responsible for the activity of polyketides as antibiotic, anticancer, and toxic compounds (2). Polyketide ring formation by fungal PKSs results from regiospecific cyclizations of reactive poly-beta-keto intermediates of specific length that is mediated by the product template (PT) domain (Fig. 1). The mechanism for aromatic ring formation, where a linear intermediate is transformed into a multicyclic product with high fidelity, has remained unclear. To reveal the cyclization mechanism, the Tsai lab at the University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with the Townsend lab at The Johns Hopkins University, solved the structure of the isolated PT domain of PksA to 1.8 Å using data from the SSRL beamline 9.1 and ALS beamline 8.2.2. The work was reported in the Oct 22 issue of Nature.

5

Polycyclic Aromatic Triptycenes: Oxygen Substitution Cyclization Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cyclization and planarization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with concomitant oxygen substitution was achieved through acid catalyzed transetherification and oxygen-radical reactions. The triptycene scaffold ...

VanVeller, Brett

6

Identification and characterization of the polyketide synthase involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis in Aspergillus carbonarius  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species and is a common contaminant of a wide variety of food commodities, with Aspergillus carbonarius being the main producer of OTA contamination in grapes and wine. The molecular structure of OTA is composed of a dihydroisocoumarin ring linked to phenylalanine and, as shown in different producing fungal species, a polyketide synthase (PKS) is a component of the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Similar to observations in other filamentous ascomycetes, the genome sequence of A. carbonarius contains a large number of genes predicted to encode PKSs. In this work a pks gene identified within the putative OTA cluster of A. carbonarius, designated as AcOTApks, was inactivated and the resulting mutant strain was unable to produce OTA, confirming the role of AcOTApks in this biosynthetic pathway. AcOTApks protein is characteristic of the highly reduced (HR)-PKS family, and also contains a putative methyltransferase domain likely responsible for the addition of the methyl group to the OTA polyketide structure. AcOTApks is different from the ACpks protein that we previously described which showed an expression profile compatible with OTA production. We performed phylogenetic analyses of the ?-ketosynthase and acyl-transferase domains of the OTA PKSs which had been identified and characterized in different OTA producing fungal species. The phylogenetic results were similar for both the two domains analyzed and showed that OTA PKS of A. carbonarius, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus ochraceus clustered in a monophyletic group with 100% bootstrap support suggesting a common origin, while the other OTA PKSs analyzed were phylogenetically distant. A qRT-PCR assay monitored AcOTApks expression during fungal growth and concomitant production of OTA by A. carbonarius in synthetic grape medium. A clear correlation between the expression profile of AcOTApks and kinetics of OTA production was observed with AcOTApks which reached its maximum level of transcription before OTA accumulation in mycelium reached its highest level, confirming the fact that gene transcription always precedes phenotypic production.

Gallo, Antonia; Knox, Benjamin P.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Solfrizzo, Michele; Baker, Scott E.; Perrone, Giancarlo

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strains Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of xyloseFungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev 1 * (complex communities Fungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Studies of the Production of Fungal Polyketides in Aspergillus nidulans by Using Systems Biology Tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...be useful for further development of a production process...all carbon sources. A strategy involving the addition...direct conidiophore development in Aspergillus nidulans...Harvey, A. L. 2000. Strategies for discovering drugs...

Gianni Panagiotou; Mikael R. Andersen; Thomas Grotkjaer; Torsten B. Regueira; Jens Nielsen; Lisbeth Olsson

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

9

Synthesis of indoles via a tandem benzannulation-cyclization strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vinylketenes (generated in situ from cyclobutenones or a-diazo ketones) react with ynamides via a pericyclic cascade process to produce highly-substituted aniline derivatives. Cyclization of the benzannulation products can ...

Lam, Tin Yiu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Crystal Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Allene Oxide Cyclase: Insights into the Oxylipin Cyclization Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which is cyclized by allene oxide cyclase (AOC) to the first cyclic and biologically active...that this cyclization reaction is catalyzed by AOC, a soluble enzyme in maize (Zea mays). AOC was subsequently purified as an apparent dimer...

Eckhard Hofmann; Philipp Zerbe; Florian Schaller

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fungal Genomics Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

Rapid PCR amplification of minimal enediyne polyketide synthase cassettes leads to a predictive familial classification model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that the biosynthesis of all enediyne warheads may proceed via similar polyunsaturated polyketide intermediates...analysis, led to the elucidation of the intact PKS genes...pathways. Atoms that were incorporated intact from the acyl CoA precursors to the enediyne...

Wen Liu; Joachim Ahlert; Qunjie Gao; Evelyn Wendt-Pienkowski; Ben Shen; Jon S. Thorson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Progress towards the synthesis of tetracyclic heteroaromatic compounds via tandem benzannulation-cyclization strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A tandem benzannulation-cyclization strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis of a tetracyclic heteroaromatic compound expected to have interesting electronic properties. Benzannulation of a diazo ketone and a ...

Mamaliga, Galina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Selective Monoterpene-like Cyclization Reactions Achieved by Water Exclusion from Reactive Intermediates in a Supramolecular Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Supramolecular Catalyst WilliamM. Hart?Cooper,confinementofthecatalystsinterior,Prinscyclizationsacidicsolution Entry Catalyst pH Conv. (%) 1 a

Hart-Cooper, William

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Targeting of single stranded oligonucleotides through metal induced cyclization of short complementary strands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manuscript #12;2 Abstract A new strategy to cyclize a short synthetic oligonucleotide on a DNA or a RNA of short synthetic oligonucleotides conjugated with two chelating 2,2':6',2"terpyridine moieties. Our protocol allows the efficient circularisation of synthetic oligonucleotides. Thereby

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

17

A Mild, Diastereoselective Construction of Cyclic and Spirocyclic Ketals Employing a Tandem Photoisomerization/Cyclization Tactic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bo Li , Brett D. Williams , and Amos B. Smith , III* ... *E-mail: smithab@sas.upenn.edu. ... To circumvent this constraint, we envisioned that the photoisomerization of trans-?-hydroxy enones in acidic media(8) held promise for the formation of a dynamic equilibrium, in which the cis-enone would cyclize and hydrate under milder conditions (Scheme 1c). ...

Bo Li; Brett D. Williams; Amos B. Smith; III

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

A Putative Polyketide Synthase/Peptide Synthetase from Magnaporthe grisea Signals Pathogen Attack to Resistant Rice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resistance gene Pi33. These rice cultivars were grown in the greenhouse as described (Dioh et al., 2000). Spray infections and...Ciufetti, L.M. (2001). Green fluorescent protein is lighting up fungal biology. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67, 1987-1994...

Heidi U. Böhnert; Isabelle Fudal; Waly Dioh; Didier Tharreau; Jean-Loup Notteghem; Marc-Henri Lebrun

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

19

Succession of Wood-inhabiting Fungal Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Succession of Wood-inhabiting Fungal Communities Diversity and Species Interactions During/Repro, Uppsala 2013 #12;Succession of Wood-inhabiting Fungal Communities ­ Diversity and Species Interactions During the Decomposition of Norway Spruce Abstract Dead wood constitutes an important substrate

20

Room Temperature Copper(II)-Catalyzed Oxidative Cyclization of Enamides to 2,5-Disubstituted Oxazoles via Vinylic CH Functionalization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A copper(II)-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of enamides to oxazoles via vinylic CH bond functionalization at room temperature is described. Various 2,5-disubstituted oxazoles bearing aryl, vinyl, alkyl, and heteroaryl ...

Cheung, Chi Wai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Synthesis and determination of the absolute configuration of Armatol A through a polyepoxide cyclization cascade : revision of the proposed structures of Armatols A-F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyclization Cascades Leading to the Tricyclic Fragment of Armatol A The synthesis of the fused 6,7,7-tricycle of armatol A was investigated. Fragments containing both a ketone and an aldehyde for subsequent fragment coupling ...

Underwood, Brian Saxton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Why sequence fungal pathogen Cochliobolus sativus?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fungal pathogen Cochliobolus sativus? fungal pathogen Cochliobolus sativus? Wheat and barley have been and will continue to be the cereal crops of major importance in the United States and around the world. In 2008, the U.S. produced over 130 million tons of wheat, third in the world behind China and India. Fungal diseases such as spot blotch are a consistent source of economic losses for the cereal crops. Spot blotch caused by C. sativus in barley and wheat is one of the most important diseases and remains a problem in many regions of the world. The fungus Cochliobolus sativus is the sexual stage of Bipolaris sorokiniana, which is the causal agent of a wide variety of cereal diseases. In its asexual stage, the pathogen can infect and cause disease on the root (where it is known as common root rot), leaf and stem, and head

23

MycoCosm, an Integrated Fungal Genomics Resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MycoCosm is a web-based interactive fungal genomics resource, which was first released in March 2010, in response to an urgent call from the fungal community for integration of all fungal genomes and analytical tools in one place (Pan-fungal data resources meeting, Feb 21-22, 2010, Alexandria, VA). MycoCosm integrates genomics data and analysis tools to navigate through over 100 fungal genomes sequenced at JGI and elsewhere. This resource allows users to explore fungal genomes in the context of both genome-centric analysis and comparative genomics, and promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis. MycoCosm has over 4500 unique visitors/month or 35000+ visitors/year as well as hundreds of registered users contributing their data and expertise to this resource. Its scalable architecture allows significant expansion of the data expected from JGI Fungal Genomics Program, its users, and integration with external resources used by fungal community.

Shabalov, Igor; Grigoriev, Igor

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Effect of relative humidity on fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation. I M Ezeonu J A Noble R B Simmons D...on fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation. | Fiberglass duct liners and fiberglass...on Fungal Colonization of Fiberglass Insulation I. M. EZEONU,1 J. A. NOBLE...

I M Ezeonu; J A Noble; R B Simmons; D L Price; S A Crow; D G Ahearn

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Melanoma Therapy with Rhenium-Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with {sup 188}Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, {sup 188}Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH and {sup 212}Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH complexes were developed and synthesized to investigate its ability to target and deliver an effective dose to small melanoma tumors and metastatic deposits. Dosimetry calculations for {sup 188}Re-CCMSH and {sup 212}Pb/{sup 212}Bi[DOTA]-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were compared in the B16/F1 mouse melanoma flank tumor model to analyze the delivered dose to tumor and normal organs.

Thomas P Quinn

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

Development of a copper-catalyzed amidation-base-promoted cyclization sequence for the synthesis of 2-aryl- and 2-vinyl1-4 quinolones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A direct two-step method for the preparation of 2-aryl- and 2-vinyl-4-quinolones that utilizes a copper-catalyzed amidation of ortho-halophenones followed by a base-promoted Camps cyclization of the resulting N-(2-keto-aryl)amides ...

Jones, Carrie Preston

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Green Fluorescent Protein Is Lighting Up Fungal Biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MINIREVIEW Green Fluorescent Protein Is Lighting Up Fungal Biology J. M. Lorang R...naturally occur, in a lab or a contained greenhouse, will present other challenges. However...host. . Green fluorescent protein is lighting up fungal biology. | Department of Botany...

J. M. Lorang; R. P. Tuori; J. P. Martinez; T. L. Sawyer; R. S. Redman; J. A. Rollins; T. J. Wolpert; K. B. Johnson; R. J. Rodriguez; M. B. Dickman; L. M. Ciuffetti

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Chapter One - Fungal Genomics: Sequencing and Annotation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Plants grow in close associations with fungipathogens, symbionts, and endophytesand depend on these associations for success. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of these interactions is important in order to create optimal conditions for plant growth. Genomics is a powerful tool not only to discover the potential encoded in genomes of both plants and plant-associated fungi but also to monitor dynamics of their interactions through gene expression and other genome-enabled analyses. Next-generation sequencing technologies offer tools to explore nature's wide array of plantfungal interactions in unprecedented depth, and the sheer volume of data produced is enormous. Several approaches to assemble, annotate, and analyse this wealth of genomics data are discussed in this chapter.

Alan Kuo; Brian Bushnell; Igor V. Grigoriev

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Dynamics of Fungal Communities in Bulk and Maize Rhizosphere Soil in the Tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pronounced changes in the composition of fungal communities during...metabolic by-products and agrochemicals, enhancing the bioavailability...mycorrhizae) can also affect the composition of bacterial communities...to describe the dynamics, composition, and fungal diversity in...

Newton C. Marcial Gomes; Olajire Fagbola; Rodrigo Costa; Norma Gouvea Rumjanek; Arno Buchner; Leda Mendona-Hagler; Kornelia Smalla

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Exploring the evolutionary ecology of fungal endophytes in agricultural systems: using functional traits to reveal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Kohn3 1 Environmental Studies, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA 2, functional traits, fungal endophytes, Fusarium, maize. Correspondence Megan Saunders, Environmental Studies systems, where pair-wise host­fungus interactions and mechanisms of fungal­fungal competition have

Kohn, Linda M.

31

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Patterns of fungal diversity and composition along a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Patterns of fungal diversity and composition along a salinity gradient Devon J, CA, USA Estuarine salinity gradients are known to influence plant, bacterial and archaeal community and evenness of taxa) and composition (taxonomic and phylogenetic) along an estuarine salinity gradient. We

Bruns, Tom

32

Biology and Management of Fungal Pathogens of Vegetables Program Leader  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and determining efficacy of disease control products #12;Re cauliflower rubber bands.msg Alternaria leaf spot on cabbage Program Justification: Fungal diseases are often a major limiting factor in vegetable production seeks to find cost effective disease control measures that result in production of high quality produce

Lazzaro, Brian

33

Cyclization Phenomena in the Sol-Gel Polymerization of a,w-Bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and Incorporation of the Cyclic Structures into Network Silsesquioxane Polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intramolecular cyclizations during acid-catalyzed, sol-gel polymerizations of ct,co- bis(tietioxysilyl)aWmes substintidly lengtien gelties formonomers witietiylene- (l), propylene- (2), and butylene-(3)-bridging groups. These cyclizations reactions were found, using mass spectrometry and %i NMR spectroscopy, to lead preferentially to monomeric and dimeric products based on six and seven membered disilsesquioxane rings. 1,2- Bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (1) reacts under acidic conditions to give a bicyclic drier (5) that is composed of two annelated seven membered rings. Under the same conditions, 1,3- bis(triethoxysilyl)propane (2), 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (3), and z-1,4- bis(triethoxysilyl)but-2-ene (10) undergo an intramolecular condensation reaction to give the six membemd and seven membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes 6, 7, and 11. Subsequently, these cyclic monomers slowly react to form the tricyclic dirners 8,9 and 12. With NaOH as polymerization catalyst these cyclic silsesquioxanes readily ~aeted to afford gels that were shown by CP MAS z%i NMR and infr=d spectroscopes to retain some cyclic structures. Comparison of the porosity and microstructwe of xerogels prepared from the cyclic monomers 6 and 7 with gels prepared directly from their acyclic precursors 2 and 3, indicate that the final pore structure of the xerogels is markedly dependent on the nature of the precursor. In addition, despite the fact that the monomeric cyclic disilsesquioxane species can not be isolated from 1-3 under basic conditions due to their rapid rate of gelation, spectroscopic techniques also detected the presence of the cyclic structures in the resulting polymeric gels.

Alam, T.M.; Carpenter, J.P.; Dorhout, P.K.; Greaves, J.; Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.; Shea, K.J.; Small, J.H.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - antigens fungal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PCR 8 ; Mycoplasma... ; Fungal culture 3 ; Histopathology 4 ; Neospora IFA 5 ; Toxic heavy metal screen 6 ; Toxoplasma gondii MAT... for parasite exam 2 ; Dexamethasone...

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisopliae fungal catalase Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fungal Isolates Metarhizium anisopliae... var. anisopliae PCR assays with ... Source: Johnson, Dan L. - Department of Geography, University of Lethbridge Collection: Environmental...

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal fungal pathogen Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a free-living fungal ... Source: Valdivia, Raphael - Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Collection: Biology and Medicine 2 This article appeared in...

37

ALSNews Vol. 307  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Print 7 Print In This Issue ALS Social Media is Here Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization New Infrared Beamline 5.4, BSISB Facility Open ALS Controls Upgrade: Meeting the Needs of a Growing Facility Ring Leaders: Accelerator Operations and Development Announcements: Guest House Special Extended, and VUVX 2010 Who's in the News Operations Update UEC Corner News Links RingLeaders Ring Leaders Accelerator Operations and Development Division Deputy for Accelerator Operations and Development David Robin gives an overview of the Accelerator Physics Group, Accelerator and Floor Operations Sections, and the ALS Procedure Center. Read the Article announcements Announcements Guest House Special

38

ALSNews Vol. 307  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Print 7 Print In This Issue ALS Social Media is Here Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization New Infrared Beamline 5.4, BSISB Facility Open ALS Controls Upgrade: Meeting the Needs of a Growing Facility Ring Leaders: Accelerator Operations and Development Announcements: Guest House Special Extended, and VUVX 2010 Who's in the News Operations Update UEC Corner News Links RingLeaders Ring Leaders Accelerator Operations and Development Division Deputy for Accelerator Operations and Development David Robin gives an overview of the Accelerator Physics Group, Accelerator and Floor Operations Sections, and the ALS Procedure Center. Read the Article announcements Announcements Guest House Special

39

ALSNews Vol. 307  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Print 7 Print In This Issue ALS Social Media is Here Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization New Infrared Beamline 5.4, BSISB Facility Open ALS Controls Upgrade: Meeting the Needs of a Growing Facility Ring Leaders: Accelerator Operations and Development Announcements: Guest House Special Extended, and VUVX 2010 Who's in the News Operations Update UEC Corner News Links RingLeaders Ring Leaders Accelerator Operations and Development Division Deputy for Accelerator Operations and Development David Robin gives an overview of the Accelerator Physics Group, Accelerator and Floor Operations Sections, and the ALS Procedure Center. Read the Article announcements Announcements Guest House Special

40

ALSNews Vol. 307  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Print 7 Print In This Issue ALS Social Media is Here Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Structure Illuminates Mechanism of Fungal Polyketide Cyclization New Infrared Beamline 5.4, BSISB Facility Open ALS Controls Upgrade: Meeting the Needs of a Growing Facility Ring Leaders: Accelerator Operations and Development Announcements: Guest House Special Extended, and VUVX 2010 Who's in the News Operations Update UEC Corner News Links RingLeaders Ring Leaders Accelerator Operations and Development Division Deputy for Accelerator Operations and Development David Robin gives an overview of the Accelerator Physics Group, Accelerator and Floor Operations Sections, and the ALS Procedure Center. Read the Article announcements Announcements Guest House Special

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Twenty-Seventh Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar, CA, March 12-17, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This meeting brings together ~900 international scientists to discuss the latest research on fungal genetics. Sessions of particular relevance to DOE include lignocellulose degradation, cellulose conversion to fermentable sugars, fermentation of sugars to fuel molecules. Other sessions cover fungal diseases of biomass crops (miscanthus, corn, switchgrass, etc.).

Walton, Jonathan

2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

Effect of ozonation on fungal resistance of bamboo and oak flooring materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignocellulosic materials are gaining increased interest as renewable sources of building materials. However, chemical and microbiological degradation can occur when lignocellulosic materials are exposed to environmental stressors such as ozone and elevated humidity. In this study, the effects of ozone treatment and solvent extraction on fungal growth rates of bamboo and oak flooring materials were investigated. One set of samples was extracted with a mixture of cyclohexane and ethanol solvents for 72h to remove extractable compounds. Another set of materials was exposed continuously to ozone (2000?Lm?3 or 2000ppbv) for one to five weeks. Solvent-extracted and ozone-treated samples were incubated in closed chambers at 85% or 55% RH and 30C. Incubated samples were removed at regular time intervals for fungal growth evaluation. Ozone treatment caused chemical changes in bamboo and oak, which appeared to reduce bamboo's resistance to fungal attack. Longer ozone exposure led to higher susceptibility to fungal growth. Untreated and ozone-treated oak showed no evidence of fungal growth, suggesting that this material may contain fungi-inhibitory compounds that are not removed by these treatments. Also, a delay in fungal growth on cyclohexane/ethanol-extracted bamboo was observed, probably due to the extraction process removing substances that enhanced fungal growth.

Chi Hoang; Tinh Nguyen; Deborah Stanley; Andrew Persily; Richard L. Corsi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fungal life in the extremely hypersaline water of the Dead Sea: first records  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by volume) of Dead Sea water. Isolated cultures did not...prepared with up to 50% Dead Sea water. This suggests that they may...classification isolation & purification Israel Osmolar Concentration Water Microbiology Fungal life in...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - arachidonate-rich fungal oil Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Mycorrhizal Species Dominate the Soil-Fungal Community in Estonian Oil Shale-Ash Hills Charles Cowden, Sam Willis, and Richard Shefferson Summary: Mycorrhizal...

45

Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: biodiversity, ecosystem, elevated carbon dioxide, nitrogen enrichment, parasites, plant pathogensEffects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species

Crews, Stephen

46

A Double Staining Method Using SYTOX Green and Calcofluor White for Studying Fungal Parasites of Phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology A Double Staining Method Using SYTOX Green and Calcofluor White for Studying Fungal...specific chitinous fluorochrome) and SYTOX green (nucleic acid stain), coupled to epifluorescence...fluorochromes (calcofluor white [CFW] and SYTOX green) coupled with epifluorescence microscopy...

Mlanie Gerphagnon; Delphine Latour; Jonathan Colombet; Tlesphore Sime-Ngando

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

Clinical Microbiology of Bacterial and Fungal Sepsis in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology ARTICLE REVIEWS Clinical Microbiology of Bacterial and Fungal Sepsis in Very-Low-Birth-Weight...Chesney, P. J., A. Taher, E. M. Gilbert, and N. T. Shahidi. 1978. Intranuclear...Streptococcal infections: clinical aspects, microbiology, and molecular pathogenesis. Oxford...

David Kaufman; Karen D. Fairchild

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Chapter Thirteen - Speciation Genomics of Fungal Plant Pathogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fungi have relatively small genomes, and many species are amendable to experimental and molecular manipulation making them excellent models to unravel the genetic, molecular and cellular aspects of speciation. Pioneering work has been conducted in the two model species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa where integrated studies using classical genetics, genomic resources and experimental approaches have shed light on mechanisms conferring reproductive isolation between diverged lineages. Experimental evolution, genetic mapping and molecular manipulation can be considerably more challenging in species of fungal plant pathogens. Yet, insight into speciation genetics is fundamental to understand the emergence of new pathogen species. Now, several fundamental questions relating to speciation genetics can be addressed using the growing resource of genome data. Population genomics and comparative genomics approaches offer the possibility of not only recapturing the evolutionary history of species but also identifying signatures of selection and genomic rearrangements associated with speciation events. Thereby, both the history of species and the underlying genetics associated with the establishment of reproductive isolation can be recovered.

Eva H. Stukenbrock

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Distribution and diversity of fungal species in and adjacent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fungi have demonstrated their ability to diversify and specialize to take advantage of new environments (Murphy 1996). These species are essential to the normal functioning of ecosystems and the impacts of human activities may be harmful to fungi. There is a need to inventory fungi throughout the range of their environments. Previously archived information representing 43 sample locations was used to perform a preliminary evaluation of the distributions and diversity of fungal species at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and in adjacent environments. Presence-absence data for 71 species of fungi in five habitats, pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine, ponderosa pine, canyon-bottom mixed conifer, and mixed conifer were analyzed. The results indicate that even though fungi occur in each of the habitats, fungal species are not distributed evenly among these habitats. The richness of fungal species is greater in the canyon-bottom mixed conifer and mixed conifer habitats than in the pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine or ponderosa pine habitats. All but three of the fungal species were recorded in either the canyon-bottom mixed conifer or the mixed conifer habitats, and all but seven of the fungal species were found in the mixed conifer habitat.

Balice, R.G.; Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

Judith Berman

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fungus Threatens the Viability of Cotton For more than a century, the fungal disease cotton root  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fungus Threatens the Viability of Cotton For more than a century, the fungal disease cotton root rot has been one of the most destructive cotton diseases in Texas. Cotton root rot reduces yield. With the disease essentially eliminating harvestable cotton on affected acres, economic losses from the disease

52

Impact of Photocatalysis on Fungal Cells: Depiction of Cellular and Molecular Effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Regulation of trehalose mobilization in fungi. Microbiol. Rev. 48 :42-59. 63. Dulermo, T , C Rascle, G Billon-Grand, E Gout, R Bligny and P Cotton. 2010. Novel insights into mannitol metabolism in the fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Biochem...

Sana Thabet; France Simonet; Marc Lemaire; Chantal Guillard; Pascale Cotton

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

53

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Fungal Map of Mutations Key to Increasing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 1, 2009 September 1, 2009 Fungal Map of Mutations Key to Increasing Enzyme Production for Bioenergy Use Download a podcast of this release! WALNUT CREEK, CA-In half a century, one fungus has gone from being the bane of the Army quartermasters' existence in the Pacific to industry staple and someday, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission to promote national energy security through clean, renewable energy development, a biofuel producers' best friend. Trichoderma reesei's makeover is due in part to scientific explorations that led to the development of mutant fungal strains that produce large quantities of biomass-degrading enzymes. T. reesei Image: T. reesei, courtesy of Irma Salovuori, VTT Biotechnology Now an international team of researchers led by scientists at the DOE Joint

54

Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Synthetic studies applied to polyketide natural products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1) (BnO) 2 P-N( i Pr) 2 tetrazole, CH 2 Cl 2 OH Ph OBn O OBna stirred suspension of tetrazole (27 mg, 0.38 mmol) in CH 2mg, 2.10 mmol), 1- phenyl-1H-tetrazole thiol (748 mg, 4.20

Mandel, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Synthetic studies applied to polyketide natural products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 H spectrum of compound 192. f1 (ppm) Spectrum A.156: Cspectrum of compound 192. f1 (ppm) f1 (ppm) Spectrum A.157: 1 H spectrum of intermediate

Mandel, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Biomechanical pulping of aspen chips; Energy savings resulting from different fungal treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Besides increasing paper strength, fungal treatments can also reduce the electrical energy needed for fiberizing chips during mechanical pulping. Fungal species, chip movement, and treatment duration affected the extent of energy savings. This paper reports that four-week-long treatment with white-rot fungi, including Phlebia species or Pholiota mutabilis, in a stationary wire tray bioreactor resulted in at least 35% energy savings for pulping chips to 100 mL CSF in a 300-mm-diameter disc refiner. With Phanerochaete chrysosporium in a rotating-drum bioreactor, the optimal treatment duration was four weeks. Treatment with a brown-rot fungus also resulted in energy savings. Over the range of fungi and conditions tested, neither chip weight loss nor lignin loss correlated with energy savings. Some treatments giving the least chip weight loss ({lt}5%) saved the most energy. Wood modifications responsible for energy savings differed from those that increased strength. Treatments that saved the most energy did not necessarily give the highest strength properties.

Leatham, G.F.; Myers, G.C.; Wegner, T.H. (USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (US))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ion Torrent PGM as Tool for Fungal Community Analysis: A Case Study of Endophytes in Eucalyptus grandis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental strains into culture, fungal communities are difficult to characterize. This is especially true assessments. In this study we sequenced the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) nuclear encoded ribosomal RNA taxonomy. Sequence similarity cutoff values only had a marginal effect on the identified family numbers

60

Insights from Sequencing Fungal and Oomycete Genomes: What Can We Learn about Plant Disease and the Evolution of Pathogenicity?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...number of projects is in progress, and the dramatic fall in the price of DNA sequencing, coupled with the new high-throughput sequencing...Harrison, S.J., Joosten, M.H., Vervoort, J., and de Wit, P.J. (2006). Cladosporium fulvum Avr4 protects fungal...

Darren M. Soanes; Thomas A. Richards; Nicholas J. Talbot

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Joint Genome Institute. Pulp NonFiction: Fungal Analysis Reveals Clues  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 22, 2012 March 22, 2012 Pulp NonFiction: Fungal Analysis Reveals Clues for Targeted Biomass Deconstruction Without fungi and microbes to break down dead trees and leaf litter in nature, the forest floor might look like a scene from TV's "Hoarders." Ceriporiopsis subvermispora mycelium on wood Photo: Scanning electron micrograph of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora mycelium on wood. (R. Blanchette, University of Minnesota) Massive-scale genome sequencing projects supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and being carried out at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) highlight the importance of learning how the cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin that serve as a plant's infrastructure can be broken down by these forest organisms to extract needed nutrients. Among the fungi being

62

The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic mechanisms for lignin degradation reconstructed using 31 fungal genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non?lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.

Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martinez, Angel T.; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Yadav, Jagit S.; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex; Coutinho, Pedro M.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Ferreira, Patricia; Findley, Keisha; Foster, Brian; Gaskell, Jill; Glotzer, Dylan; Gorecki, Pawel; Heitman, Joseph; Hesse, Cedar; Hori, Chiaki; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jurgens, Joel A.; Kallen, Nathan; Kersten, Phil; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Kumar, T. K. Arun; Kuo, Alan; LaButti, Kurt; Larrondo, Luis F.; Lindquist, Erika; Ling, Albee; Lombard, Vincent; Lucas, Susan; Lundell, Taina; Martin, Rachael; McLaughlin, David J.; Morgenstern, Ingo; Morin, Emanuelle; Murat, Claude; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Nolan, Matt; Ohm, Robin A.; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Rokas, Antonis; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Salamov, Asaf; Samejima, Masahiro; Schmutz, Jeremy; Slot, Jason C.; St. John, Franz; Stenlid, Jan; Sun, Hui; Sun, Sheng; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tsang, Adrian; Wiebenga, Ad; Young, Darcy; Pisabarro, Antonio; Eastwood, Daniel C.; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

63

Techno-economic analysis of corn stover fungal fermentation to ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This techno-economic analysis assesses the process economics of ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstock by fungi to identify promising opportunities, and the research needed to achieve them. Based on literature derived data, four different ethanologen strains are considered in this study: native and recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the natural pentose-fermenting yeast, Pichia stipitis and the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum. In addition, filamentous fungi are applied in multi-organism and consolidated process configurations. Organism performance and technology readiness are categorized as near-term (<5 years), mid-term (5-10 years), and long-term (>10 years) process deployment. The results of the analysis suggest that the opportunity for fungal fermentation exists for lignocellulosic ethanol production.

Meyer, Pimphan A.; Tews, Iva J.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Tandemly Duplicated Arabidopsis Genes That Encode Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Proteins Are Regulated Coordinately by Different Signal Transduction Pathways in Response to Fungal Infection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1995). Oligogalacturonides and chitosan activate plant defensive genes through...fragments that regulate a proteinase inhibitor II gene from potato. Proc. Natl. Acad...1994). Structure and expression of an inhibitor of fungal polygalacturonases from tomato...

Simone Ferrari; Donatella Vairo; Frederick M. Ausubel; Felice Cervone; Giulia De Lorenzo

2002-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

65

Transcriptomic response of the mycoparasitic fungus Trichoderma atroviride to the presence of a fungal prey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BACKGROUND: Combating the action of plant pathogenic microorganisms by mycoparasitic fungi has been announced as an attractive biological alternative to the use of chemical fungicides since two decades. The fungal genus Trichoderma includes a high number of taxa which are able to recognize, combat and finally besiege and kill their prey. Only fragments of the biochemical processes related to this ability have been uncovered so far, however. RESULTS: We analyzed genome-wide gene expression changes during the begin of physical contact between Trichoderma atroviride and two plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani, and compared with gene expression patterns of mycelial and conidiating cultures, respectively. About 3000 ESTs, representing about 900 genes, were obtained from each of these three growth conditions. 66 genes, represented by 442 ESTs, were specifically and significantly overexpressed during onset of mycoparasitism, and the expression of a subset thereof was verified by expression analysis. The upregulated genes comprised 18 KOG groups, but were most abundant from the groups representing posttranslational processing, and amino acid metabolism, and included components of the stress response, reaction to nitrogen shortage, signal transduction and lipid catabolism. Metabolic network analysis confirmed the upregulation of the genes for amino acid biosynthesis and of those involved in the catabolism of lipids and aminosugars. CONCLUSION: The analysis of the genes overexpressed during the onset of mycoparasitism in T. atroviride has revealed that the fungus reacts to this condition with several previously undetected physiological reactions. These data enable a new and more comprehensive interpretation of the physiology of mycoparasitism, and will aid in the selection of traits for improvement of biocontrol strains by recombinant techniques.

Seidl, Verena; Song, Lifu; Lindquist, Erika; Gruber, Sabine; Koptchinskiy, Alexeji; Zeilinger, Susanne; Schmoll, Monika; Martinez, Pedro; Sun, Jibin; Grigoriev, Igor; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Baker, Scott E; Kubicek, Christian P.

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

Kingsley, Mark T.

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

67

Environmental fitness and production of a fungal inhibitory compound by selected bacteria: a potential biocontrol for oak wilt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) was isolated at 3 mo (bole) and TAMU 1-1 at 1 wk, while all other samples did not yield any of the introduced isolates. Preliminary results indicate that the trees are not well protected from natural spread of C. fagacearum. TANU 1-15 produces a fungal.... inhibitory compound 15 23 27 33 39 45 51 56 66 73 LIST OP TABLES Table Page Plot characteristics (0. 1 acres) in a 1' o k (Q ~f' ' ) t d treated with bacterial strains. Number of bacterial isolates recovered from alternating one foot bole...

Gehring, Eugene Herman

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mycorrhizal Species Dominate the Soil-Fungal Community in Estonian Oil Shale-Ash Hills Charles Cowden, Sam Willis, and Richard Shefferson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mycorrhizal Species Dominate the Soil-Fungal Community in Estonian Oil Shale-Ash Hills Charles 30602 Introduction Estonia relies on vast reserves of oil shale to produce electricity. The mining and burning of oil shale is extremely inefficient and produces large quantities of tailings and ash (Vallner

Shefferson, Richard P.

69

Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Structural and functional studies of a phosphatidic acid-binding antifungal plant defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR motif governing fungal cell entry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A highly conserved plant defensin MtDef4 potently inhibits the growth of a filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. MtDef4 is internalized by cells of F. graminearum. To determine its mechanism of fungal cell entry and antifungal action, NMR solution structure of MtDef4 has been determined. The analysis of its structure has revealed a positively charged patch on the surface of the protein consisting of arginine residues in its ?-core signature, a major determinant of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. Here, we report functional analysis of the RGFRRR motif of the ?-core signature of MtDef4. The replacement of RGFRRR to AAAARR or to RGFRAA not only abolishes fungal cell entry but also results in loss of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. MtDef4 binds strongly to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Mutations of RGFRRR which abolish fungal cell entry of MtDef4 also impair its binding to PA. Our results suggest that RGFRRR motif is a translocation signal for entry of MtDef4 into fungal cells and that this positively charged motif likely mediates interaction of this defensin with PA as part of its antifungal action.

Sagaram, Uma S.; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghoottama; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

71

Chapter Four - Carbohydrate-Binding Modules of Fungal Cellulases: Occurrence in Nature, Function, and Relevance in Industrial Biomass Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this review, the present knowledge on the occurrence of cellulases, with a special emphasis on the presence of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in various fungal strains, has been summarized. The importance of efficient fungal cellulases is growing due to their potential uses in biorefinery processes where lignocellulosic biomasses are converted to platform sugars and further to biofuels and chemicals. Most secreted cellulases studied in detail have a bimodular structure containing an active core domain attached to a CBM. \\{CBMs\\} are traditionally been considered as essential parts in cellulases, especially in cellobiohydrolases. However, presently available genome data indicate that many cellulases lack the binding domains in cellulose-degrading organisms. Recent data also demonstrate that \\{CBMs\\} are not necessary for the action of cellulases and they solely increase the concentration of enzymes on the substrate surfaces. On the other hand, in practical industrial processes where high substrate concentrations with low amounts of water are employed, the enzymes have been shown to act equally efficiently with and without CBM. Furthermore, available kinetic data show that enzymes without \\{CBMs\\} can desorb more readily from the often lignaceous substrates, that is, they are not stuck on the substrates and are thus available for new actions. In this review, the available data on the natural habitats of different wood-degrading organisms (with emphasis on the amount of water present during wood degradation) and occurrence of cellulose-binding domains in their genome have been assessed in order to identify evolutionary advantages for the development of CBM-less cellulases in nature.

Anik Vrnai; Miia R. Mkel; Demi T. Djajadi; Jenni Rahikainen; Annele Hatakka; Liisa Viikari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compounds for pharmaceutical and agrochemical development. However, traditional...liquids of previously unknown composition that likely serve defensive functions...complements analysis of molecular composition data obtained via MS...biological samples of unknown composition is often desirable, as chromatographic...

Stephen T. Deyrup; Laura E. Eckman; Patrick H. McCarthy; Scott R. Smedley; Jerrold Meinwald; Frank C. Schroeder

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fungal Skin Infections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dermatophyte or ringworm infections are confined to stratum corneum or keratinised structures derived from epidermis, such as nail or hair, and these superficial infections are considered in this chapter. ...

R. J. Hay

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Consolidating fungal biochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of the oils contained in fungi. Biochemistry has since moved so fast that the lipid composition of representatives of the major groups of fungi is now fairly well documented and the ... have the ability to produce complex secondary metabolites, whether suitable for exploitation as pharmaceuticals or agrochemicals or whether hazardous on account of their propensity to act as mycotoxins. Often these ...

P.G. Mantle

1981-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Photochemical and Thermal Bergman Cyclization of a Pyrimidine Enediynol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the naturally occurring products as therapeutic agents because they may show reduced toxicity.3Versity of Miami, 1301 Memorial DriVe, Coral Gables, Florida 33124, and Department Of Radiation Oncology (R-71 compounds were also shown to cleave dsDNA under the appropriate conditions. Since the natural enediyne

Rusell, K.C.

76

LAP6/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A and LAP5/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE B Encode Hydroxyalkyl α-Pyrone Synthases Required for Pollen Development and Sporopollenin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with the JTT model of amino acid substitution. RT-PCR RNA quality was assessed by visual inspection of rRNA on a 1.2% formaldehyde-agarose...Pinus radiata-A stilbene synthase approach to genetically engineer nuclear male sterility. Plant Biotechnol. J. 4 : 333-343...

Sung Soo Kim; Etienne Grienenberger; Benjamin Lallemand; Che C. Colpitts; Sun Young Kim; Clarice de Azevedo Souza; Pierrette Geoffroy; Dimitri Heintz; Daniel Krahn; Markus Kaiser; Erich Kombrink; Thierry Heitz; Dae-Yeon Suh; Michel Legrand; Carl J. Douglas

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

LAP6/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A and LAP5/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE B Encode Hydroxyalkyl α-Pyrone Synthases Required for Pollen Development and Sporopollenin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plastid filled with plastoglobuli; PG, pollen grain; PM, plasma membrane; T, tapetal cell; Te, tectum; V, vacuole containing...electron detector and a PGT Spirit EDX microanalysis system (Princeton Gamma Tech). To obtain cross sections of developing anthers...

Sung Soo Kim; Etienne Grienenberger; Benjamin Lallemand; Che C. Colpitts; Sun Young Kim; Clarice de Azevedo Souza; Pierrette Geoffroy; Dimitri Heintz; Daniel Krahn; Markus Kaiser; Erich Kombrink; Thierry Heitz; Dae-Yeon Suh; Michel Legrand; Carl J. Douglas

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Engineering Escherichia coli for the production of polyketide-based platform chemicals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The current chemical industry produces a diverse array of industrial chemicals from a handful of highly reduced byproducts (termed "platform chemicals") derived from oil refining. (more)

Park, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Exploiting genetic diversity by directed evolution: molecular breeding of type III polyketide synthases improves productivityw z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 has provided the first example of engineering enhanced productivity in a type III engineer- ing techniques are a promising means to bridge the functional gap between an enzyme's natural, two factors are crucial to the success of synthetic shuffling.9 The first factor concerns the quality

Zhao, Huimin

80

Deciphering the genetic basis for polyketide variation among mycobacteria producing mycolactones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has also provided clues to the evolutionary events, particularly recombination and gene conversion, that continue to shape these remarkable systems. Methods Bacterial strains and culture conditions M. liflandii strains 128FXT (ML), XL5 and HW1 were iso... , Colorni A, Jenkin GA, Stinear T: Evolution of Mycobacterium ulcerans and other mycolactone-producing mycobacteria from a common Mycobacterium marinum progenitor. J Bacte- riol 2007, 189:2021-2029. 11. Stinear TP, Mve-Obiang A, Small PL, Frigui W, Pryor MJ...

Pidot, Sacha J; Hong, Hui; Seemann, Torsten; Porter, Jessica L; Yip, Marcus J; Men, Artem; Johnson, Matthew; Wilson, Peter; Davies, John K; Leadlay, Peter F; Stinear, Timothy P

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ABCG26-Mediated Polyketide Trafficking and Hydroxycinnamoyl Spermidines Contribute to Pollen Wall Exine Formation in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Instructions for Authors ( www.plantcell.org ) is Carl J. Douglas ( carl.douglas@ubc.ca ). [W] Online version contains Web-only data. A cellular mechanism by which exine components are transported from specialized anther secretory cells to immature...

Teagen D. Quilichini; A. Lacey Samuels; Carl J. Douglas

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

Pseudomonas syringae Phytotoxins: Mode of Action, Regulation, and Biosynthesis by Peptide and Polyketide Synthetases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...experiment indicated that the spherical crystals were chymotrypsin inhibitor...activity and cubical crystals in tomato leaves...Pseudomonas syringae . Bent A. F. Innes R. W...coronatine. . Innes R. W. Bent A. F. Kunkel B. N...

Carol L. Bender; Francisco Alarcn-Chaidez; Dennis C. Gross

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Si-Directed Nitrenium Ion Cyclization: Development & Application. Novel Inhibitors of Ebola-Cell Entry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Part I: Synthetic organic chemistry is continually used for the synthesis of the desired biologically active target molecules that can be potentially used as suitable (more)

Yermolina, Maria V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Ti(III)-Catalyzed Cyclizations of Ketoepoxypolyprenes: Control over the Number of Rings and Unexpected Stereoselectivities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Authors thank the Centro de Servicios de Informtica y Redes de Comunicaciones (CSIRC), Universidad de Granada, for providing the computing time. ...

Sara P. Morcillo; Delia Miguel; Sandra Resa; Ana Martn-Lasanta; Alba Milln; Duane Choquesillo-Lazarte; Juan M. Garca-Ruiz; Antonio J. Mota; Jos Justicia; Juan M. Cuerva

2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Crystal Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Allene Oxide Cyclase: Insights into the Oxylipin Cyclization Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...crystals, MAD data at the Se edge were collected at the European Synchroton Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) on beamline ID13...Scherrer Institute (Villigen, Switzerland) and at the European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Beamline ID13.1 (Grenoble, France...

Eckhard Hofmann; Philipp Zerbe; Florian Schaller

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

86

Single Bifunctional Ruthenium Catalyst for One-Pot Cyclization and Hydration giving Functionalized Indoles and Benzofurans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soc. 2004, 126, 12232. Catalyst 1 is now available from7992 7995 Bifunctional Ruthenium Catalyst COMMUNICATIONuse of bifunctional catalyst 1 for hydration and cycliza-

Nair, Reji??N.; Lee, Paul??J.; Rheingold, Arnold??L.; Grotjahn, Douglas??B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Structure of the Product from a Novel Cyclization Reaction Involving a C(6)-Substituted Uridine Analog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL-3794. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, USA. KATTI, S. K . , SESHADRI, T . P. & VISWAMITRA, M . A . ( 1 9 8 1 ) . Acta Cryst. B37, 407-^10. MAIN, P . , HULL, S . E . , LESSINGER, L . , GERMAIN, G . , DECLERCQ, J.-P. & WOOLFSON, M. M...

Wang, Binghe; Takusagawa, Fusao; Mertes, Mathias P.; Bowman-James, Kristin

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Mechanistic and Reactivity Studies of Cationic Cyclizations Catalyzed by Supramolecular Encapsulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lithium wire ( 45.2 mmol), 2.3 mL 2-bromo-2- butene (22.6 mmol), and 1.0 g ethyl acetate-lithium wire (27.7 mmol), 1.87 g (E)-2-bromo-2-butene (13.9 mmol), and 0.680 mL ethyl acetate (

Hastings, Courtney James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Development and Application of Gold(I)-Catalyzed Cyclization Cascades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lithium trimethylsilylacetylide to give tertiary alcohol 4.43. Deprotection and esterification then provided acetate

Sethofer, Steven Gregory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Crystal Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Allene Oxide Cyclase: Insights into the Oxylipin Cyclization Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...position of the competitive inhibitor vernolic acid (a substrate...the induction of proteinase inhibitors by MeJA and JA as part of...such as oligogalacturonides, chitosan, systemin (Farmer and Ryan...Peak Inflection Point Remote Inhibitor Wild Type Beamline ESRF ID13...

Eckhard Hofmann; Philipp Zerbe; Florian Schaller

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Calorimetric analysis of fungal degraded wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Endothermic transition and gross heat of combustion of aspenwood subjected to degradation by Lenzites trabea and Polyporus versicolor were determined by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and an adiabatic O bomb. Endothermic peak areas of undegraded and fungi-degraded wood differed from each other at all levels of weight loss. The regression analysis of the DSC data vs. weight loss revealed a significant relations, although not highly correlated, for P. versicolor-degraded specimens and a nonsignificant relation for L. trabea-degraded specimens; weight loss and gross heat of combustion values of degraded specimens were significantly correlated.

Blankenhorn, P.R.; Baldwin, R.C.; Merrill, W. Jr.; Ottone, S.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fungal Diversity An International Journal of Mycology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear ribosomal DNA regions, ITS and LSU. The ITS dataset includes 39 collections and the LSU dataset

Hibbett, David S.

93

Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that could improve biomass conversion. These include theenzymes for plant biomass conversion to biofuels. Equallybiomass is typically treated with acids prior to enzymatic conversion

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The fungal vacuole: composition, function, and biogenesis.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1349-1359. 37. Durr, M., T. Boiler, and A. Wiemken. 1975. Polybase...dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding subunits of a higher plant H+-translocating tonoplast...conformation affects processing of high mannose oligosaccharides on...Urech, K., M. Durr, T. Boiler, A. Wiemken, and J. Schwencke...

D J Klionsky; P K Herman; S D Emr

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Fungal and Parasitic Infections of the Eye  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...protozoans which exist in both fresh and marine environments and are resistant to chlorination...P. Misra S. I. Butrus Contact lens wear enhances adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...deposits on the surfaces of worn extended-wear soft contact lenses. . D. Knox J. King...

Stephen A. Klotz; Christopher C. Penn; Gerald J. Negvesky; Salim I. Butrus

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fungal and Parasitic Infections of the Eye  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recent study from Egypt suggests that concomitant...amphotericin B. . D. Price H. Hopps Loiasis...spread by a rigid gas permeable contact...Research Institute, Egypt. . J. Safneck G...Dunn J. W. Jester Natural history of experimental...Dunn J. W. Jester Natural history of experimental...

Stephen A. Klotz; Christopher C. Penn; Gerald J. Negvesky; Salim I. Butrus

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Understanding the Forest Microbiome: A Fungal Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rytas Vilgalys, Duke University, speaking at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 19, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Vilgalys, Rytas [Duke University

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fungal Fragments as Indoor Air Biocontaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of ELISA MicroWell plates (Nalge Nunc International, Naperville, Ill.) and were incubated...Seppanen (ed.), Particles, microbes, radon, vol. 4. Proceedings of Indoor Air...problems in the Netherlands: a pilot project to solve problem in social housing...

Rafa? L. Grny; Tiina Reponen; Klaus Willeke; Detlef Schmechel; Enric Robine; Marjorie Boissier; Sergey A. Grinshpun

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Characterization of the polyketide synthase gene (pksL1) required for aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus parasiticus.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coli DNA polymerase I, and E. coli DNA ligase, using the Marathon cDNA amplification kit (Clontech Laboratories, Inc., Palo...acid from a mutant strain of Aspergillus parasiticus. J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 48:9394. 38. Loros, J. J., S. A. Denome...

G H Feng; T J Leonard

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Removal of Uranium(VI) from Solution by Fungal Biomass and Fungal Wall-Related Biopolymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM CONTAMINATED DRINKING-WATER BY A CHITOSAN-CHITIN MIXTURE, WATER RESEARCH 14 : 1307 ( 1980 ). GALUN...cross-links and masks binding sites. Sodium azide, an inhibitor of electron transport, does not affect the uptake process...

M. GALUN; P. KELLER; D. MALKI; H. FELDSTEIN; E. GALUN; S. M. SIEGEL; B. Z. SIEGEL

1983-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Concise and Versatile Double-Cyclization Strategy for the Highly Stereoselective Synthesis and Arylative Dimerization of Aspidosperma Alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building cycles: A strategy for the concise, stereoselective synthesis of aspidosperma alkaloids and related structures via a common putative diiminium ion intermediate is reported. The approach enables the dimerization ...

Medley, Jonathan William

102

SSRL HEADLINES March 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 March, 2010 9 March, 2010 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature from the Oxygen-evolving Complex of Photosynthesis Science Highlight - Deadly Carcinogen Unraveled: The Molecular Origami of Fungal Polyketides Researchers Rediscover the Structure of Water SSRL Scientific Advisory Committee Convened in March Joachim Stöhr to Deliver the 2010 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lectures April 12-13 The 5th Annual SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences: Theory and Application The 37th International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet and X-ray Physics (VUVX2010) Workshop Wrap-up on Exploring X-ray Effects on Biological Samples

103

Regulatory Circuitry Governing Fungal Development, Drug Resistance, and Disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hypersensitive to ER stress as well as thermal stress (487). Interestingly, the deltahacA...cascade composed of cell type specific and non-specific elements controls mating and...Tpk1 and Tpk2 of Candida albicans PKA have non-redundant roles in stress response and...

Rebecca S. Shapiro; Nicole Robbins; Leah E. Cowen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Growth-induced mass flows in fungal networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Philip K. Maini 3 4 5 Mark D. Fricker 3 6 Nick S. Jones 2 3 5 * * Author for correspondence ( nick.jones@physics.ox.ac.uk ). 1 LSI...supported by a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award. M.D.F. thanks the BBSRC and NERC...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Biomass recycling and the origin of phenotype in fungal mycelia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resource in each cell, the biomass conversion efficiency (gamma0.2...genotype In modelled systems where biomass conversion efficiency, gamma, is low...at each time step due to the biomass conversion efficiency parameter, but...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Molecular and Nonmolecular Diagnostic Methods for Invasive Fungal Infections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Jr, and SD Reed. 2010. Comparison of costs, length of stay, and mortality associated...2010. Hospital resource utilization and costs of inappropriate treatment of candidemia...Sangrujee, D DuPlessis, and B Park. 2011. Cost-effectiveness analysis of diagnostic...

Marios Arvanitis; Theodora Anagnostou; Beth Burgwyn Fuchs; Angela M. Caliendo; Eleftherios Mylonakis

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Attached growth fungal system for corn wet milling wastewater treatment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??High organic strength food-processing wastewaters are typically treated with conventional aerobic systems such as an activated sludge process that produces substantial quantities of low value (more)

Jasti, Nagapadma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Regulatory Circuitry Governing Fungal Development, Drug Resistance, and Disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...SERCA ATPase. eca1 mutants are virulent or hypervirulent at permissive growth temperatures in a murine macrophage model, in the wax moth G. mellonella, and in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans but are attenuated in virulence at 37C (172). Furthermore...

Rebecca S. Shapiro; Nicole Robbins; Leah E. Cowen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Pectinases Link Early Fungal Evolution to the Land Plant Lineage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mary Berbee, University of British Columbia, Canada, speaking at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 19, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Berbee, Mary [University of British Columbia

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

110

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Strong coupling of plant and fungal community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tropical rainforest trees (Augspurger, 1983; Comita et al., 2010; Mangan et al., 2010; Liu et al., 2012

Fine, Paul V.A.

111

Fungal Symbionts (Harpellales) in Norwegian Aquatic Insect Larvae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 12854.209E 51 23-VIII-2002 Djubvasselva stream connecting lake Djupvatnet and lake Laksjen. Nord-Trndelag, Lierne. 20 C. 64826.089N, 13836.939E 52 23-VIII-2002 Stream draining lake 491 at kstjorna W of Rt. 765. Nord-Trndelag, Lierne. 64821.709N..., 13837.299E 53 23-VIII-2002 Aunelva stream draining S. Nord-Trndelag, Steinkjer. 17.5 C. 64819.669N, 13835.529E 54 28-VIII-2002 Small stream crossing Rt. 759, SSE of Steinkjer. 15.5 C. 63857.649N, 11834.279E 56 28-VIII-2002 Very small waterfall on E side...

White, Merlin M.; Lichtwardt, Robert W.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Convergent Bacterial Microbiotas in the Fungal Agricultural Systems of Insects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract no. DE-AC02-05CH11231...microbiome with increased capacity for energy harvest. Nature 444 :1027-1031. doi...1093/bioinformatics/btp348 . 71. Price MN , Dehal PS and Arkin AP. 2010. FastTree2-approximately...

Frank O. Aylward; Garret Suen; Peter H. W. Biedermann; Aaron S. Adams; Jarrod J. Scott; Stephanie A. Malfatti; Tijana Glavina del Rio; Susannah G. Tringe; Michael Poulsen; Kenneth F. Raffa; Kier D. Klepzig; Cameron R. Currie

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Evolution of Sex: a Perspective from the Fungal Kingdom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Penalva, M. Pertea, C. Price, B. L. Pritchard, M. A...A. Shemanchuk. 1975. Life history of Coelomomyces psorophorae...Given their unique evolutionary history as opisthokonts, along with...Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. | Journal Article Research...

Soo Chan Lee; Min Ni; Wenjun Li; Cecelia Shertz; Joseph Heitman

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fungal production of volatiles during growth on fiberglass.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to 25 C. Colonized fiberglass insulations (10 to * Corresponding author...and from colonized fiberglass insulation materialsa VOCs produced on...associated with urea-formaldehyde foam insulation in Canada. Mycopathologia 99...

I M Ezeonu; D L Price; R B Simmons; S A Crow; D G Ahearn

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Conservative ecological and evolutionary patterns in liverwortfungal symbioses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...x ) Hibbett, D. S. , L.-B. Gilbert, and M. J. Donoghue 2000 Evolutionary...classification genetics growth & development microbiology Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Mycorrhizae...development Phylogeny Plant Roots microbiology Species Specificity Symbiosis genetics...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Convergent Bacterial Microbiotas in the Fungal Agricultural Systems of Insects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Qiagen DNeasy plant maxikit (Qiagen Sciences, Germantown, MD), which has been shown...This work was supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under...the USDA NRI (2008-02438), National Science Foundation grants DEB-0747002, MCB-0702025...

Frank O. Aylward; Garret Suen; Peter H. W. Biedermann; Aaron S. Adams; Jarrod J. Scott; Stephanie A. Malfatti; Tijana Glavina del Rio; Susannah G. Tringe; Michael Poulsen; Kenneth F. Raffa; Kier D. Klepzig; Cameron R. Currie

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

An Unfavourable Effect of Shaking on Fungal Cellulases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Association Research Institute, for permission to publish these results. Walseth, C. S., Tappi, 35, 228 (1952).

S. N. BASU; P. N. PAL

1956-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Convergent Bacterial Microbiotas in the Fungal Agricultural Systems of Insects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...corresponding newick trees with the Mobyle web interface (75). Comparison of the functional...database project: improved data processing and web-based tools. Nucleic Acids Res. 41...Letondal C. 2009. Mobyle: a new full web bioinformatics framework. Bioinformatics...

Frank O. Aylward; Garret Suen; Peter H. W. Biedermann; Aaron S. Adams; Jarrod J. Scott; Stephanie A. Malfatti; Tijana Glavina del Rio; Susannah G. Tringe; Michael Poulsen; Kenneth F. Raffa; Kier D. Klepzig; Cameron R. Currie

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Comparative gene identification in mammalian, fly, and fungal genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An important step in genome interpretation is the accurate identification of protein-coding genes. One approach to gene identification is comparative analysis of the genomes of several related species, to find genes that ...

Lin, Michael F. (Michael Fong-Jay)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Synthesis of Optically Pure (+)-Puraquinonic Acid and Assignment of Absolute Configuration to Natural (?)-Puraquinonic Acid. Use of Radical Cyclization for Asymmetric Generation of a Quaternary Center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemistry Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 ... Canadian Journal of Chemistry (1994), 72 (7), 1656-9 CODEN: CJCHAG; ISSN:0008-4042. ... (23)?Leed, A. R.; Boettger, S. D.; Ganem, B. J. Org. ...

Derrick L. J. Clive; Maolin Yu; Mousumi Sannigrahi

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nucleophile-Induced Intramolecular Dipole 1,5-Transfer and 1,6-Cyclization: Experimental and ab Initio Studies of Formation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-propanesulfenimido-1,2,4,5-tetrazine Piotr Kaszynski*, and Victor G. Young, Jr. Contribution from the Organic-propanethiol/Et3N furnished tetrazine ylide 1 as the main product. The structure of this unprecedented ylide. In the process of developing an alternative route to 3,6- diphenyl-1,2,4,5-thiatriazine,5 we found that tetrazine

Kaszynski, Piotr

122

sine.I0 Cyclization of 4 to a tetrahydrobenzazepine 5 could be followed by oxidative fission of one aromatic ring. in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excited Iodine Monochloride with Halogenated Olefins Sir: We report here the photochemical separation, the trans- ClHC=CHCl photoproduct has a 35C1:37C1ratio of 2:1 compared to 3:l for naturally occurring trans with a new means of following organic gas-phase photochemical reac- tions with state selection

Zare, Richard N.

123

Pyrosequencing-Derived Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Diversity of Spacecraft Hardware Destined for Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...USA Spacecraft hardware and assembly cleanroom surfaces (233 m2 in total) were sampled...sample characteristics, such as source (cleanroom floor, ground support equipment [GSE...Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) cleanroom floor and GSE surfaces gave rise to a...

Myron T. La Duc; Parag Vaishampayan; Henrik R. Nilsson; Tamas Torok; Kasthuri Venkateswaran

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of the Fungal Virulence of Cryptococcus and Exploration of Novel Antifungals Against Cryptococcosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-? Interferon-? IRZ Itracazole MAT Mating Type MFC Minimum Fungicidal Concentration MIC Minimum Inhibitory Concentration MOPS morpholinepropanesulfonic acid vi mTOR mammalian Target Of Rapamycin PDCD4 Programmed Cell Death 4 PMB Polymyxin B PMDD... proliferative and non- proliferative cryptococcal cells in vitro ..................................................... 79 3.3.6. The polysaccharide capsule of Cryptococcus facilitates the fungicidal activity of polymyxin B...

Zhai, Bing

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Congenic Strains of the Filamentous Form of Cryptococcus neoformans for Studies of Fungal Morphogenesis and Virulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photographs were taken. The white fluffy phenotype reflects aerial hyphal production in the mating colony. The cultures of the...MJ Donlin, CA D'Souza, DS Fox, V Grinberg, J Fu, M Fukushima, BJ Haas, JC Huang, G Janbon, SJ Jones, HL Koo, MI Krzywinski...

Bing Zhai; Pinkuan Zhu; Dylan Foyle; Srijana Upadhyay; Alexander Idnurm; Xiaorong Lin

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

126

Pyrosequencing-Derived Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Diversity of Spacecraft Hardware Destined for Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in...from the Chernobyl reactor room also contained...methodologies, such as generation 3 PhyloChip DNA...high-density picolitre reactors. Nature 437...of the damaged nuclear reactor. Mycol. Res...

Myron T. La Duc; Parag Vaishampayan; Henrik R. Nilsson; Tamas Torok; Kasthuri Venkateswaran

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

Intrinsically disordered proteins aggregate at fungal cell-to-cell channels and regulate intercellular connectivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in animals and plants (3). Although...poorly in the SPA prediction (position 1...Stock Center. Machine Learning. Sirius Prediction System Builder...developmental signals in plants . Annu Rev Cell...role in human disease . Protein Sci 3...

Julian Lai; Chuan Hock Koh; Monika Tjota; Laurent Pieuchot; Vignesh Raman; Karthik Balakrishna Chandrababu; Daiwen Yang; Limsoon Wong; Gregory Jedd

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Discovery of Fungal Cell Wall Components Using Evolutionary and Functional Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domain containing alpha amylase and glycosyl transferasekingdoms containing an alpha-amylase domain and implicatedGH13-1 are usually alpha-amylases (Henrissat 1991). Motif

Sain, Divya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Gene expression in human fungal pathogen Coccidioides immitis changes as arthroconidia differentiate into spherules and mature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transform- ation is the alpha amylase (AMY1) gene. This geneJT, Goldman WE: An alpha-(1,4)-amylase is essential for

Viriyakosol, Suganya; Singhania, Akul; Fierer, Joshua; Goldberg, Jonathan; Kirkland, Theo N; Woelk, Christopher H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Comparative profiles of fungal alpha amylase production by submerged and surface fermentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Parameters for the production and recovery of pharmaceutical grade alpha amylase fromAspergillus oryzae...SMC strain have been optimized. As compared with a submerged fermentation, a surface fermentation was more...

N. K. Shah; V. Ramamurthy; R. M. Kothari

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Impact of Green Tea Extract and Fungal Alpha-Amylase on Dough Proofing and Steaming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Green tea extract (GTE) was fortified into steamed bread as a functional ingredient to enhance its nutritional values. However, GTE might inhibit ?-amylase activity and interact with gluten proteins, causing ... ...

Victoria K. Ananingsih; Jing Gao; Weibiao Zhou

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mycoflora of pecans and microscopic studies of host-fungal interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Inoculation experiments * 1 d h h d k d y p ~ r d hy~yh 'd h dark unknown fungus. The dark fungus failed to produce spores under a series of environmental conditions on several different media. Continued effort is underway to identify this fungus because... slowly than Success, Mahan or Desirable. The predominant fungi isolated from these k* 1 p '* f P I. , P ' 'll', P~h d 'k dar'k fungus. An examination of fungi in pecans of 7 cultivars moving in trade channels indicated all cultivars contained...

Wang, Huey-Ming

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Bioactivity of Fungal Endophytes as a Function of Endophyte Taxonomy and the Taxonomy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spadafora4 , Phyllis D. Coley1,3 , Thomas A. Kursar1,3 1 Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama, Republic of Panama, 2 School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States Instituto de Investigaciones Cienti´ficas y Servicios de Alta Tecnologi´a, Panama, Republic of Panama

Coley, Phyllis

134

Assessing the Roles of Striatin Orthologs in Fungal Morphogenesis, Sexual Development and Pathogenicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-utilizing mutants demonstrates that Str1 is required for hyphal fusion. In pathogenicity, ?str1 is less virulent in maize anthracnose leaf blight and stalk rot. The phenotypes of ?str1 are complemented by the Fusarium verticillioides striatin ortholog (fsr1...

Wang, Chih-Li

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

Indoor fungal composition is geographically patterned and more diverse in temperate zones than in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...companies (8, 9). Increasingly strict standards for indoor sanitation have resulted in...cultivable on artificial media are now standard, and a US Environmental Protection Agency-developed...microcosms isolated by weatherstripping and HVAC filters, but rather as compositional...

Anthony S. Amend; Keith A. Seifert; Robert Samson; Thomas D. Bruns

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Diversity of Orchid Fungal Symbionts in Estonian Mine Tailings Sam Willis, Charles Cowden and Richard Shefferson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

little more than burnt oil soaked shale and ash. We extracted all DNA in soil samples taken from multiple samples were taken is on a barren hill that was created when Estonia burned oil soaked shale to produce the fungi are utilizing the nutrients from the burnt oil and shale to support the orchids (Shefferson et al

Gittleman, John

137

Indoor fungal composition is geographically patterned and more diverse in temperate zones than in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Berkeley, CA 94720-3102; b Biodiversity Theme, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada , Ottawa, ON, Canada...and determined to the last common ancestor (LCA) using the program MEGAN [(44); LCA parameters: minimum support1, minimum...

Anthony S. Amend; Keith A. Seifert; Robert Samson; Thomas D. Bruns

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Conserved Fungal LysM Effector Ecp6 Prevents Chitin-Triggered Immunity in Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...receptors (PRRs), cell surface receptors that recognize...originating from microbial surfaces that are essential for microbial...wall polysaccharides xylan and cellulose (19...polysaccharides of plants (xylan, cellulose) and...max determined after treatment of tomato cell suspensions...

Ronnie de Jonge; H. Peter van Esse; Anja Kombrink; Tomonori Shinya; Yoshitake Desaki; Ralph Bours; Sander van der Krol; Naoto Shibuya; Matthieu H. A. J. Joosten; Bart P. H. J. Thomma

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Genomic Analysis of the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Elisabeth Fournier2,11 , Lilian Gout2 , Matthias Hahn12 , Linda Kohn13 , Nicolas Lapalu1 , Kim M. Plummer14

Kohn, Linda M.

140

Interfacial Self-Assembly of a Fungal Hydrophobin into a Hydrophobic Rodlet Layer.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Plant Biology, Biological Centre, University of Groningen, Kerklaan 30, 9751 NN Haren, The Netherlands The Sc3p hydrophobin...Department of Plant Biology, Biological Centre, University of Groningen, Kerklaan 30, 9751 NN Haren, The Netherlands. | JOURNAL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Monitoring Viable Fungal and Bacterial Bioaerosol Concentrations to Identify Acceptable Levels for Common Indoor Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 CFU/m3 of non-toxigenic or non-pathogenic organisms should be typical for normal, non-immunocompromised environments. With the exception of Cladosporium, no organism should individually contribute more than 150 CFUfm3. Furthermore, it is concluded...

Robertson, L. D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cell Biology of Plant and Fungal Tip Growth??Getting to the Point  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Universita di Siena sponsored a NATO Advanced Research Workshop which brought together 75 of...appear in a dedicated volume (), and abstracts of the presentations can be viewed at...apparently not as a supplier of metabolic energy. He suggested that apical superoxide...

I. Brent Heath; Anja Geitmann

143

A genetic component of resistance to fungal infection in frog embryos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analysed using non-parametric analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis test) and paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test to...different, population (figure 1). Finally, a Kruskal-Wallis test supported the heterogeneity in the number of...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Unexpected Blastomyces dermatitidis Etiology of Fungal Sinusitis and Erosive Palatal Infection in a Diabetic Patient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses. Chest radiology was noncontributory. Follow-up maxillofacial radiology revealed a malignant-appearing soft-tissue...Paracoccidioides brasiliensis etiology) in the dental literature (21, 22). The two papers...

Jane Thomas; Erik Munson; John C. Christianson

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

145

Short-Term Temporal Variability in Airborne Bacterial and Fungal Populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 Airborne microorganisms...conditions (e.g., wind speed, solar radiation, and humidity...at the Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and...hPa) 836 833 829 831 833 Solar irradiance (W m2) 394 628...

Noah Fierer; Zongzhi Liu; Mari Rodrguez-Hernndez; Rob Knight; Matthew Henn; Mark T. Hernandez

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

146

Host identity impacts rhizosphere fungal communities associated with three alpine plant species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.003 and 0.01, respectively; Table 1 and Figs. 3a,b). The observed host effect on AMF richness and diversity was significant regardless of what level of sequence similarity was used to designate OTUs (Supplementary Information, Figure S1d,e). AMF evenness...), and average non-AMF richness per root sample was similar across treatments (Table 1, ANOVA, P > 0.1). Average non-AMF diversity and evenness per root sample varied among host species, but only in the willow understory where non-AMF diversity and evenness...

Becklin, Katie M.; Hertweck, Kate L.; Jumpponen, Ari

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Dispersed Polyphosphate in Fungal Vacuoles in Eucalyptus pilularis/Pisolithus tinctorius  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Stained sections of ether­acrolein freeze-substituted mycorrhizas also showed only dis- persed material

Vesk, Peter

148

Sfp-Type 4?-Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Is Indispensable for Fungal Pathogenicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carrying a PPT1:enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion under...lysF encoding homoaconitase led to attenuated virulence in a...epidermal cell layers from onion bulbs (Allium cepa cv Grano) were...wild-type and Deltappt1 strains led to the identification of six...

Ralf Horbach; Alexander Graf; Fabian Weihmann; Luis Antelo; Sebastian Mathea; Johannes C. Liermann; Till Opatz; Eckhard Thines; Jesús Aguirre; Holger B. Deising

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

BIOTECHNOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ENZYMES AND PROTEINS Cloning, characterization, and engineering of fungal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

users. B. Kim :R. P. Sullivan :H. Zhao Energy Biosciences Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA H. Zhao (*) Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Bioengineering, Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana

Zhao, Huimin

150

Contrasting Diversity Patterns of Crenarchaeal, Bacterial and Fungal Soil Communities in an Alpine Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1371/journal.pone.0019950 Editor: Jack Anthony Gilbert, Argonne National Laboratory, United States of America@zinger.fr ¤ Current address: Microbial Habitat Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

151

THE LIFE CYCLE OF THE FUNGAL SYMBIONT OF SIREX NOCTILIO t  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1938), Clark (1933), Muller (1934), Gilbert and Miller (1952), Orman (1958), Stillwell (1960 Institute. t A paper read before the New Zealand Microbiological Society Conference, May, 1964. 80 #12;W. J

152

Fungal Diversity Ceratocystis and Ophiostoma species, including three new taxa, associated with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Roux, J.1 1 Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Tree Health Africa 2 Department of Microbiology, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa Kamgan, N. Kamgan Nkuekam; e-mail: gilbert.kamgan@fabi.up.ac.za Introduction Species of Ceratocystis Ellis & Halst

153

Effectiveness of Germicidal UV Radiation for Reducing Fungal Contamination within Air-Handling Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems and is a potential...been found growing on air filters, insulation, and cooling...bioaerosols or when the HVAC system itself is contaminated...maintained high-quality filters within HVAC systems as well as portable...

Estelle Levetin; Richard Shaughnessy; Christine A. Rogers; Robert Scheir

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Indoor fungal composition is geographically patterned and more diverse in temperate zones than in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Therefore, we suggest that indoor habitats should not be thought of as microcosms isolated by weatherstripping and HVAC filters, but rather as compositional subsets of a larger biome. Materials and Methods Dust Collection. Protocols were adapted...

Anthony S. Amend; Keith A. Seifert; Robert Samson; Thomas D. Bruns

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Discovery of Fungal Cell Wall Components Using Evolutionary and Functional Genomics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Understanding the various processes/pathways necessary for the biogenesis and maintenance of the cell wall is of immense value as that knowledge can be used for (more)

Sain, Divya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Binding interactions of murine natural killer cells with the fungal target Cryptococcus neoformans.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from the two interfaces between the...Pa. Three-dimensional reconstructions...conjugates. Three-dimensional reconstructions...PC-based Three Dimensional Reconstruction...performed a standard assay measuring the 51Cr released...

J W Murphy; M R Hidore; N Nabavi

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Specific binding of a fungal glucan phytoalexin elicitor to membrane fractions from soybean Glycine max  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...arabinogalactan from larch wood, chitosan from crab shells, glucan...cerevisiae), dextran, chitosan, xylan, arabinogalactan...and xylan from larch wood, chitosan from crab shells, glucan...binding assay of the competitive inhibitor of f3-glucosidase, 1...

Walter E. Schmidt; Jrgen Ebel

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Conserved Fungal LysM Effector Ecp6 Prevents Chitin-Triggered Immunity in Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...beta}-1,4-glucan), chitosan hexamer (GlcN) 6 , and chitosan did not induce a pH shift...myoglobin, and trypsin inhibitor. The experiment...Ltd. for the supply of chitosan oligosaccharides and to the...

Ronnie de Jonge; H. Peter van Esse; Anja Kombrink; Tomonori Shinya; Yoshitake Desaki; Ralph Bours; Sander van der Krol; Naoto Shibuya; Matthieu H. A. J. Joosten; Bart P. H. J. Thomma

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

Prediction of Toxigenic Fungal Growth in Buildings by Using a Novel Modelling System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that indoor air quality can have a significant...International Energy Agencys Annex...power, and air flow in a building...measures aimed at improving the energy and environmental...generation, and air movement, ESP-r...and diffuse solar irradiance measurement...

Neil J. Rowan; Cameron M. Johnstone; R. Craig McLean; John G. Anderson; Joe A. Clarke

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pyrosequencing-Derived Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Diversity of Spacecraft Hardware Destined for Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...floor 2) 142 (air lock) 146 (JPL-SAF...following rigorous quality control and cleaning...or urea as an energy source, and members...High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters...of acting as an energy transporter for...Texas, for improving the pyrosequencing...yeasts in the air from hospital...

Myron T. La Duc; Parag Vaishampayan; Henrik R. Nilsson; Tamas Torok; Kasthuri Venkateswaran

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Soil fungal effects on floral signals, rewards, and aboveground interactions in an alpine pollination web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

content, which is the primary reward for bumblebee pol- linators, and pollen production, which is an additional reward for co-polli- nators ( Galen and Kevan, 1980 ). With the exception of fl owering duration and pollen production (estimated from...-specifi c correla- tions between AMF colonization and each fl oral signal using linear regression. We tested whether fungicide affected the likelihood of ant damage (cost of pol- linator attraction) using ordinal logistic regression with site, fungicide...

Becklin, Katie M.; Gamez, Guadelupe; Uelk, Brian; Raguso, Robert A.; Galen, Candace

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

No biogeographical pattern for a root-associated fungal species complexgeb_589 160..169  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* 1 Forest Pathology and Dendrology, Institute of Integrative Biology (IBZ), ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland, 2 Plant Pathology, Institute of Integrative Biology (IBZ), ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland and Dendrology, Institute of Integrative Biology (IBZ), ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland. E-mail: christoph

Bruns, Tom

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-fungal drug design Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pg. 1: Eligible Expenses & Documentation Pg. 2: Over-The-Counter Changes due to Health Care Reform Summary: Allergy & sinus medicines and products Feminine anti-fungalanti-itch...

164

Short-Term Temporal Variability in Airborne Bacterial and Fungal Populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...likely to be related to local meteorological conditions...be driven by changes in local and regional meteorological conditions (e.g., wind speed, solar radiation...sampling site ( http://foehn.colorado.edu/weather...likely to be related to local meteorological conditions...

Noah Fierer; Zongzhi Liu; Mari Rodrguez-Hernndez; Rob Knight; Matthew Henn; Mark T. Hernandez

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

Protective effect of endolithic fungal hyphae on oolitic limestone buildings Nicolas Concha-Lozano a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limestone from four quarries and eight monuments exposed on various environmental conditions focusing molding. Study of weathering forms on old quarries indicates that lichens colonization (Verrucaria

Boyer, Edmond

166

Nutrient Losses in Agriculture: the Role of Biochar and Fungal Associations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatments, average weekly percentage loss of water did not explain variation in biomass (Figure 4, p=0.22). Excluding data representing pots that received fertilization, biochar, and mycorrhizae the relationship between water leached and shoot biomass... the habitat for microorganisms.5 The increase in microbial biomass often seen with biochar application has prompted many hypotheses about soil microorganism responses to biochar. One of the more popular hypotheses is that the miniscule pores that cover...

King, Alison

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

One-Pot Formation of Functionalized Indole and Benzofuran Derivatives Using a Single Bifunctional Ruthenium Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bifunctional Ruthenium Catalyst Reji N. Nair Paul J. Lee bifunctional ruthenium catalyst for cyclization of terminalof transi- tion metal based catalysts have been reported to

Nair, Reji N; Lee, Paul J; Grotjahn, Douglas B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

High-Resolution Transcript Profiling of the Atypical Biotrophic Interaction between Theobroma cacao and the Fungal Pathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...figures in this article are displayed in color online but in black and white in the print edition. [W] Online version contains Web-only data. [OPEN] Articles can be viewed online without a subscription. This work dissects the intriguing biotrophic interaction...

Paulo José Pereira Lima Teixeira; Daniela Paula de Toledo Thomazella; Osvaldo Reis; Paula Favoretti Vital do Prado; Maria Carolina Scatolin do Rio; Gabriel Lorencini Fiorin; Juliana José; Gustavo Gilson Lacerda Costa; Victor Augusti Negri; Jorge Maurício Costa Mondego; Piotr Mieczkowski; Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães Pereira

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

A New Method To Monitor Airborne Inoculum of the Fungal Plant Pathogens Mycosphaerella brassicicola andBotrytis cinerea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variable-airflow conditions found in the field. Wind directional field-based MTIST device...device). We thank R. B. Maude, P. R. Mills, and G. Keane for critically reviewing...Limpert Barley mildew in Europe: evidence of wind-dispersal of the pathogen and its implications...

R. Kennedy; A. J. Wakeham; K. G. Byrne; U. M. Meyer; F. M. Dewey

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the {Delta}{sup 9} desaturase is developmentally regulated.

Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Treatment of Fungal Bioaerosols by a High-Temperature, Short-Time Process in a Continuous-Flow System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...microorganisms in food or water. Prolonged exposure to conditions...continuous airflow with an atmospheric pressure condition drops to...from the top outlet of the generator to the inlet of the sampling...1970. Relationship between atmospheric temperature and survival of...

Jae Hee Jung; Jung Eun Lee; Chang Ho Lee; Sang Soo Kim; Byung Uk Lee

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

173

Phosphorylation of an ERF Transcription Factor by Arabidopsis MPK3/MPK6 Regulates Plant Defense Gene Induction and Fungal Resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for distribution of materials integral to the findings...phosphorylation sites. (B) Diagram of ERF6 protein with...could be a result of the handling of seedlings during...signaling. METHODS Plant Materials, Growth Conditions...Supplemental Data The following materials are available in the...

Xiangzong Meng; Juan Xu; Yunxia He; Kwang-Yeol Yang; Breanne Mordorski; Yidong Liu; Shuqun Zhang

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Biochemical Changes During Fungal Sporulation and Spore Germination: I. Phenyl Methyl Sulfonyl Fluoride Inhibition of Macroconidial Germination in Microsporum gypseum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...agent. The germination of Bacillus spores was inhibited 190...alkaline protease of B. subtilis (2). It is interesting that the B. subtilis alkaline protease was...transformable strain of Bacillus subtilis. Arch. Biochem. Biophys...

T. J. Leighton; J. J. Stock

1970-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analysis of a Food-Borne Fungal Pathogen Outbreak: Virulence and Genome of a Mucor circinelloides Isolate from Yogurt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hosts and via pseudopods for wax moth larvae. (A) When male...significantly virulent in the wax moth larva host model compared...Toolkit (GATK version 2.4-9) pipeline and the Unified Genotyper with...was injected into a cohort of wax moth larvae for each strain...

Soo Chan Lee; R. Blake Billmyre; Alicia Li; Sandra Carson; Sean M. Sykes; Eun Young Huh; Piotr Mieczkowski; Dennis C. Ko; Christina A. Cuomo; Joseph Heitman

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Isolated fungal promoters and gene transcription terminators and methods of protein and chemical production in a fungus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention encompasses isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention also encompasses a method of utilizing a fungus for protein or chemical production. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to another molecule comprising a coding region of a gene of interest. The gene regulatory element and gene transcription terminator may temporally and spatially regulate expression of particular genes for optimum production of compounds of interest in a transgenic fungus.

Dai, Ziyu (Richland, WA); Lasure, Linda L. (Fall City, WA); Magnuson, Jon K. (Pasco, WA)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

Isolated Fungal Promoters and Gene Transcription Terminators and Methods of Protein and Chemical Production in a Fungus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention encompasses isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention also encompasses a method of utilizing a fungus for protein or chemical production. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to another molecule comprising a coding region of a gene of interest. The gene regulatory element and gene transcription terminator may temporally and spatially regulate expression of particular genes for optimum production of compounds of interest in a transgenic fungus.

Dai, Ziyu (Richland, WA); Lasure, Linda L. (Fall City, WA); Magnuson, Jon K. (Pasco, WA)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Design and characterization of synthetic fungal-bacterial consortia for direct production of isobutanol from cellulosic biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...proof-of-concept application, our modular system could be readily adapted to the...and engineering stable, tunable, and modular consortia for CBP. Materials and Methods Model and Simulations...before being over-wintered at 4o C in a refrigerator. These conditions cause minimal selection...

Jeremy J. Minty; Marc E. Singer; Scott A. Scholz; Chang-Hoon Bae; Jung-Ho Ahn; Clifton E. Foster; James C. Liao; Xiaoxia Nina Lin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Disulfide Bond Structure of the AVR9 Elicitor of the Fungal Tomato Pathogen Cladosporium fulvum:? Evidence for a Cystine Knot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Henno W. van den Hooven ,*? Harrold A. van den Burg , Paul Vossen , Sjef Boeren , Pierre J. G. M. de Wit , and Jacques Vervoort * ... 32.?Price-Carter, M., Salem Hull, M., and Goldenberg, D. P. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 9851?9861. ...

Henno W. van den Hooven; Harrold A. van den Burg; Paul Vossen; Sjef Boeren; Pierre J. G. M. de Wit; Jacques Vervoort

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

180

HISTONE MONOUBIQUITINATION1 Interacts with a Subunit of the Mediator Complex and Regulates Defense against Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...972-980. Church, G.M., and Gilbert, W. (1984). Genomic sequencing...pathogenicity Arabidopsis anatomy & histology microbiology physiology Arabidopsis Proteins genetics...Photoperiod Plant Diseases Plant Leaves microbiology Plants, Genetically Modified Protein...

Rahul Dhawan; Hongli Luo; Andrea Maria Foerster; Synan AbuQamar; Hai-Ning Du; Scott D. Briggs; Ortrun Mittelsten Scheid; Tesfaye Mengiste

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Treatment of Fungal Bioaerosols by a High-Temperature, Short-Time Process in a Continuous-Flow System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...onto a 13-mm mixed cellulose ester filter with a pore size of 1.2 mum (Millipore...process, the mixed cellulose ester filters were coated with an osmium coater...particles with a low-efficiency HVAC filter enhanced by continuous emission of...

Jae Hee Jung; Jung Eun Lee; Chang Ho Lee; Sang Soo Kim; Byung Uk Lee

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effect of phosphorus application and ectomycorrhizal fungal inoculation on biomass production of Eucalyptus urophylla plantation in South China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Eucalypt plantations in China have largely been established on...Eucalyptus urophylla. As little as 20 kg P ha ?1 increased stand biomass by 450%. Superphosphate increased the proportion of stem-wood

D. Xu; B. Dell; N. Malajczuk; M. Gong

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fungal Homoserine Kinase (thr1?) Mutants Are Attenuated in Virulence and Die Rapidly upon Threonine Starvation and Serum Incubation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...identifies a role for the cortical actin patch/endocytosis complex in the response...2006. Linking uracil base excision repair and 5-fluorouracil toxicity in yeast...2001. Antifungals: what's in the pipeline. Curr. Opin. Microbiol. 4 :540-545...

Joanne M. Kingsbury; John H. McCusker

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

High-Resolution Transcript Profiling of the Atypical Biotrophic Interaction between Theobroma cacao and the Fungal Pathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...figures in this article are displayed in color online but in black and white in the print edition. [W] Online version contains Web-only data. This work dissects the intriguing biotrophic interaction between Theobroma cacao and the fungus Moniliophthora...

Paulo José Pereira Lima Teixeira; Daniela Paula de Toledo Thomazella; Osvaldo Reis; Paula Favoretti Vital do Prado; Maria Carolina Scatolin do Rio; Gabriel Lorencini Fiorin; Juliana José; Gustavo Gilson Lacerda Costa; Victor Augusti Negri; Jorge Maurício Costa Mondego; Piotr Mieczkowski; Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães Pereira

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

Rhizobial and Fungal Symbioses Show Different Requirements for Calmodulin Binding to Calcium Calmodulin??Dependent Protein Kinase in Lotus japonicus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in binding buffer at room temperature for 1 h. Binding of biotinylated...leghaemoglobin synthesis in snake beans. Biochem. J. 125...regulating symbiotic nodule development. Nature 417 : 962-966...for cortical endosymbiotic development. Plant Cell 22 : 2509-2526...

Yoshikazu Shimoda; Lu Han; Toshimasa Yamazaki; Rintaro Suzuki; Makoto Hayashi; Haruko Imaizumi-Anraku

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Synthesis of Marine Polycyclic Polyethers via Endo-Selective Epoxide-Opening Cascades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed biosynthetic pathways to ladder polyethers of polyketide origin and oxasqualenoids of terpenoid origin share a dramatic epoxide-opening cascade as a key step. Polycyclic structures generated in these biosynthetic ...

Vilotijevic, Ivan

187

Manufacturing Molecules Through Metabolic Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have found broad use as APIs, veterinary agents, and agrochemicals. Naturally occurring polyketides and NRPs are produced by...infancy. However, metabolic models that incorporate cell composition and gene regulation have become relatively predictive and...

Jay D. Keasling

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Promotion of Mn(II) Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment Systems by Diverse Fungal and Bacterial Communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment...concentrations of dissolved Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD). Studies...and throughout the world. In Appalachia, centuries of coal mining has left thousands of abandoned...

Cara M. Santelli; Donald H. Pfister; Dana Lazarus; Lu Sun; William D. Burgos; Colleen M. Hansel

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Towards Stunt-Free Lonren Reniform Nematode Resistance by Dissection of an Alien R-Gene Chromosome Segment and Detection of Significant Fungal Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^(lon) -linked. To enable large-scale SNP applications, we developed inexpensive methods for high-throughput non-destructive seed DNA extraction for PCR-based genotyping. We then high-resolution mapped 10 SNPs in the proximal alien segment near Ren^(lon). We...

Zheng, Xiuting

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Impact of postfire logging on soil bacterial and fungal communities and soil biogeochemistry in a mixed-conifer forest in central Oregon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil microbes can indirectly influence soil productivity by enhancing nutrient availability for plant uptake, or reducing plant productivity through competition for nutrients with plant roots by promoting nutr...

Tara N. Jennings; Jane E. Smith; Kermit Cromack Jr.; Elizabeth W. Sulzman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fungal communities in mycorrhizal roots of conifer seedlings in forest nurseries under different cultivation systems, assessed by morphotyping, direct sequencing and mycelial isolation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fungi colonising root tips of Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies grown under four different seedling cultivation systems were assessed by morphotyping, direct sequencing and isolation methods. Roots were morphotype...

Audrius Menkis; Rimvydas Vasiliauskas; Andrew F. S. Taylor; Jan Stenlid

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The influence of bacterial and fungal isolates from the rhizosphere of Tamcot CAMD-E on host response to Phymatotrichum root rot of cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'* ph . R \\ t * t ~Ph t t ' h omnivorum appears to be influenced by such a mechanism. Investigations have been conducted over a three year period in greenhouse and field experiments to determine what effect microorganisms from MAR cottons have... on the incidence of dead plants for greenhouse Experiment One. . 25 3 Dead plants and seed cotton yield for Experiment One in the greenhouse testing the effects of microbial treatments on Phymatotrichum root rot. 26 4 Dead plants over time for Experiment Two...

Lazo, Gerard Raymond

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Investigations into the mycoheterotrophic symbiosis between Rhizopogon salebrosus and Pterospora andromedea and development of bioinformatic tools related to non-assembled fungal genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as penylacetic acid (PAA) to the culture medium,expression in response to PAA in DS17690 (van Den Berg etregardless of the presence of PAA, as well as a penicillin

Wong, Valerie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE8 Differentially Regulates Plant Immunity to Fungal Pathogens through Kinase-Dependent and -Independent Functions in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...through Kinase-Dependent and -Independent Functions in Arabidopsis [C] [W] Yingfang Zhu a Craig M. Schluttenhoffer a 1 Pengcheng Wang b Fuyou Fu a Jyothi Thimmapuram c Jian-Kang Zhu b Sang Yeol Lee d Dae-Jin Yun d Tesfaye Mengiste a 2 2 Address correspondence...

Yingfang Zhu; Craig M. Schluttenhoffer; Pengcheng Wang; Fuyou Fu; Jyothi Thimmapuram; Jian-Kang Zhu; Sang Yeol Lee; Dae-Jin Yun; Tesfaye Mengiste

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

195

Isolation from the Sorghum bicolorMycorrhizosphere of a Bacterium Compatible with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Development and Antagonistic towards Soilborne Fungal Pathogens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surface sterilized as previously described (). Plants were grown in a sterilized clay loam soil-calcined clay (Oil Dry Type III; OILDRI, Limited, Wisbech, United Kingdom) mixture (1:1) in sterile Sunbags (catalog no. 7026; Sigma...

S. W. Budi; D. van Tuinen; G. Martinotti; S. Gianinazzi

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrhizus ethyl esters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rhizopus arrhizus fungal biomass. Biosorption was not considered globally... groups; Sorption capacity; Rhizopus arrhizus fungal biomass 1. Introduction The influential role of...

197

The Jasmonate Signal Pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...converted to OPDA by allene oxide cyclase (AOC). Because of the acute instability of the epoxide, AOS and AOC are probably linked functionally and physically...JA may be required for pin2 expression. AOC AOC catalyzes the stereospecific cyclization...

John G. Turner; Christine Ellis; Alessandra Devoto

198

Rhodium-catalyzed epoxide-opening cascades toward brevisin and hemibrevetoxin B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER I. Rhodium-Catalyzed Epoxide-Opening Cascades: Formal Synthesis of (-)-Brevisin [chemical formula inserted] [Rh(CO)?Cl]? was found to be an effective catalyst for endo-selective cyclizations and cascades of ...

Armbrust, Kurt W. (Kurt Willes)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Transition-metal catalysis of cyclocarbonylation and cycloisomerization reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. The asymmetric Pauson-Khand cyclization of nitrogen-containing enynes using carbon monoxide and a catalytic amount of (EBTHI)TiMe2 was examined. The influence of the nitrogen substituent and the concentration ...

Sturla, Shana Jocette, 1975-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Poly(Pyridinium Phenylene)s: Water-Soluble N-Type Polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poly(pyridinium phenylene) conjugated polymers are synthesized by a cross-coupling and cyclization sequence. These polyelectrolytes are freely soluble in water and display high degrees of electroactivity. When reduced ...

Swager, Timothy Manning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Studies on taxadiene synthase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fed in vitro to taxadiene synthase (overexpressed in truncated form in E. coli). These analogs were designed to interrupt the cyclization cascade, such that the monocyclic and/or bicyclic carbocation intermediates could not react further and therefore...

Chow, Siew Yin

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

Studies directed towards the total synthesis of (+)-sieboldine A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Progress towards the total synthesis of sieboldine A is described. This synthetic approach uses a nickel-catalyzed alkyne-ketone reductive cyclization to form the hydrindane core of the natural product in good yield and ...

Gehling, Victor S. (Victor Scott)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The development of endo-selective epoxide-opening cascades in water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This tutorial review traces the development of endo-regioselective epoxide-opening reactions in water. Templated, water-promoted epoxide-opening cyclization reactions can offer rapid access to subunits of the ladder ...

Morten, Christopher J.

204

Biosynthesis of the Isoprenoid Moieties of Furanonaphthoquinone I and Endophenazine A in Streptomyces cinnamonensis DSM 1042  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biosynthesis of the Isoprenoid Moieties of Furanonaphthoquinone I and Endophenazine A in Streptomyces cinnamonensis DSM 1042 ... Streptomyces cinnamonensis DSM 1042 produces the polyketide-isoprenoid compound furanonaphthoquinone I (FNQ I) and isoprenylated phenazines, predominantly endophenazine A. However, the recently identified biosynthetic gene cluster for these compounds only contains a single gene for a mevalonate pathway enzyme, that is, a putative mevalonate kinase gene. ... Streptomyces cinnamonensis DSM 1042 produces two classes of secondary metabolites with isoprenoid moieties:? the mixed polyketide?isoprenoid compound furanonaphthoquinone I (FNQ I, 1) and prenylated phenazines, predominantly endophenazine A (2, Figure 1). ...

Gerhard Bringmann; Yvonne Haagen; Tobias A. M. Gulder; Tanja Gulder; Lutz Heide

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

Crystal Structure of (+)-[delta]-Cadinene Synthase from Gossypium arboreum and Evolutionary Divergence of Metal Binding Motifs for Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

(+)-{delta}-Cadinene synthase (DCS) from Gossypium arboreum (tree cotton) is a sesquiterpene cyclase that catalyzes the cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate in the first committed step of the biosynthesis of gossypol, a phytoalexin that defends the plant from bacterial and fungal pathogens. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of unliganded DCS at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution and the structure of its complex with three putative Mg{sup 2+} ions and the substrate analogue inhibitor 2-fluorofarnesyl diphosphate (2F-FPP) at 2.75 {angstrom} resolution. These structures illuminate unusual features that accommodate the trinuclear metal cluster required for substrate binding and catalysis. Like other terpenoid cyclases, DCS contains a characteristic aspartate-rich D{sup 307}DTYD{sup 311} motif on helix D that interacts with Mg{sub A}{sup 2+} and Mg{sub C}{sup 2+}. However, DCS appears to be unique among terpenoid cyclases in that it does not contain the 'NSE/DTE' motif on helix H that specifically chelates Mg{sub B}{sup 2+}, which is usually found as the signature sequence (N,D)D(L,I,V)X(S,T)XXXE (boldface indicates Mg{sub B}{sup 2+} ligands). Instead, DCS contains a second aspartate-rich motif, D{sup 451}DVAE{sup 455}, that interacts with Mg{sub B}{sup 2+}. In this regard, DCS is more similar to the isoprenoid chain elongation enzyme farnesyl diphosphate synthase, which also contains two aspartate-rich motifs, rather than the greater family of terpenoid cyclases. Nevertheless, the structure of the DCS-2F-FPP complex shows that the structure of the trinuclear magnesium cluster is generally similar to that of other terpenoid cyclases despite the alternative Mg{sub B}{sup 2+} binding motif. Analyses of DCS mutants with alanine substitutions in the D{sup 307}DTYD{sup 311} and D{sup 451}DVAE{sup 455} segments reveal the contributions of these segments to catalysis.

Gennadios, Heather A.; Gonzalez, Veronica; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Li, Amang; Yu, Fanglei; Miller, David J.; Allemann, Rudolf K.; Christianson, David W.; (UPENN); (Cardiff); (UC)

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Wednesdays 12-1 / 101 Barker Hall (except where noted*) **Special seminar hosted by PMB graduate students. Reception to follow from 1-2:30 pm in 338 Koshland Hall.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Singapore "Pipes, Pores, Plugs and Gaskets: Innovation and Control in the Microfluidic Fungal Hypha" John

Silver, Whendee

207

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2011) 38:873890 DOI 10.1007/s10295-011-0970-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbiology 2011 Abstract Microorganisms have become an increasingly important platform for the production of drugs, chemicals, and biofuels from renewable resources. Advances in pro- tein engineering, metabolic, polyketides, non-ribo- somal peptides, biofuels, and chemicals. Related topics on lignocellulose degradation

Zhao, Huimin

208

Cryptosporidium parvum: enhancing our understanding of its unique fatty acid metabolism and the elucidation of putative new inhibitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthase (CpFAS1), C. parvum also possesses an enormous type I polyketide synthase (CpPKS1). Because of the size of this megasynthase, functional characterization of the complete enzyme is not possible. We have isolated and characterized the loading unit...

Fritzler, Jason Michael

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of the Holo Form of the Frenolicin Acyl Carrier Protein,)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were made for 433 hydrogen atoms, 333 carbon atoms, and 84 nitrogen atoms, representing a total of 94 in a bundle with three additional short helices in intervening loops; one of the short helices slowly. The carbon chain assembly of polyketides is analogous to fatty acid biosynthesis, in which successive

Puglisi, Joseph

210

Total syntheses of ?-lactone containing natural products: I. total synthesis of belactosin C II. synthetic studies toward spongiolactone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specificity. The synthetic efforts toward these have been reviewed recently. 11 The first total synthesis of salinosporamide A (1.9) was also described by Corey (Scheme 1.6). 12 After cyclization of the amide 1.36, an oxazoline allowing for alkylation... specificity. The synthetic efforts toward these have been reviewed recently. 11 The first total synthesis of salinosporamide A (1.9) was also described by Corey (Scheme 1.6). 12 After cyclization of the amide 1.36, an oxazoline allowing for alkylation...

Cho, Sung Wook

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Comparative Evaluation of Capsular Polysaccharide-Specific IgM and IgG Antibodies and F(ab?)2 and Fab Fragments as Delivery Vehicles for Radioimmunotherapy of Fungal Infection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the best delivery vehicle for radioimmunotherapy...used as delivery vehicles for radionuclides...Latex-Crypto antigen detection system (2), which is...Antibodies as delivery vehicles for radioimmunotherapy...components of the immune system in vitro and during...

Ekaterina Dadachova; Ruth A. Bryan; Xianchun Huang; Geraldina Ortiz; Tiffany Moadel; and Arturo Casadevall

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Magnaporthe grisea Pth11p Is a Novel Plasma Membrane Protein That Mediates Appressorium Differentiation in Response to Inductive Substrate Cues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...heterokaryotic and vegetative diploid phases of Magnaporthe grisea Gilbert R. Johnson A. Dean R. Chemical signals responsible for...Sequence Base Sequence DNA, Fungal Fungal Proteins Hordeum microbiology Magnaporthe genetics metabolism pathogenicity Membrane Proteins...

Todd M. DeZwaan; Anne M. Carroll; Barbara Valent; James A. Sweigard

213

Oligogalacturonides and chitosan activate plant defensive genes through the octadecanoid pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of proteinase inhibitor accumulation in...fungal-derived chitosan oligosaccharides...reduced by two inhibitors (salicylic acid...fungal-derived chitosan oligosaccharides...reduced by two inhibitors (salicylic acid...

S H Doares; T Syrovets; E W Weiler; C A Ryan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Glucose and Stress Independently Regulate Source and Sink Metabolism and Defense Mechanisms via Signal Transduction Pathways Involving Protein Phosphorylation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as the fungal elicitor chitosan, the phosphatase inhibitor endothall, and benzoic...of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine on mRNA...as the fungal elicitor chitosan, the phosphatase inhibitor endothall, and benzoic...

215

Genomic and metagenomic approaches to natural product chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Correlation of gene changes generated from yeast transcriptional profile data........36 FIG. 15. Photograph of the Hon6 strain cultured on a marine agar plate................................42 FIG. 16. Plasmid map of the shuttle vector p... their common biosynthetic origin is taken into account. Polyketides are synthesized in a process very similar to fatty acid synthesis (Fig. 5) (33, 192). Acetate units generated through primary metabolism are loaded onto coenzyme A (Co...

Angell, Scott Edward

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Chinese Journal of Polymer Science Vol. 22, No. 4, (2004), 349-353 SYNTHESIS AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Polybenzoxazoles (PBOs) have long been regarded as heat-resistant fibers and as matrix materials for fiberChinese Journal of Polymer Science Vol. 22, No. 4, (2004), 349-353 SYNTHESIS AND THERMAL PROPERTIES precursor was subjected to thermal cyclization in an inert atmosphere to convert it into the corresponding

Wan, Xin-hua

217

Template Synthesis, Properties, and Crystal Structure of a Trigonal Bipyramidal Cobalt(II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Experimental Section Reagents. All chemicals and solvents used in the synthesis were of reagent grade and deaerated thoroughly prior to use. For the spectroscopic and physical measurements, solvents were dried under a nitrogen atmosphere. While the cyclization reaction proceeded, the brownish green color

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

218

Paper # P45 Topic: Soot US Combustion Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper # P45 Topic: Soot 5th US Combustion Meeting Organized by the Western States Section potentials obtained from second order Møller-Plesset per- turbation (MP2) and Dunning's consistent basis sets of the direct cyclization reaction at high temperature and for a wide range of 1 #12;5th US Combustion Meeting

Pitsch, Heinz

219

Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 74, No. 1, pp. 93105, 2002. 2002 IUPAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Catalysis Science and Technology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa 32000 presented at the 11th IUPAC International Symposium on Organometallic Chemistry Directed Towards Organic [9]; and (c) methods that involve chirality transfer, such as the oxidative cyclization [10] and poly

Keinan, Ehud

220

Discovery of Cyclotide-Like Protein Sequences in Graminaceous Crop Plants: Ancestral Precursors of Circular Proteins?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nitrogen atoms are blue, and carbon is green. Actual atoms involved in the hydrogen...as the completion of natures unfinished business. Head-to-tail cyclization leads to...the basis of a model based on the lowest energy structure of the cycloviolacin O1 structure...

Jason P. Mulvenna; Joshua S. Mylne; Rekha Bharathi; Rachel A. Burton; Neil J. Shirley; Geoffrey B. Fincher; Marilyn A. Anderson; David J. Craik

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Communications J,Org. Chem., Vol.40, No. 14, 1975 2141 for 7 hr led quantitatively to a mixture of the pseudo-acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the resulting amide mixture was cyclized using as medium 10% sodium acetate-acetic acid for 20 hr at 25'. After of 12a was removed by reaction with lithium mercaptide in HMPAZ2yielding 90% of 20(S)-camptothec- in (12

Keinan, Ehud

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal pathogen cryptococcus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resistance to the Pathogenic Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans Maaike C. W. van den Berg,*, Jessica Z. Woerlee... in their susceptibility to a fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus...

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspergillus enzymes involved Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the fungal arsenal of hydrolytic... -155 Fakhoury AM, Woloshuk CP (1999) Amy1, the -amylase gene of ... Source: Cotty, Peter J. - School of Plant Sciences, University of...

224

Injectable in Situ Cross-Linking Hydrogels for Local Antifungal Therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasive fungal infections can be devastating, particularly in immunocompromised patients, and difficult to treat with systemic drugs. Furthermore, systemic administration of those medications can have severe side effects. ...

Kohane, Daniel S.

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation defines nonpathogenic Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

related non-pathogenic species should therefore provide... data from a wide range of phy- topathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and the available fungal genome Source: Talbot,...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspergillus flavus aflatoxins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

108 ATOXIGENIC STRAINS OF ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS HAVE BEEN APPLIED TO COMMERCIAL COTTON FIELDS... are a group of toxic, carcinogenic fungal metabolites produced by certain...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspergillus flavus infection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: 108 ATOXIGENIC STRAINS OF ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS HAVE BEEN APPLIED TO COMMERCIAL COTTON FIELDS... are a group of toxic, carcinogenic fungal metabolites produced by certain...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - anu sepp estonia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 5 Mycorrhizal Species Dominate the Soil-Fungal Community in Estonian Oil Shale-Ash Hills Charles Cowden, Sam Willis, and Richard Shefferson Summary: and Sepp...

229

Use of Comparative Genomics for Non-coding Rna Prediction and Investigation of Dna Introgression in Yeast.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The rapid development of large-scale genomic sequencing has dramatically changed the field of genetics, in part through the development of comparative genomics. Fungal comparative genomics (more)

Kavanaugh, Laura Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - autophagic machinery activated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and vac... Autophagic Fungal Cell Death Is Necessary for Infection by the Rice Blast Fungus Claire Veneault... autophagic cell death of the conidium. R ice blast disease...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - activator aicar reduces Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

architectures. The reactions pro- bacterial and fungal enzymes, including their primary ceed Source: Stoddard, Barry - Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - amphibian chytrid fungus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trachochytrium dendrobatidis) pathogenic to amphibians in the mid-1990s... Cope, Panama, where a chytrid fungal epidemic caused a 90% decline in amphibian abundance and a...

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne bacterial spores Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

immune recognition of airborne fungal spores, Nature, 460, 1117-1121, 2009... -236, 1966. Gilbert, G. S. and Reynolds, D. R.: Nocturnal fungi: ... Source: Martin, Scot T.- School...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - aflatoxin b1 toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

potent toxic and carcinogenic fungal metabolites... CROP ROTATION INFLUENCES AFLATOXIN PRODUCING POTENTIAL OF ASPERGILLUS COMMUNITIES IN SOUTH TEXAS... Tucson, AZ Abstract...

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - aphid pathogen pandora Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: aphid pathogen pandora Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Community ecology Ants defend aphids against Summary: aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic fungus blastocladiella Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oregon State University Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 48 Fungal farming in a snail Brian R. Silliman* Summary: between fungi and...

237

Comparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. (2009) Comparative genomics of the fungal pathogensComparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhancedapplications. BMC Genomics Wisselink HW, Toirkens MJ, Wu Q,

Wohlbach, Dana J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

STUDIES IN MYCOLOGY 55: 1333. 2006. How many species of fungi are there at the tip of Africa?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity. Key words: Biodiversity, conservation, National Collection of Fungi, numbers of fungi voor Schimmelcultures, Fungal Biodiversity Centre, P. O. Box 85167, 3508 AD, Utrecht, The Netherlands of fungal biodiversity, and have used these data as basis for revised estimates of species numbers based

239

Paracoccidioidomycosis: an update.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...advisable to culture repeated samples in a battery of selective and non- selective media...evaluated with the aim of amplifying the battery of serodiagnostic tests capable of demonstrating...reported in other fungal diseases caused by thermal dimorphic fungal patho- gens, e.g...

E Brummer; E Castaneda; A Restrepo

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Interactions between fungi and bacteria influence microbial community structure in the Megachile rotundata larval gut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...probability of an interspecific encounter (PIE, a diversity index) and Chao1-estimated...bacterial and fungal OTU richness, diversity (PIE), and Chao1-estimated richness (separately...OTU) richness, (b) fungal evenness (PIE-the probability of an interspecific encounter...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Crystal Structure of (+)-?-Cadinene Synthase from Gossypium arboreum and Evolutionary Divergence of Metal Binding Motifs for Catalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The constellation of three magnesium ions is identical regardless of whether Mg2+B is chelated by an aspartate-rich motif or the NSE/DTE motif, and regardless of whether the enzyme catalyzes an isoprenoid chain elongation reaction or a cyclization reaction. ... Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contracts W-31-109-Eng-38 and DE-AC02-06CH11357. ...

Heather A. Gennadios; Veronica Gonzalez; Luigi Di Costanzo; Amang Li; Fanglei Yu; David J. Miller; Rudolf K. Allemann; David W. Christianson

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Speaker(s): Carol Rao Date: July 9, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Exposures to fungi have been linked with asthma, toxicoses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and a range of non-specific symptoms. Definitive associations between indoor fungal exposure and health effects in population-based exposure-response studies, however, have not been well established. Issues in exposure assessment methods, both in collection and analysis, are major limitations. Classic methods for assessing airborne fungi rely upon collecting and analyzing whole fungal spores by culture. However, quantifying whole fungal spores may not fully describe fungal exposures, especially for purposes of investigating adverse respiratory

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity histopathology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

P.O. Box 5786 Summary: ; Fungal culture 3 ; Histopathology 4 ; Neospora IFA 5 ; Toxic heavy metal screen 6 ; Toxoplasma gondii MAT... Parvovirus-2 FA 4 ; Histopathology 5 ; (2)...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - albicans early stage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to antifungal drug discovery Terry Roemer,1 * Bo Jiang,1 John Davison,1... , Quebec, Canada, H3A 1B1. Summary Candida albicans is the primary fungal pathogen of humans....

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - albicans isoladas da Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to antifungal drug discovery Terry Roemer,1 * Bo Jiang,1 John Davison,1... , Quebec, Canada, H3A 1B1. Summary Candida albicans is the primary fungal pathogen of humans....

246

Sorghum Ergot: New Disease Threat to the Sorghum Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produces very durable, compact fungal structures called sclerotia. Where is it? Sorghum ergot has existed in Africa for many decades. It appeared in Brazil in 1995, and since then it has quickly spread throughout sorghum production areas in the Americas...

Krausz, Joseph P.; Isakeit, Thomas

1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

 

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carbs versus Fats Unicellular eukaryotic algae accumulate triacylglycerides (TAGs), which are a potential renewable source of biodiesel. Wang et al. (p. 1856-1868 ) document...factors regulating LB accumulation in algae. Where Everything Is in a Fungal Cell...

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne nitrogen load Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies 2 Correlating Bioaerosol Load with PM2.5 and PM10 Concentrations Jordan Peccia1, Ann M. Dillner1,2, Justin Boreson1 Summary: at all, of the fungal loading. It...

249

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Characterizing the regulatory mechanisms in fusarium verticillioides secondary metabolism using functional genomics approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusarium verticillioides is one of the most important fungal pathogens of maize and has also received increasing attention due to its ability to produce various secondary metabolites, including fumonisin B1 (FB1) and bikaverin. However, little...

Choi, Yoon E

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Suppression of mRNAs for lipoxygenase (LOX), allene oxide synthase (AOS), allene oxide cyclase (AOC) and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase (OPR) in pea reduces sensitivity to the phytotoxin coronatine and disease development by Mycosphaerellapinodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a recently developed model pathosystem involving Medicagotruncatula and Mycosphaerellapinodes, causal agent of Mycosphaerella blight on pea to understand host molecular response to a fungal suppressor, we...

Kazuhiro Toyoda; Yuriko Kawanishi; Yuriko Kawamoto

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Copyright 2013, Avicenna Journal of Medical Biotechnology. All rights reserved. Vol. 5, No. 1, January-March 2013 Original Article  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

42 Copyright © 2013, Avicenna Journal of Medical Biotechnology. All rights reserved. Vol. 5, No Biotechnology Department, Biotechnology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran 2. Fungal Biotechnology Group, Medical Biotechnology Department, Biotechnology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

More than a colour change: insect melanism, disease resistance and fecundity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...route is via cuticular penetration, implying that critical...reflect the faster rate of fungal penetration through a thinner cuticle...and (b) mortality rates following topical treatment...germination-positivea % penetration-positiveb % with...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Genomic Insights into the Atopic Eczema-Associated Skin Commensal Yeast Malassezia sympodialis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Laboratory, Swedish National Infrastructure for large-Scale DNA Sequencing...sequencing and computational infrastructure. We are also grateful for...mitochondrial control of fungal hybrid virulence. Nature 411...Jain E , et al. 2009. Infrastructure for the life sciences: design...

Anastasia Gioti; Bjrn Nystedt; Wenjun Li; Jun Xu; Anna Andersson; Anna F. Averette; Karin Mnch; Xuying Wang; Catharine Kappauf; Joanne M. Kingsbury; Bart Kraak; Louise A. Walker; Henrik J. Johansson; Tina Holm; Janne Lehti; Jason E. Stajich; Piotr Mieczkowski; Regine Kahmann; John C. Kennell; Maria E. Cardenas; Joakim Lundeberg; Charles W. Saunders; Teun Boekhout; Thomas L. Dawson; Carol A. Munro; Piet W. J. de Groot; Geraldine Butler; Joseph Heitman; Annika Scheynius

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fungi associated with urea-formaldehyde foam insulation in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sixty-eight fungal taxa were identified from samples of urea-formaldehyde foam insulation taken from Canadian residences. Mesophilic taxa were...Penicillium spp., Trichoderma harzianum and Paecilomyces variotii o...

John Bissett

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Indoor Mold, Toxigenic Fungi, and Stachybotrys chartarum: Infectious Disease Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other substrates including pipe insulation, gypsum, fiberglass wallpaper...Fungal colonization of fiberglass insulation in the air distribution system...associated with urea-formaldehyde foam insulation in Canada. Mycopathologia 99...

D. M. Kuhn; M. A. Ghannoum

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ecology, 88(3), 2007, pp. 582588 2007 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona and distribution of seed losses to fungal pathogens is still lacking (Gilbert 2002). For species with rapid seed

Arnold, A. Elizabeth

259

Ecological analysis of secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complex and fascinating aspect of fungal development is the production of secondary metabolites. One of the best characterized secondary metabolite pathway is the aflatoxin (AF) and sterigmatocystin (ST) pathway, found in many Aspergillus spp...

Ramaswamy, Anitha

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

MINI-REVIEW Aspergillus flavus hydrolases: their roles in pathogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and metalloproteinases, pectinase P2c, and amylase. Many hydrolases are presumed to function in polymer degradation, but may also play roles in fungal defense and virulence. Secretion of the endopolygalacturonase P2c

Cotty, Peter J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting calcium oxalate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by fungi or fungal) leave mineralogical (metal oxalates) and organic traces on the affected rock... at 3462 cm-1. These values are in good agreement with the pub- lished Raman...

262

Solving the structure of the bubble protein using the anomalous sulfur signal from single-crystal in-house Cu K diffraction data only  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The previously unknown structure of a 64-residue fungal protein, denoted the bubble protein, was solved in a highly automated fashion using the anomalous scattering from eight S atoms in data collected on in-house equipment.

Olsen, J.G.

2004-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

Agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are numerous references throughout history to catastrophic crop losses ranging from the effects of plagues of locusts in Egypt in biblical times to the Irish potato famine, caused by the fungal disease ...

C. A. Heaton

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are numerous references throughout history to catastrophic crop losses ranging from the effects of plagues of locusts in Egypt in biblical times to the Irish potato famine, caused by the fungal disease ...

Alan Heaton

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspergillus oryzae strain Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aspergillus oryzae strain Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Copyright 2007 CBS Fungal Biodiversity Centre, P.O. Box 85167,...

266

Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a fungal prey. BMC Genomics 10, 567 (2009). This studythe TrichoEST functional genomics approach. Curr. Genet. 51,in Hypocrea jecorina. BMC Genomics. 9, 430 (2008) Mukherjee,

Druzhinina, Irina S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

185Agron. Sustain. Dev. 26 (2006) 185193 INRA, EDP Sciences, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost of investmentsand energy,together with their impact on crops (Ehret et al., 2001). Among other Fungal diseases are a major problem in soilless cultivation of greenhouse plants because both yield

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

Combining ability for condensed tannin concentration among five cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genotypes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crops has been studied. The observation that redwood forests are nearly free of bird life due to a lack of insects suggests that tannins, which redwood trees contain, protect trees from insect and fungal attack (Buchanan, 1952). Tannic acid was found... crops has been studied. The observation that redwood forests are nearly free of bird life due to a lack of insects suggests that tannins, which redwood trees contain, protect trees from insect and fungal attack (Buchanan, 1952). Tannic acid was found...

Altamarino, Teresita Protacio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Study of the combined effect of temperature, pH and water activity on the radial growth rate of the white-rot basidiomycete Physisporinus vitreus by using a hyphal growth model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work investigates environmental effects on the growth of fungal colonies of P. vitreus by using a lattice-free discrete modelling approach called FGM (Fuhr et al. (2010), arXiv:1101.1747), in which hyphae and nutrients are considered as discrete structures. A discrete modelling approach allows studying the underlying mechanistic rule concerning the basic architecture and dynamic of fungal networks on the scale of a single colony. By comparing simulations of the FGM with laboratory experiments of growing fungal colonies on malt extract agar we show that combined effect of temperature, pH and water activity on the radial growth rate of a fungal colony on a macroscopic scale may be explained by a power law for the growth costs of hyphal expansion on a microscopic scale. The information about the response of the fungal mycelium on a microscopic scale to environmental conditions is essential to simulate its behavior in complex structure substrates such as wood, where the impact of the fungus to the woo...

Fuhr, M J; Schubert, M; Schwarze, F W M R; Herrmann, H J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates: Catalysts for asymmetric olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research presented and discussed in this dissertation involves the synthesis of transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates, and their application in catalytic enantioselective olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation. Neutral oxazolinylboranes are excellent synthetic intermediates for preparing new borate ligands and also developing organometallic complexes. Achiral and optically active bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are synthesized by reaction of 2-lithio-2-oxazolide and 0.50 equiv of dichlorophenylborane. These bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are oligomeric species in solid state resulting from the coordination of an oxazoline to the boron center of another borane monomer. The treatment of chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes with sodium cyclopentadienide provide optically active cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates H[PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}] [Ox{sup R} = Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4R-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4S-tBu]}. These optically active proligands react with an equivalent of M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) to afford corresponding cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 complexes {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}}M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} in high yields. These group 4 compounds catalyze cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature or below, providing pyrrolidine, piperidine, and azepane with enantiomeric excesses up to 99%. Our mechanistic investigations suggest a non-insertive mechanism involving concerted C?N/C?H bond formation in the turnover limiting step of the catalytic cycle. Among cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 catalysts, the zirconium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}){sub 2}}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} ({S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}) displays highest activity and enantioselectivity. Interestingly, {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} also desymmetrizes olefin moieties of achiral non-conjugated aminodienes and aminodiynes during cyclization. The cyclization of aminodienes catalyzed by {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} affords diastereomeric mixture of cis and trans cylic amines with high diasteromeric ratios and excellent enantiomeric excesses. Similarly, the desymmetrization of alkyne moieties in {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-catalyzed cyclization of aminodiynes provides corresponding cyclic imines bearing quaternary stereocenters with enantiomeric excesses up to 93%. These stereoselective desymmetrization reactions are significantly affected by concentration of the substrate, temperature, and the presence of a noncyclizable primary amine. In addition, both the diastereomeric ratios and enantiomeric excesses of the products are markedly enhanced by N-deuteration of the substrates. Notably, the cationic zirconium-monoamide complex [{S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2})][B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] obtained from neutral {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} cyclizes primary aminopentenes providing pyrrolidines with S-configuration; whereas {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} provides R-configured pyrrolidines. The yttrium complex {S-2}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} also affords S-configured pyrrolidines by cyclization of aminopentenes, however the enantiomeric excesses of products are low. An alternative optically active yttrium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-tBu}){sub 2}}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} ({S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3}) is synthesized, which displays highly enantioselective in the cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature affording S-configured cyclic amines with enantiomeric excesses up to 96%. A noninsertive mechanism involving a six-membered transition state by a concerted C?N bond formation and N?H bond cleavage is proposed for {S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} system based on the kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical features. In the end, a series of bis- and tris(oxazolinyl)borato iridium and rhodium complexes are synthesized with bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborane [PhB(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 2}]{sub n}, tris(oxazolinyl)borane [B(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 3}]n, and tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate [To{sup M}]{sup ?}. All these new an

Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Why Sequence Chestnut Blight Fungus?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chestnut Blight Fungus? Chestnut Blight Fungus? Cryphonectria parasitica, the chestnut blight fungus, is responsible for epidemics that caused the destruction of hundreds of millions of mature chestnut trees in forests of North America and Europe during the first part of the 20th century. The discovery of a group of RNA viruses, now classified in the family Hypoviridae (hypoviruses), that reduce the virulence (hypovirulence) of this pathogen stimulated intensive research into the potential of using fungal viruses for the biological control of fungal disease. Subsequent epidemiologic and population genetic studies have established the chestnut/C. parasitica/hypovirus pathosystem as the textbook example of both the consequences of accidental introduction of an exotic organism and of hypovirulence-mediated biological control of fungal

272

JGI - Product Offerings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Product Offerings Product Offerings Scientific Program Product Brief Description Deliverables FY14 target cycle time (median), days FY14 target cycle time (75th %), days Fungal Minimal Draft Low coverage whole genome shotgun sequencing for evaluation. May turn into a standard draft or improved standard draft. Assembly. Annotation optional (JGI portal); raw data submitted to SRA 250 400 Fungal Resequencing SNP and short indel calls, rearrangement detection, population analysis. Text file of SNPs (incl location in genome, coding/vs non, syn vs non-syn aa change etc) and structural rearrangements, alignment files, tracks for upload to genome browser and fastq files; raw data submitted to SRA 140 200 Fungal Standard Draft Whole genome shotgun sequencing. Exact scope items and quality of finished product depend on genome. Selected genomes will be improved based on feasibility and scientific merit. Assembly, annotation (JGI Portal + Genbank); raw data submitted to SRA 250 400

273

Cellular and molecular responses of Neurospora crassa to non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Filamentous fungi have been rarely explored in terms of plasma treatments. This letter presents the cellular and molecular responses of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa to an argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The viability and cell morphology of N. crassaspores exposed to plasma were both significantly reduced depending on the exposure time when treated in water. The intracellular genomicDNA content was dramatically reduced in fungal tissues after a plasma treatment and the transcription factor tah-3 was found to be required for fungal tolerance to a harsh plasma environment.

Gyungsoon Park; Young H. Ryu; Young J. Hong; Eun H. Choi; Han S. Uhm

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nature of airborne particulates at tropic exposure sites. Final report, November 1982-September 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne particulates were collected at five exposure sites in Panama using cascade impactor air samplers. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and culture identification techniques were used to analyze the particulates. Analysis revealed that the particulates consist of silicates, chlorides, and sulfur-rich and phosphorus-rich particles. Atmospheric particle levels were higher in the dry season than in the rainy season, and the predominant fungal species varied at each exposure site. The open direct exposure of culture plates served as a simple, appropriate method for monitoring atmospheric fungal spores.

Chen, F.; Dement, W.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

c004817h_LR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PAPER PAPER www.rsc.org/obc | Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry Insights into lignin primary structure and deconstruction from Arabidopsis thaliana COMT (caffeic acid O-methyl transferase) mutant Atomt1† Syed G. A. Moinuddin,‡ Micha¨ el Jourdes,‡ Dhrubojyoti D. Laskar, Chanyoung Ki, Claudia L. Cardenas, Kye-Won Kim, Dianzhong Zhang, Laurence B. Davin and Norman G. Lewis* Received 31st March 2010, Accepted 19th May 2010 First published as an Advance Article on the web 22nd July 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c004817h The Arabidopsis mutant Atomt1 lignin differs from native lignin in wild type plants, in terms of sinapyl (S) alcohol-derived substructures in fiber cell walls being substituted by 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol (5OHG)-derived moieties. During programmed lignin assembly, these engender formation of benzodioxane substructures due to intramolecular cyclization

276

United abominations: Density functional studies of heavy metal chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonyl and nitrile addition to uranyl (UO{sup 2}{sup 2+}) are studied. The competition between nitrile and water ligands in the formation of uranyl complexes is investigated. The possibility of hypercoordinated uranyl with acetone ligands is examined. Uranyl is studied with diactone alcohol ligands as a means to explain the apparent hypercoordinated uranyl. A discussion of the formation of mesityl oxide ligands is also included. A joint theory/experimental study of reactions of zwitterionic boratoiridium(I) complexes with oxazoline-based scorpionate ligands is reported. A computational study was done of the catalytic hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes with zirconium-based catalysts. Techniques are surveyed for programming for graphical processing units (GPUs) using Fortran.

Schoendorff, George

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

277

Synthesis and spectral properties of fluorescent photochromic diarylethenes with 6,6a-dihydropentalene-2(1H)-one ethene bridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An alternative synthetic strategy for the preparation of 6,6a-dihydropentalene-2(1H)-one derivatives comprising the stage of the regioselective ?-bromination of cyclopentenone system has been proposed. The method along with the bromination process includes the alkylation of ethyl 4-aryl-3-oxobutanoate with bromocyclopentenones and intramolecular carbocyclization reaction of alkylated product. The cyclization reaction has been studied in detail and it was found that the yields of the main and side products depend strongly on alkali concentration, and the method can be also used to design 8,8a-dihydrocyclopenta[a]inden-2(1H)-one unit. The spectral properties of the compounds obtained have been studied, and it was found that pentalenone derivatives as well as starting cyclopentenones, exhibit photochromic properties; in addition, the former, unlike the latter, are also fluorescent.

Dmitry V. Lonshakov; Valerii Z. Shirinian; Igor V. Zavarzin; Andrey G. Lvov; Mikhail M. Krayushkin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Doctoral Thesis Defense Speaker: Christine Houry Kehyayan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:00 Place: EV 1.162 ABSTRACT With the rapid development of genome sequencing technologies, complete genomes experimentally characterized enzymes from fungal genomes in the mycoCLAP database. Our study shows that the MCLAPhy, a novel approach for clustering proteins by leveraging the global context of complete genomes

Doedel, Eusebius

279

Morphology and ultrastructure of fungi in extended-wear soft contact lenses.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and disinfection of extended-wear contact lenses is advisable...while wearing current extended-wear lenses, or the lenses should...CITED 1. Berger, R. O., and B. W. Streeten. 1981. Fungal growth...soft contact lenses in extended wear. Folia Ophthalmol. Jpn. 35...

R B Simmons; J R Buffington; M Ward; L A Wilson; D G Ahearn

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Zygomycetes in Human Disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from such wards since they may harbor a variety of fungal agents. Patients when neutropenic below 1,000/ml are asked to wear masks when leaving the cancer or transplant wards, particularly when going outside. The monitoring of air quality, particularly...

Julie A. Ribes; Carolyn L. Vanover-Sams; Doris J. Baker

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mating System of the Anther Smut Fungus Microbotryum violaceum: Selfing under Heterothallism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...organisms. In this review, we aim to describe...violaceum below). We will review recent investigations...expression in the fungal literature is that heterothallism...antibiotic production, and bioenergy), while others destroy...Non-U.S. Gov't Review | Basidiomycota classification...

Tatiana Giraud; Roxana Yockteng; Manuela Lpez-Villavicencio; Guislaine Refrgier; Michael E. Hood

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gordon Research Conferences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capsula-tum"; R. Storck, "Control of fungal di-morphism...three dimen-sional modeling of motion in glass melts...primary structures, control of synthesis, biological...Kenneth Trabert, Stanis-law Ulam, Michael Wade...Canadian approaches to the control of SCIENCE, VOL. 191...

Alexander M. Cruickshank

1976-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.bioone.org) is a nonprofit, online aggregation of core research in the biological, ecological, and environmental sciences% with its host fungus, Rhizopogon salebrosus A.H. Sm. (Basidiomycota). Even short GA exposure (one or three with its fungal symbiont. Application of GA to induce monotrope germination may be used to examine

California at Berkeley, University of

284

Chapter Eleven - Genomics, Lifestyles and Future Prospects of Wood-Decay and Litter-Decomposing Basidiomycota  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Saprobic (saprotrophic and saprophytic) wood-decay fungi are in majority species belonging to the fungal phylum Basidiomycota, whereas saprobic plant litter-decomposing fungi are species of both the Basidiomycota and the second Dikarya phylum Ascomycota. Wood-colonizing white rot and brown rot fungi are principally polypore, gilled pleurotoid, or corticioid Basidiomycota species of the class Agaricomycetes, which also includes forest and grassland soil-inhabiting and litter-decomposing mushroom species. In this chapter, examples of lignocellulose degradation patterns are presented in the current view of genome sequencing and comparative genomics of fungal wood-decay enzymes. Specific attention is given to the model white rot fungus, lignin-degrading species Phanerochaete chrysosporium and its wood decay-related gene expression (transcriptomics) on lignocellulose substrates. Types of fungal decay patterns on wood and plant lignocellulose are discussed in the view of fungal lifestyle strategies. Potentiality of the plant biomass-decomposing Basidiomycota species, their secreted enzymes and respective lignocellulose-attacking genes is evaluated in regard to development of biotechnological and industrial applications.

Taina K. Lundell; Miia R. Mkel; Ronald P. de Vries; Kristiina S. Hildn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Heptaketides from Corynespora sp. Inhabiting the Cavern Beard Lichen, Usnea caWernosa: First Report of Metabolites of an Endolichenic Fungus1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heptaketides from Corynespora sp. Inhabiting the Cavern Beard Lichen, Usnea caWernosa: First Report fungal strain, Corynespora sp. BA-10763, occurring in the cavern beard lichen Usnea ca the lichen Usnea caVernosa (cavern beard lichen; Parmeliaceae; Lecanorales), collected in early 2005 from

Arnold, A. Elizabeth

286

VOLUME 81, NUMBER 8 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 AUGUST 1998 Nonequilibrium Roughening Transition in a Simple Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roughening Transition in a Simple Model of Fungal Growth in 1 1 1 Dimensions Juan M. López and Henrik exhibits a continuous roughening transition far from equilibrium from a smooth (a 0) to a rough phase (a 1 the problem onto a directed percolation process. The model reproduces the roughening transition observed

Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

287

The use of cotton blue stain to improve the efficiency of picking and identifying chironomid head capsules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTE The use of cotton blue stain to improve the efficiency of picking and identifying chironomid Cotton blue was added to sediment sam- ples at least 2 h before chironomid head capsules were picked during the picking process. Cotton blue has been used previously to stain chitin in fungal cell walls

Bern, Universität

288

INTRODUCTORY MYCOLOGY: BIOM 423 Fall 2010, 3 cr. LEC 2 LAB 1, PGC, Rm 214, M W 1:00-4:00 (1 hr lecture and 2 hr lab), field trips.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20* White-spored Mushrooms Mushroom ID D2L, Web W Sept 22 Dark-spored Mushrooms Mushroom ID D2L, Web mycology. Lecture Lab Reading M Aug 30 Introduction: the Fungal Lifestyle Movie, or movie clips D2L, Web W Sept 1 Phylogeny of Fungi Microscopic technique D2L, Web W Sept 8 BASIDIOMYCOTA introduction tissue

Cripps, Cathy

289

This article is from the October 2007 issue of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

where parameter values for wind and gravitation lead to expo- nentially or polynomially decreasing explicitly in terms of parameters for diffusion, wind, gravitation, and spore release height. Additional keywords: dispersal gradient, power law. The dispersal of airborne fungal spores within a field has been

290

Cyd Hamilton  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cyd Hamilton came to the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) as a researcher in ecology and the fungal sciences, already authoring 12 academic papers. She left better connected to the policy community and with an understanding and appreciation for how government agencies function and contribute to private-public partnerships in her field.

291

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie Fungal spores Organic agriculture Pathogen dispersal Conventional agriculture uses herbicides, pesticides

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

292

1276 Plant Disease / Vol. 90 No. 10 A Detached Cucumber Fruit Method to Screen for Resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1276 Plant Disease / Vol. 90 No. 10 A Detached Cucumber Fruit Method to Screen for Resistance to Phytophthora capsici and Effect of Fruit Age on Susceptibility to Infection A. J. Gevens, Department of Plant, East Lansing 48824 Fruit rot caused by the fungal-like oo- mycete pathogen, Phytophthora capsici

Lamour, Kurt

293

Proceedings of 7th Pacific Rim Bio-based Composite Symposium. Nanjing, China. October Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Wood-Polymer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Wood-Polymer Composites Modified with Chitosan Copper Complexes complexes (CCC); fungal decay resistance; mechanical properties; wood-polymer composite ABSTRACT Wood-polymer composites (WPC) have been extensively used for building products, automotive, packaging materials, and other

294

DOI: 10.1126/science.1197754 , 1100 (2011);332Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-syp) bio- synthetic pathway in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (9). NRPS-mutant O33 colonized culture-independent and culture- dependent analyses, shows that plants, like mam- mals and insects (10 plants from fungal infection through the production of a putative chlorinated lipopeptide encoded by NRPS

Li, Teng

295

The ER Chaperone LHS1 Is Involved in Asexual Development and Rice Infection by the Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...processes that occur on the outer plant surface. Conidial germination and appressorium...method (Miller, 1959) with 0.1% xylan and 0.1% polygalacturonic acid as substrates...encodes a fungal hydrophobin involved in surface interactions during infection-related...

Mihwa Yi; Myoung-Hwan Chi; Chang Hyun Khang; Sook-Young Park; Seogchan Kang; Barbara Valent; Yong-Hwan Lee

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Gene Related to Yeast HOS2 Histone Deacetylase Affects Extracellular Depolymerase Expression and Virulence in a Plant Pathogenic Fungus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...looking down on the adaxial surface of the leaf. Images in (B...cross-sections of fungal mycelium on the surface and within the leaf, whereas...mutant restricted to the leaf surface. Some background fluorescence...7.7 0.5 4.8 0.2 62 Xylan 7.9 0.4 5.5 0.1 70...

Dipnath Baidyaroy; Gerald Brosch; Joong-hoon Ahn; Stefan Graessle; Sigrun Wegener; Nyerhovwo J. Tonukari; Oscar Caballero; Peter Loidl; Jonathan D. Walton

297

The ER Chaperone LHS1 Is Involved in Asexual Development and Rice Infection by the Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...heat shock, cold shock, or ER stress treatments, such as DTT (10 mM) and tunicamycin...method (Miller, 1959) with 0.1% xylan and 0.1% polygalacturonic acid as substrates...encodes a fungal hydrophobin involved in surface interactions during infection-related...

Mihwa Yi; Myoung-Hwan Chi; Chang Hyun Khang; Sook-Young Park; Seogchan Kang; Barbara Valent; Yong-Hwan Lee

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Blue-Green Algae: Use of Antibiotics to purify Blue-Green Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... for tissue cultures suggests that such techniques may also be useful for freeing blue-green algae of contaminants. Our results with antibiotics have not been entirely successful, but it may ... and fungostatin are not inhibitory. It is possible to eliminate fungal contaminants by cultivation of algae in the presence of actidione and fungostatin, but not possible to free the ...

Y. T. TCHAN; J. GOULD

1961-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Single-Cell Microbiology: Tools, Technologies, and Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...optical, or electrokinetic forces (47, 77, 111). Alternatively...Because fluorescence is of fundamental importance to many of the approaches...as the micronewton invasive forces generated by individual fungal...indirect (e.g., atomic force) interactions result in z-plane...

Byron F. Brehm-Stecher; Eric A. Johnson

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Also inside this issue: Bioengineering Better Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Also inside this issue: Bioengineering Better Biomass DOE JGI/EMSL Collaborative Science Projects and degrade carbon. This is an image of the Mn(II)-oxidizing fungus Stilbella aciculosa ­ the fungal biomass Better Biomass Feedstock Science Highlights 15 Clouds up Close Improving Catalysts Pore Challenge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Selective medium for isolation of Fusarium species and dematiaceous hyphomycetes from cereals.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of fungal counts from cereals on DCPA and DRBC. To...enumeration media for fungi on cereals, 28 samples were examined...of weather- damaged cereals for potentially mycotoxigenic...1), and sunflower seeds (2). The following...have been isolated on starch-based media, such...

S Andrews; J I Pitt

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Entry Number: 1 GL A NEW HONEY BEE THREAT-THE PARASITIZING PHORID FLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and larvae also test positive for pathogens that have been implicated in colony collapse. Understanding is an ongoing part of a master's thesis project designed to quantify the effects the fungal pathogen, Bd for the testing of many individuals without the destructive and time consuming rigors histological examination

303

GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-240 Breeding for Disease Resistance in Hevea spp. -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., in order to have sustainable rubber production. Key words: Hevea brasiliensis, fungal diseases, South, the commercial rubber cultivation, due to their genetic vulnerability, is under a constant threat of attack rubber growing regions of India, may possibly alter the host-pathogen interactions leading to epidemics

Standiford, Richard B.

304

Advanced Technology for Economical Dehumidification to Improve Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by reducing the temperature required for occupant comfort. Fungal growth in humidities above 70% can have many detrimental health effects, depending on the particular species encountered [5,1]. In fact, high humidity is often an underlying cause of many air...

Beckwith, W. R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Infections Caused by Scedosporium spp.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...multinucleate giant cells. Radiology The role of radiology in the diagnosis of mycetoma is limited...Uncommon fungal maxillary sinusitis of dental origin due to Scedosporium prolificans...comparison of MR imaging with CT. Radiology 178: 865-870. 397 Shear, C. L...

Karoll J. Cortez; Emmanuel Roilides; Flavio Quiroz-Telles; Joseph Meletiadis; Charalampos Antachopoulos; Tena Knudsen; Wendy Buchanan; Jeffrey Milanovich; Deanna A. Sutton; Annette Fothergill; Michael G. Rinaldi; Yvonne R. Shea; Theoklis Zaoutis; Shyam Kottilil; Thomas J. Walsh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Role of Innate Immune Receptors in Paradoxical Caspofungin Activity In Vivo in Preclinical Aspergillosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical...fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization...Dis. 28 :717. 40. Wheeler, RT , and GR Fink...fungi from the immune system. PLoS Pathog. 2 :e35...aspergillosis. | This study investigated the possible...

Silvia Moretti; Silvia Bozza; Carmen D'Angelo; Andrea Casagrande; Maria Agnese Della Fazia; Lucia Pitzurra; Luigina Romani; Franco Aversa

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

Alteration of Microbial Communities Colonizing Leaf Litter in a Temperate Woodland Stream by Growth of Trees under Conditions of Elevated Atmospheric CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...driven by a relatively small fraction of the fungal communities...differences and influence on shredder feeding preferences. Oikos...biomass to the growth of the shredder, Pycnopsyche gentilis (Trichoptera...Shure. 1994. The influence of light and nutrients on foliar phenolics...

John J. Kelly; Amit Bansal; Jonathan Winkelman; Lori R. Janus; Shannon Hell; Marie Wencel; Patricia Belt; Kevin A. Kuehn; Steven T. Rier; Nancy C. Tuchman

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

Influence of Temperature on Growth and Peak Oil Biosynthesis in a Carbon-Limited Medium by Pythium irregulare  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetic analysis was investigated for a carbon-limited medium (C/N ratio=5.0) supporting the growth of the 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5; ?-3) (EPA)-accumulating fungal organism Pythium irregulare. T...

Keri B. Cantrell; Terry H. Walker

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Melanized Fungi in Human Disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Several blood culture systems are available, and...when making an initial assessment of fungal disease with...models of central nervous system infection with R. mackenziei...agents of central nervous system phaeohyphomycosis...Laboratory and clinical assessment of ketoconazole in deep-seated...

Sanjay G. Revankar; Deanna A. Sutton

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

News and Notes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...turning sunlight into electricity; (ii) demonstration...fuels, from its own production as well as from imports...on fungal leaf para-sites of Hawaiian plants...bacteriophages. University of Kansas. Cora M. Downs. Pathogenesis...Iowa. R. E. Kallio. Production and purification of...

1954-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Atmospheric Movement of Microorganisms in Clouds of Desert Dust and Implications for Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fungal spores in dust storms Sample site (reference) Dust storm source...0-267 (11) 11-43 (23) Kansas (23) Kansas For background, 1.5 min; for...membrane filtration. b Values for the Kansas study are bacterial cells per square...

Dale W. Griffin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Customer Developed FTA Page 1 of 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures. FTA® Technology FTA Cards are impregnated with a patented chemical formula that lyses cell damage and microbial and fungal attack. Infectious pathogens in samples applied to FTA Cards are rendered of plasmid DNA. Handling Instructions · Always wear gloves when handling FTA or CloneSaver Cards to avoid

Franks, Robert

313

The 9th International Mycological Congress (IMC 9) 1-6 August, Edinburgh, Scotland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years tree pathologists, crop scientists, geneticists, medical mycologists, mushroom growers talks and more than 1500 posters. Among these were 11 Fabians and several ex-Fabians (Ph.D. students themed symposia. FABI contributions were in the fields of tree pathogens, endophytes, fungal taxonomy

314

Aspergillus niger is a filamentous fungus that is ubiquitous and commonly found on decaying plant material. A. niger has a saprophytic lifestyle and plays an important role in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is therefore of great importance for future optimisation of heterologous protein production in the fungus into smaller molecules that can be taken up and serve as energy and nutrient sources, the fungus successfully exploited for the production of homologous and other fungal enzymes, the expression

Hille, Sander

315

Horticultural & Forest crops 2014 Floral Crops: Diseases 5-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horticultural & Forest crops 2014 Floral Crops: Diseases 5-1 Diseases Chuan Hong, Plant Pathologist humidity, low light intensity, and frequent watering, are favorable for the development of fungal and bacterial diseases. If insects are uncontrolled in the greenhouse, viruses can become a major problem

Liskiewicz, Maciej

316

EXCITING PROJECTS IN THE FIELD OF DISEASES OF NATIVE TREES Written by Ms Briar Harmer, (MSc student)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

important native forestry crops. Mr Gilbert Kamgan Nkuekan (under the guidance of Prof. Jolanda Roux Gilbert Kamgan Nkuekan at work in the field collecting fungal pathogens from cut timber. Cultured isolates, agronomy, genetics, microbiology, entomology and plant pathology. The CTHB now includes the discipline

317

The O-Mannosyltransferase PMT4 Is Essential for Normal Appressorium Formation and Penetration in Ustilago maydis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...et al., 1991; Lee and Dean, 1993; Gilbert et al., 1996). Cell wall glycoproteins...of fungal dimorphism and virulence. Microbiology 147: 1395-1401. Bolker, M., Bohnert...mannosyltransferases. Glycobiology 7: 481-486. Gilbert, R.D., Johnson, A.M., and Dean...

Alfonso Fernández-Álvarez; Alberto Elías-Villalobos; José I. Ibeas

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Evaluation of HVAC filters as a sampling mechanism for indoor microbial communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of HVAC filters as a sampling mechanism for indoor microbial communities Federico Noris Fungi Microbial community HVAC filter Settled dust Air a b s t r a c t HVAC filters are in place of bacterial and fungal concentrations and communities in HVAC filter dust and other sampling locations

Siegel, Jeffrey

319

PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease Striped bass (Morone saxitilis) and hybrid striped bass these fish are commonly raised in high densities under intensive aquaculture situations (e.g., cages, ponds of the viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens, but the fish become increasingly susceptible

Liskiewicz, Maciej

320

ORIGINAL PAPER Genetic variation of natural durability traits in Eucalyptus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-treated wood in some of the world's main wine-producing countries. · Methods Stem diameter at breast height over- and under- bark, heartwood proportion, wood density, methanol extrac- tives and fungal decay were. · Discussion NIR was an effective predictor of methanol extractives, moderately effective for basic density

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Polypeptide from Tomato Leaves Induces Wound-Inducible Proteinase Inhibitor Proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wound-inducible proteinase inhibitor proteins when supplied to...that activate pro-temase inhibitors in both local and distant...may regulate pro-teinase inhibitor I and II genes in both wounded...AUGUST 1991 3), chitin and chitosan fragments from fun-gal cell...

GREGORY PEARCE; DANIEL STRYDOM; SCOTT JOHNSON; CLARENCE A. RYAN

1991-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

Declining Amphibian Populations: The Problem of Separating Human Impacts from Natural Fluctuations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wound-inducible proteinase inhibitor proteins when supplied to...that activate pro-temase inhibitors in both local and distant...may regulate pro-teinase inhibitor I and II genes in both wounded...AUGUST 1991 3), chitin and chitosan fragments from fun-gal cell...

JOSEPH H. K. PECHMANN; DAVID E. SCOTT; RAYMOND D. SEMLITSCH; JANALEE P. CALDWELL; LAURIE J. VITT; J. WHITFIELD GIBBONS

1991-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

Characterization of a Novel, Antifungal, Chitin-Binding Protein from Streptomyces tendae T901 That Interferes with Growth Polarity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...crab shell chitin, chitosan, and cell walls...chitin synthetase inhibitor nikkomycin inhibited...protein protease inhibitors from S. lividans...crab shell chitin, chitosan, and fungal cell...crab shell chitin, chitosan, and cell walls...chitin synthetase inhibitor nikkomycin inhibited...

Christiane Bormann; Daniel Baier; Ingmar Hrr; Claudia Raps; Jrgen Berger; Gnther Jung; Heinz Schwarz

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Polypeptide signaling for plant defensive genes exhibits analogies to defense signaling in animals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cysteine and aspartyl proteinase inhibitors (2-4) and polyphenol oxidase...more recently, proteinase inhibitors in sedges and grasses have...of the defensive proteinase inhibitor genes in excised tomato leaves...Subsequently, chitin and chitosan oligomers derived from fungal...

D R Bergey; G A Howe; C A Ryan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

388 S. Afr. J. Bot. 1999,65(5 & 6); 388-391 Leptographium eucalyptophilum, a new species from Eucalyptus in the Congo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eucalyptus in the Congo K. Jacobs', M.J. Wingfeld and J. Raux Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology diseases on Eucalyptus in the Republic of Congo, West Africa, an unidentified Leptographium sp. novo Keywords; Eucalypfus, Leplographium. West Africa. Congo, fungal description. *To whom

326

Biological activity of Tat (47-58) peptide on human pathogenic fungi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tat (47-58) peptide, a positively charged Arginine-rich peptide derived from HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat, is known for a peptidic delivery factor as a cell-penetrating peptide on mammalian cells. In this study, antifungal effect and its mode of action of Tat peptide were investigated on fungal cells. The results indicate that Tat peptide exhibits antifungal activity against pathogenic fungal cells without hemolytic effect on human erythrocytes. To understand the mechanism(s) of Tat peptide, the cellular distribution of the peptide was investigated. Tat peptide internalized in the fungal cells without any damage to cell membrane when examined using an artificial liposome (PC/cholesterol; 10:1, w/w). Moreover, flow cytometry analysis exhibited the uptake of Tat peptide by energy- and salt-independent pathway, and confocal scanning microscopy displayed that this peptide accumulated in the nucleus of fungal cells rapidly without any impediment by time or temperature, which generally influence on the viral infections. After penetration into the nuclear, the peptide affected the process of cell cycle of Candida albicans through the arrest at G1 phase.

Jung, Hyun Jun [Department of Microbiology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Puk-ku, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoonkyung [Research Center for Proteinous Materials (RCPM), Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Kwangju 501-750 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biotechnology, Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Kwangju 501-750 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Kyung-Soo [Research Center for Proteinous Materials (RCPM), Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Kwangju 501-750 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine, Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Kwangju 501-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Gun [Department of Microbiology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Puk-ku, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: dglee222@knu.ac.kr

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

No claim to original US government works New Phytologist (2009) 182: 483494 483 Journal compilation New Phytologist (2009) www.newphytologist.org 483  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to volume ratios affected water-loss rates. · We used oxygen stable isotope analysis of water combined can affect water-loss rates and hence influences fungal ability to fruit during summer drought. Author : volume ratio, water loss, water sources. Introduction Summer drought in forested ecosystems presents

Silver, Whendee

328

A flowering of pleasure and pain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... gallery a photograph of a dried globe amaranth (Gomphrena globosa) unfolding in a glass teapot on a scenic balcony? His mysterious picture accompanies a sculpture of brain connectivity made ... wondrous fungal growth, or even a blossom flowering posthumously in the scalding water of a teapot. ...

Martin Kemp

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

1 JUNE 2006 Bact to basics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the bug another talent. The fungal enzymes now used to degrade cellulose for ethanol are expensive, she into ethanol? "We think we can produce a cellulase enzyme that can break down cellulose into glucose, and obtain a microorganism that will be able to degrade cellulose, and transform it into ethanol." That

Lovley, Derek

330

Insights into evolution of multicellular fungi from the assembled chromosomes of the mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea (Coprinus cinereus)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bruce W. Birren Mark Borodovsky Claire Burns Bjorn Canback Lorna A. Casselton C...Ramesh Cathy J. Rehmeyer Bruce A. Roe Narmada Shenoy Mario Stanke Vardges Ter-Hovhannisyan...Fungal Genet Biol 40 : 93 102 . 15 Burns C Pukkila PJ Zolan ME ( 2010 ) in Cellular...

Jason E. Stajich; Sarah K. Wilke; Dag Ahrn; Chun Hang Au; Bruce W. Birren; Mark Borodovsky; Claire Burns; Bjrn Canbck; Lorna A. Casselton; C.K. Cheng; Jixin Deng; Fred S. Dietrich; David C. Fargo; Mark L. Farman; Allen C. Gathman; Jonathan Goldberg; Roderic Guig; Patrick J. Hoegger; James B. Hooker; Ashleigh Huggins; Timothy Y. James; Takashi Kamada; Sreedhar Kilaru; Chinnapa Kodira; Ursula Kes; Doris Kupfer; H.S. Kwan; Alexandre Lomsadze; Weixi Li; Walt W. Lilly; Li-Jun Ma; Aaron J. Mackey; Gerard Manning; Francis Martin; Hajime Muraguchi; Donald O. Natvig; Heather Palmerini; Marilee A. Ramesh; Cathy J. Rehmeyer; Bruce A. Roe; Narmada Shenoy; Mario Stanke; Vardges Ter-Hovhannisyan; Anders Tunlid; Rajesh Velagapudi; Todd J. Vision; Qiandong Zeng; Miriam E. Zolan; Patricia J. Pukkila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A glucose-activated electron transfer system in the plasma membrane stimulates the H(+)-ATPase in Penicillium cyclopium.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the observed restoration of the At. On...characteristics of PM redox systems of higher plant...to% PM REDOX SYSTEMS IN FUNGAL CELLS...of "reductive power" observed at...of reductive power but also-via...trans-PM redox systems which are also...1969. Enzyme handbook, vol. 1, p...

J Pnitz; W Roos

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

a Miscellaneous Paper A-96-1 US Army Corps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Netherland, Judy F. Shearer =.=- -===- Approved For Public Release; Distribution Is Unlimited Prepared for Control of Hydrilla by Michael D. Netherland, Judy F. Shearer U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Netherland, Michael D. Integrated use of fluridone and a fungal pathogen for control of hydrilla / by Michael

US Army Corps of Engineers

333

Southwest MN IPM STUFF All the pestilence that's fit to print  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-spotted spider mite problems or 2012 collapsed from fungal disease during a drought. Cool mornings with lingering developing period and sensitivity to stress Stress likely to cause pod abortion and reduces pod number The R4 senescence begins Pod abortion is now less likely. Stress reduces seed size The R6 stage averages 18 days (9

Amin, S. Massoud

334

Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids that circumvent fungal drug- resistance mechanisms. In this work we used soft X-ray tomogra- phy to image of an entire, fully functional biological system, i.e., in the milieu of a cell (8, 10). Recently, soft X-ray

Barron, Annelise E.

335

Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

Pringle, Anne

336

Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Moscow, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Infections Caused by Scedosporium spp.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ubiquitous. The fungus is able to use natural gas, aromatic compounds with potential use...mycetoma due to fungal agents. In the natural history of mycetoma, a more mature granuloma...hacking the mycorrhizal network. Mycena News 57: 8. 470 Westerman, D. A., B...

Karoll J. Cortez; Emmanuel Roilides; Flavio Quiroz-Telles; Joseph Meletiadis; Charalampos Antachopoulos; Tena Knudsen; Wendy Buchanan; Jeffrey Milanovich; Deanna A. Sutton; Annette Fothergill; Michael G. Rinaldi; Yvonne R. Shea; Theoklis Zaoutis; Shyam Kottilil; Thomas J. Walsh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Aug. 2011, p. 54905504 Vol. 77, No. 15 0099-2240/11/$12.00 doi:10.1128/AEM.02996-10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuels are C4 energy crops, e.g., Miscanthus and Saccharum (52). However, most research on fungal decon in the Field Prachand Shrestha,1 Timothy M. Szaro,2 Thomas D. Bruns,2 and John W. Taylor2 * Energy Biosciences June 2011 The goals of our project were to document the diversity and distributions of cultivable fungi

Silver, Whendee

339

Structure and Function of the Macrolide Biosensor Protein, MphR(A), with and without Erythromycin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regulatory protein MphR(A) has recently seen extensive use in synthetic biological applications, such as metabolite sensing and exogenous control of gene expression. This protein negatively regulates the expression of a macrolide 2{prime}-phosphotransferase I resistance gene (mphA) via binding to a 35-bp DNA operator upstream of the start codon and is de-repressed by the presence of erythromycin. Here, we present the refined crystal structure of the MphR(A) protein free of erythromycin and that of the MphR(A) protein with bound erythromycin at 2.00- and 1.76-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. We also studied the DNA binding properties of the protein and identified mutants of MphR(A) that are defective in gene repression and ligand binding in a cell-based reporter assay. The combination of these two structures illustrates the molecular basis of erythromycin-induced gene expression and provides a framework for additional applied uses of this protein in the isolation and engineered biosynthesis of polyketide natural products.

Zheng, Jianting; Sagar, Vatsala; Smolinsky, Adam; Bourke, Chase; LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Cropp, T. Ashton; (Maryland)

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Why sequence Postia placenta ?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Postia placenta? Postia placenta? Commonly found in forest ecosystems, brown rot fungi such as Postia placenta are a major cause of wood decay and are thought to be responsible for 10 percent of the wood decay in the annual timber harvest. Unlike white-rot fungi, however, brown-rot fungi can rapidly break down the cellulose in wood without affecting the lignin. The 33 Mbp genome of P. placenta was sequenced in 2006 using the tried-and-true Sanger method, and was published in 2009. The information allowed researchers to compare white-rot, brown-rot and soft-rot fungal genomes for the first time. Now researchers plan to resequence the genome using new sequencing technologies in order to further refine the genomic data collected during the assembly and annotation process. The fungal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Print  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fungi play key roles in DOE- Fungi play key roles in DOE- relevant missions of bioenergy production, bioremediation and carbon cycling. In bioenergy proj- ects alone, for example, fungal genome data have been used not only to ensure the health of crops that serve as biomass feedstocks but also provide enzymes that can break down the biomass as well as help convert it to transportation fuel. The DOE JGI has developed a Fungal Genomics Program headed by Igor Grigoriev. The program's first project, launched October 1, is the Genome Encyclopedia of Fungi (GEF). The program aims to explore fungi's ecological diversity and breadth across the Tree of Life for DOE-relevant science and applications. DOE JGI pioneered sequenc- ing and analysis of several fungi important for lignocellu- lose degradation, enzyme pro-

342

Novel Combination of Enzyme Systems Could Lower Biofuel Costs (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two natural enzyme systems-one produced by Two natural enzyme systems-one produced by fungi and the other by bacteria-break down cel- lulose faster if used in combination. The resulting process shows promise for less expensive biofuels. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and their partners studied a cocktail of individual fungal enzymes that depoly- merize biomass, and an alternative bacterial system in which multiple biomass-degrading enzymes, termed the cellulosome, are linked together by a protein scaffold. This study suggests that two of the most thoroughly studied and distinct paradigms of biomass degradation, namely free fungal enzymes and multi-enzyme bacterial cellulosomes, function together in an unexpected way to efficiently break down polysaccharides.

343

c3ee00019b 1..10  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fungal Fungal cellulases and complexed cellulosomal enzymes exhibit synergistic mechanisms in cellulose deconstruction† Michael G. Resch, * ab Bryon S. Donohoe, ab John O. Baker, ab Stephen R. Decker, ab Edward A. Bayer, c Gregg T. Beckham de and Michael E. Himmel ab Nature has evolved multiple enzymatic strategies for the degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides, which are central to carbon flux in the biosphere and an integral part of renewable biofuels production. Many biomass-degrading organisms secrete synergistic cocktails of individual enzymes with one or several catalytic domains per enzyme, whereas a few bacteria synthesize large multi-enzyme complexes, termed cellulosomes, which contain multiple catalytic units per complex. Both enzyme systems employ similar catalytic chemistries; however, the physical mechanisms by which these enzyme systems degrade polysaccharides

344

Ghimire et al 2010.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of of fungal endophyte communities inhabiting switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) growing in the native tallgrass prairie of northern Oklahoma Sita R. Ghimire & Nikki D. Charlton & Jeremey D. Bell & Yelugere L. Krishnamurthy & Kelly D. Craven Received: 24 November 2010 / Accepted: 12 December 2010 # Kevin D. Hyde 2010 Abstract This study was conducted to explore fungal endophyte communities inhabiting native switchgrass plants from the tallgrass prairie of northern Oklahoma. The primary focus was to isolate these endophytes in pure culture from surface-sterilized plant tissues and provide taxonomic identifications based on comparative analysis of ITS rDNA gene sequences. From these data, we evaluated the biodiversity of these potentially beneficial endosym- bionts from this rapidly disappearing habitat of the Great Plains. While important from a strictly

345

JGI - CSP Sequencing Plans for 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 For status information, see the Genome Projects section. Proposer Affiliation Project Description Algae Kerfeld, Cheryl DOE JGI Genome and Transcriptome Analyses of Two Extremely Acidophilic and One Neutrophilic Eukaryotic Algal Species with Diverse Mechanism for CO2 Acquisition Lovejoy, Connie Laval University, Canada Small planktonic single celled eukaryotes from the Arctic Ocean Plants Muehlbauer, Gary University of Minnesota Whole genome shotgun sequencing of the barley genome Vogel, John USDA-ARS Surveying natural diversity of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon Fungi de Vries, Ronald CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands Comparative analysis of Aspergilli to facilitate novel strategies in fungal biotechnology Goodwin, Stephen Purdue University Sequencing of pathogens and extremophiles in the Dothideomycetes

346

Modeling the effects of cymene on the distribution of germination and growth of Beauveria bassiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Essential oils have antifungal and antipathogenic effects and therefore are targets in plant pathology research for their potential uses as natural substitutes for inorganic plant pesticides. Beauveria bassiana, an entomopathogenic fungus, can endophytically colonize a vast number of plant species and trigger induced systemic resistance against plant pathogens. Spore germination is the most vulnerable in the fungal life cycle and is therefore a good candidate for monitoring the effect of essential oils on the growth of B. bassiana. Percentage germination of fungal spores and length of germination tubes were recorded from experiments. A mathematical model that was able to capture the effects of cymene, an essential oil produced by Monarda, on the germination and growth was developed. This is the first report of a model for the impact of essential oils on B. bassiana spore germination.

Luong Nguyen; Dubravka Bodiroga; Reka Kelemen; Jaewook Joo; Kimberly D. Gwinn

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

347

Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

Merino, Sandra

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

Merino, Sandra

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

Merino, Sandra

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

research 1..7  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Digestibility Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment Zhifang Cui, †,§ Caixia Wan, †,§ Jian Shi, † Robert W. Sykes, ‡ and Yebo Li* ,† † Department of Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering, The Ohio State University/Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Avenue, Wooster, Ohio 44691-4096, United States ‡ BioEnergy Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401-3305, United States ABSTRACT: Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly

351

Assessing conserved function of conidiation regulators in two distantly related ascomycetes, Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental stimuli including aerial cues (desiccation and hyperoxia), light, osmotic stress, and nutrition limitation (Roncal and Ugalde, 2003). For This dissertation follows the style of Fungal Genetics... gives rise to an aerial stalk (a diameter 4 ? 5 ?m, a height ~ 100 ?m) that swells at its tip to form a multinucleate vesicle (a diameter ~ 10 ?m). Two layers of sterigmata, the metulae and phialides, form sequentially from the vesicle. Each vesicle...

Chung, Da Woon

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Exploring Hormone Crosstalk in Fusarium verticillioidies Infection of Maize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of IAA had an effect on F. verticillioides (fig. 2). Sporulation of the fungus was relatively unaffected by the addition of IAA (a). However, application of exogenous IAA did cause enhanced fungal colonization (b). At day 1 and 2 post inoculation... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR Approved by: Research Advisor: Dr. Michael Kolomiets April 2013 Major: Bio-Environmental Science 1 TABLE...

Drab, Dillon

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to inhibitors and stress  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced tolerance to stress and/or inhibitors such as sodium acetate and vanillin. The enhanced tolerance can be achieved by increasing the expression of a protein of the Sm-like superfamily such as a bacterial Hfq protein and a fungal Sm or Lsm protein. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using the genetically modified microorganisms of the present invention.

Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Shihui

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

The action of Trichoderma viride cellulase on purified and partially purified cellulosic substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of practical importance are usually fungal in origin, and each particular one is really a complex of enzymes whose overall action is the degradation of cellulose to glucose. The past work has been limited somewhat in that although many fungi produce... digestion some workers have used the culture filtrate with no special treatments other than filtration through glass wool and pH adjustment (24). In the past, attempts have been made to convert wood to an energy source for ruminant animal nutrition...

Villarreal, Anita

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Enfield rifles: the composite conservation of our american civil war heritage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chooses to save one element over the others and treat the artifact accordingly. Iron undergoes electrolysis or hydrogen reduction, and wood undergoes PEG or tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) treatments (this treatment will be discussed below). They were... to keep the humidity under 70 percent, or the sugar will leach out of the wood. Additives, such as pesticides and fungicides, are needed to inhibit fungal growth and insect attack. While this method will not affect metals and the cost is low...

Cox, Starr Nicole

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Effectiveness of irradiation in killing pathogens. [Treatment of sewage sludge for land application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations include gamma ray irradiation of sludge as an approved Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP) prior to land application. Research at Sandia National Laboratories on pathogen inactivation in sludge by gamma irradiation has demonstrated that the 1 Mrad PFRP dose is capable, by itself, of eliminating bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens from sludge. Gamma irradiation of sludge in conjunction with the required Processes to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) should also eliminate the viral hazard from wastewater sludges.

Yeager, J.G.; Ward, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

CAFTA: Sanitary and Phytosanitary Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the five countries on the specific equipment needed to conduct pest diagnostic, in the areas of Entomology, Virology, Weed Science, Fungal and Bacterial Pathology, and Mycology. #0;? Collect information on the equipment needed to carry out inspection... was marked ?No? on the survey from Costa Rica. Costa Rica?s legislation gives the national organization substantial authority to conduct inspections, train personnel, undertake risk analysis, and issue phytosanitary regulations. The most recent revision...

Alford, John; Blackburn, Casey; Holland, Lynn; Rolison, Richard; Schwartz, Andrew; Smith, James; Williams, Erin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Seed metabolites alter the development of Aspergillus ssp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Four oxidative enzyme inhibitors including SKF 525-A (F450 inhibitor) and the following lipoxygenase inhibitors- salicylhydroxamic acid, propyl gallate, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid ? were individually incorporated at concentrations of 4 uM, 40 uM..., and 400 uM into YGT media before autoclaving. The solid media was then inoculated with A. iiidulans strain WIM-126. All samples were triplicated in both the light and dark with sample cores trom a uniform area of fungal growth being harvested...

Hinze, Lori Lynn

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Environmental Biology | Biosciences Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Elevated CO2 and O3 effects on Carbon demand Elevated CO2 and O3 effects on Carbon demand BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Elevated CO2 and O3 effects on Carbon demand of the Extramatrical Mycorrhizal Fungal Network Contact: R. Michael Miller (rmmiller@anl.gov) We are evaluating the interactive effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on the sequential growth and allocation of both ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), paper birch (Betula papyrifera), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum) at the Aspen FACE site. The Aspen FACE approach consists of 30 m diameter rings of gas-dispensing pipes that allow us to fumigate intact forest canopies with atmospheric pollutants and study the interaction of plants, soils and atmosphere (http://aspenface.mtu.edu/index.html). We have used several different approaches to quantifying treatment effects on the mycorrhizal fungal network, especially how host responses influence root associated colonization and extramatrical hyphal (EMH) production and symbiotic benefit. Over the last six years we have been developing and improving upon methods to better quantify root associated mycorrhizal fungal biomass and EMH production and standing crop. Because both AMF and EMF play a significant role in the system of study we also have had to develop a means of separating the production of these different mycorrhizae, especially quantification of the EMH.

360

Controlled Synthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lUU lUU iIII---11111 q o m Controlled Synthesis of Polyenes by Catalytic Methods Progress Report for the period 12/01/92 - 11/30/93 Richard R. Schrock Five papers have appeared in the last year (see list at end), numbers 225,229, 233, 236, and 240. The living cyclopolymerization of dipropargyl derivatives has been reported for diethyl dipropargylmalonate (X = C(CO2Et)2; Scheme I; #225). We have found that c_ addition and [3 addition take place approximately to an equivalent degree, on the basis of the 13C NMR chemical shift for the quaternary carbon atom in the five or si×-membered ring, and in the presence of ethylene have isolated a molecule that contains a si×-membered ring that is formed when ethylene cleaves the cyclized species from the metal in a chain transfer-like reaction. On this basis also we can say that the polymer prepared from this monomer using classical catalysts contain

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Synthesis of 6-Methyl-9-propyldibenzothiophene-4-ol amended to 9-isopropyl-6-methyldibenzothiophene-4-ol. Final technical report, July 25, 1991--January 25, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a draft final technical report on Task 1 of a contract to synthesize 6-Methyl-9-propyldibenzothiophene-4-ol, as amended to 9- isopropyl-6-methyldibenzothiophene-4-ol. This report is a compilation of data presented in earlier reports. The first annual report dealt with an attempted synthesis of 4-methoxy-6-methyl-9- propyldibenzothiophene (the original target compound), the successful synthesis and delivery of 200 grams of the sulfide 1,4-diethyl-2- [(2{prime}-methoxyphenyl)-thio]benzene, and initial work on a new synthesis route for the preparation of the new target compound 9- isopropyl-6-methyldibenzothiophene-4-ol. The change to the new target compound and the new synthesis route became necessary when it was learned that the sulfide mixture could not be cyclized to the substituted dibenzothiophene mixture. The second annual report described the successful preparation of 45 g of the new target compound using the new synthesis route. Subsequently funds were provided to synthesize an additional 45 g of the new target using the same reaction scheme. This task was recently completed.

Eisenbraun, E.J.

1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

Thermal degradation of cellulose in alkali  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass in an alkaline aqueous slurry can be liquefied by heat and pressure. Understanding the mechanisms of biomass liquefaction to improve the efficiency of converting biomass to useful products, particularly chemicals and synthetic fuels is discussed. To study the chemical mechanisms of this process, pure cellulose, the main component of biomass, was liquefied. The 78 cellulose liquefaction products that were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry include polyols, furans, ketones, hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds. Polyols may be formed by hydrogenolytic cleavage. Furans an cyclic ketones may be cyclization products of dicarbonyl intermediates formed by aldol condensation of small initial degradation products such as acetone and acrolein. Several of these small carbonyl compounds were used as model compounds to test proposed mechanisms for furans and cyclic ketones and obtained products supporting five of the mechanisms. For the best case of 26 cellulose liquefaction experiments, 34% of the initial mass of the cellulose was converted to acetone-soluble oil with a heat of combustion of 14,000 Btu/lb.

Miller, R.K.; Molton, P.M.; Russell, J.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Catalytic cracking of a Gippsland reduced crude on zeolite catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking reactions of a Gippsland reduced crude have been investigated at 520[degrees]C over HY and HZSM-5. Gasolines with similar characteristics can be obtained on both zeolites, although the mechanistic routes to these products are quite distinct. Changes in aromatic product selectivities are consistent with the zeolite pore geometries. Minor quantities of aromatics are formed via hydrogen transfer processes involving product olefins and naphthenes over the faujasite and the cyclization (and to a lesser extent oligomerization) of olefinic species on the pentasil. Dehydrogenation of naphthenic species in the feedstock is also important for aromatic formation. While paraffins are formed via hydrogen transfer processes together with cracking and isomerization of feed paraffins on HY, only the latter route can explain formation of saturated species on HZSM-5. The removal of linear paraffins from the GRC was traced as a function of conversion on HY. It was found that the relative reactivity of the linear paraffins increased monotonically with paraffin chain length. 43 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Guerzoni, F.N.; Abbot, J. (Univ. of Tasmania (Australia))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Preparative enzymatic solid phase synthesis of cis(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid physical interaction of AOS and AOC is not necessary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pathway of jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis was established in the 1980s by Vick and Zimmerman but, until now, the preparative biosynthesis of the jasmonic acid precursors 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) and 3-oxo-2-[2?-pentenyl]-cyclopentan-1-octanoic acid (OPC-8:0) in their endogenous and biologically relevant cis(+)-configuration was only possible in small amounts and had to put up with high costs. This was mainly due to the lack of high amounts of pure and enzymatically active allene oxide cyclase (AOC), which is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of jasmonates in that it releases, in a coupled reaction with allene oxide synthase (AOS), the first cyclic and biological active metabolite OPDA. We describe here the expression and purification of AOS and AOC and their subsequent coupling to solid matrices to produce an enantioselective, reusable bioreactor for octadecanoid production. With the method described here it is possible to produce optically pure enantiomers of octadecanoids in high amounts in a cost- and time-efficient manner. Furthermore, it could be demonstrated that a physical interaction of AOS and AOC, hitherto postulated to be required for substrate channeling from AOS to AOC, is not necessary for the in vitro cyclization of the unstable epoxide generated by the AOS reaction.

Philipp Zerbe; Elmar W. Weiler; Florian Schaller

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha}, {omega}- bis(triethoxy-silyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under acidic sol-gel polymerization conditions, 1,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)-propane (1) and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (2) were shown to preferentially form cyclic disilsesquioxanes 3 and 4 rather than the expected 1,3-propylene- and 1,4-butylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Formation of 3 and 4 is driven by a combination of an intramolecular cyclization to six and seven membered rings, and a pronounced reduction in reactivity under acidic conditions as a function of increasing degree of condensation. The ease with which these relatively unreactive cyclic monomers and dimers are formed (under acidic conditions) helps to explain the difficulties in forming gels from 1 and 2. The stability of cyclic disilsesquioxanes was confirmed withe the synthesis of 3 and 4 in gram quantities; the cyclic disilsesquioxanes react slowly to give tricyclic dimers containing a thermodynamically stable eight membered siloxane ring. Continued reactions were shown to perserve the cyclic structure, opening up the possibility of utilizing cyclic disilsesquioxanes as sol-gel monomers. Preliminary polymerization studies with these new, carbohydrate-like monomers revealed the formation of network poly(cyclic disilsesquioxanes) under acidic conditions and polymerization with ring-opening under basic conditions.

Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The effect of rhenium, sulfur and alumina on the conversion of hydrocarbons over platinum single crystals: Surface science and catalytic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion reactions of hydrocarbons over Pt-Re model catalyst surfaces modified by sulfur and alumina have been studied. A plasma deposition source has been developed to deposit Pt, Re, and Al on metal substrates variable coverage in ultrahigh vacuum without excessive heating. Conversion of n-hexane was performed over the Re-covered Pt and Pt-covered Re surfaces. The presence of the second metal increased hydrogenolysis activity of both Pt-Re surfaces. Addition of sulfur on the model Catalyst surfaces suppressed hydrogenolysis activity and increased the cyclization rate of n-hexane to methylcyclopentane over Pt-Re surfaces. Sulfiding also increased the dehydrogenation rate of cyclohexane to benzene Over Pt-Re surfaces. It has been proposed that the PtRe bimetallic catalysts show unique properties when combined with sulfur, and electronic interactions exist between platinum, rhenium and sulfur. Decomposition of hydrocarbons on the sulfur-covered Pt-Re surfaces supported that argument. For the conversion of 1-butene over the planar Pt/AlO{sub x}, the addition of Pt increased the selectivity of hydrogenation over isomerization.

Kim, C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The effect of rhenium, sulfur and alumina on the conversion of hydrocarbons over platinum single crystals: Surface science and catalytic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion reactions of hydrocarbons over Pt-Re model catalyst surfaces modified by sulfur and alumina have been studied. A plasma deposition source has been developed to deposit Pt, Re, and Al on metal substrates variable coverage in ultrahigh vacuum without excessive heating. Conversion of n-hexane was performed over the Re-covered Pt and Pt-covered Re surfaces. The presence of the second metal increased hydrogenolysis activity of both Pt-Re surfaces. Addition of sulfur on the model Catalyst surfaces suppressed hydrogenolysis activity and increased the cyclization rate of n-hexane to methylcyclopentane over Pt-Re surfaces. Sulfiding also increased the dehydrogenation rate of cyclohexane to benzene Over Pt-Re surfaces. It has been proposed that the PtRe bimetallic catalysts show unique properties when combined with sulfur, and electronic interactions exist between platinum, rhenium and sulfur. Decomposition of hydrocarbons on the sulfur-covered Pt-Re surfaces supported that argument. For the conversion of 1-butene over the planar Pt/AlO[sub x], the addition of Pt increased the selectivity of hydrogenation over isomerization.

Kim, C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

Degradation of selected agrochemicals by the white rot fungus Trametes versicolor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Use of agrochemicals is a worldwide practice that exerts an important effect on the environment; therefore the search of approaches for the elimination of such pollutants should be encouraged. The degradation of the insecticides imiprothrin (IP) and cypermethrin (CP), the insecticide/nematicide carbofuran (CBF) and the antibiotic of agricultural use oxytetracycline (OTC) were assayed with the white rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Experiments with fungal pellets demonstrated extensive degradation of the four tested agrochemicals, at rates that followed the pattern IP>OTC>CP>CBF. In vitro assays with laccase-mediator systems showed that this extracellular enzyme participates in the transformation of IP but not in the cases of CBF and OTC. On the other hand, in vivo studies with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 revealed that this intracellular system plays an important role in the degradation of IP, OTC and CBF, but not for CP. The compounds 3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (DCCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (PBA) were detected as transformation products of CP, as a result of the breakdown of the molecule. Meanwhile, 3-hydroxycarbofuran was detected as a transformation product of CBF; this metabolite tended to accumulate during the process, nonetheless, the toxicity of the system was effectively reduced. Simultaneous degradation of CBF and OTC showed a reduction in toxicity; similarly, when successive additions of OTC were done during the slower degradation of CBF, the fungal pellets were able to degrade both compounds. The simultaneous degradation of the four compounds successfully took place with minimal inhibition of fungal activity and resulted in the reduction of the global toxicity, thus supporting the potential use of T. versicolor for the treatment of diverse agrochemicals.

Josep Anton Mir-Tutusaus; Mario Mass-Mora; Cayo Corcellas; Ethel Eljarrat; Dami Barcel; Montserrat Sarr; Glria Caminal; Teresa Vicent; Carlos E. Rodrguez-Rodrguez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Biotechnology Regulatory Services public data file (permits, notifications,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biotechnology Regulatory Services public data file (permits, notifications, Biotechnology Regulatory Services public data file (permits, notifications, and petitions) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Biotechnology Regulatory Services public data file (permits, notifications, and petitions) Dataset Summary Description Public information on BRS applications for genetically engineered permits, notifications, and petitions. Tags {BRS,Permits,Notifications,Petitions,GE,"Agronomic Properties","Bacterial Resistance","Fungal Resistance","Herbicide Tolerance","Insect Resistance","Marker Gene","Nematode Resistance","Product Quality","Virus Resistance",Institution,Article,Phenotypes,"Genotypes "}

371

DOE JGI CSP 2012 PI Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organizers Organizers Workshop Organizers Nikos Kyrpides Prokaryotic Superprogram Lead, DOE JGI Susannah Tringe Metagenomics Program Lead, DOE JGI Tanja Woyke Microbial Genomics Program Lead, DOE JGI Igor Grigoriev Fungal Genomics Program Lead, DOE JGI Participants Heike Bucking, South Dakota State University Jeff Dangl, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Kristen DeAngelis, University of Massachusetts University of Massachusetts, University of British Columbia Jorge Rodrigues, University of Texas Louis Tisa, University of New Hampshire Christopher Schadt, ORNL Jerry Tuskan, ORNL Eoin Brodie, LBNL Brendan Bohannan, University of Oregon Angela Kent, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign James Tiedje, Michigan State University Nikos Kyrpides, DOE JGI Susannah Tringe, DOE JGI

372

JGI - Organization Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organization Structure Organization Structure clickable organizational chart Dan Rokhsar Genomic Technologies Department Nikos Kyrpides Jeremy Schmutz Plant Program Metagenome Program Igor Grigoriev Fungal Program LBNL Director P. Alivisatos Scientific Advisory Committee JGI Director, Eddy Rubin Deputy Director of Science Programs, Jim Bristow S. Canon NERSC JGI Support Team Ray Turner Operations Department Prokaryote Super Program Genomic Technologies Department Len Pennacchio Microbial Program Tanja Woyke Dan Rokhsar Eukaryote Super Program Susannah Tringe Chia-lin Wei Executive Management DOE JGI Director: Eddy Rubin Deputy of Science: Jim Bristow Deputy of Operations: Ray Turner Deputy of Genomic Technologies: Len Pennacchio Departments Operations Deputy of Operations Ray Turner

373

JGI - LSP Small-Scale Sequencing Plans for 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Science Program Laboratory Science Program Small-Scale Sequencing Plans For status information, see the Genome Projects section. Organism Proposer Affiliation Five Archaea (Methanohalobium evestigatum, Methanobacterium formicicum, Halococcoides, Ferroglobus placidus, and Acidianus sp. JP7) Kyrpides LBNL Aspergillus terreus EST Baker PNNL Avena Barbata ESTs Anderson BNL Burkholderia cepacia Bu72 van der Lelie BNL ChIP-enriched binding sequences Stubbs LLNL CRISPR loci of Leptospirillum Banfield Cochliobolus heterostrophus Turgeon Cornell University Columbia River Microbiota Magnuson PNNL Dehalococcoides Brodie LBNL Etolico Lagoon in Greece Kyrpides LBNL Fungal comparative genomics (Orpinomyces) Baker PNNL Hypersaline microbial mat Raymond LLNL Leonotis nepetifolia Shanklin BNL

374

Crystallization and diffraction analysis of [beta]-N-acetylhexosaminidase from Aspergillus oryzae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fungal {beta}-N-acetylhexosaminidases are enzymes that are used in the chemoenzymatic synthesis of biologically interesting oligosaccharides. The enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae was produced and purified from its natural source and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Diffraction data from two crystal forms (primitive monoclinic and primitive tetragonal) were collected to resolutions of 3.2 and 2.4 {angstrom}, respectively. Electrophoretic and quantitative N-terminal protein-sequencing analyses confirmed that the crystals are formed by a complete biologically active enzyme consisting of a glycosylated catalytic unit and a noncovalently attached propeptide.

Vanek, Ondrej; Brynd, Jir; Hofbauerov, Katerina; Kukack, Zdenek; Pachl, Petr; Bezouska, Karel; Rezcov, Pavlna (Czech Academy)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Study of seed-borne fungi on oat seed produced in Saltillo, Mexico and College Station, Texas in 1961 and 1962  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The comparative oat. seed'lings (l) 1% live H. seed mixed wii sa" ivum o(2 kil sand. , (3) 1% k sand and (4) q oven dry stem and 'leaf weighis of from College Staiion-grown seed in sativum cultured o%%ut killed oai h quartz sand, (2) 1% ki'lied H. led... was calculated for each i est (20 3. Data ir elude total number and type of fungal colonies in the plates, number of germinated seeds out of 20 seeds per 2 plates, and average length of rootlers and coleopr iles. Data from the parho- genicity rests include...

De la Garza-Gonzalez, Jose Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trichoderma is a genus of common filamentous fungi that display a remarkable range of lifestyles and interactions with other fungi, animals and plants. Because of their ability to antagonize plant-pathogenic fungi and to stimulate plant growth and defence responses, some Trichoderma strains are used for biological control of plant diseases. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in molecular ecology and genomics which indicate that the interactions of Trichoderma spp. with animals and plants may have evolved as a result of saprotrophy on fungal biomass (mycotrophy) and various forms of parasitism on other fungi (mycoparasitism), combined with broad environmental opportunism.

Druzhinina, Irina S.; Seiboth, Verena Seidl; Estrella, Alfredo Herrera; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Kenerley, Charles M.; Monte, Enrique; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Zeilinger, Susanne; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kubicek, Christian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Complete genome sequence of the plant-associated Serratia plymuthica strain AS13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serratia plymuthica AS13 is a plant-associated Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of special interest because of its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The complete genome of S. plymuthica AS13 consists of a 5,442,549 bp circular chromosome. The chromosome contains 4,951 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced as part of the project enti- tled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Synthetic studies in nitrogen chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

N,N-Bis(benzotriazolylmethyl)arylamines were obtained quantitatively from mixtures of benzotriazole, formaldehyde and the corresponding arylamine in refluxing toluene with azeotropic removal of water. Treatment of these adducts with Grignard reagents or sodium borohydride afforded symmetrically substituted N,N-dialkylarylamines in high yields. Unsymmetrically substituted N,N-dialkylarylamines could also be obtained by similar stepwise procedures. Sterically hindered N,N-bis(sec-butyl)arylamines were prepared by alkylations of the anions of the corresponding arylamines with 2-iodobutane. Chlorosulfonation of 2-nitroanisole gave 4-methoxy-3-nitrobenzene-sulfon-yl chloride, which was converted with N-butyl-(3-phenylpropyl)-amine into the corresponding benzenesulfonamide. Hydrolysis of the methoxy group and reduction of the nitro substituent of this benzene-sulfonamide, followed by diazotization and coupling with 2-naphthol, afforded N-butyl-N-(3-phenylpropyl)-4-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)azobenzenesulfonamide. Medium-sized (7 and 8) benzosultams were synthesized by Friedel-Crafts cyclizations of w-phenylaklanesulfamoyl chlorides. New (benzotriazol-1-y)methyl derivatives of type Bt(1)CH[sub 2] X [Bt(1) = benzotriazol-1-yl] were prepared. [alpha]-(Benzotriazol-1-yl)acetophenone was converted to a number of interesting derivatives. Lithiation of 1-methylbenzotriazole followed by treatments with electrophiles gave various [alpha]-substituted 1-methylbenzotriazoles. Simple treatments of 2-alkylbenzotriazoles by LDA gave symmetrical [alpha],[beta]-bis-(benzotriazol-2-yl)alkanes sterospecifically as the [alpha],[alpha]-coupled products in high yields. A molecule [Bt(2)CH(CH[sub 3])CH(CH[sub 3])CH(CH[sub 3])CH(CH[sub 3])Bt(2)] [Bt(2) = benzotriazole-2-yl] with four asymmetric centers derived from four molecules of 2-ethylbenzotriazole was obtained as a single isomer. A new radical mechanism was first proposed to account for the chemistry of 2-alkylbenzotriazoles.

Wu, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

HARNESSING THE CHEMISTRY OF CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research program is broadly focused on activating CO{sub 2} through the use of organic and organometallic based catalysts. Some of our methods have centered on annulation reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons (and carbonyl substrates) to provide a diverse array of carbocycles and heterocycles. We use a combination of catalyst discovery and optimization in conjunction with classical physical organic chemistry to elucidate the key mechanistic features of the cycloaddition reactions such that the next big advances in catalyst development can be made. Key to all of our cycloaddition reactions is the use of a sterically hindered, electron donating N heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand, namely IPr (or SIPr), in conjunction with a low valent nickel pre-catalyst. The efficacy of this ligand is two-fold: (1) the high {delta}-donating ability of the NHC increases the nucleophilicity of the metal center which thereby facilitates interaction with the electrophilic carbonyl and (2) the steric hindrance prevents an otherwise competitive side reaction involving only the alkyne substrate. Such a system has allowed for the facile cycloaddition to prepare highly functionalized pyrones, pyridones, pyrans, as well as novel carbocycles. Importantly, all reactions proceed under extremely mild conditions (room temperature, atmospheric pressures, and short reaction times), require only catalytic amounts of Ni/NHC and readily available starting materials, and afford annulated products in excellent yields. Our current focus revolves around understanding the fundamental processes that govern these cycloadditions such that the next big advance in the cyclization chemistry of CO{sub 2} can be made. Concurrent to our annulation chemistry is our investigation of the potential for imidazolylidenes to function as thermally-actuated CO{sub 2} sequestering and delivery agents.

Louie, Janis

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

An electrocyclic strategy to poly(triarylmethyl radical) polymers: Potential organic ferromagnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent interest in organic ferromagnetism has been stimulated by the idea that large poly(triarylmethyl radical) polymers in which the radical centers are connected by [open quotes]meta[close quotes]-aryl groups may possess ferromagnetic properties. However, synthesis of these polyradicals has been limited by stepwise methods that are unsuitable for the preparation of large polymers. This limitation represents a primary challenge confronting the field. The authors have developed the first polymeric strategy to poly (m-triarylmethyl radical) precursors that involves an electrocyclic formation of the [open quotes]meta[close quotes]-substituted triarylmethyl chloride repeating unit from a polypropynol precursor. Poly[(E)-6-[beta]-chloroethenyl-1,3-phenylene-1-phenylpropynol-1,3-ylene] was prepared by palladium-catalyzed coupling of a bifunctional acetylene-aryl iodide monomer. The stable polymer reacted with thionyl chloride to form an unstable polychloroallene intermediate that underwent an electrocyclic conversion to the polyradical precursor, poly(1-chloro-2,7-naphthalenechlorobenzylidene). The reduced polyradicals exhibited properties of radical-radical coupling, and preparation of a second generation polymer that would overcome this problem has been initiated. The polymeric strategy was based on model studies that showed that (E)-3-(2-[beta]-chloroethenylphenyl)-1,1-diphenylpropynol, when converted to the corresponding chloroallene with thionyl chloride, underwent an electrocyclic conversion to [beta]-(1-chlornaphthyl)diphenylmethyl chloride. The strategy expanded upon the use of triarylpropynes as precursors to triarylmethyl chlorides, and extension of both approaches to higher analogs was demonstrated with dimeric systems. The electrocyclic processes were found to occur only for the trans-vinyl chlorides; the cis-isomers were found to undergo an alternative concerted cyclization to benzofluorene products.

Morelli, J.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE ON MITOCHONDRIA & CHLOROPLASTS, LUCCA, ITALY, JULY 11-16, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2010 GRC on Mitochondria & Chloroplasts will assemble an international group of molecular, structural and cellular biologists, biochemists and geneticists investigating a broad spectrum of fundamental problems related to the biology of these organelles in animal, plant and fungal cells. This field has witnessed an extraordinary expansion in recent years, fueled by the discovery of the role of mitochondria in human disease and ageing, and of the synergy of chloroplasts and mitochondria in energetic output, the identification of novel factors involved in organelle division, movement, signaling and acclimation to changing environmental conditions, and by the powerful tools of organelle proteomics. The 2010 GRC will highlight advances in the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of organelle biogenesis including regulation of genome structure, evolution and expression, organellar protein import, assembly and turnover of respiratory and photosynthetic complexes, bidirectional signaling between organelles and nucleus, organelle morphology and dynamics, and the integration of cellular metabolism. We will also explore progress in mechanisms of disease and ageing/ senescence in animals and plants. The organellar field has forged new fronts toward a global and comprehensive understanding of mitochondrial and chloroplast biology at the molecular level. Many of the molecules under study in model organisms are responsible for human diseases, providing significant impetus for a meeting that encourages interactions between mammalian, fungal and plant organellar biologists.

Alice Barkan

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Structures and Functions of Oligosaccharins: The Role of Endoglycanases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research proposed will investigate two projects that involve studies of the chemistry and biology of protein/protein and protein/carbohydrate interactions involved in host/pathogen interactions. Specifically, the projects involve (i) the interactions between fungal endopolygalacturonases and plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins and (ii) the interactions between fungal endoxylanases and plant arabinoxylans. During pathogenesis fungi secrete families of endoglycanases that fragment the cell wall polysaccharides of the plant host. The result of endoglycanase action on cell wall polysaccharides can include weakening of the wall, penetration of host cells by the pathogen, solubilization of carbohydrate nutrients, and formation of oligosaccharins (oligosaccharides with regulatory function) that can stimulate plant defenses. We have made significant advances during the last funding period to support the hypothesis that the outcome of attempted pathogenesis can be influenced by protein/protein and protein/carbohydrate interactions in the extracellular matrices of the host and pathogen. We plan to expand on those successes by further exploring the mechanism of action of the endoglycanases and their plant-derived inhibitors, the expression of the various members of the endoglycanase families at various stages of infection and their role in the release of oligosaccharins and in pathogenicity, as well as the role played by the polysaccharide substrates in both pathogenicity and endoglycanase-inhibitor interactions.

Bergmann, Carl W. [University of Georgia

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

Comparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulosic biomass is an abundant and underused substrate for biofuel production. The inability of many microbes to metabolize the pentose sugars abundant within hemicellulose creates specific challenges for microbial biofuel production from cellulosic material. Although engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use the pentose xylose, the fermentative capacity pales in comparison with glucose, limiting the economic feasibility of industrial fermentations. To better understand xylose utilization for subsequent microbial engineering, we sequenced the genomes of two xylose-fermenting, beetle-associated fungi, Spathaspora passalidarum and Candida tenuis. To identify genes involved in xylose metabolism, we applied a comparative genomic approach across 14 Ascomycete genomes, mapping phenotypes and genotypes onto the fungal phylogeny, and measured genomic expression across five Hemiascomycete species with different xylose-consumption phenotypes. This approach implicated many genes and processes involved in xylose assimilation. Several of these genes significantly improved xylose utilization when engineered into S. cerevisiae, demonstrating the power of comparative methods in rapidly identifying genes for biomass conversion while reflecting on fungal ecology.

Wohlbach, Dana J.; Kuo, Alan; Sato, Trey K.; Potts, Katlyn M.; Salamov, Asaf A.; LaButti, Kurt M.; Sun, Hui; Clum, Alicia; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Jin, Mingjie; Gunawan, Christa; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E.; Jeffries, Thomas W.; Zinkel, Robert; Barry, Kerrie W.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Gasch, Audrey P.

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Large scale solubilization of coal and bioconversion to utilizable energy. Quarterly technical progress report, September--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to develop a system for a large scale coal solubilization and its bioconversion to utilizable fuel, we plan to clone the genes encoding Neurospora protein that facilitate depolymerization of coal. We also plan to use desulfurizing bacteria to remove the sulfur in situ and use other microorganisms to convert biosolubilized coal into utilizable energy following an approach utilizing several microorganisms (Faison, 1991). In addition the product of coal solubilized by fungus will be characterized to determine their chemical nature and the mechanism of reaction catalyzed by fungal product during in vivo and in vitro solubilization by the fungus or purified fungal protein. The main objectives are: (1) Cloning of Neurospora gene for coal depolymerization protein controlling solubilization in different host cells, utilizing Neurospora plasmid and other vector(s); (2) (a) Development of a large scale electrophoretic separation of coal-drived products obtained after microbial solubilization; (b) Identification of the coal derived products obtained after biosolubilization by Neurospora cultures or obtained after Neurospora enzyme catalyzed reaction in in vitro by the wildtype and mutant enzymes; and (3) Bioconversion of coal-derived products into utilizable fuel.

Mishra, N.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation of pretreatment methods for lignocellulosic ethanol production from energy cane variety L 79-1002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Approximately half of the 80 billion tons of crop produced annually around the world remains as residue that could serve as a renewable resource to produce valuable products such as ethanol and butanol. Ethanol produced from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising renewable alternative to diminishing oil and gas liquid fuels. Sugarcane is an important industry in Louisiana. The recently released variety of energy cane has great potential to sustain a competitive sugarcane industry. It has been demonstrated that fuel-grade ethanol can be produced from post harvest sugarcane residue in the past, but optimized ethanol production was not achieved. Optimization of the fermentation process requires efficient pretreatment to release cellulose and hemicellulose from lignocellulosic complex of plant fiber. Determining optimal pretreatment techniques for fermentation is essential for the success of lignocellulosic ethanol production process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three pretreatment methods for the energy cane variety L 79-1002 for maximum lignocellulosic ethanol production. The pretreatments include alkaline pretreatment, dilute acid hydrolysis, and solid-state fungal pretreatment process using brown rot and white rot fungi. Pretreated biomass was enzymatically saccharified and subjected to fermentation using a recombinant Escherichia coli FBR5. The results revealed that all pretreatment processes produced ethanol. However, the best result was observed in dilute acid hydrolysis followed by alkaline pretreatment and solid-state fungal pretreatment.

V. Sri Harjati Suhardi; Bijeta Prasai; David Samaha; Raj Boopathy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fungal free enzymes and bacterial complexed cellulosomes deconstruct biomass using different physical mechanisms. Free enzymes, which typically contain a large proportion of GH7 cellobiohydrolase, diffuse throughout the substrate and hydrolyze primarily from the cellulose reducing end, resulting in 'sharpened' macrofibrils. In contrast, complexed cellulosomes contain a diverse array of carbohydrate binding modules and multiple catalytic specificities leading to delamination and physical peeling of the cellulose macrofibril structures. To investigate how cellulose structure contributes to recalcitrance, we compared the deconstruction of cellulose I, II, and III; using free and complexed enzyme systems. We also evaluated both systems on Clean Fractionation and alkaline pretreated biomass, which remove much of the lignin, to determine the impact on enzyme loading reduction. Free fungal enzymes demonstrated a swelling of the outer surface of the plant cell walls while removing localized disruptions, resulting in a smooth surface appearance. Cellulosomes produced cell wall surfaces with localized areas of disruption and little surface layer swelling. These studies contribute to the overall understanding of biomass recalcitrance and how combining different enzymatic paradigms may lead to the formulation of new enzyme cocktails to reduce the cost of producing sugars from plant cell wall carbohydrates.

Resch, M.; Donohoe, B.; Katahira, R.; Ashutosh, M.; Beckham, G.; Himmel, M.; Decker, S.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Novel Aryne Chemistry in Organic Synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arynes are among the most intensively studied systems in chemistry. However, many aspects of the chemistry of these reactive intermediates are not well understood yet and their use as reagents in synthetic organic chemistry has been somewhat limited, due to the harsh conditions needed to generate arynes and the often uncontrolled reactivity exhibited by these species. Recently, o-silylaryl triflates, which can generate the corresponding arynes under very mild reaction conditions, have been found very useful in organic synthesis. This thesis describes several novel and useful methodologies by employing arynes, which generate from o-silylaryl triflates, in organic synthesis. An efficient, reliable method for the N-arylation of amines, sulfonamides and carbamates, and the O-arylation of phenols and carboxylic acids is described in Chapter 1. Amines, sulfonamides, phenols, and carboxylic acids are good nucleophiles, which can react with arynes generated from a-silylaryl triflates to afford the corresponding N- and O-arylated products in very high yields. The regioselectivity of unsymmetrical arynes has also been studied. A lot of useful, functional groups can tolerate our reaction conditions. Carbazoles and dibenzofurans are important heteroaromatic compounds, which have a variety of biological activities. A variety of substituted carbazoles and dibenzofwans are readily prepared in good to excellent yields starting with the corresponding o-iodoanilines or o-iodophenols and o-silylaryl triflates by a treatment with CsF, followed by a Pd-catalyzed cyclization, which overall provides a one-pot, two-step process. By using this methodology, the carbazole alkaloid mukonine has been concisely synthesized in a very good yield. Insertion of an aryne into a {sigma}-bond between a nucleophile and an electrophile (Nu-E) should potentially be a very beneficial process from the standpoint of organic synthesis. A variety of substituted ketones and sulfoxides have been synthesized in good yields via the intermolecular C-N {sigma}-bond addition of amides and S-N {sigma}-bond addition of sulfinamides to arynes under mild reaction conditions. The indazole moiety is a frequently found subunit in drug substances with important biological activities. Indazole analogues have been readily synthesized under mild reaction conditions by the [3+2] cycloaddition of a variety of diazo compounds with o-silylaryl triflates in the presence of CsF or TBAF. Polycyclic aromatic and heteroaromatic hydrocarbons have been synthesized in high yields by two different processes involving the Pd-catalyzed annulation of arynes. Both processes appear to involve the catalytic, stepwise coupling of two very reactive substrates, an aryne and an organopalladium species, to generate excellent yields of cross-coupled products.

Zhijian Liu

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Cellulases: ambiguous nonhomologous enzymes in a genomic perspective  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cellulases: Cellulases: ambiguous nonhomologous enzymes in a genomic perspective Leonid O. Sukharnikov 1,2,4 , Brian J. Cantwell 1,4 , Mircea Podar 1,2,4 and Igor B. Zhulin 1,3,4,5 1 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 2 Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 3 Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 4 Graduate School of Genome Science and Technology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA 5 Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA The key material for bioethanol production is cellulose, which is one of the main components of the plant cell wall. Enzymatic depolymerization of cellulose is an essential step in bioethanol production, and can be accomplished by fungal and bacterial cellulases. Most

389

Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Aspergillus is not only one of the most important fungi for use in biotechnology it is also one of the most commonly found groups of fungi worldwide. This project seeks to sequence and annotate a series of additional Aspergillus species and Penicillium roqueforti to complement and strengthen the genomic data currently available for comparative studies. The data resulting from these species comparisonswill be of direct relevance to the DOE mission, particularly to howspecies have become adapted for utilization of specific carbon sources enabling efficientbiomass degradation. Principal Investigators: Ronald de Vries, CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli

390

JGI - Why Sequence Poplar Leaf Rust?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Poplar Leaf Rust? Poplar Leaf Rust? The Populus (poplar tree) genome has been publicly released by the JGI, and the genomes of its symbiotic fungal associates Laccaria bicolor and Glomus intraradices are near completion. As part of the development of a broader community-based Populus genomics resource, and as a means of conducting informative comparative genomics among fungi, JGI will be sequencing Melampsora larici-populina (poplar leaf rust fungus), which causes widespread economic losses in poplar plantations worldwide and is a close relative of other economically important rusts (Uredinales), including Puccinia and other cereal rusts. There is a pressing need to develop a thorough understanding of the Melampsora species that are poplar pathogens so that new control approaches

391

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

392

DOE JGI CSP 2012 PI Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agenda Agenda Monday, January 23 8:15am Shuttle bus departs from the Walnut Creek Marriott 8:30 Sign In and Continental Breakfast at JGI 9:00-9:15 Introductions, Workshop Overview and Goals Metagenome Program overview Susannah Tringe 9:15-9:30 JGI Prokaryotic Super Program Overview Nikos Kyrpides 9:30-9:45 JGI Microbial Program Overview Tanja Woyke 9:45-10:00 JGI Fungal Program Overview Igor Grigoriev 10:00-10:15 JGI Sequencing Technologies Feng Chen 10:15-10:30 Questions 10:30-10:45 Break 10:45-11:15 Rhizosphere Grand Challenge and CSP2012 Plant-Microbe interactions projects Susannah Tringe 11:15-11:35 CSP2012: Plant associated metagenomes--Microbial community diversity and host control of community assembly across model and emerging plant ecological genomics systems Jeff Dangl

393

The Annual DOE JGI User Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Workshops 1 Workshops IMG Workshop Date: Monday, March 21 Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Location: Walnut Creek Marriott Audience: Users and potential users of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) data analysis systems. Description: 1-day workshop with hands-on tutorials on IMG. IMG-Metagenomes Workshop Date: Tuesday, March 22 Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Location: Walnut Creek Marriott Audience: Users and potential users of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) with Microbiome Samples (IMG/M) data analysis system. Description: half day workshop with hands-on tutorials on IMG/M. Mycocosm Workshop Date: Tuesday, March 22 Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Location: Walnut Creek Marriott Audience: Users and potential users of the Mycocosm fungal genomics portal. Description: The JGI Mycocosm web-portal provides data access,

394

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z D'haeseleer, Patrik (Patrik D'haeseleer) - Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dabiri, John O. (John O. Dabiri) - Department of Aerospace, California Institute of Technology Dai, Yang (Yang Dai) - Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago Dal Palù, Alessandro (Alessandro Dal Palù) - Dipartimento di Matematica, Università degli Studi di Parma Dalkilic, Mehmet (Mehmet Dalkilic) - Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics & School of Informatics, Indiana University Daub, Margaret (Margaret Daub) - Center for Integrated Fungal Research & Department of Plant Biology, North Carolina State University Daugulis, Andrew J. (Andrew J. Daugulis) - Department of Chemical

395

Why sequence Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus? Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus? The term Pisolithus is derived from Greek, where piso means pea-shaped and lithos means stone. The fungal species under this category get their name from the pea-shaped spore capsules that break down to disperse spores, and thrive in temperate regions as well as in less-than-ideal conditions such as high levels of heavy metals, highly acidic soils and drought. They form associations with a wide range of woody plants, including trees, which act as carbon sinks and could be feedstocks for cellulosic biofuels. Interactions with mycorrhizal fungi help trees access scarce nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphate. By sequencing the genomes of fungi related to others previously sequenced by the DOE JGI, researchers hope to better understand the symbiosis

396

The Annual DOE JGI User Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genomics of Energy & Environment Genomics of Energy & Environment The annual DOE JGI User Meeting March 18 - 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, California Register now for the Meeting and Workshops Register Topics include: Microbial genomics, fungal genomics, metagenomics, and plant genomics; genome editing, natural products, pathway engineering, synthetic biology, high-throughput functional genomics, and societal impact of technological advances. State-of-the-art presentations by invited speakers as well as short talks selected from poster abstracts. In addition, tutorials on genomic informatics, data management, and new genomic technologies. Keynotes: Annalee Newitz, io9 Steve Quake, Stanford University Other confirmed speakers: Martin Ackermann, ETH Zurich Luke Alphey, Oxitec Mary Berbee, University of British Columbia

397

Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization Characterization of the Rust Fungus, Puccinia emaculata, and Evaluation of Genetic Variability for Rust Resistance in Switchgrass Populations Srinivasa Rao Uppalapati & Desalegn D. Serba & Yasuhiro Ishiga & Les J. Szabo & Shipra Mittal & Hem S. Bhandari & Joseph H. Bouton & Kirankumar S. Mysore & Malay C. Saha # The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Several fungal pathogens have been identified on ornamental and native stands of switchgrass (Panicum virga- tum L.). Diseases of switchgrass, particularly rust, have been largely neglected and are likely to become the major limiting factor to biomass yield and quality, especially when monocul- tured over a large acreage. Based on teliospore morphology and internal transcribed spacer-based diagnostic primers, the rust pathogen collected

398

Why Sequence Paxillus involutus?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paxillus involutus? Paxillus involutus? More than 75% of the carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is stored in forests. More than half of this carbon is found in soil organic matter (SOM). Recent studies have indicated that ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi provide the dominant pathway through which carbon enters the SOM pool. The same fungi also drive the cycling of other nutrients within the forest community (microbiome) together with other soil microorganisms. Global climate changes as well as increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition are compelling reasons to study in detail how EM fungi and associated microflora mediate carbon as well as nitrogen cycling and deposition in terrestrial ecosystems. Likewise, EM fungi are known to protect plants from toxic metals. So, the development of metal-tolerant fungal associations would provide a strategy

399

U.S Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S Department of Energy S Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute Progress Report 2009 Representatives of the four DOE JGI genome programs (plant, fungal, metagenome, and microbe) grace the cover of this annual report. Three of the organisms were among the 81 projects selected in 2009 for the 2010 Community Sequencing Program portfolio. Photo credits, clockwise from bottom left: Brachypodium distachyon by Roy Kaltschmidt, LBNL; Amanita thiersii fungus by Joe McFarland; Cow rumen metagenome by Gemma Henderson, AgResearch; Soybeans by Roy Kaltschmidt, LBNL; Zymomonas mobilis Z4 by Katherine Pappas, University of Athens U.S Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute Progress Report 2009 DOE JGI Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Director's

400

Why Sequence Bacillus coagulans?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bacillus coagulans? Bacillus coagulans? Bacilus coagulans strain 36D1 and its close relatives are ideal biocatalysts for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. This bacterium is an acidophile and a moderate thermophile (grows at pH 5.0 and at 55°C). These characteristics are similar to the optimal conditions for the activity of fungal cellulases, which have been developed with significant support from DOE for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to useful products (fuel ethanol, lactic acid, etc.). The optimal growth conditions for the biocatalysts currently used by industry for production of ethanol or lactic acid significantly differ from the optimal conditions for cellulase activity. This mismatch leads to higher usage of expensive cellulases than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

JGI - CSP Sequencing Plans for 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Program Science Program Sequencing Plans for 2014 Proposer Affiliation Project Description Banfield, Jillian UC Berkeley, LBNL Community metagenomic and transcriptomic analyses of microbial carbon turnover in grassland soil profiles under two rainfall regimes Bonito, Gregory Duke University Comparative genomics of early diverging terrestrial fungi and their bacterial endosymbionts Brem, Rachel UC Berkeley Pioneering fungal mutagenesis using Tn-seq Brutnell, Thomas Donald Danforth Plant Science Center Doubling the number of Panicoideae genome sequences Canovas, David University of Seville, Spain Global genomic consequences of the deletion of the Aspergilli non-homologous end joining DNA repair mechanism employed as a genetic tool worldwide Chen, Jay Oak Ridge National Laboratory RNA-seq-Enabled Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) in Populus

402

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

403

Some factors in the control of the southern blight organism, Sclerotium rolfsii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 8 ~NH4)iQ q (4000-24 ~ 005ppa j Vu4 03 (4ik0 24, 0Apps) (~8. ) 0 (4000~5, %0IIpa) xe&02 (: 0, ) {20 400ppa) CaCyq ("u, ' (500-800'0ppa) fungal mats were then removed, washed iree of surplus nutri- ent solution and drie4 at 70 Oentigrade... Ho Growth 1. 23 le 32 2e12 1 ~ 99 2 )l 2, 45 0, 25 Total Treataent Total Treatment 40, 0QQ ppa vs reaain8er Bala nee , wa1 sis gf Variance F for si8nifieonoe e, eZ Gn el' ~ 0 ~ Ql 4 . eros t Qluooae 0. 09 0. 03 0. 015 3. 00 3. 88...

Johnson, Samuel Park

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

Process for producing ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for producing ethanol from raw materials containing a high dry solid mash level having fermentable sugars or constituents which can be converted into sugars, comprising the steps of: (a) liquefaction of the raw materials in the presence of an alpha amylase to obtain liquefied mash; (b) saccharification of the liquefied mash in the presence of a glucoamylase to obtain hydrolysed starch and sugars; (c) fermentation of the hydrolysed starch and sugars by yeast to obtain ethanol; and (d) recovering the obtained ethanol, wherein an acid fungal protease is introduced to the liquefied mash during the saccharification and/or to the hydrolysed starch and sugars during the fermentation, thereby increasing the rate of production of ethanol as compared to a substantially similar process conducted without the introduction of the protease.

Lantero, O.J.; Fish, J.J.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Catalytic Machinery of a Key Enzyme in Amino Acid Biosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is essential for all microbial life but is absent in mammals. Characterizing the enzyme-catalyzed reactions in this pathway can identify new protein targets for the development of antibiotics with unique modes of action. The enzyme aspartate {beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) catalyzes an early branch point reaction in the aspartate pathway. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural studies of ASADH from various microbial species have been used to elucidate mechanistic details and to identify essential amino acids involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and enzyme regulation. Important structural and functional differences have been found between ASADHs isolated from these bacterial and fungal organisms, opening the possibility for developing species-specific antimicrobial agents that target this family of enzymes.

Viola, Ronald E.; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Blanco, Julio; Moore, Roger A.; Liu, Xuying; Arachea, Buenafe T.; Pavlovsky, Alexander G. (Toledo); (Yale); (Cold Spring); (NIH)

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fiebig, Anne [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Citrus essential oils and their influence on the anaerobic digestion process: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Citrus waste accounts for more than half of the whole fruit when processed for juice extraction. Among valorisation possibilities, anaerobic digestion for methane generation appears to be the most technically feasible and environmentally friendly alternative. However, citrus essential oils can inhibit this biological process. In this paper, the characteristics of citrus essential oils, as well as the mechanisms of their antimicrobial effects and potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed. Previous studies of anaerobic digestion of citrus waste under different conditions are presented; however, some controversy exists regarding the limiting dosage of limonene for a stable process (24192mg of citrus essential oil per liter of digester and day). Successful strategies to avoid process inhibition by citrus essential oils are based either on recovery or removal of the limonene, by extraction or fungal pre-treatment respectively.

B. Ruiz; X. Flotats

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Development of a commercial enzymes system for lignocellulosic biomass saccharification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DSM Innovation Inc., in its four year effort was able to evaluate and develop its in-house DSM fungal cellulolytic enzymes system to reach enzyme efficiency mandates set by DoE Biomass program MYPP goals. DSM enzyme cocktail is uniquely active at high temperature and acidic pH, offering many benefits and product differentiation in 2G bioethanol production. Under this project, strain and process development, ratio optimization of enzymes, protein and genetic engineering has led to multitudes of improvement in productivity and efficiency making development of a commercial enzyme system for lignocellulosic biomass saccharification viable. DSM is continuing further improvement by additional biodiversity screening, protein engineering and overexpression of enzymes to continue to further lower the cost of enzymes for saccharification of biomass.

Manoj Kumar

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

Summit-Watertown transmission line project, South Dakota. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) needs to rebuild the existing Summit-Watertown 115-kV transmission line, located in northeastern South Dakota, and western Minnesota. Nearly 60 percent of the existing facility was replaced in 1965 after severe ice-loading broke structures and wires. Because of the extensive loss of the line, surplus poles had to be used to replace the damaged H-frame structures. These were of varying sizes, causing improper structure loading. Additionally, the conductors and overhead shield wires have been spliced in numerous places. This provides additional space on these wires for icing and wind resistance, which in turn create problems for reliability. Finally, a progressive fungal condition has weakened the poles and, along with the improper loading, has created an unsafe condition for maintenance personnel and the general public.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

MINI-REVIEW Processive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processive Processive and nonprocessive cellulases for biofuel production-lessons from bacterial genomes and structural analysis David B. Wilson Received: 23 September 2011 / Revised: 18 October 2011 / Accepted: 1 November 2011 / Published online: 24 November 2011 # Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract Cellulases are key enzymes used in many processes for producing liquid fuels from biomass. Cur- rently there many efforts to reduce the cost of cellulases using both structural approaches to improve the properties of individual cellulases and genomic approaches to identify new cellulases as well as other proteins that increase the activity of cellulases in degrading pretreated biomass materials. Fungal GH-61 proteins are important new enzymes that increase the activity of current commercial cellulases leading to lower total protein loading and thus lower cost. Recent work has greatly increased

411

Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in their active sites that help explain the variations in their respective substrate specificities.

Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (UCSF)

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

412

Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

413

Neutron Reflectometry and QCM-D Study of the Interaction of Cellulase Enzymes with Films of Amorphous Cellulose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) of the interaction of a commercial fungal enzyme extract (T. viride), two purified endoglucanses from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima), and a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens) with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nm resolution, while QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. At 20 oC and 0.3 mg/ml, the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, beginning from the surface followed by activity throughout the bulk of the film. For similar conditions, Cel9A and Cel5A were active for only a short period of time and only at the surface of the film, with Cel9A releasing 40 from the ~ 700 film and Cel5A resulting in only a slight roughening/swelling effect at the surface. Subsequent elevation of the temperature to the Topt in each case resulted in a very limited increase in activity, corresponding to the loss of an additional 60 from the film for Cel9A and 20 from the film for Cel5A, and very weak penetration into and digestion within the bulk of the film, before the activity again ceased. The results for Cel9A and Cel5A contrast sharply with results for Cel45A where very rapid and extensive penetration and digestion within the bulk of the film was observed at 20 C. We speculate that the large differences are due to the use of the thermophilic enzymes far below their optimal temperatures and also the presence of a cellulose binding module (CBM) on Cel45A while the thermophilic enzymes lack a CBM.

Halbert, Candice E [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Kent, Michael S [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jaclyn, Murton K [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Browning, Jim [ORNL; Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Liu, Zelin [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Majewski, Jaroslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Supratim, Datta [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Michael, Jablin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bulent, Akgun [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Alan, Esker [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Simmons, Blake [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Urine definition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

definition definition Name: durwood Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What material is urine composed of? Replies: Urine is normally composed of water and wasted products filtered form the body. The kidney produces urine. The other main function of the kidney is to regulate fluid balance in the body. It performs this function by using a selective osmosis system. Basically, the way it works is that electrolytes (dissolved salts like sodium, potassium, calcium, carbonate, chloride) are pumped back into or out of urine and blood so that in the end, just the right amounts of electrolyte and water exit the kidney blood vein. The rest ends up in urine. Interestingly, normal urine is sterile and has no bacteria. psych Urine contains 95% water and 5% solids. More than 1000 different mineral salts and compounds are estimated to be in urine. So far, our scientific community knows of about 200 elements. Some substances are: vitamins, amino acids, antibodies, enzymes, hormones, antigens, interleukins, proteins, immunoglobulins, gastric secretory depressants, tolergens, immunogens, uric acid, urea, proteoses, directin, H-11 (a growth inhibitory factor in human cancer), and urokinase. Believe it or not, scientists have know for years that urine is antibacterial, anti-protozoal, anti-fungal, anti- viral, and anti-tuberculostatic!

415

Microbial degradation of n-alkyl tetrahydrothiophenes found in petroleum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although n-alkyl-substituted tetrahydrothiophenes are found in nonbiodegraded petroleums, they are not found in petroleums which have undergone biodegradation in their reservoirs. These observations suggested that this group of compounds with alkyl chain lengths from approximately C/sub 10/ to at least C/sub 30/ is biodegradable. Two of these sulfides, 2-n-dodecyltetrahydrothiophene (DTHT) and 2-n-undecyltetrahydrothiophene, were synthesized, and their biodegradabilities were tested by using five gram-positive, n-alkane-degrading bacterial isolates. The alkyl side chains of these compounds were oxidized, and the major intermediates found in 2-n-undecyltetrahydrothiophene- and DTHT-metabolizing cultures were 2-tetrahydrothiophenecarboxylic acid (THTC) and 2-tetrahydrothiopheneacetic acid (THTA), respectively. Four n-alkane-degrading fungi were also shown to degrade DTHT, yielding both THTA and THTC. Quantitation of tetrahydrothiophene ring-containing products in 28-day-old bacterial and fungal cultures suggested that THTC and THTA were metabolized further to unidentified products. In addition, two of the bacterial isolates were shown to degrade a mixture of n-alkyl tetrahydrothiophenes isolated from Bellshill Lake crude oil.

Fedorak, P.M.; Payzant, J.D.; Montgomery, D.S.; Westlake, D.W.S.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Health-hazard evaluation report No. MHETA 88-249-1931, Community Savings Association, Finleyville, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Finleyville Branch of the Community Savings Association (SIC-6036), located in Finleyville, Pennsylvania. Employees had been sensitized to a fungus and were experiencing nausea, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, and difficulty in breathing even after action to control the fungus had been taken. The first allergic reaction was noted in October of 1986 with four more cases developing by December 5 of that same year. During early February of 1987 the wall in the storeroom was scraped, cleaned, and painted with a fungal-resistant paint. On March 16 the office was closed early due to three full-time employees suffering the aforementioned symptoms plus dermatological symptoms of an allergic reaction. Additional control efforts were likewise unsuccessful. Analysis indicated that exposure to microorganisms and an inadequate supply of fresh air were likely the causes of the symptoms experienced by these workers. The authors recommend that the ventilation, heating, and air conditioning unit be operated according to ASHRAE standards; that the storeroom wall be maintained free of microbial growth and that files in open boxes be cleaned and placed in enclosed cabinets, and humidity be adjusted.

Sanderson, W.T.; Costa, C.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Improvements In Ethanologenic Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella Oxytoca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current Verenium cellulosic ethanol process is based on the dilute-acid pretreatment of a biomass feedstock, followed by a two-stage fermentation of the pentose sugar-containing hydrolysate by a genetically modified ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain and a separate simultaneous saccharification-fermentation (SSF) of the cellulosic fraction by a genetically modified ethanologenic Klebsiella oxytoca strain and a fungal enzyme cocktail. In order to reduce unit operations and produce a fermentation beer with higher ethanol concentrations to reduce distillation costs, we have proposed to develop a simultaneous saccharification co-fermentation (SScF) process, where the fermentation of the pentose-containing hydrolysate and cellulosic fraction occurs within the same fermentation vessel. In order to accomplish this goal, improvements in the ethanologens must be made to address a number of issues that arise, including improved hydrolysate tolerance, co-fermentation of the pentose and hexose sugars and increased ethanol tolerance. Using a variety of approaches, including transcriptomics, strain adaptation, metagenomics and directed evolution, this work describes the efforts of a team of scientists from Verenium, University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Genomatica to improve the E. coli and K. oxytoca ethanologens to meet these requirements.

Dr. David Nunn

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Kinetic studies of amylase and biomass production by Calvatia gigantea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of alpha-amylase (alpha-4, glucan 4-glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1) by microorganisms has been practiced for many years in small and large scale operations and the literature on this enzyme is voluminous. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae have been reported as the main fungal species used for commercial production of the enzyme. On the other hand, large volumes of low-cost agricultural products such as acorn (the perisperm-free dry seed contains approximately 60% starch) are wasted in many countries and provide a challenge to biotechnology to efficiently utilize these rich sources of starch for the production of high added value products like enzymes. C. gigantea is an edible puffball excreting high levels of alpha-amylase when cultivated on different sources of starch containing elevated quantities of toxic tannic compounds. This fungus has been employed for the production of microbial protein from wastes and acorns containing high levels of toxic tannic compounds. The same fungus was also reported to grow on both hydrolyzable and condensed tannins as sole carbon sources. The present work was undertaken to investigate certain kinetic characteristics of alpha-amylase and biomass production by C. gigantea grown on soluble and acorn starch in a lab fermenter. (Refs. 18).

Kekos, D.; Macris, B.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effects of brewers` condensed solubles (BCS) on the production of ethanol from low-grade starch materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yeast fermentation was performed on grain and bakery byproducts with and without adding the same volume of brewers` condensed solubles (BCS). Starch material in the grain and bakery byproducts effectively was converted to fermentable sugars with conversion ratios of 93-97% by successive treatments of samples with bacterial {alpha}-amylase and fungal glucoamylase. The yeast fermentation of these enzyme-digested byproducts alone showed that ethanol concentrations of 16.4-42.7 mL/100 g dry solid in the broth were achieved with fermentation efficiencies of 87-96%. Addition of BCS to the grain byproducts increased ethanol concentration by 10-86% by increasing the potential glucose content of the broth. The rates of fermentation measured by CO{sub 2} gas production demonstrated that BCS addition to bakery byproducts reduced the fermentation time from 62-72 h to 34-35 h. In bakery byproducts that were low in amino nitrogen, exhaustion of nitrogenous compounds in substrates was found to be a limiting factor for yeast growth. Because BCS is a rich source of nitrogen, adding BCS to these substrates markedly increased the fermentation rate. 15 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Choi, C.H.; Chung, D.S.; Seib, P.A. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)] [and others

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Continuous bioconversion of starch to ethanol by calcium-alginate immobilized enzymes and yeasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous bioconversion of starch to EtOH by immobilized enzymes and yeasts was studied. Commercial corn starch (10%) was 1st batch-liquefied with bacterial alpha-amylase. In continuous-flow systems, liquefied starch was then converted to glucose with Ca alginate-entrapped fungal glucoamylase, and the resulting glucose was fermented to EtOH by Ca alginate-entrapped active dry yeast. The continuous-flow saccharification-fermentation processes were performed in either 2-stage (sequential) or single-stage (simultaneous) operations. In the single-stage operation, immobilized glucoamylase produced glucose from liquefied starch continuously for 11 days. In the simultaneous saccharification technique using immobilized glucoamylase and yeast mixture in a single-stage column, EtOH production was 69% of theoretical for 5 days. In the 2-stage operation, in which immobilized glucoamylase and yeast were contained in separate columns connected in tandem, EtOH production averaged 97% of theoretical for 5 days. The overall alcoholic production efficiency was significantly greater in the 2-stage system than in the single-stage system.

McGhee, J.E.; Carr, M.E.; St. Julian, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mould incidence and mycotoxin contamination in maize kernels from Swat Valley, North West Frontier Province of Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mould incidence and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination as well as proximate composition and minerals content of maize kernels from Swat Valley, North West Frontier Province of Pakistan was studied during the year, 2007. Results indicated that the mean moisture content of the kernels was within the recommended safe storage levels of ?15%. Across the whole valley, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium and Rhizopus were the most predominant fungal genera identified and amongst the mycotoxigenic species, Aspergillus flavus had the highest incidence. AFB1 content ranged from none to 30.92?g/kg with the average values of 14.94 and 16.22?g/kg for Upper and Lower Swat regions, respectively. Similar trend was observed for OTA with the contamination level ranged from Valley may be exposed to the danger of aflatoxins and ochratoxins poisoning. Thus, there is a need for policy makers to establish and enforce maize quality standards and regulations related to moulds and mycotoxins across the area.

Hamid Ullah Shah; Thomas J. Simpson; Sahib Alam; Khanzadi Fatima Khattak; Sajida Perveen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

Michelle Momany

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

423

Metabolic engineering of seeds can achieve levels of omega-7 fatty acids comparable to the highest levels found in natural plant sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plant oils containing {omega}-7 fatty acids (FAs; palmitoleic 16:1{Delta}{sup 9} and cis-vaccenic 18:1{Delta}{sup 11}) have potential as sustainable feedstocks for producing industrially important octene via metathesis chemistry. Engineering plants to produce seeds that accumulate high levels of any unusual FA has been an elusive goal. We achieved high levels of {omega}-7 FA accumulation by systematic metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). A plastidial 16:0-ACP desaturase has been engineered to convert 16:0 to 16:1{Delta}{sup 9} with specificity >100-fold than that of naturally occurring paralogs, such as that from cat's claw vine (Doxantha unguis-cati). Expressing this engineered enzyme (Com25) in seeds increased {omega}-7 FA accumulation from <2% to 14%. Reducing competition for 16:0-ACP by down-regulating the {beta}-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II 16:0 elongase further increased accumulation of {omega}-7 FA to 56%. The level of 16:0 exiting the plastid without desaturation also increased to 21%. Coexpression of a pair of fungal 16:0 desaturases in the cytosol reduced the 16:0 level to 11% and increased {omega}-7 FA to as much as 71%, equivalent to levels found in Doxantha seeds.

Nguyen, H.T.; Shanklin, J.; Mishra, G.; Whittle, E.; Bevan, S. A.; Merlo, A. O.; Walsh, T. A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Old-field Community, Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are in the process of finishing a number of laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse projects, analyzing data, and writing papers. The projects reported addressed these subjects: How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground plant biomass and community structure; Effects of multiple climate changes factors on plant community composition and diversity: what did we learn from a 5-year open-top chamber experiment using constructed old-field communities; Do atmospheric and climatic change factors interact to alter woody seedling emergence, establishment and productivity; Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature in importance as a control on soil carbon dynamics; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground root and fungal biomass; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter soil microarthropod and microbial communities; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground microbial function; Linking root litter diversity and microbial functioning at a micro scale under current and projected CO{sub 2} concentrations; Multifactor climate change effects on soil ecosystem functioning depend on concurrent changes in plant community composition; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground insect populations; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter festuca endophyte infection; How do climate and atmospheric changes soil carbon stabilization.

Aimee Classen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Physiological, toxicological, and population responses of smallmouth bass to acidification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lake Acidification and Fisheries (LAF) project examined effects of acidic water chemistries on four fish species. This report presents an overview of investigations on smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui). Experiments conducted with this species included as many as 84 exposure combinations of acid, aluminum, and low calcium. In egg, fry, and juvenile stages of smallmouth bass, increased acid and aluminum concentrations increased mortality and decreased growth, while increased calcium concentrations often improved survival. Relative to the juvenile life stages of smallmouth bass tested, yolksac and swim-up fry were clearly more sensitive to stressful exposure conditions. While eggs appeared to be the most sensitive life stage, this conclusion was compromised by heavy mortalities of eggs due to fungal infestations during experimental exposures. As found in our earlier studies with brook and rainbow trout, acid-aluminum stressed smallmouth bass exhibited net losses of electrolytes across gills and increased accumulation of aluminum on gill tissues. Overall, our results indicated that smallmouth bass were generally more sensitive to increased exposure concentrations of aluminum than to increased acidities. Compared to toxicology results from earlier LAF project studies, smallmouth bass were more sensitive than brook trout and slightly less sensitive than rainbow trout when exposed to water quality conditions associated with acidification.An example application of the LAF modeling framework shows how different liming scenarios can improve survival probabilities for smallmouth bass in a set of lakes sensitive to acidification.

Marcus, M.D.; Gulley, D.D. (eds.); Christensen, S.W.; McDonald, D.G.; Van Winkle, W.; Mount, D.R.; Wood, C.M.; Bergman, H.L. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

Simo Sarkanen

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

427

Biotechnology and genetic optimization of fast-growing hardwoods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A biotechnology research program was initiated to develop new clones of fast-growing Populus clones resistant to the herbicide glyphosate and resistant to the leaf-spot and canker disease caused by the fungus Septoria musiva. Glyphosate-resistant callus was selected from stem segments cultured in vitro on media supplemented with the herbicide. Plants were regenerated from the glyphosate-resistant callus tissue. A portion of plants reverted to a glyphosate susceptible phenotype during organogenesis. A biologically active filtrate was prepared from S. musiva and influenced fresh weight of Populus callus tissue. Disease-resistant plants were produced through somaclonal variation when shoots developed on stem internodes cultured in vitro. Plantlets were screened for disease symptoms after spraying with a suspension of fungal spores. A frequency of 0.83 percent variant production was observed. Genetically engineered plants were produced after treatment of plant tissue with Agrobacterium tumefasciens strains carrying plasmid genes for antibiotic resistance. Transformers were selected on media enriched with the antibiotic, kanamycin. Presence of foreign DNA was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Protoplasts of popular were produced but did not regenerate into plant organs. 145 refs., 12 figs., 36 tabs.

Garton, S.; Syrkin-Wurtele, E.; Griffiths, H.; Schell, J.; Van Camp, L.; Bulka, K. (NPI, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electron microprobe and X-ray microfluorescence analyses of copper binding to active and inactivated cells of Mucor rouxii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron microprobe and x-ray microfluorescence spectroscopies have been used to study copper binding to active and inactivated Mucor rouxii copper-sensitive and copper-tolerant cells. A better understanding of metal resistance may help in the application of fungal biomass for the treatment of metal-contaminated water, and also in enrichment or recycling of valuable metals. After repeated culturing in progressively higher concentrations of copper sulfate, a copper-tolerant Mucor rouxii strain was obtained. The copper-tolerant strain differed from the sensitive parental strain in both shape and size. Copper binding studies using a laboratory batch technique revealed that the copper-tolerant strain cultured at higher copper levels bound large amounts of this metal. Electron microprobe and x-ray microfluorescence analyses showed that the copper characteristic x-ray signal on the cell surface of the copper-tolerant strain after copper binding was higher than the copper signal in sensitive cells. The copper signal in cross sections of the copper-tolerant cells also showed a statistically significant correlation with the sulfur signal but no correlation with the phosphorus signal. These results suggest that there are several mechanisms for metal detoxification inside and outside of the Mucor rouxii cells and that copper may be binding to sulfur-containing groups.

Cano-Aguilera, I.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Pingitore, N.E. Jr.; Webb, R. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nanoparticle and polysaccharide conjugate: A potential candidate vaccine to improve immunological stimuli  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Active polysaccharides isolated from various fungal sources have been implicated to stimulate immune response against various pathogens as well as self anomalies such as cancer. Therefore, the nuanced approach presented in our work was to blend polysaccharides derived from Pleurotus ostreatus with biocompatible ferrite nanoparticles and thereafter investigate the enhanced immune functionality of the polysaccharidenanoparticle composite. A Schiff base reductive amination reaction occurred between the aldehyde group of the polysaccharide and the amine group of the nanoparticles in the presence of a strong reducing agent such as sodium cyanoborohydride to form a stable amide bond between the two conjugating molecules. The multifaceted conjugate was characterized by physiochemical techniques such as electron microscopy, FTIR, VSM and DLS measurements. This particulate form of the polysaccharide showed a marked escalation in the production of free radicals such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in murine macrophages as compared to the soluble form. Animal based experiments demonstrated a reduction in tumor volume and augmentation in the proliferation of splenocytes in particulate or conjugated polysaccharide treated mice. Furthermore, molecular signaling studies showed a high upregulation in p-p38 and p-MEK molecules in particulate polysaccharide treated RAW264.7 cells suggesting a cellular downstream mechanistic regulation behind the immunostimulative response.

K. Sanjana P. Devi; Banalata Sahoo; Birendra Behera; Tapas K. Maiti

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Evaluation of HVAC filters as a sampling mechanism for indoor microbial communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HVAC filters are in place for extended periods of time and can serve as integrated air samplers. This paper presents a comparison of bacterial and fungal concentrations and communities in HVAC filter dust and other sampling locations in occupied residences and in the unoccupied \\{UTest\\} House. A DNA-based, culture-independent approach was utilized to characterize the microbial communities. Microbial concentrations and communities in HVAC filter dust samples were not statistically different from those in high surface dust samples in occupied homes. Despite the general similarity in the communities, Proteobacteria were present in greater proportion in HVAC filter dust samples than in surface dust samples suggesting the air origin of this phylum. Gram-positive bacteria were present in greater proportion in occupied residences than in an unoccupied test house, confirming the potential association of this group with occupants. HVAC filter microbial communities were not different from those present in a composited month-long indoor air sample providing preliminary evidence that filters could be a viable option for long-term investigation of airborne biological contaminants.

Federico Noris; Jeffrey A. Siegel; Kerry A. Kinney

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chapter 29 - Biofuel Conversion Pathways Service Learning Projects and Case Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter presents the biofuel conversion pathways related service learning projects undertaken by students in a northeastern region of United States over many years as part of the Bioenergy Program1. The students experiences are described. Particularly three different case studies are presented authored by the respective students who successfully completed their projects. The first case study, biodiesel project: an educational experience converting waste cooking oil to biodiesel, started the project with these objectives: define the chemical process required to convert waste cooking oil into usable biodiesel; develop a standardized local procedure to convert waste cooking oil into biodiesel; design a machine that will implement the procedure; developed a method to evaluate the quality of the biodiesel produced; and develop a plan to utilize the waste product of biodiesel (glycerol) in a sustainable manner. The second case study, Use of Magnetite for Enhanced Harvesting of Wastewater Biogas Feedstock, was done in partnership with a municipal wastewater treatment plant producing biogas. The third case study, feasibility of the Fungal Breakdown of Lignocellulosic Biomass based on interviews with three established companies as case studies for analysis, developed a concept pilot system and explored its commercialization. Similar projects can be undertaken in any location in partnership with the local solid biofuel-based businesses, farms and communities.

Anju Dahiya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Electric field as pretreatment to enhance the activity of a whole-cell biocatalyst for hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a method using two successive cultures, solid then liquid, for the production and use of a hydrocarbon degrading biocatalyst (BC) is proposed. Hexadecane (HXD) was used as a model hydrocarbon. An electric field was applied during the solid state culture (SSC) as a novel approach, denoted the electric field pretreatment, to enhance the HXD degrading activity. Afterward, the catalytic activity (CA) was determined in liquid culture. The CA of the biocatalyst pretreated and untreated was evaluated, discriminating between sorption capacity and HXD degradation rate; biomass production on the electric field pretreated biocatalyst was only 20% of that on the untreated biocatalyst, but the maximum biocatalyst sorption capacity was enhanced from 11941mg (gBC)?1 to 20723mg (gBC)?1 by the effect of the electric field pretreatment. The activity of the biocatalyst was mainly associated with the pretreated fungal biomass; its activity was 9-fold higher than that of the untreated biomass. Linear model was used to obtain the affinity constant and Langmuir to adjust maximum sorption capacity. This enhancement in sorption capacity was associated with the high HXD degradation rate observed here; 86% of the initial HXD was eliminated in 42h by the pretreated biocatalyst, whilst 53% was eliminated in 48h by the untreated biocatalyst.

V. Snchez-Vzquez; I. Gonzlez; M. Gutirrez-Rojas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Interactions of Endoglucanases with Amorphous Cellulose Films Resolved by Neutron Reflectometry and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the interaction of four endoglucanases with amorphous cellulose films by neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) is reported. The endoglucanases include a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens), a processive endoglucanase from a marine bacterium (Cel5H from S. degradans), and two from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima). The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. The endoglucanases displayed highly diverse behavior. Cel45A and Cel5H, which possess carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), penetrated and digested within the bulk of the films to a far greater extent than Cel9A and Cel5A, which lack CBMs. While both Cel45A and Cel5H were active within the bulk of the films, striking differences were observed. With Cel45A, substantial film expansion and interfacial broadening were observed, whereas for Cel5H the film thickness decreased with little interfacial broadening. These results are consistent with Cel45A digesting within the interior of cellulose chains as a classic endoglucanase, and Cel5H digesting predominantly at chain ends consistent with its designation as a processive endoglucanase.

Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Liu, Zelin [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Kent, Michael S [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Majewski, Jaroslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Michael, Jablin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Jaclyn, Murton K [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Halbert, Candice E [ORNL; Datta, Supratim [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Chao, Wang [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Brown, Page [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nitrogen content, amino acid composition and digestibility of fungi from a nutritional perspective in animal mycophagy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fungi comprise a major part of the diet of many animals. Even so, the nutritional value of fungi has been much debated, with some arguing that fungi are nutritionally poor. However, the chemical composition of fungi and of the biology of the animals that eat them are not well understood, particularly in reference to amino acid (AA) composition of fungi and digestibility of fungal protein. We analysed fibre, total nitrogen (N), available N, and AA contents and measured invitro digestibility of a wide range of epigeous and hypogeous fungi collected in Australia and the USA to test three hypotheses: (i) fungi are nutritionally poor because they contain few nutrients or are otherwise of low digestibility, (ii) fungi vary substantially in their nutritional composition; and (iii) animals can counter this variable quality by eating diverse taxa. Resultant data indicate many fungi are a reasonable source of \\{AAs\\} and digestible nitrogen. However, they vary highly between species in AA content, and the protein has a poor balance of digestible AAs. This helps explain why many mycophagous animals eat a wide array of fungi and often have digestive strategies to cope with fungi, such as foregut fermentation. Another common strategy is to supplement the diet with high quality protein, such as insect protein. Accordingly, evaluating nutritional value of fungi requires consideration of physiology of the animal species and their whole diet.

Ian R. Wallis; Andrew W. Claridge; James M. Trappe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H{sup +} competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe{sup 3+} loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, suggesting that Fe{sup 3+} and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass.

Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Ogden Environmental Service, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)] [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Allingham, John S., E-mail: allinghj@queensu.ca [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Crystal structure of a triacylglycerol lipase from Penicillium expansum at 1.3 A determined by sulfur SAD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Triacylglycerol lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) are present in many different organisms including animals, plants, and microbes. Lipases catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain triglycerides into fatty acids and glycerol at the interface between the water insoluble substrate and the aqueous phase. Lipases can also catalyze the reverse esterification reaction to form glycerides under certain conditions. Lipases of microbial origin are of considerable commercial interest for wide variety of biotechnological applications in industries, including detergent, food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals, and biodiesel. Nowadays, microbial lipases have become one of the most important industrial enzymes. PEL (Penicillium expansum lipase) is a fungal lipase from Penicillium expansum strain PF898 isolated from Chinese soil that has been subjected to several generations of mutagenesis to increase its enzymatic activity. PEL belongs to the triacylglycerol lipases family, and its catalytic characteristics have been studied. The enzyme has been used in Chinese laundry detergent industry for several years (http://www.leveking.com). However, the poor thermal stability of the enzyme limits its application. To further study and improve this enzyme, PEL was cloned and sequenced. Furthermore, it was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris. PEL contains GHSLG sequence, which is the lipase consensus sequence Gly-X1-Ser-X2-Gly, but has a low amino acid sequence identities to other lipases. The most similar lipases are Rhizomucor miehei (PML) and Rhizopus niveus (PNL) with a 21% and 20% sequence identities to PEL, respectively. Interestingly, the similarity of PEL with the known esterases is somewhat higher with 24% sequence identity to feruloyl esterase A. Here, we report the 1.3 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of PEL determined by sulfur SAD phasing. This structure not only presents a new lipase structure at high resolution, but also provides a structural platform to analyze the published mutagenesis results. The structure may also open up new avenues for future protein engineering study on PEL.

Bian, Chuanbing; Yuan, Cai; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Jiang, Longguang; Huang, Zixiang; Lin, Lin; Huang, Mingdong; (UAH); (Fujian); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

439

Organic fertilizer effects on growth, crop yield, and soil microbial biomass indices in sole and intercropped peas and oats under organic farming conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a field experiment, peas (Pisum sativum L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.) were grown as sole crops and intercrops, fertilized with horse manure and yard-waste compost derived from shrub and garden cuttings at 10tCha?1 each. The objectives were to compare the effects of these organic fertilizer and cropping system in organic farming on (a) yield of peas and oats, grown as the sole crop or intercropped, as well as N2 fixation and photosynthetic rates, (b) the yield of wheat as a succeeding crop, (c) microbial biomass indices in soil and roots, and (d) microbial activity estimated by the CO2 evolution rate in the field and the amount of organic fertilizers, recovered as particulate organic matter (POM). In general, organic fertilizer application improved nodule dry weight (DW), photosynthetic rates, N2 fixation, and N accumulation of peas as well as N concentration in oat grain. Averaged across fertilizer treatments, pea/oat intercropping significantly decreased nodule DW, N2 fixation and photosynthetic rate of peas by 14, 17, and 12%, respectively, and significantly increased the photosynthetic rate of oats by 20%. However, the land equivalent ratio (LER) of intercropped peas and oats exceeded 1.0, indicating a yield advantage over sole cropping. Soil microbial biomass was positively correlated with pea dry matter yields both in sole and intercropped systems. Organic fertilizers increased the contents of microbial biomass C, N, P, and fungal ergosterol in soil and CO2 production, whereas the cropping system had no effects on these microbial indices. According to the organic fertilizer recovered as POM, 70% (manure) and 64% (compost) of added C were decomposed, but only 39% (manure) and 13% (compost) could be attributed to CO2C during a 101-day period. This indicated that horse manure was more readily available to soil microorganisms than compost, leading to increased grain yields of the succeeding winter wheat.

Ramia Jannoura; Rainer Georg Joergensen; Christian Bruns

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fungal polyketide cyclization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian L.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Simmons, Blake A.; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry C.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

Molecular and biochemical characterization of the jasmonic acid methyltransferase gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methyl jasmonate is a metabolite known to be produced by many plants and has roles in diverse biological processes. It is biosynthesized by the action of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT), which belongs to the SABATH family of methyltransferases. Herein is reported the isolation and biochemical characterization of a JMT gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). The genome of P. trichocarpa contains 28 SABATH genes (PtSABATH1 to PtSABATH28). Recombinant PtSABATH3 expressed in Escherichia coli showed the highest level of activity with jasmonic acid (JA) among carboxylic acids tested. It was therefore renamed PtJMT1. PtJMT1 also displayed activity with benzoic acid (BA), with which the activity was about 22% of that with JA. PtSABATH2 and PtSABATH4 were most similar to PtJMT1 among all PtSABATHs. However, neither of them had activity with JA. The apparent Km values of PtJMT1 using JA and BA as substrate were 175 lM and 341 lM, respectively. Mutation of Ser-153 and Asn-361, two residues in the active site of PtJMT1, to Tyr and Ser respectively, led to higher specific activity with BA than with JA. Homology-based structural modeling indicated that substrate alignment, in which Asn-361 is involved, plays a role in determining the substrate specificity of PtJMT1. In the leaves of young seedlings of black cottonwood, the expression of PtJMT1 was induced by plant defense signal molecules methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid and a fungal elicitor alamethicin, suggesting that PtJMT1 may have a role in plant defense against biotic stresses. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that PtJMT1 shares a common ancestor with the Arabidopsis JMT, and functional divergence of these two apparent JMT orthologs has occurred since the split of poplar and Arabidopsis lineages.

Zhao, Nan [ORNL; Yao, Jianzhuang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chaiprasongsuk, Minta [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Guanglin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guan, Ju [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Guo, Hong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, Feng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Recycling of Vineyard and Winery Wastes as Nutritive Composts for Edible Mushroom Cultivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every year in Romania huge amounts of wine and vine wastes cause serious environmental damages in vineyards as well as nearby winery factories for instance by their burning on the soil surface or their incorporation inside soil matrix. The optimal and efficient way to solve these problems is to recycle these biomass wastes as main ingredients in nutritive composts preparation that could be used for edible mushrooms cultivation. In this respect the main aim of this work was to establish the best biotechnology of winery and vine wastes recycling by using them as appropriate growth substrata for edible and medicinal mushrooms. According to this purpose two mushroom species of Basidiomycetes namely Lentinula edodes as well as Pleurotus ostreatus were used as pure mushroom cultures in experiments. The experiments of inoculum preparation were set up under the following conditions: constant temperature 23?C; agitation speed 90120 rev min ?1 pH level 5.06.0. All mycelia mushroom cultures were incubated for 120168 h. In the next stage of experiments the culture composts for mushroom growing were prepared from the lignocellulose wastes as vine cuttings and marc of grapes in order to be used as substrata in mycelia development and fruit body formation. The tested culture variants were monitored continuously to keep constant the temperature during the incubation as well as air humidity air pressure and a balanced ratio of the molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide. In every mushroom culture cycle all the physical and chemical parameters that could influence the mycelia growing as well as fruit body formation of L. edodes and P. ostreatus were compared to the same fungal cultures that were grown on poplar logs used as control samples.

Marian Petre; Alexandru Teodorescu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Genotipificacin de aislamientos clnicos del complejo Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii obtenidos en el Hospital Dr. Julio C. Perrando, de la ciudad de Resistencia (Chaco, Argentina)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resumen La criptococosis es una infeccin fngica causada por levaduras del gnero Cryptococcus, particularmente las del complejo Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii. El conocimiento sobre la casustica de la criptococosis en el nordeste argentino es exiguo y no se tiene informacin sobre los tipos moleculares circulantes. El objetivo de este estudio fue realizar la caracterizacin gentica de los aislamientos pertenecientes al complejo C. neoformans/C. gattii obtenidos en el Hospital Dr. Julio C. Perrando de la ciudad de Resistencia (Chaco, Argentina), con el fin de determinar especie, variedad y genotipo. Durante dos aos y un mes se estudiaron 26 aislamientos clnicos. Mediante mtodos convencionales y moleculares, un aislamiento fue identificado como C. gattii genotipo VGI y los 25 restantes como C. neoformans var. grubii, 23 de los cuales correspondieron al genotipo VNI y dos al genotipo VNII. Estos datos son una contribucin al conocimiento de la epidemiologa de la criptococosis en la Argentina y el primer informe sobre genotipos del complejo C. neoformans/C. gattii de origen clnico en el nordeste argentino. Abstract Cryptococcosis is a fungal infection caused by yeast species of Cryptococcus genus, particularly Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex. The knowledge of the cryptococcosis casuistic in northeastern Argentina is scarce and there is no information about the molecular types circulating in this area. The aim of this study was to genotyping C. neoformans/C. gattii complex clinical isolates obtained at Hospital Dr. Julio C. Perrando, Resistencia city (Chaco, Argentina), in order to determine species, variety and molecular type. During two years and one month 26 clinical isolates were studied. Using conventional and molecular methods one isolate was identified as C. gattii VGI type, and 25 isolates as C. neoformans var. grubii; 23 of these belonged to VNI type and two belonged to VNII type. This data is a contribution to the knowledge of cryptococcosis epidemiology in Argentina and the first report about C. neoformans/C. gattii complex molecular types from clinical isolates in northeastern Argentina.

Maria E. Cattana; Maria F. Tracogna; Mariana S. Fernndez; Mariana C. Carol Rey; Maria A. Sosa; Gustavo E. Giusiano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Measurements of OC and EC in coarse particulate matter in the southeastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) content of filter-based, 24-hr integrated particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters between 2.5 and 10 {mu}m (PM10-2.5) was measured at two urban and two rural locations in the southeastern United States. On average, total carbon (OC + EC) comprised approximately 30% of PM10-2.5 mass at these four sites. Carbonate carbon was measured on a subset of samples from three sites and was found to be undetectable at a rural site in central Alabama, less than 2% of PM10-2.5 at an urban site in Georgia, and less than 10% of PM10-2.5 at an urban-industrial site in Alabama. Manual scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and computer-controlled SEM (CCSEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to identify individual carbonaceous particles in a selected subset of samples collected at one rural site and one urban-industrial site in Alabama. CCSEM results showed that biological material (e.g., fungal spores, pollen, and vegetative detritus) accounted for 60-70% of the carbonaceous mass in PM10-2.5 samples with concentrations in the range of 2-16 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Samples with higher PM10-2.5 concentrations (25-42 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) at the urban-industrial site were found by manual SEM to have significant amounts of unidentified carbonaceous material, likely originating from local industrial activities. Both filter-based OC and EC concentrations and SEM-identified biological material tended to have higher concentrations during warmer months. Upper limits for organic mass (OM) to OC ratios (OM/OC) are estimated for PM10-2.5 samples at 2.1 for urban sites and 2.6-2.7 for rural sites. 40 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

Edgerton, E.S.; Casuccio, G.S.; Saylor, R.D.; Lersch, T.L.; Hartsell, B.E.; Jansen, J.J.; Hansen, D.A. [Atmospheric Research & Analysis, Inc., Cary, NC (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Melanin, a promising radioprotector: Mechanisms of actions in a mice model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioprotective effect of extracellular melanin, a naturally occurring pigment, isolated from the fungus Gliocephalotrichum simplex was examined in BALB/C mice, and the probable mechanism of action was established. At an effective dose of 50 mg/kg body weight, melanin exhibited both prophylactic and mitigative activities, increasing the 30-day survival of mice by 100% and 60%, respectively, after exposure to radiation (7 Gy, whole body irradiation (WBI)). The protective activity of melanin was primarily due to inhibition of radiation-induced hematopoietic damages as evidenced by improvement in spleen parameters such as index, total cellularity, endogenous colony forming units, and maintenance of circulatory white blood cells and platelet counts. Melanin also reversed the radiation-induced decrease in ERK phosphorylation in splenic tissue, which may be the key feature in its radioprotective action. Additionally, our results indicated that the sustained activation of AKT, JNK and P38 proteins in splenic tissue of melanin pre-treated group may also play a secondary role. This was also supported by the fact that melanin could prevent apoptosis in splenic tissue by decreasing BAX/Bcl-XL ratio, and increasing the expressions of the proliferation markers (PCNA and Cyclin D1), compared to the radiation control group. Melanin also reduced the oxidative stress in hepatic tissue and abrogated immune imbalance by reducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL6 and TNF?). In conclusion, our results confirmed that fungal melanin is a very effective radioprotector against WBI and the probable mechanisms of radioprotection are due to modulation in pro-survival (ERK) signaling, prevention of oxidative stress and immunomodulation. -- Highlights: ? Melanin showed promising radioprotection under pre and post irradiation condition. ? Melanin protects the hematopoietic system from radiation induced damage. ? Melanin modulates pro-survival pathways, immune system and prevents oxidative stress.

Kunwar, A., E-mail: amitbio@rediffmail.com [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Adhikary, B. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jayakumar, S. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Barik, A. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chattopadhyay, S. [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Raghukumar, S. [Myko Tech Private Limited, Dona Paula, Goa?403004 (India)] [Myko Tech Private Limited, Dona Paula, Goa?403004 (India); Priyadarsini, K.I., E-mail: kindira@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Determination of the three-dimensional solution structure of Raphanus sativus Antifungal Protein 1 by 1H NMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raphanus sativus Antifungal Protein 1 (Rs-AFP1) is a 51 amino acid residue plant defensin isolated from radish (Raphanus sativusL.) seeds. The three-dimensional structure in aqueous solution has been determined from two-dimensional 1H NMR data recorded at 500 \\{MHz\\} using the DIANA/REDAC calculation protocols. Experimental constraints consisted of 787 interproton distances extracted from NOE cross-peaks, 89 torsional constraints from 106 vicinal interproton coupling constants and 32 stereospecific assignments of prochiral protons. Further refinement by simulated annealing resulted in a set of 20 structures having pairwise root-mean-square differences of 1.35(0.35) over the backbone heavy atoms and 2.11(0.46) over all heavy atoms. The molecule adopts a compact globular fold comprising an ?-helix from Asn18 till Leu28 and a triple-stranded ?-sheet (?1=Lys2-Arg6, ?2=His33-Tyr38 and ?3=His43-Pro50). The central strand of this ?-sheet is connected by two disulfide bridges (Cys21Cys45 and Cys25Cys47) to the ?-helix. The connection between ?-strand 2 and 3 is formed by a type \\{VIa\\} ?-turn. Even the loop (Pro7 to Asn17) between ?-strand 1 and the ?-helix is relatively well defined. The structure of Raphanus sativus Antifungal Protein 1 features all the characteristics of the cysteine stabilized ?? motif. A comparison of the complete structure and of the regions important for interaction with the fungal receptor according to a mutational study, is made with the structure of ?-thionin, a plant defensin that has no antifungal activity. It is concluded that this interaction is both electrostatic and specific, and some possible scenarios for the mode of action are given.

Franky Fant; Wim Vranken; Willem Broekaert; Frans Borremans

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Biopulping: A new energy-saving technology for papermaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biopulping is defined as the treatment of wood chips with lignin-degrading fungi prior to pulping. Fungal pretreatment prior to mechanical pulping reduces electrical energy requirements during refining or increases mill throughput, improves paper strength, reduces the pitch content, reduces cooking time for sulfite pulping, and reduces the environmental impact of pulping. The recent work involved scaling up the biopulping process towards the industrial level, investigating both the engineering and economic feasibility of the technology. The authors envision the process to be done in either a chip-pile or silo-based system for which several factors need to be considered. These factors include the degree of decontamination, a hospitable environment for the fungus, and the overall process economics. Currently, treatment of the chips with low pressure steam is sufficient for decontamination. Furthermore, a simple, forced ventilation system can be used to maintain the proper temperature, humidity, and moisture content throughout the chip bed, thus promoting uniform growth of the fungus. The pilot-scale trial resulted in the successful treatment of 4 tons, of wood chips (dry weight basis) with results comparable to those on a laboratory scale. For mechanical pulping, a 2-week treatment results in approximately 30% energy savings that, considering the additional equipment and operating costs, results in an overall savings of $9 to $20/ton of pulp in a chip-pile system. The other benefits that biopulping confers improve the economics considerably A larger, 40-ton trial was also successful, with energy savings and paper properties comparable with the laboratory scale.

Scott, G.M.; Akhtar, M.; Lentz, M.J.; Kirk, T.K.; Swaney, R.; Shipley, D.F.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Efficient Graph Based Assembly of Short-Read Sequences on Hybrid Core Architecture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced architectures can deliver dramatically increased throughput for genomics and proteomics applications, reducing time-to-completion in some cases from days to minutes. One such architecture, hybrid-core computing, marries a traditional x86 environment with a reconfigurable coprocessor, based on field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology. In addition to higher throughput, increased performance can fundamentally improve research quality by allowing more accurate, previously impractical approaches. We will discuss the approach used by Convey?s de Bruijn graph constructor for short-read, de-novo assembly. Bioinformatics applications that have random access patterns to large memory spaces, such as graph-based algorithms, experience memory performance limitations on cache-based x86 servers. Convey?s highly parallel memory subsystem allows application-specific logic to simultaneously access 8192 individual words in memory, significantly increasing effective memory bandwidth over cache-based memory systems. Many algorithms, such as Velvet and other de Bruijn graph based, short-read, de-novo assemblers, can greatly benefit from this type of memory architecture. Furthermore, small data type operations (four nucleotides can be represented in two bits) make more efficient use of logic gates than the data types dictated by conventional programming models.JGI is comparing the performance of Convey?s graph constructor and Velvet on both synthetic and real data. We will present preliminary results on memory usage and run time metrics for various data sets with different sizes, from small microbial and fungal genomes to very large cow rumen metagenome. For genomes with references we will also present assembly quality comparisons between the two assemblers.

Sczyrba, Alex; Pratap, Abhishek; Canon, Shane; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Wang, Zhong; Brewer, Tony; Soper, David; D'Jamoos, Mike; Collins, Kirby; Vacek, George

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every 4 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a protein of unknown biochemical function. How this oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, ?ham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM5-GFP co-localized with NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the ?mak-2 strain, HAM5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK2 activity influences HAM5 function/localization. However, MAK2-GFP showed only cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a ?ham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta, as observed in wild type germlings. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM5 was shown to physically interact with MAK2, MEK2 and NRC1, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members during oscillation and chemotropic interactions during both germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK2 to upstream factors and other proteins involved in this intriguing process of fungal communication.

Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Starr, Trevor L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Glass, N. Louise

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iteroparity, the ability to repeat spawn, is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations, and could help reestablish this naturally occurring life history trait. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia River Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, wild emigrating steelhead kelts were placed into one of three study groups (direct capture and transport, short-term reconditioning, or long-term reconditioning). Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 15 March to 21 June 2004. In total, 842 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.5% (842 of 2,755) of the entire 2003-2004 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in 20-foot circular tanks, and fed freeze-dried krill initially or for the duration of the experiment. All steelhead kelts received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement as a means to improve initial nutrition. Long-term steelhead kelts received Moore-Clark pellets to provide essential minerals and nutrients necessary for gonadal redevelopment. Oxytetracycline was administered to all reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. To control parasitic infestations two methods were used, first, after initial capture an intubation of Ivermectin{trademark} was administered to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Next, a Formalin drip was used for the duration of reconditioning to prevent fungal outbreaks. Captured kelts were separated into three experimental groups: short-term reconditioning, long-term reconditioning, and direct transport and release. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 5 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on May 11, 2004. Survival-to-release was good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 79.0%. Long-term steelhead kelts are currently being held for a 6-9 month period with a scheduled release in December 2004. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts has not been determined and will be presented in the 2005 annual report. Direct transport and release kelts and short-term reconditioned kelts were radio or acoustic tagged to assess their travel time and migratory behaviors below Bonneville Dam. A total of 29 direct-transport and release kelts and 29 short-term reconditioned kelts received surgically implanted radio tags, and a total of 28 direct-transport/release and 26 short-term reconditioned fish received surgically implanted hydro acoustic tags. These tags will allow us to determine outm

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan; Whiteaker, John (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iteroparity, the ability to repeat spawn, is a natural life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Estimated rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the current expression of repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations, and could help reestablish this naturally occurring life history trait. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia River Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, wild emigrating steelhead kelts were placed into one of four study groups (in river release, direct capture and transport, short-term reconditioning, or long-term reconditioning). Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 7 March to 8 June 2006. In total, 348 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 17.0% (348 of 2,002) of the entire 2005-2006 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. Steelhead kelts were reconditioned in 20-foot circular tanks, and fed freeze-dried krill initially (first 2 months of long-term reconditioning) or for the duration of the experiment. Long-term steelhead kelts also received Moore-Clark pellets to provide essential minerals and nutrients necessary for gonadal redevelopment. Oxytetracycline was administered to all reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. To control parasitic infestations two methods were used: an intubation of Ivermectin{trademark} was administered to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.) and, a Formalin drip system was administered via drip system for the duration of reconditioning to prevent fungal outbreaks. From the steelhead kelts collected at the CJMF, four experimental groups were established; in-river release, direct transport and release, short-term reconditioning and long-term reconditioning. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 5 weeks. Surviving specimens were released on May 15, 2006 and June 27, 2006. Long-term steelhead kelts were held for a 6-9 month period with a release in October 18, 2006. No-term release kelts and short-term reconditioned kelts received PIT-tags with a portion of each group receiving hydro-acoustic tags to assess return survival, travel time, and migratory behavior below Bonneville Dam. In total, 49 No-term release kelts and 50 short-term reconditioned kelts were PIT-tagged, with all surviving No-term and short-term reconditioned kelts successfully receiving a surgically implanted hydroacoustic tag as well. With the conclusion of this third year we have completed a number of multi year analyses to better understand how kelts are faring in the lower river as well as laying the groundwork for a cost analysis.

Branstetter, Ryan; Whiteaker, John; Hatch, Douglas R. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Development of Geothermally Assisted Process for Production of Liquid Fuels and Chemicals from Wheat Straw  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently there has been much interest in developing processes for producing liquid fuels from renewable resources. The most logical long term approach in terms of economics derives the carbohydrate substrate for fermentation from the hydrolysis of cellulosic crop and forest residues rather than from grains or other high grade food materials (1,2). Since the presence of lignin is the main barrier to the hydrolysis of cellulose from lignocellulosic materials, delignification processes developed by the wood pulping industry have been considered as possible prehydrolysis treatments. The delignification process under study in our laboratory is envisioned as a synthesis of two recently developed pulping processes. In the first step, called autohydrolysis, hot water is used directly to solubilize hemicellulose and to depolymerize lignin (3). Then, in a second step known as organosolv pulping (4), the autohydrolyzed material is extracted with aqueous alcohol. A s shown in Figure 1, this process can separate the original lignocellulosic material into three streams--hemicellulose in water, lignin in aqueous alcohol, and a cellulose pulp. Without further mechanical milling, delignified cellulose can be enzymatically hydrolyzed at 45-50 C to greater than 80% theoretical yield of glucose using fungal cellulases (5, 6). The resulting glucose syrup can then be fermented by yeast to produce ethanol or by selected bacteria to produce acetone and butanol or acetic and propionic acids (7). One objection to such a process, however, is the large energy input that is required. In order to extend our supplies of liquid fuels and chemicals, it is important that the use of fossil fuels in any lignocellulosic conversion process be minimized. The direct use of geothermal hot water in carrying out the autohydrolysis and extraction operations, therefore, seems especially attractive. On the one hand, it facilitates the conversion of non-food biomass to fuels and chemicals without wasting fossil fuel; and on the other hand, it provides a means for ''exporting'' geothermal energy from the well site. The primary goal of the work discussed in this report was to investigate the effects of variations in autohydrolysis conditions on the production of fermentable sugars from wheat straw. In assessing the relative merits of various sets of conditions, we considered both the direct production of sugar from the autohydrolysis of hemicellulose and the subsequent yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The principal parameters studied were time, temperature, and water/fiber weight ratio; however, we also investigated the effects of adding minor amounts of phenol and aluminum sulfate to the autohydrolysis charge. Phenol was selected for study because it was reported (8) to be effective in suppressing repolymerization of reactive lignin fragments. Aluminum sulfate, on the other hand, was chosen as a representative of the Lewis acids which, we hoped, would catalyze the delignification reactions.

Murphy, V.G.; Linden, J.C.; Moreira, A.R.; Lenz, T.G.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z