Sample records for functional nanomaterials cfn

  1. BNL | Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) | Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Job Openings at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials The CFN Jobs List is currently unavailable. You may search for CFN positions in the Lab's job list. About CFN The...

  2. BNL | Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    logo Subscribe to iCFN, the CFN newsletter See all Research Highlights lithium ion battery cell Peering into How Rechargeable Lithium Ion Batteries Function Ni-Al alloy Metal...

  3. BNL | Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using CFN Facilities: Arrival and Departure Preparing for Arrival Training Safety is essential aspect of all work done at the CFN. Appropriate training is required for all facility...

  4. iCFN | Center for Functional Nanomaterials Newsletter | Issue...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CFN Home Brookhaven National Laboratory Issue Archives Friday, May 15, 2015 iCFN: Message from CFN Director Emilio Mendez A Message from Balaji Raghothamachar Updates for the...

  5. iCFN | Center for Functional Nanomaterials Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Latest Issue: Friday, May 15, 2015 Emilio Mendez iCFN: Message from CFN Director Emilio Mendez As we move into spring and a season of growth, the...

  6. BNL | CFN: Soft & Biological Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soft and Bio Nanomaterials Contact: Oleg Gang Novel methods for system fabrication are required in order to build materials and devices that can take advantage of rich variety...

  7. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  8. BNL | Center for Functional Nanomaterials Operations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CFN Operations Plan Note: The only official copy of this file is the one online. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Center for Functional Nanomaterials Date: 472014 Approved by: R....

  9. BNL | Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Electron Microscope The JEOL 2100F is a versatile general user field emission transmission electron microscope suitable for high-resolution imaging, Z-contrast...

  10. BNL | Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    based on the current results; description the work for the next cycle Acknowledgement The following acknowledgment is being used when referencing work performed at the...

  11. CFN | Video Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CFN Video Library Other Videos 436 Kevin Yager Kevin Yager on the Nanoscience of Studying Scattered X-rays Kevin Yager, a scientist at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional...

  12. BNL | CFN: Electronic Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    options, sunlight has the highest ultimate power capacity, with a total average solar energy flux of 30,000 terawatts impacting the land areas of the world. Solar energy has...

  13. CFN | Research Highlights Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Research Highlights Archives lithium ion battery cell Peering into How Rechargeable Lithium Ion Batteries Function Wednesday, March 18, 2015...

  14. BNL | Center for Functional Nanomaterials Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all onsite Users the opportunity to acquire an account on a CFN-dedicated computer server. This data server, which is managed by BNL's Information Technology Division (ITD),...

  15. BNL | CFN Strategic Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Over the last six years, guided by Users' feedback and the SAC's advice, the CFN has allocated resources - equipment, people, and operating funds - so that each facility...

  16. BNL | CFN Operations Safety Awareness (COSA) Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CFN Operations Safety Awareness (COSA) Training All users at the CFN must complete the CFN Operations Safety Awareness (COSA) Training before they can access the facilities. COSA...

  17. Nanofabrication | Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clean room (5,000 sq. ft) dedicated to state-of-the art patterning and processing of thin films, nanomaterials, and devices. The instrumentation in the facility has been...

  18. Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities User Facilities Dev X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for...

  19. Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National Laboratory Laboratory Policy (LP)(SC)U.S.Office

  20. Synthesis of Functional Nanomaterials Nanocarbon Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Indranath

    nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application for formic acid oxidation." Chemistry of Materials 23 on Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes, Nanoparticles, and Nanowires." Chapter 4 in Handbook of ElectrochemicalSynthesis of Functional Nanomaterials Nanocarbon Materials o Graphene · Zhang S, Y Shao, H Liao, MH

  1. BNL | CFN Strategic Plan | Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    considered an essential resource in large-scale scientific efforts in catalysis, photocatalysis, energy storage, or photovoltaics? Are CFN scientists key elements of...

  2. Functional Carbon Nanomaterials Myoung-Woon Moon,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho-Young

    Editorial Functional Carbon Nanomaterials Myoung-Woon Moon,1 Ho-Young Kim,2 Aiying Wang,3 and Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201, China 4 Northeastern University, Boston, MA. Carbon nanomaterials have increasingly gained interest due to their capability of forming various

  3. CFN Ops Plan | Experimental Safety Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Safety Committee The CFN Experimental Safety Committee will consist of the members listed below. Additional SME's from the lab support divisions will be added as...

  4. Peter V. Bonnesen Nanomaterials Synthesis and Functional Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Peter V. Bonnesen R&D Staff Nanomaterials Synthesis and Functional Assembly Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Oak Ridge National Laboratory (865) 574-6715 bonnesenpv@ornl.gov Education Lafayette College, Easton, PA Chemistry B.S. (ACS certified), 1983 University of California at Los Angeles Inorganic

  5. Fabrication of functional nanomaterials using flame assisted spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purwanto, Agus, E-mail: aguspur@uns.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta 632112 (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Flame assisted spray pyrolysis (FASP) is a class of synthesis method for nanomaterials fabrication. The ability to control nanomaterials characteristics and easy to be-scaled up are the main features of FASP. The crystallinity and particles size of the prepared nanomaterials can be easily controlled by variation of fuel flow rate. The precursor concentration, carrier gas flow rate, and carrier gas can be also used to control the prepared nanomaterials. Energy related nanomaterials preparation uses as the example case in FASP application. These material are yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}). It needs strategies to produce these materials into nano-sized order. YAG:Ce nanoparticles only can be synthesized by FASP using the urea addition. The decomposition of urea under high temperature of flame promotes the breakage of YAG:Ce particles into nanoparticles. In the preparation of WO{sub 3}, the high temperature flame can be used to gasify WO{sub 3} solid material. As a result, WO{sub 3} nanoparticles can be prepared easily. Generally, to produce nanoparticles via FASP method, the boiling point of the material is important to determine the strategy which will be used.

  6. BNL | CFN Strategic Plan | Self-Assembled Nanomaterials by Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    symmetry. Dynamically tunable and reconfigurable self-assembled systems, mimicking protein folding. Controlling and switching the linkages between specific particles on a DNA...

  7. An overview—Functional nanomaterials for lithium rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hua Kun, E-mail: hua@uow.edu.au

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Nanomaterials play important role in lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials play important role for lithium rechargeable batteries. • Nanostructured materials increase the capacitance of supercapacitors. • Nanostructure improves the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. • Nanomaterials enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts in fuel cells. - Abstract: There is tremendous worldwide interest in functional nanostructured materials, which are the advanced nanotechnology materials with internal or external dimensions on the order of nanometers. Their extremely small dimensions make these materials unique and promising for clean energy applications such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and other applications. This paper will highlight the development of new approaches to study the relationships between the structure and the physical, chemical, and electrochemical properties of functional nanostructured materials. The Energy Materials Research Programme at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, the University of Wollongong, has been focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of functional nanomaterials, including nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanoporous materials, and nanocomposites. The emphases are placed on advanced nanotechnology, design, and control of the composition, morphology, nanostructure, and functionality of the nanomaterials, and on the subsequent applications of these materials to areas including lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells.

  8. BNL | CFN Strategic Plan | NSLS-II Synergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theme 2: Nano-architectures for Energy Solutions The growth of Li dendrites during battery cycling is a key problem in all-Li electrodes. CFN researchers have proposed nano...

  9. BNL | CFN Strategic Plan | Nano-architectures for Energy Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CFN expertise more broadly for materials design. As an example, they have created artificial spin-ice systems in mm2 areas by electron-beam lithography of magnetic thin...

  10. BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users...

  11. Optically Functional Nanomaterials: Optothermally Responsive Composites and Carbon Nanotube Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okawa, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    materials for organic photovoltaics. We have successfully investigated polymer functionalization to produce supramolecular

  12. Functional DNA-Containing Nanomaterials: Cellular Applications in Biosensing, Imaging, and Targeted Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    . As models, we have chosen to highlight DNA/nanomaterial complexes consisting of gold nanoparticles, graphene biosensing and high-resolution imaging result. For example, gold nanoparticles and graphene oxides can quench

  13. Sustainable Nanomaterials Industry Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by MeadWestvaco Corporation held on June 26, 2012

  14. Metrology for Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Michael Postek (National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST) for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop on June 26, 2012

  15. Nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, and biomaterials, such as proteins and other biopolymers, are promising building blocks for smart functional materials. Being "Smart" towards external stimuli such as stress, chemical reactions, pH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    biopolymers, are promising building blocks for smart functional materials. Being "Smart" towards externalSponsored by the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience Efficient Energy Transport and Storage in Functional for controllable transports of energy carriers (phonons and electrons). Specifically, carbon nanomaterials exhibit

  16. CFN | News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    makes self-assembly 1,000 times faster and could be used for industrial-scale solar panels and electronics. Electromagnetic Spectrum Into the Depths of the Electromagnetic...

  17. The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group From Nano-Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group From Nano-Particles to Nano-Polymers Francesco Stellacci Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT frstella@mit.edu #12;S u N M a G The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group Supramolecular Materials Science Monolayer Protected Metal Nanoparticles Functionalized Carbon

  18. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop (held in Washington, D.C., on June 26, 2012) gathered stakeholders from industry and academia to discuss the current state of the art for sustainable nanomat...

  19. CFN | Doing Business with CFN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Agreements and Sponsored Research Activities While the Department of Energy is the primary sponsor of research at Brookhaven National Laboratory, several paths...

  20. 1Nanomaterials for Energy Group Byungwoo Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    Fuel Cell Solar Panel Portable Devices Solar Cell Phosphor Li+ Battery #12;4Nanomaterials for Energy://bp.snu.ac.kr Cutting-Edge Nanomaterials for Energy: Solar Cell · Li+ Battery #12;2Nanomaterials for Energy Group- Sensitized Solar Cells DSSC SONY DSSC KIST #12;6Nanomaterials for Energy Group e-e- h

  1. Experiment Hazard Class 14.1 - Nanomaterials - Contained or in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x-ray beam. Training - ESH590, Engineered Nanomaterials Orientation. Signs and Labeling - Containers with nanomaterials must be labeled "Caution - Engineered Nanomaterials"....

  2. Experiment Hazard Class 14.2 - Nanomaterials - Liquid Suspension

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x-ray beam. Training - ESH590, Engineered Nanomaterials Orientation. Signs and Labeling - Containers with nanomaterials must be labeled "Caution - Engineered Nanomaterials"....

  3. Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable Biomaterials Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable Biomaterials Integrating...

  4. Systematic Evaluation of Nanomaterial Toxicity: Utility of Standardize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systematic Evaluation of Nanomaterial Toxicity: Utility of Standardized Materials and Rapid Assays. Systematic Evaluation of Nanomaterial Toxicity: Utility of Standardized...

  5. 1Nanomaterials for Energy Group Byungwoo Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    for Energy Fuel Cell Li+ Battery Solar Panel Portable Devices Solar Cell White LED PDP Phosphor #12://bp.snu.ac.kr Cutting-Edge Nanomaterials for Energy: Solar Cell Nanophosphor Li+ Battery #12;2Nanomaterials for Energy-Dot- and Dye- Sensitized Solar Cells DSSC SONY DSSC KIST #12;5Nanomaterials for Energy Group e-e- h

  6. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  7. Nanotechnology: Nanomaterials, Nanomedicine and Nanocars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Nanotechnology: Nanomaterials, Nanomedicine and Nanocars Wednesday March 21, 2012, Babbio 122, 11am and Technology Rice University, Houston, TX An overview of several of the nanotechnology research areas in our Nanotechnology in 2008, the NASA Space Act Award in 2008 for his development of carbon nanotube reinforced

  8. Powerful new technique simultaneously determines nanomaterials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powerful new technique simultaneously determines nanomaterials' chemical makeup, topography By Angela Hardin * December 2, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - A team of...

  9. Nanomaterials Analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanomaterials Analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope Technology available for licensing: Steradian X-ray detection system increases the detection capability of SEMs during...

  10. Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel Technologies Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel Technologies 2007 Diesel...

  11. Application of Surface Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof ISOTC 201 Technical Report: ISO 14187:2011 -Surface Application of Surface Analysis Methods to Nanomaterials: Summaryof ISOTC 201...

  12. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  13. NSLS Endstations | Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beamline performs simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments for nano-scale structural characterization of a variety of materials. The Ambient Pressure X-ray...

  14. Advanced Optics | Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at several repetition rates Femto- and Nanosecond Transient Absorption Spectrometer (Ultrafast Systems), Tunable femtosecond pump pulses from TOPAS OPA. Spectral transients...

  15. Emilio Mendez Director, Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    density of today's Power Density and Energy StoragePower Density and Energy Storage 200 years #12;(V-in Hybrid (2011) -- Volt All Electric -- Tesla ICE + auxiliary electric motor + battery system to recover

  16. Electron Microscopy | Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Atomic-resolution imaging of internal materials structure with scanning transmission and transmission electron microscopy Spectroscopic characterization with...

  17. Proximal Probes | Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and catalysis at pressures from ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) to 5 bar via complementary scanning tunneling microscopy imaging and photoelectron spectroscopy, coupled with real-time...

  18. Theory and Computation | Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory and Computation theory and computation Flexible computational infrastructure, software tools and theoretical consultation are provided to support modeling and understanding...

  19. CFN | Thin Films Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility Thin-Film Processing Facility Online Manager (FOM) website FOM manual ESR for lab 1L32 (High-Resolution SEM and x-ray...

  20. BNL | CFN Strategic Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamically tunable and reconfigurable self-assembled systems that mimic protein folding, and nanoparticle clusters with tailored particles. Advanced characterization...

  1. BNL | CFN: Theory & Computation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory and Computation Contact: Mark Hybertsen Advances in theory, numerical algorithms and computational capabilities have enabled an unprecedented opportunity for fundamental...

  2. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  3. 1Nanomaterials for Energy Group Byungwoo Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    Humanity's Top Ten Problems for the next 50 years 1. ENERGY 2. WATER 3. FOOD 4. ENVIRONMENT 5. POVERTY 6 Fuel Cell Solar Panel Portable Devices Solar Cell Phosphor Li+ Battery #12;4Nanomaterials for Energy

  4. The Tactical and Strategic Implementation of Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Verso Paper Corp. and TAPPI held on June 26, 2012

  5. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by U.S. Forest Service and Purdue University held on June 26, 2012

  6. Building a Risk Management Program for Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    ;Engineered Nanomaterials · Carbons ­ e.g., Fullerenes, nanotubes, nanofibers · Oxides ­ e.g., TiO2, ZnO, SiO2, CeO2, Fe3O4 · Metals ­ e.g., Ag, Fe, Al, Si, Zn, Cu, Ni · Semiconductors ­ e.g., CdSe, CdS, In

  7. 1 | P a g e MANIPULATING NANOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    is reprinted from the fall 2009 issue of the Faculty of Engineering Dean's Report. Nanomaterials are, the de-icing sand used on roads in winter accumulates inside the rims of bus wheels and erodes microseconds provides the energy to deposit and fuse materials without causing them to lose their nanostructure

  8. Nanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Veronika Szalai (NIST to catalyze water oxidation. K E Y A C C O M P L I S H M E N T S Produced highly active iron oxide (hematite water. R E F E R E N C E Effect of tin doping on -Fe2 O3 photoanodes for water splitting, C. D. Bohn, A

  9. Identifying and Managing the Health and Safety Hazards of Nanomaterials in Laboratories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin Sek

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    of identifying and managing the health and safety hazards of nanomaterials inside laboratories. Two main areas of research are studied: 1) Identification of nanomaterial hazards in laboratories, and 2) Mitigation of nanomaterial hazards in laboratories...

  10. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Niemann, Michael U.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Phani, Ayala R.; Kumar, Ashok; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes,TiS2/MoS2nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials maymore »offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc.) and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.« less

  11. Controlled Structure of Organic-Nanomaterial Solar Cells - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlled Structure of Organic-Nanomaterial Solar Cells Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryOrganic, polymer-based...

  12. SURE Projects and Supervisors 2014 (1) Shane Bergin Sticky Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    -contact Raman Analysis of Historical Manuscripts (3) Werner Blau II Carbon Nanotubes for Renewable Saline Power Moebius Bubble formation at gas-evolving micro electrodes (13) David O'Regan Simulation of magneto ­ these are known as low dimensional nanomaterials. The properties of nano-materials such as carbon nanotubes

  13. 1Electromaterials and Nanomaterials Group Prof. Byungwoo Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    for Energy #12;Quantum-Dot- and Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Prototype dye-sensitized solar cell panel from SONY Dye-sensitized solar cells from KIST #12;4Electromaterials and Nanomaterials Group e-e- h Working Principles of Sensitized Solar Cells #12;5Electromaterials and Nanomaterials Group

  14. Nanomaterials Discovery Corporation NDC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean EnergyEnergyNanceNanoMasNanomaterials

  15. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop - Tuesday June 26, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat PumpsSustainable Nanomaterials

  16. Quarterly Report: Microchannel-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition Technology for Photovoltaic Material Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, Daniel R.

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Quarterly report to ITP for Nanomanufacturing program. Report covers FY11 Q2. The primary objective of this project is to develop a nanomanufacturing process which will reduce the manufacturing energy, environmental discharge, and production cost associated with current nano-scale thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing approaches. The secondary objective is to use a derivative of this nanomanufacturing process to enable greener, more efficient manufacturing of higher efficiency quantum dot-based photovoltaic cells now under development. The work is to develop and demonstrate a scalable (pilot) microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. The high level task duration is shown. Phase I consists of a pilot platform for Gen II PV films along with parallel efforts aimed at Gen III PV quantum dot materials. Status of each task is described.

  17. Packaging Materials of the 21st Century: "Sustainable Nano-Materials- Benefits to the industry"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Nanocellulose Work Group held on June 26, 2012

  18. Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21st Century

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by USDA Forest Service held on June 26, 2012

  19. Sustainable Nano-Materials: What is happening at the cellular level?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Georgia Institute of Technology held on June 26, 2012

  20. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov Basic Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    take advantage of the wealth of capabilities and facilities that CFN has to offer. Materials Synthesis · Organic nanomaterials (polymers, DNA, graphene, etc.) synthesis and characterization · Inorganic nanomaterials (quantum dots, metallic nanoparticles, etc.) synthesis and characterization · UV, visible

  1. BNL | CFN Laser System Qualifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lasers. This standard requires each Class 3B and 4 laser user to have a pre-assignment eye examination by an ophthalmologist, which is recorded on Part B of the Laser Medical...

  2. CFN Ops Plan | Work Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    teams consist of the primary reviewer, subject matter experts (such as Industrial Hygiene staff and the Environmental Compliance Representative), the WCC, the service...

  3. BNL | CFN Science Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 30, 2015 Professor Marc Baldo Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139...

  4. BNL | CFN: Interface Science & Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system and the environment. Any solution to these issues will necessarily involve the development of renewable energy sources, together with new strategies for efficient energy...

  5. In situ XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications to Fuel Cells and Batteries Friday, July 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Qingying...

  6. MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Nanotechnology 145 Nanotechnology, Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Nanotechnology 145 Nanotechnology, Nanomaterials Synthesize Silver Metal Chalcogenides ........................................165 #12;146 Nanotechnology MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 #12;MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Nanotechnology 147 Synthesize Silver Nanoprisms

  7. Challenges for In vitro to in Vivo Extrapolation of Nanomaterial Dosimetry for Human Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jordan N.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proliferation in types and uses of nanomaterials in consumer products has led to rapid application of conventional in vitro approaches for hazard identification. Unfortunately, assumptions pertaining to experimental design and interpretation for studies with chemicals are not generally appropriate for nanomaterials. The fate of nanomaterials in cell culture media, cellular dose to nanomaterials, cellular dose to nanomaterial byproducts, and intracellular fate of nanomaterials at the target site of toxicity all must be considered in order to accurately extrapolate in vitro results to reliable predictions of human risk.

  8. Assembly and actuation of nanomaterials using active biomolecules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Thayer, Gayle Echo; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Liu, Jun; Corwin, Alex David; Gaudioso, Jennifer Marie; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Boal, Andrew Kiskadden; Bachand, George David; Trent, Amanda M.; Bachand, Marlene; Rivera, Susan B.; Koch, Steven John

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and functions of living materials and organisms are fundamentally different from those of synthetic materials and devices. Synthetic materials tend to have static structures, and are not capable of adapting to the functional needs of changing environments. In contrast, living systems utilize energy to create, heal, reconfigure, and dismantle materials in a dynamic, non-equilibrium fashion. The overall goal of the project was to organize and reconfigure functional assemblies of nanoparticles using strategies that mimic those found in living systems. Active assembly of nanostructures was studied using active biomolecules to drive the organization and assembly of nanocomposite materials. In this system, kinesin motor proteins and microtubules were used to direct the transport and interactions of nanoparticles at synthetic interfaces. In addition, the kinesin/microtubule transport system was used to actively assemble nanocomposite materials capable of storing significant elastic energy. Novel biophysical measurement tools were also developed for measuring the collective force generated by kinesin motor proteins, which will provide insight on the mechanical constraints of active assembly processes. Responsive reconfiguration of nanostructures was studied in terms of using active biomolecules to mediate the optical properties of quantum dot (QD) arrays through modulation of inter-particle spacing and associated energy transfer interaction. Design rules for kinesin-based transport of a wide range of nanoscale cargo (e.g., nanocrystal quantum dots, micron-sized polymer spheres) were developed. Three-dimensional microtubule organizing centers were assembled in which the polar orientation of the microtubules was controlled by a multi-staged assembly process. Overall, a number of enabling technologies were developed over the course of this project, and will drive the exploitation of energy-driven processes to regulate the assembly, disassembly, and dynamic reorganization of nanomaterials.

  9. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F. [Department of Physics, College of Arts and Sciences, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088 (United States)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH{sub 2} and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI)

  10. Optically Functional Nanomaterials: Optothermally Responsive Composites and Carbon Nanotube Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okawa, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Carbon Nanotube Photovoltaics by David Christopher OkawaPart II: Carbon Nanotube Photovoltaics Chapter 6:Carbon Nanotube – Polymer Photovoltaics 6.1 Polymer-Nanotube

  11. Optically Functional Nanomaterials: Optothermally Responsive Composites and Carbon Nanotube Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okawa, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    welding have arisen. Photothermal spectroscopy 8 probes the changes in the refractive index or temperature

  12. Postdoctoral Research Associate Nanomaterials Synthesis and Functional Assembly Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (865) 576-1756 yangb1@ornl.gov _____________________________________Publications______________________________ __________ Education Hunan University, China Materials Science and Engineering B. S., 2007 Hunan University, China Materials Science and Engineering M. S., 2010 University

  13. Carbon-Based Nanomaterials as an Anode for Lithium Ion Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Carbon-Based Nanomaterials as an Anode for Lithium Ion Battery Fei YAO LPICM-École Polytechnique POLYTECHNIQUE Spécialité: Physique Par Fei YAO Carbon-Based Nanomaterials as an Anode for Lithium Ion Battery #12;I ABSTRACT In this thesis work, carbon-based nanomaterials using as an anode for lithium ion

  14. Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Large Scale Energy Storage: From Nanomaterials to Large Systems Wednesday October 26, 2011, Babbio energy storage devices. Specifically, this talk discusses 1) the challenges for grid scale of emergent technologies with ultralow costs on new energy storage materials and mechanisms. Dr. Jun Liu

  15. Controlled Photonic Manipulation of Proteins and Other Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Peng

    Controlled Photonic Manipulation of Proteins and Other Nanomaterials Yih-Fan Chen,,,§ Xavier Serey: The ability to controllably handle the smallest materials is a fundamental enabling technology for nanoscience force to manipulate dielectric materials smaller than about 100 nm. Recently, several near-field optical

  16. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .1. Overview .................................................................................................... 1 1.2. Nanomaterials ............................................................................................. 4 1.2.1. Bulk nanostructured... 1.3. Schematic diagram showing different types of nanostructured ceramic materials: a) two-phased nanocomposite material b) inter/intra-granular nanocomposite material c) micro/nanostructured material d) inter- granular nanocomposite material...

  17. One-Dimensional Titanium Dioxide Nanomaterials: Nanowires, Nanorods, and Nanobelts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xudong

    One-Dimensional Titanium Dioxide Nanomaterials: Nanowires, Nanorods, and Nanobelts Xudong Wang Methods P 4.4. Top-down Fabrication Techniques Q 4.4.1. Direct Oxidation of Titanium Sheets Q 4 Nanostructures for Energy Storage AD 5.3.1. Lithium Ion Batteries AD 5.3.2. Supercapacitors AE 5

  18. Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches (474th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gang, Oleg (Center for Functional Nanomaterials) [Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of nanoscience, if you can control how nanoparticles self-assemble in particular structures — joining each other, for example, as molecules can form, atom-by-atom — you can design new materials that have unique properties that industry needs. Nature already uses the DNA genetic code to instruct the building of specific proteins and whole organisms in both plants and people. Taking a cue from nature, scientists at BNL devised a way of using strands of synthetic DNA attached to the surface of nanoparticles to instruct them to self-assemble into specific nanoscale structures, clusters, and three-dimensional organizations. Novel materials designed and fabricated this way promise use in photovoltaics, energy storage, catalysis, cell-targeted systems for more effective medical treatments, and biomolecular sensing for environmental monitoring and medical applications. To find out more about the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method and its applications, join Physicist Oleg Gang of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) as he gives the 474th Brookhaven Lecture, titled “Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches." Gang, who has led this work at the CFN, will explain the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method, and discuss its present and future applications in highly specific biosensors, optically active nano-materials, and new ways to fabricate complex architectures in a rational manner via self-assembly. Gang and his colleagues used the CFN and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facilities to perform their groundbreaking research. At the CFN, the scientists used electron microscopes and optical methods to visualize the clusters that they fabricated. At the NSLS, they applied x-rays to study a particles-assembly process in solution, DNA’s natural environment. Gang earned a Ph.D. in soft matter physics from Bar-Ilan University in 2000, and he was a Rothschild Fellow at Harvard University from 1999 to 2002. After joining BNL as a Goldhaber Fellow in 2002, he became an assistant scientist at the CFN in 2004. He became the CFN’s leader for Soft and Biological Nanomaterials Theme Group in 2006, and earned the title of scientist in 2009. Gang has received numerous honors and recognitions, including the 2010 Gordon Battelle Prize for Scientific Discovery.

  19. managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conversion and storage devices. A View of Brookhaven Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven. Some uses envisioned by scientists at Brookhaven's CFN include: · nanostructured catalysts to improve-conversion devices. The CFN program emphasizes the preparation of nanomaterials and understanding

  20. Bobby G. Sumpter Nanomaterials Theory Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , and functionality. Research highlights polymer- based materials for energy storage (supercapacitors and batteries), energy conversion (organic optoelectronics and photovoltaics), and lightweight structural materials State University Chemistry B.S. (ACS certified)1983 Oklahoma State University Physical Chemistry Ph

  1. Combustion process for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials from liquid hydrocarbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diener, Michael D.; Alford, J. Michael; Nabity, James; Hitch, Bradley D.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a combustion apparatus for the production of carbon nanomaterials including fullerenes and fullerenic soot. Most generally the combustion apparatus comprises one or more inlets for introducing an oxygen-containing gas and a hydrocarbon fuel gas in the combustion system such that a flame can be established from the mixed gases, a droplet delivery apparatus for introducing droplets of a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock into the flame, and a collector apparatus for collecting condensable products containing carbon nanomaterials that are generated in the combustion system. The combustion system optionally has a reaction zone downstream of the flame. If this reaction zone is present the hydrocarbon feedstock can be introduced into the flame, the reaction zone or both.

  2. Nanomaterial modifications on conductivity of coal conveyer belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.C.; Zhang, Y.G.; Wang, T.T.; Yang, L.F.; Liu, S.M.; Yang, D.H.; Zhang, M.; Gao, X. [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou (China)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By analyzing the macro electrical properties and the microscopic structure from SEM of nanomaterials modified mine transmission belt samples. The influences of the filling process of inorganic nano particle-filled rubber and PVC polymer on the physical properties of coal transmission belt is reviewed, as well as PTC and NTC effect on the stability of the physical properties and stability of materials. Influence of nano-materials and polymer materials for rubber and temperature changes in the plastic filled refining process. Crosslinker and major filler changes in the amount and filled plastic chain time on the conductivity of coal conveyer belt is studied. Influence of cure temperature. Cure time on the mechanical performance is studied. The microscopic mechanism of macro conductivity change of conveyer belt is discussed.

  3. Green chemical synthesis of silver nanomaterials with maltodextrin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallant, David Robert; Lu, Ping; Lambert, Timothy N.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver nanomaterials have significant application resulting from their optical properties related to surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high electrical conductivity, and anti-microbial impact. A 'green chemistry' synthetic approach for silver nanomaterials minimizes the environmental impact of silver synthesis, as well as lowers the toxicity of the reactive agents. Biopolymers have long been used for stabilization of silver nanomaterials during synthesis, and include gum Arabic, heparin, and common starch. Maltodextrin is a processed derivative of starch with lower molecular weight and an increase in the number of reactive reducing aldehyde groups, and serves as a suitable single reactant for the formation of metallic silver. Silver nanomaterials can be formed under either a thermal route at neutral pH in water or by reaction at room temperature under more alkaline conditions. Deposited silver materials are formed on substrates from near neutral pH solutions at low temperatures near 50 C. Experimental conditions based on material concentrations, pH and reaction time are investigated for development of deposited films. Deposit morphology and optical properties are characterized using SEM and UV-vis techniques. Silver nanoparticles are generated under alkaline conditions by a dissolution-reduction method from precipitated silver (II) oxide. Synthesis conditions were explored for the rapid development of stable silver nanoparticle dispersions. UV-vis absorption spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to characterize the nanoparticle formation kinetics and the influence of reaction conditions. The adsorbed content of the maltodextrin was characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  4. Development of Integrated Microanalysis of Nanomaterials (06-ERI-001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J P

    2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Comets--small extraterrestrial bodies of ice, dust, and small rocky particles--are considered the oldest, most primitive bodies in the solar system. They were thought to be composed of preserved interstellar particles from 4.6 billion years ago, when the Sun and the planets began to form from a primordial disk of dust and gas. The nonvolatile mineral components of comets are probably natural nanomaterials that include preserved interstellar dust as well as the first solids condensed in the solar system. Thus, comet samples may be considered as forensic 'time capsules' from the presolar molecular cloud and the earliest stages of solar system formation. Cometary material was captured in 2004, when the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Stardust spacecraft flew through the coma of comet Wild as it neared the orbit of Mars. As Stardust approached the 4.5-kilometer-diameter comet, the spacecraft briefly extended a collector filled with lightweight aerogel glass foam to capture thousands of tiny particles. On January 15, 2006, the spacecraft ejected its sample return capsule onto the Utah desert southwest of Salt Lake City. Researchers at LLNL supported by this LDRD were part of a collaborative team investigating the mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions of natural cometary nanomaterials from the Stardust mission using the unique array of analytical facilities at Livermore. The studies have provided provide new insight into cosmically primitive materials that will enable a better understanding of the earliest stages of disk accretion around stars. The skills and analysis techniques developed for the characterization of these natural nanomaterials are synergistic with several Livermore programmatic needs in the emerging fields of nanomaterials, nanotechnology and forensics. The Stardust samples are also ideal training materials for a new generation of young scientists using state-of-the-art analytical instruments at the Laboratory.

  5. Novel Magnetic Nanomaterials Inspired by Magnetotactic Baterial: Topical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prozorov, Tanya [Ames Laboratory; Bazylinki, Dennis A. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Mallapragada, Surya K. [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, Ruslan [Ames Laboratory

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetotactic bacteria, known to produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes at physiological conditions, serve as an inspiration and source of a number of biological macromolecules used for the biomimetic synthesis of a variety of magnetic nanomaterials. This review discusses the current state of understanding of magnetosome biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria, as well as the ways in which iron biomineralization processes can be utilized for tailored in vivo formation of complex magnetic nanomaterials, not occurring in magnetotactic bacteria naturally. The review assesses the current efforts on in vitro synthesis of a variety of magnetic nanoparticles using bioinspired approaches by utilizing mineralization proteins from magnetotactic bacteria, and surveys biomimetic strategies for the rational synthesis of various magnetic nanomaterials under ambient conditions. Finally, this review presents magnetic characterization of nanoparticles, highlighting differences in magnetic behavior between magnetic nanoparticles produced using bioinspired in vivo and in vitro strategies, compared to those produced using conventional methods. This in turn impacts their utility in a wide range of applications for magnetic nanoparticles, which are examined in detail, where bioinspired synthesis methods have potentially provided added advantages.

  6. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092, China Correspondence should be addressed to Junhong Chen onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor and fabrication, and is a key factor for the function of biosensing devices. In the past decade, carbon nanotubes

  7. Multitasking mesoporous nanomaterials for biorefinery applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandel, Kapil [Ames Laboratory

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have attracted great interest for last two decades due to their unique and advantageous structural properties, such as high surface area, pore volume, stable mesostructure, tunable pore size and controllable particle morphology. The robust silica framework provides sites for organic modifications, making MSNs ideal platforms for adsorbents and supported organocatalysts. In addition, the pores of MSNs provide cavities/ channels for incorporation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticle catalysts. These supported metal nanoparticle catalysts benefit from confined local environments to enhance their activity and selectivity for various reactions. Biomass is considered as a sustainable feedstock with potential to replace diminishing fossil fuels for the production of biofuels. Among several strategies, one of the promising methods of biofuel production from biomass is to reduce the oxygen content of the feedstock in order to improve the energy density. This can be achieved by creating C-C bonds between biomass derived intermediates to increase the molecular weight of the final hydrocarbon molecules. In this context, pore size and organic functionality of MSNs are varied to obtain the ideal catalyst for a C-C bond forming reaction: the aldol condensation. The mechanistic aspects of this reaction in supported heterogeneous catalysts are explored. The modification of supported organocatalyst and the effect of solvent on the reaction are rationalized. The significance of two functional surfaces of MSNs is exploited by enzyme immobilization on the external surface and organo catalyst functionalization on the internal surface. Using this bifunctional catalyst, the tandem conversion of small chain alcohols into longer chain hydrocarbon molecules is demonstrated. The ability to incorporate metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in the pores and subsequent functionalization led to develop organic modified magnetic MSNs (OM-MSNs) for applications in microalgae biorefinery. Two different integrated biorefinery systems are highlighted. (i) OM-MSNs are used to harvest microalgae and selectively sequester free fatty acids (FFAs). (ii) OM-MSNs are shown to selectively sequester FFAs and convert them into diesel-range liquid hydrocarbon fuels. A similar MSN supported metal nanoparticle catalyst is demonstrated to transform FFAs into green diesel with even greater activity and selectivity. The incorporation of a different organic functional group into MSN provides a selective adsorbent for separation and purification of ?-tocopherol from microalgae oil. The functional group with electron deficient aromatic rings demonstrated high sequestration capacity and selectivity of {alpha}-tocopherol.

  8. Combustion synthesis and nanomaterials Singanahally T. Aruna a,*, Alexander S. Mukasyan b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    Combustion synthesis and nanomaterials Singanahally T. Aruna a,*, Alexander S. Mukasyan b,1 October 2008 Accepted 2 December 2008 Keywords: Combustion synthesis Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis Solution combustion Nanomaterials Catalysts Phosphors a b s t r a c t The recent developments

  9. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  10. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael (Lakewood, CO); Diener, Michael D. (Denver, CO); Nabity, James (Arvada, CO); Karpuk, Michael (Boulder, CO)

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  11. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  12. Advanced Nanomaterials for High-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Junhong [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee] [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy supply has arguably become one of the most important problems facing humankind. The exponential demand for energy is evidenced by dwindling fossil fuel supplies and record-high oil and gas prices due to global population growth and economic development. This energy shortage has significant implications to the future of our society, in addition to the greenhouse gas emission burden due to consumption of fossil fuels. Solar energy seems to be the most viable choice to meet our clean energy demand given its large scale and clean/renewable nature. However, existing methods to convert sun light into electricity are not efficient enough to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels. This DOE project aims to develop advanced hybrid nanomaterials consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots or QDs) supported on graphene for cost-effective solar cells with improved conversion efficiency for harvesting abundant, renewable, clean solar energy to relieve our global energy challenge. Expected outcomes of the project include new methods for low-cost manufacturing of hybrid nanostructures, systematic understanding of their properties that can be tailored for desired applications, and novel photovoltaic cells. Through this project, we have successfully synthesized a number of novel nanomaterials, including vertically-oriented graphene (VG) sheets, three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanostructures comprising few-layer graphene (FLG) sheets inherently connected with CNTs through sp{sup 2} carbons, crumpled graphene (CG)-nanocrystal hybrids, CdSe nanoparticles (NPs), CdS NPs, nanohybrids of metal nitride decorated on nitrogen-doped graphene (NG), QD-carbon nanotube (CNT) and QD-VG-CNT structures, TiO{sub 2}-CdS NPs, and reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-SnO{sub 2} NPs. We further assembled CdSe NPs onto graphene sheets and investigated physical and electronic interactions between CdSe NPs and the graphene. Finally we have demonstrated various applications of these nanomaterials in solar cells (both as photoanodes and counter electrodes), gas sensors, and energy storage devices. This research is potentially transformative since the availability of affordable hybrid nanostructures and their fundamental properties will enable various innovative applications of the multifunctional hybrid nanostructures and thus will accelerate new discoveries and inventions in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  13. Nanomaterials for LightManagement in Electro-Optical Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, Vo-Van [Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, H4B 1R6, Canada; Singh, Jai [Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Tanemura, Sakae [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya, Japan; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, nanostructured materials and nanoparticles have emerged as the necessary ingredients for electrooptical applications and enhancement of device performance, in particular by making use of the light management aspects of the nanomaterials. The application areas that are being transformed profoundly include smart coating devices (e.g., electrochromic, photochromic, and thermochromic devices), solar energy, and sensing. Despite the large volume of work in the past on smart coating devices, and in particular on electrochromic devices and thermochromic fenestrations, for optical transmission or reflection control, applications remain limited because of slow response time and nonuniformity in the case of large surfaces. Recent works in the field indicate that nanostructured electrochromic coatings would be an integral part of the solution to the above problem. One aspect that can thus be focused on would be the fabrication and characterization of the nanostructured smart coating materials and their compatibility with other layers in the overall smart coating device. In the area of solar photovoltaics, nanomaterials have been used in designing light-trapping schemes for inorganic as well as organic solar cells. One particular category of solar cells that has attracted much interest is the plasmonic solar cells in which metallic nanoparticles are incorporated, helping in enhancing their energy conversion efficiency. Nanostructured solar cells would eventually develop into a 'game changing' technology for making solar cells that are affordable and highly efficient, providing a sizeable alternative energy source for our ever-increasing energy needs. Sensors based on the optical properties of constituting nanostructures and nanoparticles also form a most interesting class of bio- and electrochemical sensing devices. The possibility of synthetizing nanoparticles and structures of specifically desired sizes and shapes has indeed opened a whole new range of sensing applications. In parallel to the experimental development of nanomaterials for light management in devices, theoretical modeling and analysis have also accomplished much progress, and different methods for simulating the optical properties of nanoparticles and structures have been proposed. This special issue of the Journal of Nanomaterials is thus dedicated to articles dealing with nanostructured materials that can be used for light management purpose in different applications. Silicon-rich oxide (SRO) is a dielectric material that contains Si nanoparticles and exhibits interesting physical characteristics for applications in optoelectronic devices. The work by Aceves-Mijares et al. examine, in detail the electro-, cathode- and photoluminescence properties of SRO and discuss the origin of light emission in this type of materials. SRO films, of high and medium silicon excess density, obtained by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition and annealed at 1,100 C have been studied. Results obtained by the authors have led to conclude that SRO emission properties are due to oxidation state nanoagglomerates rather than to nanocrystals, and the emission mechanism is similar to that in the donor-acceptor decay in semiconductors with a specific wide emission spectrum. Two papers are devoted to nanostructured electrochromic thin films, a category of materials most suitable for controlling light transmission or absorption in electrooptical devices, including smart window coatings. Dinh et al. have shown that by mixing nanostructured Ti and W oxides films, one can obtain devices with considerable enhancement of electrochromic efficiency and electrochemical stability as compared to the conventional nonnanostructured films. As large-area mixed Ti and W oxides can be prepared by the simple doctor blade technique followed by an electrochemical process, this type of nanostructured electrochromic films can be considered a good candidate for smart window applications. Djaoued et al. have presented their studies on the synthesis, characterization, and electrochromic applicatio

  14. Multifunctional virus scaffolds fore energy applications : nanomaterials synthesis and two dimensional assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Ki Tae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological systems inherently posses the ability to synthesize and assemble nanomaterials with remarkable precision, as evident in biomineralization. These unique abilities of nature continue to inspire us to develop new ...

  15. Development of and Application of Plasmonic Nanomaterials for Mass Spectrometry Based Biosensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamez, Roberto

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    exhibited by gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanomaterials have made for versatile platforms in a wide range of applications including surface plasmon biosensing techniques and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). A primary driver for this work...

  16. Simple Chemical Routes for Changing Composition or Morphology in Metal Chalcogenide Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wark, Stacey Elaine

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal chalcogenide nanomaterials are interesting due to their size dependent properties and potential use in numerous types of devices or applications. The synthetic methods of binary phase metal chalcogenide nanoparticles are well established...

  17. Surface Reductive Capacity of Carbon Nanomaterials after Various Heating and Aging Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chunghoon

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , commercially available carbon black, carbon nanotubes, standard reference materials, fullerenes, graphenes and acetylene soot generated in the lab were used. The carbon nanomaterials were subjected to heating at various temperatures in various atmospheres up...

  18. Simple Chemical Routes for Changing Composition or Morphology in Metal Chalcogenide Nanomaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wark, Stacey Elaine

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal chalcogenide nanomaterials are interesting due to their size dependent properties and potential use in numerous types of devices or applications. The synthetic methods of binary phase metal chalcogenide nanoparticles are well established...

  19. Development of and Application of Plasmonic Nanomaterials for Mass Spectrometry Based Biosensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamez, Roberto

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    exhibited by gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanomaterials have made for versatile platforms in a wide range of applications including surface plasmon biosensing techniques and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). A primary driver for this work...

  20. Identifying and Managing the Health and Safety Hazards of Nanomaterials in Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin Sek

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Filtering Facepiece Respirator GEV General Exhaust Ventilation HEPA High Efficiency Particulate Air KSt Deflagration Index LEV Local Exhaust Ventilation MKOPSC Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center MEC Minimum Explosive Concentration MIE Minimum... of a nanomaterial and its minimum ignition energy (MIE), minimum explosion concentration (MEC), maximum explosion pressure (Pmax), maximum rate of pressure rise ((dP/dt)max), and deflagration index (KSt) of various nanomaterials, such as carbon...

  1. Surface Characterization of Nanomaterials and Nanoparticles: important needs and challenging opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Lai, Jinfeng; Mueller, Karl T.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Washton, Nancy M.; Elder, Alison C.; Baisch, Brittany L.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Moon, DaeWon

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review examines the characterization challenges inherently associated with understanding nanomaterials and how surface characterization methods can help meet those challenges. In parts of the research community, there is growing recognition that many studies and published reports on the properties and behaviors of nanomaterials have involved inadequate characterization. As a consequence, the true value of the data in these reports is, at best, uncertain. As the importance of nanomaterials in fundamental research and technological applications increases, it is necessary for researchers to recognize the challenges associated with reproducible materials synthesis, maintaining desired materials properties during handling and processing, and the dynamic nature of nanomaterials, especially nanoparticles. Researchers also need to understand how characterization approaches (surface and otherwise) can be used to minimize synthesis surprises and to determine how (and how quickly) materials and properties change in different environments. The types of information that can be provided by traditional surface sensitive analysis methods (including X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopies, scanning probe microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy) and less common or evolving surface sensitive methods (e.g., nuclear magnetic resonance, sum frequency generation, and low and medium energy ion scattering) are discussed and various of their use in nanomaterial research are presented.

  2. ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Nanomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Nanomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP Computational Methods in Materials Science 4 CP Lab Materials Science I 5 CP Science Chemistry Physics Engineering Nanomaterials Introductory Engineering 5 CP #12;

  3. 1Plastic deformation and fracture processes in metallic and ceramic nanomaterials... 2007 Advanced Study Center Co. Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovid'ko Ilya A.

    1Plastic deformation and fracture processes in metallic and ceramic nanomaterials... © 2007-mail: ovidko@def.ipme.ru PLASTIC DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE PROCESSES IN METALLIC AND CERAMIC NANOMATERIALS at the boundaries between the large grains and nanoscale matrix. In the framework of the model, cracks are generated

  4. Can Ionic Liquids Be Used As Templating Agents For Controlled Design of Uranium-Containing Nanomaterials?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, A.; Bridges, N.; Tosten, M.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured uranium oxides have been prepared in ionic liquids as templating agents. Using the ionic liquids as reaction media for inorganic nanomaterials takes advantage of the pre-organized structure of the ionic liquids which in turn controls the morphology of the inorganic nanomaterials. Variation of ionic liquid cation structure was investigated to determine the impact on the uranium oxide morphologies. For two ionic liquid cations, increasing the alkyl chain length increases the aspect ratio of the resulting nanostructured oxides. Understanding the resulting metal oxide morphologies could enhance fuel stability and design.

  5. Research Profile The Functional Materials Laboratory (FML) is committed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoghdar, Vahid

    of industrially important nanomaterials Chemical functionalization of graphene­ Functional Materials CONTACT Prof CH-8093 Zürich www.fml.ethz.ch Nanoparticles, Biomaterials, Graphene, Nanomagnets MRCMaterials­(Schneider­O.D.­et­al.,­J.­Biomed.­Mater.­Res.,­84B­(2008)). The­preparation­of­complex­nanoparticles­(right)­in­flame­reactors­­ (left)­gives

  6. Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis, Sensing, Drug Delivery and Gene Transfection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniela Rodica Radu

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The central theme of this dissertation is represented by the versatility of mesoporous silica nanomaterials in various applications such as catalysis and bio-applications, with main focus on biological applications of Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres (MSN). The metamorphosis that we impose to these materials from catalysis to sensing and to drug and gene delivery is detailed in this dissertation. First, we developed a synthetic method that can fine tune the amount of chemically accessible organic functional groups on the pores surface of MSN by exploiting electrostatic and size matching between the cationic alkylammonium head group of the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant and various anionic organoalkoxysilane precursors at the micelle-water interface in a base-catalyzed condensation reaction of silicate. Aiming nature imitation, we demonstrated the catalytic abilities of the MSNs, We utilized an ethylenediamine functional group for chelating Cu{sup 2+} as a catalytic functional group anchored inside the mesopores. Thus, a polyalkynylene-based conducting polymer (molecular wire) was synthesized within the Cu-functionalized MSNs silica catalyst. For sensing applications, we have synthesized a poly(lactic acid) coated mesoporous silica nanosphere (PLA-MSN) material that serves as a fluorescence sensor system for detection of amino-containing neurotransmitters in neutral aqueous buffer. We exploited the mesoporosity of MSNs for encapsulating pharmaceutical drugs. We examined bio-friendly capping molecules such as polyamidoamine dendrimers of generations G2 to G4, to prevent the drug leaching. Next, the drug delivery system employed MSNs loaded with Doxorubicin, an anticancer drug. The results demonstrated that these nano-Trojan horses have ability to deliver Doxorubicin to cancer cells and induce their death. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of MSN as an universal cellular transmembrane nanovehicle, we anchored positively charged dendrimers on the surface of MSN and utilize them to complex cationic DNA. The p-EGFP-CI gene-coated MSN nanocomposite was able to transfect cancer cell lines, such as human HeLa and CHO cancer cell lines. The gene carrier ability of MSNs was further proved by transfecting primary cells and cotransfecting of two different genes in cancer cell lines. In sum, MSN are versatile partners in several types of applications.

  7. Identifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomaterials for Hybrid Solar Cells Hongjun Xiang* and Su-Huai Wei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    Identifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomaterials for Hybrid Solar Cells Hongjun Xiang* and Su-Huai Wei and Department of Physics, Fudan UniVersity, Shanghai 200433, China ReceiVed: August 17, 2009 As a newly developed photovoltaic technology, organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells have attracted great interest

  8. Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    1 Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles can range in size from molecular-scale to hundreds of microns with a typical example be synthesized by aerosol routes where precursor species are dispersed either in a vapor or in micron

  9. Laser Interactions in Nanomaterials Synthesis David B. Geohegan1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Laser Interactions in Nanomaterials Synthesis David B. Geohegan1,2 , Alex A. Puretzky1,2 , Chris. Laser interactions with materials have unique advantages to explore the rapid synthesis, processing, laser vaporization of solids into background gases provides a wide range of processing conditions

  10. Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamali, Ali Reza, E-mail: ark42@cam.ac.uk; Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: {yields} Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. {yields} The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. {yields} A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. {yields} The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

  11. JOM January 201148 www.tms.org/jom.html OverviewOverviewNanomaterials for Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOM · January 201148 www.tms.org/jom.html OverviewOverviewNanomaterials for Renewable Energy Global to fundamental advances in direct renewable energy and ener- gy storage and conversion which are needed to enable renewable energy and meet the general energy challenges and associated environmental effects. This paper

  12. Nanomaterials-Enabled Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells and Jun Lou1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O-7 Nanomaterials-Enabled Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Pei Dong1 and Jun Lou1 1 sensitized solar cells (DSCs), the third generation of solar cells, have attracted more and more attention Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. Dye

  13. Nanomaterials : a review of the definitions, applications, health effects. How to implement secure development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    production for the most common nanomaterials (such as silica, titanium dioxide, carbon black carbone) se chiffre en centaines de milliers de tonnes. Comme c'est le cas pour toute innovation, il are "attributable to its size and distinguishable from the chemical or physical properties of individual atoms

  14. Surface characterization of nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Important needs and challenging opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Lai, Jinfeng; Mueller, Karl; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Washton, Nancy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, EMSL, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, EMSL, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Elder, Alison; Baisch, Brittany L. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Karakoti, Ajay; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V. N. T. [Battelle Science and Technology India, Pune, Maharashtra (India); Moon, DaeWon [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daeju (Korea, Republic of)] [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This review examines characterization challenges inherently associated with understanding nanomaterials and the roles surface and interface characterization methods can play in meeting some of the challenges. In parts of the research community, there is growing recognition that studies and published reports on the properties and behaviors of nanomaterials often have reported inadequate or incomplete characterization. As a consequence, the true value of the data in these reports is, at best, uncertain. With the increasing importance of nanomaterials in fundamental research and technological applications, it is desirable that researchers from the wide variety of disciplines involved recognize the nature of these often unexpected challenges associated with reproducible synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, including the difficulties of maintaining desired materials properties during handling and processing due to their dynamic nature. It is equally valuable for researchers to understand how characterization approaches (surface and otherwise) can help to minimize synthesis surprises and to determine how (and how quickly) materials and properties change in different environments. Appropriate application of traditional surface sensitive analysis methods (including x-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopies, scanning probe microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy) can provide information that helps address several of the analysis needs. In many circumstances, extensions of traditional data analysis can provide considerably more information than normally obtained from the data collected. Less common or evolving methods with surface selectivity (e.g., some variations of nuclear magnetic resonance, sum frequency generation, and low and medium energy ion scattering) can provide information about surfaces or interfaces in working environments (operando or in situ) or information not provided by more traditional methods. Although these methods may require instrumentation or expertise not generally available, they can be particularly useful in addressing specific questions, and examples of their use in nanomaterial research are presented.

  15. Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han,W.Q.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boron nitride (BN) is a synthetic binary compound located between III and V group elements in the Periodic Table. However, its properties, in terms of polymorphism and mechanical characteristics, are rather close to those of carbon compared with other III-V compounds, such as gallium nitride. BN crystallizes into a layered or a tetrahedrally linked structure, like those of graphite and diamond, respectively, depending on the conditions of its preparation, especially the pressure applied. Such correspondence between BN and carbon readily can be understood from their isoelectronic structures [1, 2]. On the other hand, in contrast to graphite, layered BN is transparent and is an insulator. This material has attracted great interest because, similar to carbon, it exists in various polymorphic forms exhibiting very different properties; however, these forms do not correspond strictly to those of carbon. Crystallographically, BN is classified into four polymorphic forms: Hexagonal BN (h-BN) (Figure 1(b)); rhombohedral BN (r-BN); cubic BN (c-BN); and wurtzite BN (w-BN). BN does not occur in nature. In 1842, Balmain [3] obtained BN as a reaction product between molten boric oxide and potassium cyanide under atmospheric pressure. Thereafter, many methods for its synthesis were reported. h-BN and r-BN are formed under ambient pressure. c-BN is synthesized from h-BN under high pressure at high temperature while w-BN is prepared from h-BN under high pressure at room temperature [1]. Each BN layer consists of stacks of hexagonal plate-like units of boron and nitrogen atoms linked by SP{sup 2} hybridized orbits and held together mainly by Van der Waals force (Fig 1(b)). The hexagonal polymorph has two-layered repeating units: AA'AA'... that differ from those in graphite: ABAB... (Figure 1(a)). Within the layers of h-BN there is coincidence between the same phases of the hexagons, although the boron atoms and nitrogen atoms are alternatively located along the c-axis. The rhombohedral system consists of three-layered units: ABCABC..., whose honeycomb layers are arranged in a shifted phase, like as those of graphite. Reflecting its weak interlayer bond, the h-BN can be cleaved easily along its layers, and hence, is widely used as a lubricant material. The material is stable up to a high temperature of 2300 C before decomposition sets in [2] does not fuse a nitrogen atmosphere of 1 atm, and thus, is applicable as a refractory material. Besides having such properties, similar to those of graphite, the material is transparent, and acts as a good electric insulator, especially at high temperatures (10{sup 6} {Omega}m at 1000 C) [1]. c-BN and w-BN are tetrahedrally linked BN. The former has a cubic sphalerite-type structure, and the latter has a hexagonal wurtzite-type structure. c-BN is the second hardest known material (the hardest is diamond), the so-called white diamond. It is used mainly for grinding and cutting industrial ferrous materials because it does not react with molten iron, nickel, and related alloys at high temperatures whereas diamond does [1]. It displays the second highest thermal conductivity (6-9 W/cm.deg) after diamond. This chapter focuses principally upon information about h-BN nanomaterials, mainly BN nanotubes (BNNTs), porous BN, mono- and few-layer-BN sheets. There are good reviews book chapters about c-BN in [1, 4-6].

  16. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Inorganic Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Seunghwan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    maximizing the thermal conductivity of the nanomaterial (which typically occurs for nanoparticle size varying between ~ 20-30nm) and maximizing the specific heat capacity (which typically occurs for nanoparticle size less than 5nm), while simultaneously...

  17. Strategic Research Orientation `NanoMaterials for Energy' 1 Energy projects within MESA+ research groups, February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    Strategic Research Orientation `NanoMaterials for Energy' 1 Energy projectsMaterials for Energy' Information: www.utwente.nl/mesaplus/nme/ Project title Group Ph water splitting and CO2 reduction OS / PCS Sun-Young Park Jennifer Herek

  18. Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells; Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopal Rao, MRS Web-Editor; Yury Gogotsi, Drexel University; Karen Swider-Lyons, Naval Research Laboratory

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Symposium T: Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are under intense investigation worldwide for applications ranging from transportation to portable power. The purpose of this seminar is to focus on the nanomaterials and nanostructures inherent to polymer fuel cells. Symposium topics will range from high-activity cathode and anode catalysts, to theory and new analytical methods. Symposium U: Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storage Electricity, which can be generated in a variety of ways, offers a great potential for meeting future energy demands as a clean and efficient energy source. However, the use of electricity generated from renewable sources, such as wind or sunlight, requires efficient electrical energy storage. This symposium will cover the latest material developments for batteries, advanced capacitors, and related technologies, with a focus on new or emerging materials science challenges.

  19. Synthesis and Functionalization of Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kristopher John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Nitrides for Hydrogen Storage. Adv. Funct. Mater.N compounds for chemical hydrogen storage. Chemical SocietyT. , High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage in Zeolite-Templated

  20. Synthesis and Functionalization of Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kristopher John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wall carbon nanotube/polyimide nanocomposites. Journal ofwall carbon nanotube/polyimide nanocomposites. Journal ofto BNNTs 2.6.2 Attachment of Polyimide Polymer to BNNTs ii

  1. Synthesis and Functionalization of Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kristopher John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fields of batteries, supercapacitors, and composites, all offor battery or supercapacitors electrode materials), or be

  2. Synthesis and Functionalization of Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kristopher John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or electronics, as a supercapacitor or battery electrode,Significant advancements in supercapacitor 49 and battery 50

  3. Nanomaterials for Fuel cells, Batteries, and Supercapacitors Flow Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Indranath

    nanoparticles with high activity for formic acid oxidation." Journal of Power Sources 195(4):1103-1106. 7. Li, Z. 2010. "Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable support of Pt nanoparticles.1016/j.elecom.2009.08.053 Fuel Cells: Direct Methanol and Formic Acid Fuel Cells 3. Song, P; Zhang, XY

  4. DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700076 Novel Method for Synthesis of Nano-Materials: Combustion of Active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700076 Novel Method for Synthesis of Nano-Materials: Combustion of Active- and combustion synthesis. A combination of combustion and reactive solution approaches leads to so- called solution (aqueous) combustion synthesis (SCS) method.[1­3] Typically SCS involves a self-sustained reaction

  5. Post Doctoral Associate Position on Carbon Nanomaterials We are looking for a highly motivated, experienced, and talented Post Doctoral Scholar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based Nanomaterials and Composites with Applications in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells. This project is related-cost photovoltaic devices, in order to provide efficient conversion of solar energy to electricity. The strong ties to the Research Program "Advanced Materials for Highly Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells ­ AdMatDSC" funded

  6. Vol. 63 No. 1 JOM 43www.tms.org/jom.html CommentaryNanomaterials for Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vol. 63 No. 1 · JOM 43www.tms.org/jom.html CommentaryNanomaterials for Renewable Energy Fernand D be placed on achieving higher energy efficiency and increasing supplies from all forms of renewable energy Systems in Energy and Environment: Renewable Energy Fernand D.S. Marquis ence include (1) dimensional

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory/National Synchrotron Light Source Subject: Operation of Nano-material Hood in Room 1-128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    -material Hood in Room 1-128 Number: LS-ESH-0051 Revision: 1 Effective: 10/01/2007 Page 1 of 1 Keith Klaus John Procedure on Nanomaterial ES&H requires work that could generate dispersible nanoparticles be conducted of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify

  8. CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Card Entry: Use of card to enter room, proper room entry (no piggybacking) - no entry to service chase by users without specific authorization Emergency phone numbers:...

  9. BNL | CFN Strategic Plan | State-of-the-art Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    catalyst supports, and solar energy capture. New capabilities to enhance the time, energy and spatial resolutions of the ultrafast and single-molecule optical facilities...

  10. CFN | Hitachi HD2700C Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hitachi HD2700C Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope Contacts: Dong Su | Lihua Zhang | Huolin Xin The Hitachi 2700C is a dedicated Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope...

  11. albino rat cfn: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    most commonly used in research are believed to be domesticated albino strains of the Norway rat rattus nirvegicus. Rats like mice, belong to the order Rodentia Biology and...

  12. BNL | CFN Strategic Plan | Nanpmaterials in Operando Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cu, Pt) family, for example, shows promise for the hydrogenation of CO2 to produce methanol. But reaction pressures approaching 1 atm are necessary to produce enough methanol to...

  13. CFN, A User-oriented Nanoscience Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Energy * Materials * Coatings * Composites Industrial interest General Electric Raytheon ExxonMobil NEI Corporation Proto Mfg. Inc. Perpetual Technologies Brentronics A & A...

  14. CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Soft-Bio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    access to the building without authorization of Facility Leader and ES&H Coordinator Card Entry: Use of card to enter room, proper room entry (no piggybacking) Emergency phone...

  15. CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Electrophoretic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Leader and ES&H Coordinator Card Entry: Use of card to enter room, proper room entry (no piggybacking) Emergency phone numbers: FireMedical 631-344-2222, Security...

  16. CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Electronic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Leader and ES&H Coordinator Card Entry: Use of card to enter room, proper room entry (no piggybacking) Emergency phone numbers: FireMedical 631-344-2222, Security...

  17. CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    location of all necessary PPE Card Entry: Use of card to enter room, proper room entry (no piggybacking) After Hours Policy: Normal working hours is 8 to 6, Mon. to Fri....

  18. CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Proximal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Card Entry: Use of card to enter room, proper room entry (no piggybacking) - no entry to service chase by users without specific authorization Emergency phone numbers:...

  19. NSLS User Transition Planning Forum 2012 NSLS/CFN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1974 & 2004 11 000 12,000 ALS 1993 LCLS 2009 APS 1996 Harriet Kung, BESAC March 17 2011 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 rs 4 000 5,000 6,000 7,000 umberofUser APS ALS SSRL LCLS 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 N NSLS

  20. Microsoft Word - CFN_Final_for_IDM.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8 3. MarchFigure 1CAMDCBFO

  1. Linear and nonlinear optics of hybrid plasmon-exciton nanomaterials in the presence of overlapping resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukharev, Maxim; Pachter, Ruth

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a hybrid plasmon-exciton system comprised of a resonant molecular subsystem and three Au wires supporting a dipole mode which can be coupled to a dark mode in controllable fashion by variation of a symmetry parameter. The physics of such a system under strong coupling conditions is examined in detail. It is shown that if two wires supporting the dark mode are covered with molecular layers the system exhibits four resonant modes for a strong coupling regime due to asymmetry and lifted degeneracy of the molecular state in this case, while upon having molecular aggregates covering the top wire with dipolar mode, three resonant modes appear. Pump-probe simulations are performed to scrutinize the quantum dynamics and find possible ways to control plasmon-exciton materials. It is demonstrated that one can design hybrid nanomaterials with highly pronounced Fano-type resonances when excited by femtosecond lasers.

  2. Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Brozik, Susan Marie; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Bachand, George David; Bachand, Marlene; Aaron, Jesse S.; Allen, Amy; Seagrave, Jean-Clare

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in commercial products, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, and clothing industries. For example, pants and shirts are routinely manufactured with silver nanoparticles to render them 'wrinkle-free.' Despite the growing applications, the associated environmental health and safety (EHS) impacts are completely unknown. The significance of this problem became pervasive within the general public when Prince Charles authored an article in 2004 warning of the potential social, ethical, health, and environmental issues connected to nanotechnology. The EHS concerns, however, continued to receive relatively little consideration from federal agencies as compared with large investments in basic nanoscience R&D. The mounting literature regarding the toxicology of ENMs (e.g., the ability of inhaled nanoparticles to cross the blood-brain barrier; Kwon et al., 2008, J. Occup. Health 50, 1) has spurred a recent realization within the NNI and other federal agencies that the EHS impacts related to nanotechnology must be addressed now. In our study we proposed to address critical aspects of this problem by developing primary correlations between nanoparticle properties and their effects on cell health and toxicity. A critical challenge embodied within this problem arises from the ability to synthesize nanoparticles with a wide array of physical properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, surface chemistry, etc.), which in turn creates an immense, multidimensional problem in assessing toxicological effects. In this work we first investigated varying sizes of quantum dots (Qdots) and their ability to cross cell membranes based on their aspect ratio utilizing hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy. We then studied toxicity of epithelial cell lines that were exposed to different sized gold and silver nanoparticles using advanced imaging techniques, biochemical analyses, and optical and mass spectrometry methods. Finally we evaluated a new assay to measure transglutaminase (TG) activity; a potential marker for cell toxicity.

  3. RE/ZrO{sub 2} (RE = Sm, Eu) composite oxide nano-materials: Synthesis and applications in photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Weimin, E-mail: duweimin75@gmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455002 (China); Zhu, Zhaoqiang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455002 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China); Zhang, Xiaofen; Wang, Dacheng; Liu, Donghe [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455002 (China); Qian, Xuefeng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Du, Jimin, E-mail: djm@aynu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455002 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • RE/ZrO{sub 2} (RE = Sm, Eu) nano-materials have been successfully synthesized. • Defect and electron structures determine the absorption properties on visible light. • Nano-sized Zr{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}O{sub 2??} has good visible-light-responsive photocatalytic activities. • In the future, it can be used in wastewater treatment and environmental protection. - Abstract: Zirconia modified by Samarium/Europium, RE/ZrO{sub 2} (RE = Sm, Eu), composite oxide nano-materials have been successfully synthesized by improved sol–gel method. Characterization results show that X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks of products gradually shift to the lower angle with the increase of rare earth which implies that the lattice distances of RE/ZrO{sub 2} nano-materials are gradually enlarged. Moreover, the molar ratios between zirconium and rare earth are consistent with the chemical formula and both of them are uniformly distributed in samples. Optical properties indicate that defect structures and electron configurations of RE/ZrO{sub 2} (RE = Sm, Eu) with single phase determine their absorption properties on visible light. Photocatalytic experiments indicate Zr{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}O{sub 2??} nano-crystals have excellent visible-light-responsive photocatalytic activities on Methylene blue and Rhodamine B which results from the special defect structure, suitable electronic configuration, and larger specific surface area. It follows that Zr{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}O{sub 2??} nano-crystals are new visible-light-responsive photocatalysts which can be applied in dye wastewater treatment and environmental protection in the future.

  4. Bonding distances as Exact Sums of the Radii of the Constituent Atoms in Nanomaterials - Boron Nitride and Coronene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents for the first time the exact structures at the atomic level of two important nanomaterials, boron nitride and coronene. Both these compounds are hexagonal layer structures similar to graphene in two dimensions and to graphite in three-dimensions. However, they have very different properties: whereas graphene is a conductor, h-BN is an electrical insulator and coronene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of cosmological interest. The atomic structures presented here for boron nitride, coronene and graphene have been drawn to scale based on bond lengths as sums of the atomic radii.

  5. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I. [Nuclear Reactor Program, Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  6. Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The projected size of the INL 300 kW pilot model reactor would be about 15% that of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. Including the safety net factor the projected INL pilot reactor size would be 25-30% of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma pilot reactor. Due to the modularity of the INL plasma reactor and the energy cascading effect from the upstream plasma to the downstream plasma the energy utilization is more efficient in material processing. It is envisioning that the material through put range for the INL pilot reactor would be comparable to the PPG 300 kW pilot reactor but the energy consumption would be lower. The INL hybrid plasma technology is rather close to being optimized for scaling to a pilot system. More near term development work is still needed to complete the process optimization before pilot scaling.

  7. Scientific Evaluation of Nanomaterials of TiO{sub 2} and Related Derivatives in a Variety of Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitler, Timothy M; Stewart, Matthew; Pasquier, Aurelien Du; Coleman, Michael; Gunasinghe, Thushara; Manev, Veselin; Stucky, Galen; Holden, Patricia; Neal, Andrea; Suh, Won Hyuk

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Altair Nanotechnolgies, Inc. (Altair) has performed and hereby reports on research and development of novel nanomaterials for applications in 1) advanced power storage devices, 2) sensors for chemical, biological and radiological agents and on an 3) investigation into mechanisms of living cell-nanoparticle interactions that will allow predictions of health and safety issues and potentially result in novel agents for remediation of chemical and biological hazards. The project was organized around four distinct objectives. Two of the objectives are focused on developments designed to dramatically improve the performance of rechargeable Li-Ion batteries. These efforts are based on extensions of Altair's proprietary TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and nanoparticle aggregates in the form of lithium titanate spinel, lithium manganates and lithium cobaltates. A third objective leverages the core Altair nanomaterials technology to develop a unique (nanosensor) platform for the error-free, "lab on a chip" detection of chemical, biological and radiological agents for hazardous materials remediation and threat detection. The innovative approach taken by the Altair/Western Michigan team develops individual nanosensor elements built upon a construct that includes a target-specific receptor molecule coupled through a signal transducing nanomolecule to a gold, TiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2} nanoparticle coated with a high density of strongfluorescing molecules for signal amplification The final objective focuses on interaction mechanisms between cells and nanoparticles with the goal of understanding how specific chemical and physical properties of these nanoparticles influence that interaction. The effort will examine a range of microbes that have environmental or societal importance.

  8. Calibration and data collection protocols for reliable lattice parameter values in electron pair distribution function (ePDF) studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Hu, Hefei; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore and describe different protocols for calibrating electron pair distribution function (ePDF) measurements for quantitative studies on nano-materials. We find the most accurate approach to determine the camera-length is to use a standard calibration sample of Au nanoparticles from National Institute of Standards and Technology. Different protocols for data collection are also explored, as are possible operational errors, to find the best approaches for accurate data collection for quantitative ePDF studies.

  9. Surface Modification of Layered Zirconium Phosphates: A Novel Pathway to Multifunctional Nanomaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosby, Brian Matthew

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    the surface or exterior layers of the material, while leaving the internal layers and structure unchanged. This allows for organic derivatives of layered materials in which the interlayer chemistry is not lost to achieve organic functionalization. The addition...

  10. Nanotechnology for Solar-hydrogen Production via Photoelectrochemical Water-splitting: Design, Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Nanomaterials and Quantum Dots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenzi, Naser D.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR SOLAR-HYDROGEN PRODUCTION VIA PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL WATER-SPLITTING: DESIGN, SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND APPLICATION OF NANOMATERIALS AND QUANTUM DOTS A Dissertation by NASER D. ALENZI Submitted... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR SOLAR-HYDROGEN PRODUCTION VIA...

  11. Interlaboratory Evaluation of in Vitro Cytotoxicity and Inflammatory Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: The NIEHS Nano GO Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Tian; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Bonner, James C.; Crandall, Edward D.; Elder, Alison C.; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Girtsman, Teri A.; Mitra, Somenath; Ntim, Susana A.; Orr, Galya; Tagmount, Mani; Taylor, Alexia J.; Telesca, Donatello; Tolic, Ana; Vulpe, Chris D.; Walker, Andrea J.; Wang, Xiang; Witzmann, Frank A.; Wu, Nianqiang; Xie, Yumei; Zink, Jeffery I.; Nel, Andre; Holian, Andrij

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Differences in interlaboratory research protocols contribute to the conflicting data in the literature regarding engineered nanomaterial (ENM) bioactivity. Objectives: Grantees of a National Institute of Health Sciences (NIEHS)-funded consortium program performed two phases of in vitro testing with selected ENMs in an effort to identify and minimize sources of variability. Methods: Consortium program participants (CPPs) conducted ENM bioactivity evaluations on zinc oxide (ZnO), three forms of titanium dioxide (TiO2), and three forms of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In addition, CPPs performed bioassays using three mammalian cell lines (BEAS-2B, RLE-6TN, and THP-1) selected in order to cover two different species (rat and human), two different lung epithelial cells (alveolar type II and bronchial epithelial cells), and two different cell types (epithelial cells and macrophages). CPPs also measured cytotoxicity in all cell types while measuring inflammasome activation [interleukin-1? (IL-1?) release] using only THP-1 cells. Results: The overall in vitro toxicity profiles of ENM were as follows: ZnO was cytotoxic to all cell types at ? 50 ? g/mL, but did not induce IL-1?. TiO2 was not cytotoxic except for the nanobelt form, which was cytotoxic and induced significant IL-1? production in THP-1 cells. MWCNTs did not produce cytotoxicity, but stimulated lower levels of IL-1? production in THP-1 cells, with the original MWCNT producing the most IL-1?. Conclusions: The results provide justification for the inclusion of mechanism-linked bioactivity assays along with traditional cytotoxicity assays for in vitro screening. In addition, the results suggest that conducting studies with multiple relevant cell types to avoid false-negative outcomes is critical for accurate evaluation of ENM bioactivity.

  12. Finite Size Effects on the Real-Space Pair Distribution Function of Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Benjamin

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pair distribution function (PDF) method is a powerful approach for the analysis of the structure of nanoparticles. An important approximation used in nanoparticle PDF simulations is the incorporation of a form factor describing nanoparticle size and shape. The precise effect of the form factor on the PDF is determined by both particle shape and structure if these characteristics are both anisotropic and correlated. The correct incorporation of finite size effects is important for distinguishing and quantifying the structural consequences of small particle size in nanomaterials.

  13. CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Nanofabrication (Clean Room) Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    -ESH-USERS [ ] [ ] [ ] Cyber Security Training GE-CYBERSEC X X X Laboratory Standard HP-IND-220 X X X Hazardous Waste HP Safety for Benchtop Workers TQ-ELECT-BENCHTOP [ ] [ ] [ ] Oxygen Deficiency Hazard TQ-ODH X X X and understood clean room orientation/protocols Gowning procedure: demonstrate proper clean room dress Personal

  14. CFN Director E. Mendez User Administration G. Webster D. McArthur

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kisslinger D. Su E. Sutter H. Xin D. Zakharov L. Zhang M. Cordeiro* A. Gamalski* K. He* Theory Computation M. Hybertsen D. Lu A. Tkachenko Q. Wu X. Ge* J. Lyons* P. Liu+ Center...

  15. Microsoft Word - CFN_CSD_Cabling_Infrastructure_v1.1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commissioning of the cabling systems above are also in the scope of this contract. The supplier shall provide a warranty for the installed cabling systems. Cable trays are out...

  16. Magnetic Nanoparticle NANOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 and T2 relaxation times, hysteretic energy loss, etc.) for use in biomedical applications reduce the $1.7 billion price tag to bring a drug to the market. Approach Materials Science measurement techniques will be developed: First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) models to correlate physical size

  17. Method for making nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou; Wu, Huimeng

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a nanostructure by preparing a face centered cubic-ordered metal nanoparticle film from metal nanoparticles, such as gold and silver nanoparticles, exerting a hydrostatic pressure upon the film at pressures of several gigapascals, followed by applying a non-hydrostatic stress perpendicularly at a pressure greater than approximately 10 GPA to form an array of nanowires with individual nanowires having a relatively uniform length, average diameter and density.

  18. Bioremediation of nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

  19. Synchrotron Beamline NANOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -of-the-art local structure measurements for electronic, energy, and magnetic storage applications. Approach; and development of lubricants for magnetic hard drives. 852-06-63b · NIST operates a suite of three synchrotron cycle helium refrigeration system, which should be commissioned in FY10. This modification provides

  20. Metrology for Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergyInstitute of Standards and

  1. Sustainable Nanomaterials Industry Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps |DepartmentNano-Materials

  2. thermonuclear functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Aslam Chaudhry

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two representations of the extended gamma functions ? 2,0 0,2 [(b,x)] are proved. These representations are exploited to find a transformation relation between two Fox’s H-functions. These results are used to solve Fox’s H-function in terms of Meijer’s G-function for certain values of the parameters. A closed form representation of the kernel of the Bessel type integral transform is also proved. 1.

  3. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 052115 (2011) Quantum heating of a parametrically modulated oscillator: Spectral signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dykman, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 052115 (2011) Quantum heating of a parametrically modulated oscillator¨orperphysik and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe of the nonequidistance of the oscillator quasienergy levels and quantum heating that accompanies relaxation. The heating

  4. Synthesis of Functionalized Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from a Common Precursor and their Application as Heavy Metal and Actinide Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Marvin G.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Davidson, Joseph D.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the use of a simple and versatile technique to generate a series of ligand stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles containing different ? functionalities with specificities toward heavy metals and actinides at the periphery of the stabilizing ligand shell from a common, easy to synthesize precursor nanoparticle. The resulting nanoparticles are designed to contain affinity ligands that make them excellent sorbent materials for a variety of heavy metals from contaminated aqueous systems such as river water and ground water as well as actinides from clinical samples such as blood and urine. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles make ideal reagents for extraction of heavy metal and actinide contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. In addition, these engineered nanomaterials have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g) making them ideal sorbent materials for these types of applications

  5. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  6. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  7. Gonzalo Alvarez Nanomaterials Theory Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . of Montevideo, Uruguay Physics M.S., 1999 U. of Montevideo, Uruguay Physics B.S., 1996 Professional Experience. of Montevideo, Uruguay Honors and Awards 2011 Early Career award, Department of Energy 2008 Gordon Bell Prize

  8. Microfluidic synthesis of colloidal nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saif A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on microfluidics based approaches for synthesis and surface-engineering of colloidal particles. Bottom-up assembly through colloidal nucleation and growth is a popular route to the controlled synthesis ...

  9. Jingsong Huang Nanomaterials Theory Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Ridge National Laboratory (865) 576-3991 huangj3@ornl.gov Publications Education Georgetown University, Washington, DC Physical Chemistry Ph.D., 2006 Nankai University, Tianjin, China Physical Chemistry M.S., 1994 Southwest University, Chongqing, China Professional Experience Chemistry B.S., 1991, Outstanding Graduate

  10. Nanomaterials Information | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593Energy StoragePortal Hydrogen

  11. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop - Participants List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps

  12. Lyapunov functions nonlinear spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafstein, Sigurður Freyr

    Lyapunov functions on nonlinear spaces R. Sepulchre -- University of Liege, Belgium Reykjavik - July 2013 Constructing Lyapunov functions: a personal journey · Lyap functions in linear spaces (1994: homogeneous spaces with flat, positive, and negative curvature) Lyapunov functions in linear spaces 3

  13. Exploring Functional Mellin Transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. LaChapelle

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We define functional Mellin transforms within a scheme for functional integration proposed in [1]. Functional Mellin transforms can be used to define functional traces, logarithms, and determinants. The associated functional integrals are useful tools for probing function spaces in general and $C^\\ast$-algebras in particular. Several interesting aspects are explored.

  14. Functional Mellin Transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. LaChapelle

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Functional integrals are defined in terms of locally compact topological groups and their associated Banach-valued Haar integrals. This approach generalizes the functional integral scheme of Cartier and DeWitt-Morette. The definition allows a construction of functional Mellin transforms. In turn, the functional Mellin transforms can be used to define functional traces, logarithms, and determinants. The associated functional integrals are useful tools for probing function spaces in general and $C^\\ast$-algebras in particular. Several interesting aspects are explored.

  15. Functional Power Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrik Stenlund

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This work introduces a new functional series for expanding an analytic function in terms of an arbitrary analytic function. It is generally applicable and straightforward to use. It is also suitable for approximating the behavior of a function with a few terms. A new expression is presented for the composite function's n'th derivative. The inverse-composite method is handled in this work also.

  16. Green's function on lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Ray

    2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to calculate exact Green's functions on lattices in various dimensions is presented. Expressions in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions in one or more variables are obtained for various examples by relating the resolvent to a contour integral, evaluated using residues. Different ways of arranging the series leads to different combinations of hypergeometric functions providing identities involving generalized hypergeometric functions. The method is shown to be useful for computing Green's functions with next-nearest neighbor hopping as well.

  17. Nanoscale Synthesis and Functional Assembly Center for Nanophase Materials Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Society 2001­p Journal Reviewer: Applied Catalysis, Catalysis Communications, Chemical Communications catalysis, nanomaterials for catalysis and photocatalysis, and applied spectroscopy. Specific techniques­2003 Research Associate, State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, China

  18. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  19. Nanotechnology for Solar-hydrogen Production via Photoelectrochemical Water-splitting: Design, Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Nanomaterials and Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenzi, Naser D.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    -scale ..................................................... 35 1.25 Atoms nucleation and growth rate during synthesis .................................. 36 1.26 The AM 1.5 solar spectrum as function of photon energy. ........................ 37 1.27 Thermal solar energy systems (A) parabolic dish (B... Page 1.1 Hydrogen production pathways ................................................................. 4 1.2 Solar to hydrogen conversion pathways, STC is solar thermochemical, CST is concentrating solar thermal, and PEC...

  20. Green's functions Lucia Reining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Green's functions Lucia Reining Laboratoire des Solides Irradi´es Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau - France European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) Belfast, 27.6.2007 Green's functions Lucia Motivation 2 Encouragement 3 Mathematics 4 Physics: the harmonic oscillator 5 Green's functions in quantum

  1. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

  2. Photon wave function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, the photon wave function exists as long as it can be precisely defined and made useful.

  3. Zeta Functional Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Idowu

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We intimate deeper connections between the Riemann zeta and gamma functions than often reported and further derive a new formula for expressing the value of $\\zeta(2n+1)$ in terms of zeta at other fractional points. This paper also establishes and presents new expository notes and perspectives on zeta function theory and functional analysis. In addition, a new fundamental result, in form of a new function called omega $\\Omega(s)$, is introduced to analytic number theory for the first time. This new function together with some of its most fundamental properties and other related identities are here disclosed and presented as a new approach to the analysis of sums of generalised harmonic series, related alternating series and polygamma functions associated with Riemann zeta function.

  4. Functional Answer Set Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabalar, Pedro

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we propose an extension of Answer Set Programming (ASP), and in particular, of its most general logical counterpart, Quantified Equilibrium Logic (QEL), to deal with partial functions. Although the treatment of equality in QEL can be established in different ways, we first analyse the choice of decidable equality with complete functions and Herbrand models, recently proposed in the literature. We argue that this choice yields some counterintuitive effects from a logic programming and knowledge representation point of view. We then propose a variant called QELF where the set of functions is partitioned into partial and Herbrand functions (we also call constructors). In the rest of the paper, we show a direct connection to Scott's Logic of Existence and present a practical application, proposing an extension of normal logic programs to deal with partial functions and equality, so that they can be translated into function-free normal programs, being possible in this way to compute their answer sets...

  5. Spectral Functions in QFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pisani, Pablo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a pedagogical exposition of some applications of functional methods in quantum field theory: we use heat-kernel and zeta-function techniques to study the Casimir effect, the pair production in strong electric fields, quantum fields at finite temperature and beta-functions for a self-interacting scalar field, QED and pure Yang-Mills theories. The more recent application to the UV/IR mixing phenomenon in noncommutative theories is also discussed in this framework.

  6. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS capabilities and much-needed beam time for the life sciences, soft condensed matter physics, and nanoscience communities. Looking toward the future, a significant step has been made in expanding the user base and diversifying the work force by holding the first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Professors' Workshop. The workshop, which brought 11 professors to the NSLS to learn how to become successful synchrotron users, concluded with the formation of an HBCU User Consortium. Finally, significant contributions were made in optics and detector development to enhance the utilization of the NSLS and address the challenges of NSLS-II. In particular, x-ray detectors developed by the NSLS Detector Section have been adopted by an increasing number of research programs both at the NSLS and at light sources around the world, speeding up measurement times by orders of magnitude and making completely new experiments feasible. Significant advances in focusing and high-energy resolution optics have also been made this year.

  7. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLER, L. (EDITOR)

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget and the years to follow, we need to continue to educate our elected representatives about the benefits that are provided to our society and our economy by scientific investigation including research done at DOE user facilities like the NSLS. We face another interesting challenge as the NSLS-II project progresses: the formation of scientific research teams associated with particular beamlines at the new facility. In early 2007, the final draft of the conceptual design report will be available, which will describe the projected capabilities of NSLS-II, and we can expect a workshop in mid-2007 to launch the process leading to letters of intent for beamlines. This process will include lots of discussion about access modes, as we seek ways to allow scientific and technical innovators from the user community to play significant roles at NSLS-II.

  8. GREEN'S FUNCTIONS OF VORTEX OPERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface clustering the Green's function 5.1 actually spreadsb. Another graph for the same Green's function. c. Anothercomposite divergences. The Green's function 5.6, considered

  9. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

  10. Properties of Entire Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunkler, Richard F

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -3) an entire function F(z) differs from its canonical product by a factor of e , where h(z) h(z) is an entire function. Ifp is not an integer, then P is equal to the integral part of p o However, ifpk is an integer, then ~ ~)A- 1 orp according...

  11. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  12. Pretzelosity distribution function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Avakian; A. V. Efremov; P. Schweitzer; F. Yuan

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'pretzelosity' distribution is discussed. Theoretical properties, model results, and perspectives to access experimental information on this leading twist, transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function are reviewed. Its relation to helicity and transversity distributions is highlighted.

  13. Software Function Allocation Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, Michael Ralph

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Necessary) Rapid Prototypes (Optional) 3. 4. 1 SFAM Step 1 ? Preparation If the Computer System Map (CSM) has not been created for the current overall hardware system, it is completed before the software function allocation process begins.... The methodology begins when the preconditions above have been met and the CSM is completed. The first step is to consult the list of software function allocation parameters provided as part of the methodology. The list of parameters will at first be sufficient...

  14. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  15. Coverable functions Petr Kucera,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of clauses needed to represent f by a CNF. ess(f) - maximum number of pairwise disjoint essential sets of implicates of f. A function f is coverable, if cnf(f)=ess(f). #12;Talk outline We already know from Horn functions. X E ess(f) = ess(X) + k #12;CNF Graph For a Horn CNF let be the digraph defined as: N

  16. Astrophysical thermonuclear functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Anderson; H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    As theoretical knowledge and experimental verification of nuclear cross sections increases it becomes possible to refine analytic representations for nuclear reaction rates. In this paper mathematical/statistical techniques for deriving closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions are summarized and numerical results for them are given.The purpose of the paper is also to compare numerical results for approximate and closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions.

  17. Functional Area Assessments Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    with Huron on detailed project plan. Subject Experts Subject Expert Role Functional leadership Administrative1 of 2 Functional Area Assessments ­ Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments - Internal Budgeting - Human Resources These diagnostics will be performed using interviews, surveys, data

  18. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, D. [UCLA; Casero, D. [UCLA; Cokus, S. J. [UCLA; Merchant, S. S. [UCLA; Pellegrini, M. [UCLA

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  19. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  20. Hypertrapezoidal fuzzy membership functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, John H.; Kelly, W. E. III

    1996-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , the use of one-dimensional membership yi??? Figure 1. Typical 1 D membership functions. 0-7803-3645-3196 $5 .OOO 1996 IEEE functions has proved to be inadequate in practical situations involving comlplex systems. In particular, previous work... University. Downloaded on February 16,2010 at 15:03:24 EST from IEEE Xplore. Restrictions apply. : "Correlated" model - Two variable composition 8 (i.e. IF Si and Sj, THEN ...) rint sf fuzzy set w For systems with correlation between two variables, x...

  1. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  2. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana, R.A.

    1988-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R[sub 1]H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R[sub 1] represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R[sub 2])[sub 3

  3. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturi, Daniele, E-mail: daniele-venturi@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)] [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  4. Astrophysical thermonuclear functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Anderson; Hans J. Haubold; Arak Mathai Mathai

    1993-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Stars are gravitationally stabilized fusion reactors changing their chemical composition while transforming light atomic nuclei into heavy ones. The atomic nuclei are supposed to be in thermal equilibrium with the ambient plasma. The majority of reactions among nuclei leading to a nuclear transformation are inhibited by the necessity for the charged participants to tunnel through their mutual Coulomb barrier. As theoretical knowledge and experimental verification of nuclear cross sections increases it becomes possible to refine analytic representations for nuclear reaction rates. Over the years various approaches have been made to derive closed-form representations of thermonuclear reaction rates (Critchfield 1972, Haubold and John 1978, Haubold, Mathai and Anderson 1987). They show that the reaction rate contains the astrophysical cross section factor and its derivatives which has to be determined experimentally, and an integral part of the thermonuclear reaction rate independent from experimental results which can be treated by closed-form representation techniques in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions. In this paper mathematical/statistical techniques for deriving closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions will be summarized and numerical results for them will be given. The separation of thermonuclear functions from thermonuclear reaction rates is our preferred result. The purpose of the paper is also to compare numerical results for approximate and closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions. This paper completes the work of Haubold, Mathai, and Anderson (1987).

  5. Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amanda R. Lopes; Alvaro Iribarrem; Marcelo B. Ribeiro; William R. Stoeger

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach using observational data provided by galaxy redshift surveys. Starting from the theory of Ribeiro & Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094) between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity $L$ and the average galactic mass $\\mathcal{M}_g$ are computed in terms of the redshift. $\\mathcal{M}_g$ is also alternatively estimated by a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allows us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range $0.5 light ratio and its GSMF data. Assuming ${\\mathcal{M}_{g_0}} \\approx 10^{11} \\mathcal{M}_\\odot$ as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in $L_{B} \\propto (1+z)^{(2.40 \\pm 0.03)}$ and $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(1.1\\pm0.2)}$. However, using the GSMF results produces $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(-0.58 \\pm 0.22)}$. We chose the latter result as it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function. The derived GCMF follows theoretical predictions in which the less massive objects form first, being followed later by more massive ones. In the range $0.5 < z < 2.0$ the GCMF has a strong variation that can be interpreted as a higher rate of galaxy mergers or as a strong evolution in the star formation history of these galaxies.

  6. HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University AMS-ASL-MAA Panel on Hilberts Tenth Problem San Francisco January 14, 2010 #12;HTP over Function's known about HTP over Function Fields. Field Results for Characteristic 0 Field Results for Positive

  7. Nanomaterials Summer School, Tsukuba, July 2007 Nanomagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    be demagnetized by heating. Soft ferromagnets: CoS2, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, ZnFe2O4 Hard feromagnets: SmCo5, CoFe2O4, Nd

  8. Nanomaterials for Energy and Electronics Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    . These devices have demonstrated conversion efficiencies of 16-32%. Although photovoltaic devices built, DSCs are thought to be advantageous as a photovoltaic device possessing both practical high efficiency and environ- mental challenge as a carbon-neutral energy source. Many photovoltaic devices that fulfill

  9. Synthesis and Spectroscopy of Composite Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmorris, Robert Carl

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. ; Hodes, G. , Dye-sensitized Solar Cells: Principles ofGary Hodes, Dye-sensitized Solar Cells: Principles ofSilicon PV cells or dye sensitized solar cells can work in

  10. Carbon nanomaterials in silica aerogel matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Christopher E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Manuel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duque, Juan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gupta, Gautam [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obrey, Kimberly A D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silica aerogels are ultra low-density, high surface area materials that are extremely good thermal insulators and have numerous technical applications. However, their mechanical properties are not ideal, as they are brittle and prone to shattering. Conversely, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene-based materials, such as graphene oxide, have extremely high tensile strength and possess novel electronic properties. By introducing SWCNTs or graphene-based materials into aerogel matrices, it is possible to produce composites with the desirable properties of both constituents. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs and graphene-based materials into silica gels. Subsequent supercritical drying results in monolithic low-density composites having improved mechanical properties. These nanocomposite aerogels have great potential for use in a wide range of applications.

  11. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    in a wide range of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum [6­8]. ZnO has the hexagonal wurtzite structure, while Mg and has mainly the wurtzite structure with bandgap spanning the range of 3.4­4 eV. At the composition range of 35%­60% (referred to as the transition range), the alloy is phase separated into the wurtzite

  12. STRUCTURAL COMPLEXITIES SYNTHETIC SELF-ASSEMBLING NANOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    applications in catalysis, next-generation energy production and storage devices, optical metamaterials for the formation of metal-based nanostructures from designer blocked macromolecules. Finally, a facile synthesis

  13. Composites comprising biologically-synthesized nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curran, Seamus; Dias, Sampath; Blau, Werner; Wang, Jun; Oremland, Ronald S; Baesman, Shaun

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure describes composite materials containing a polymer material and a nanoscale material dispersed in the polymer material. The nanoscale materials may be biologically synthesized, such as tellurium nanorods synthesized by Bacillus selenitireducens. Composite materials of the present disclosure may have optical limiting properties and find use in optical limiting devices.

  14. Nanomaterials DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105324

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenkel, Anatoly

    of the vapor and its condensation into Re-doped MoO3�y nanoparticles. The resulting NP react with H2/H2S gas a long (25­35 h) annealing process at 8708C in the presence of H2S and forming gas (H2 10 wt%; N2

  15. Synthesis and Spectroscopy of Composite Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmorris, Robert Carl

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind or solar energy for hydrogen storage and hydrogen fuelstudied energy storage molecule is hydrogen gas. Molecular

  16. Nanomaterials for superconductors from the energy prospective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) wires or coated conductors (CC) are expected to revolutionize the transmission of electricity enabling the present electric grid to meet the world s growing energy needs. Although superconducting wires can carry 150 times more power than copper wires of the same cross section, further performance improvements are necessary for the superconducting technology to become cost-competitive. This objective can be achieved by introducing and controlling nano-sized defects and non-superconducting phases within the superconducting film s matrix. Such nanostructures, when carefully engineered, significantly increase the loss-free current sustained by the superconductor through a mechanism known as flux pinning. This chapter is a review of the various types of nanostructures that are artificially introduced in superconducting films to enhance the superconductor s performance. Different approaches, materials, and techniques are discussed and the most recent results in this field compared. The last section of this chapter discusses an additional example of nanotechnology employment in superconducting wires. This nanotechnology can be regarded as an atomic surface treatment designed to enable the right crystallographic orientation of the superconducting film deposited on the metal template.

  17. Synthesis and Spectroscopy of Composite Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmorris, Robert Carl

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    titanium and oxygen cause the valence band which has mostly O 2p character to be of much lower energy

  18. Design and control of hierarchically structured nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Charles Shane

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................................. 1 1.2. Zeolites ................................................................................................. 4 1.2.1. Low-Silica Zeolites ....................................................................... 6 1.2.1.1. Linde Type A (Zeolite... ........................................................................................ 72 IV MICROEMULSION MEDIATED GROWTH OF LOW-SILICA ZEOLITES ...................................................................................................... 74 4.1. Introduction...

  19. Paul R. C. Kent Nanomaterials Theory Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    -oxide interface, nanophase stability reversals in nanoparticles, electrolytes for Li-ion batteries, supercapacitor

  20. Nanomaterials Engineering and Applications in Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qiao

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    75 Although direct photocatalysis utilizing such plasmoniclittle investigated. In photocatalysis research, anatase TiOthe perspective of photocatalysis, there are also several

  1. Synthesis and Spectroscopy of Composite Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmorris, Robert Carl

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    103 Sulfur doped TiO 2 has shown promise for photocatalysis.The improved efficiency for photocatalysis and decreased PEC

  2. Postdoctoral Research Associate Nanomaterials Theory Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Materials Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory zhouj1@ornl.gov Education Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China Applied Chemistry B.E., 2003 Fudan University, China Physical Chemistry M.Sc., 2006 Wayne Chinese Government Award for Outstanding Students Abroad, China 2007 Excellent Master's Dessertation Award

  3. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment ofEnergy State andBuildingsSustainable FederalSustainable

  4. Manufacturing Innovation Topics Workshop: Engineered Nanomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) |Footprints Scopeto

  5. Nanomaterials by Design | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593Energy StoragePortal

  6. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat PumpsSustainable

  7. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat PumpsSustainableDepartment of

  8. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Nanomaterials Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche HomeCybernetics: VisualTrainingSecurity

  9. Microlens Mass Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William D. Heacox

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-parametric statistical model is constructed to directly relate The distribution of observed microlens timescales to that of the mass Function of the population from which the lenses are drawn, corrected For observational selection based on timescales and event amplifications. Explicit distributions are derived for microlensing impact parameters and maximum amplifications; both are shown to be statistically independent of all other parameters in the problem, including lens mass. The model is used to demonstrate that the narrow range of microlens timescales observed toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is probably not consistent with lensing by a widely distributed spheroidal population of large velocity dispersion, as expected of a dark halo; but is consistent with lensing within a rotating thick disk. Poor numerical conditioning on the statistical connection between lens masses and event timescales, and small number statistics, severely limit the mass function information obtainable from current microlensing surveys toward the LMC.

  10. Adding New Functionality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 IntroductionActinideAdding New Functionality When a

  11. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G. (Kensington, CA); Janowicz, Andrew H. (Wilmington, DE); Periana, Roy A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R.sub.1 H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R.sub.1 represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ]H.sub.2 wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical; Rh represents a rhodium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.2 represents a hydrocarbon radical; H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ](R.sub.1)H (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X''X'''X'''' or CHX'X''X''' wherein X', X'', X'", X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e., ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  12. Green functions and Macdonald functions associated to complex reflection groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    Green functions and Macdonald functions associated to complex reflection groups Toshiaki Shoji Department of Mathematics Science University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278­8510, Japan 1. Introduction 1.1. Green functions are introduced by J.A. Green [G] in 1955, in connection with the representation theory of general

  13. Fusion excitation function revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ph. Eudes; Z. Basrak; F. Sébille; V. de la Mota; G. Royer; M. Zori?

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a comprehensive systematics of fusion-evaporation and/or fusion-fission cross sections for a very large variety of systems over an energy range 4-155 A.MeV. Scaled by the reaction cross sections, fusion cross sections do not show a universal behavior valid for all systems although a high degree of correlation is present when data are ordered by the system mass asymmetry.For the rather light and close to mass-symmetric systems the main characteristics of the complete and incomplete fusion excitation functions can be precisely determined. Despite an evident lack of data above 15A.MeV for all heavy systems the available data suggests that geometrical effects could explain the persistence of incomplete fusion at incident energies as high as 155A.MeV.

  14. Properties of Entire Functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunkler, Richard F

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (z ) in RE mEOHEM (1-2). L*t (f ( 1) ( =1. 2, " ~ ) b q * of functions such that (1) f (z) (n=li2~ ~ ~ ~ ) is analytic in the region R, (2) the sequence converges uniformly to f(z) in RE Then f(z) is analytic in R, THEOREM (1-3) (Principle... of the argument). Let f(z) be analytic within and on a simple closed curve C, except possibly for poles. Suppose f(z) has no zeros on CD Then N-P=? arg f(z), 1 where N and P denote the number of zeros and polesi respectively, within Ci and M arg f(z) denotes...

  15. FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Program of Study Research Areas Students Applying Correspondence Graduate Genomics. Students receive training in the biological, physical and computational sciences through of primary institutional affiliation. The Functional Genomics program is administered through the Graduate

  16. Physical one-way functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Ravikanth Srinivasa

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern cryptography relies on algorithmic one-way functions - numerical functions which are easy to compute but very difficult to invert. This dissertation introduces physical one-way firnctions and physical one-way hash ...

  17. Conjectured inequality for subharmonic functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Conjectured inequality for subharmonic functions. A. Eremenko. April 4, 2015. Let u1,u2,u3 be three subharmonic functions in the plane, and uj(0) = 0, 1 ? j ? 3 ...

  18. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  19. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal Immobilization, and Catalytic Applications. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal...

  20. Functionalism What is Functionalism? Functionalism is one of the major proposals that have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Ned

    combustion engine--carburetor is a functional concept. In the case of the kidney, the scientific concept

  1. 309 Building deactivation function analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, D.P.; 309 Building Working Group

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate the 309 Building.

  2. 308 Building deactivation function analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, D.P.; 308 Building Working Group

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describes what needs to be performed to deactivate the 308 Building.

  3. Interpolating function and Stokes Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masazumi Honda; Dileep P. Jatkar

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    When we have two expansions of physical quantity around two different points in parameter space, we can usually construct a family of functions, which interpolates the both expansions. In this paper we study analytic structures of such interpolating functions and discuss their physical implications. We propose that the analytic structures of the interpolating functions provide information on analytic property and Stokes phenomena of the physical quantity, which we approximate by the interpolating functions. We explicitly check our proposal for partition functions of zero-dimensional $\\varphi^4$ theory and Sine-Gordon model. In the zero dimensional Sine-Gordon model, we compare our result with a recent result from resurgence analysis. We also comment on construction of interpolating function in Borel plane.

  4. Interpolating function and Stokes Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, Masazumi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When we have two expansions of physical quantity around two different points in parameter space, we can usually construct a family of functions, which interpolates the both expansions. In this paper we study analytic structures of such interpolating functions and discuss their physical implications. We propose that the analytic structures of the interpolating functions provide information on analytic property and Stokes phenomena of the physical quantity, which we approximate by the interpolating functions. We explicitly check our proposal for partition functions of zero-dimensional $\\varphi^4$ theory and Sine-Gordon model. In the zero dimensional Sine-Gordon model, we compare our result with a recent result from resurgence analysis. We also comment on construction of interpolating function in Borel plane.

  5. Methods of making functionalized nanorods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan (San Francisco, CA); Milliron, Delia (Berkeley, CA); Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Liu, Haitao (Berkeley, CA)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for forming functionalized nanorods. The process includes providing a substrate, modifying the substrate by depositing a self-assembled monolayer of a bi-functional molecule on the substrate, wherein the monolayer is chosen such that one side of the bi-functional molecule binds to the substrate surface and the other side shows an independent affinity for binding to a nanocrystal surface, so as to form a modified substrate. The process further includes contacting the modified substrate with a solution containing nanocrystal colloids, forming a bound monolayer of nanocrystals on the substrate surface, depositing a polymer layer over the monolayer of nanocrystals to partially cover the monolayer of nanocrystals, so as to leave a layer of exposed nanocrystals, functionalizing the exposed nanocrystals, to form functionalized nanocrystals, and then releasing the functionalized nanocrystals from the substrate.

  6. Formal relations between analytic functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Algebraic Spaces (mimeographed), Yale University {1969}. M. l~rwe, Functions of Several Complex Variables [Russian translation], Mir, Moscow (1965}. 319.

  7. In-situ TEM study of carbon nanomaterials and thermoelectric nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Xiaoting

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are quasi one dimensional structures which have unique transport properties, and have a potential to open a bandgap at small ribbon widths. They have been extensively studied in recent years due ...

  8. Function follows dynamics: state-dependency of directed functional influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, Demian

    Function follows dynamics: state-dependency of directed functional influences Demian Battaglia of computations must Demian Battaglia Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Selforganization and Bernstein Center@nld.ds.mpg.de. 1 #12;2 Demian Battaglia be performed in a way dependent from external context and internal brain

  9. Harmonic functions on Walsh's Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jehring, Kristin Elizabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.3 Harmonic Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 3 Harmonic Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1Markov Chains 4.3.2 Harmonic Functions for the Embedded

  10. Generalized Transforms and Special Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dattoli; E. Sabia

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the properties of different type of transforms by means of operational methods and discuss the relevant interplay with many families of special functions. We consider in particular the binomial transform and its generalizations. A general method, based on the use of the Fourier transform technique, is proposed for the study of the properties of functions of operators.

  11. Functional composition and decomposition for signal processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirtas, Sefa

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Functional composition, the application of one function to the results of another function, has a long history in the mathematics community, particularly in the context of polynomials and rational functions. This thesis ...

  12. Beurling spectrum of functions in Banach space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dang Vu Giang

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We are interested in Beurling spectrum of $\\mathbb X-$valued functions with application in functional delay differential equations.

  13. Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss...

  14. PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    functional groups. PEGylation of surfaces is a key strategic approach for providing stealth characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by...

  15. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  16. Wave function as geometric entity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Lev

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to the geometrization of the electron theory is proposed. The particle wave function is represented by a geometric entity, i.e., Clifford number, with the translation rules possessing the structure of Dirac equation for any manifold. A solution of this equation is obtained in terms of geometric treatment. Interference of electrons whose wave functions are represented by geometric entities is considered. New experiments concerning the geometric nature of electrons are proposed.

  17. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  18. SYSTEMS OF FUNCTIONAL EQUATIONS MICHAEL DRMOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drmota, Michael

    of planted plane trees. Hence the corresponding generating function y(x) satis#12;es the functional equation the asymptotic properties of the coeÃ?cients of generating functions which satisfy a system of functional a recursive description then the generating function y(x) = P o2Y x joj = P n#21;0 yn x n satis#12;es

  19. High throughout reproducible cantilever functionalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  20. Functional Integration on Constrained Function Spaces II: Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. LaChapelle

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Some well-known examples of constrained quantum systems commonly quantized via Feynman path integrals are re-examined using the notion of conditional integrators introduced in [1]. The examples yield some new perspectives on old results. As an interesting new application, the formalism is used to construct a physical model of average prime counting functions modeled as a constrained gamma process.

  1. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Ring, P. [Physics Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  2. Project X functional requirements specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support a world-leading program in Intensity Frontier physics at Fermilab. The facility is designed to support programs in elementary particle and nuclear physics, with possible applications to nuclear energy research. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions, and to assure that the facility is designed with sufficient upgrade capability to provide U.S. leadership for many decades to come. This paper will briefly review the previously described Functional Requirements, and then discuss their recent evolution.

  3. Poly(ethylene oxide) functionalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pratt, Russell Clayton

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple procedure is provided by which the hydroxyl termini of poly(ethylene oxide) can be appended with functional groups to a useful extent by reaction and precipitation. The polymer is dissolved in warmed toluene, treated with an excess of organic base and somewhat less of an excess of a reactive acylating reagent, reacted for several hours, then precipitated in isopropanol so that the product can be isolated as a solid, and salt byproducts are washed away. This procedure enables functionalization of the polymer while not requiring laborious purification steps such as solvent-solvent extraction or dialysis to remove undesirable side products.

  4. Differential Impact of Parent Functioning on Infant Social Emotional Functioning During the Transition to Parenthood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carhart, Kathryn Patricia

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    infants’ dysregulatory problems, while mothers’ functioning better predicted infants’ internalizing problems. Specifically, fathers’ functioning predicted negative emotionality and eating problems in their infants, while mothers’ functioning predicted...

  5. Functional Metadata Schema for Engineering Knowledge Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    Functional Metadata Schema for Engineering Knowledge Management Yoshinobu Kitamura Naoya Washio engineering knowledge about functionality representing design rationale because of the lack of rich common, ontology, metadata, functional model, knowledge management 1. INTRODUCTION In the engineering design

  6. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions called symbols. Generali* *zing this, we define Green functions associated to complex reflection

  7. Discontinuous Lyapunov Functions for Nonasymptotic Stability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discontinuous Lyapunov Functions for Nonasymptotic Stability Analysis A. Polyakov Inria Lille of discontinuous control systems using discontinuous Lyapunov functions. Elements of Filippov theory of generalized derivatives and non-smooth Lyapunov functions are considered. The generalized Lyapunov theorems

  8. Nonpathological Lyapunov functions and discontinuous Caratheodory systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacciotti, Andrea

    Nonpathological Lyapunov functions and discontinuous Carath´eodory systems Andrea Bacciotti both Lyapunov stability and asymptotic stability in terms of nonsmooth Lyapunov functions are given. An invariance principle is also proven. Key words: Lyapunov functions, stability, stabilizability, discontinuous

  9. Lyapunov Function Synthesis using Handelman Representations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Lyapunov Function Synthesis using Handelman Representations. Sriram Sankaranarayanan Xin Chen investigate linear programming relaxations to synthesize Lyapunov functions that es- tablish the stability approach searches for a Lyapunov function, given a parametric form with unknown coefficients

  10. Visualizations of Spatial Distribution Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    number. - Determines 3D structure around a chosen molecule - The SDF gives radial and angular distribution - to study the SDF of water and hydronium around sulfonate group and side chain. Spatial Distribution Function (SDF) #12;3D Isodensity Surfaces - points around atom A where it's equally probable

  11. Nuclear Organization and Genome Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corces, Victor G.

    Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

  12. STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDING OF LOGARITHMIC FUNCTION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachael Kenney

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    be treated as both a process and an object at the same time, and that it is the ability to deal with this dual ... with notation that gives a clear rule for what to do with an input value (Hurwitz, 1999). For example, f(x) ... logarithm as a function output.

  13. ON SOME FUNCTIONAL EQUATIONS CONNECTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fractional transformation, and L2 is a linear function [27] (see also [14]). Associated with ... @k = C/l" , then a cover 9" —> 9'2 exists if and only if I"l C F2. The degree .... o = hs o g, preserves the measure a and maps the family Bk(zx) into a fam-.

  14. Functional Convolution Models Maria Asencio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    on the California E55/59 study of diesel truck emissions. Keywords: Convolution Model, Functional Data Analysis-world road conditions, from highways to suburban traffic. An emissions analyzer is attached to the truck, Distributed Lag Model, Particulate Matter, Emissions Modeling 1. INTRODUCTION This paper proposes

  15. Delegatable Functional Signatures Michael Backes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delegatable Functional Signatures Michael Backes MPI-SWS Saarland University Germany Sebastian (from FS) . . . . 36 B Blind signatures 38 B.1 Basic security notions for blind signatures, such as the delegation of computation on authenticated data, the basic notion is insufficient. Consider as an example

  16. Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riera, Jesús Bisbal

    Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies Jes´us Bisbal, Jane Grimson Department of Computer there is a need to prototype the database which the applications will use when in operation. A prototype database can be built by sampling data from an existing database. Including relevant semantic information when

  17. The Globular Cluster Luminosity Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aspects of the globular cluster luminosity function needing to be explained by a general theory of cluster formation are reviewed, and the importance of simultaneously understanding globular cluster systematics (the fundamental plane) within such a theory is pointed out.

  18. Wave functions of linear systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Sowinski

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete analysis of quantum wave functions of linear systems in an arbitrary number of dimensions is given. It is shown how one can construct a complete set of stationary quantum states of an arbitrary linear system from purely classical arguments. This construction is possible because for linear systems classical dynamics carries the whole information about quantum dynamics.

  19. Functional Logic Programming Sergio Antoy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoy, Sergio

    statements. A declarative program is a set of logical statements describing properties of the application with respect to these properties. Thus, the programming effort shifts from encoding the steps for com- putingFunctional Logic Programming Sergio Antoy Portland State University Portland, OR 97207, U

  20. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

  1. Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard - DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50-2013, Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard by Administrator The Quality Assurance (QA) Functional Area Qualification Standard (FAQS) establishes common...

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Function of Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization, and Catalytic Function of Novel Highly Dispersed Tungsten Oxide Catalysts on Mesoporous Silica . Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Function of Novel...

  3. Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable support of Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction. Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable...

  4. Spin dependent parton distributions and structure functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; T. Ito; A. W. Thomas; K. Yazaki

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear parton distributions and structure functions are determined in an effective chiral quark theory. We also discuss an extension of our model to fragmentation functions.

  5. Functional determinants, generalized BTZ geometries and Selberg zeta function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R Aros; D E Diaz

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We continue the study of a special entry in the AdS/CFT dictionary, namely a holographic formula relating the functional determinant of the scattering operator in an asymptotically locally anti-de Sitter (ALAdS) space to a relative functional determinant of the scalar Laplacian in the bulk. A heuristic derivation of the formula involves a one-loop quantum effect in the bulk and the corresponding sub-leading correction at large N on the boundary. We presently explore a higher-dimensional version of the spinning BTZ black hole obtained as a quotient of hyperbolic space by a discrete subgroup of isometries generated by a loxodromic (or hyperbolic) element consisting of dilation (temperature) and torsion angles (spinning). The bulk computation is done using heat-kernel techniques and fractional calculus. At the boundary, we get a recursive scheme that allows us to range from the non-spinning to the full-fledged spinning geometries. The determinants are compactly expressed in terms of an associated (Patterson-)Selberg zeta function and a connection to quasi-normal frequencies is discussed.

  6. Spline functions and extremal problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kmiecik, Dolores

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operation. THEOREM 1. 2. Let f, g I Ll such that f and g are even functions. Then f s g is an even function. PROOF. Applying the definition, f W g(-x) = $ f(-x-t)g(t)dt = S f(x+t)g(t)dt = Sf(T) g(T-x)dT $ f (T) g(x-T)dT el g + f(x) = f a g(x). THEO... define the Fourier transform of f, denoted by f as (4) f(x) = ( e f(t)dt. THEOREM 1. 4. Let f, g f Ll. Then PROOF. Applying (4), we have f ? g(x) = Ie (f + g) (t)? f + g(x) = $ e dt ( f(t-u)g(u)du $g(u)du I f(t-u)e dt 5 g(u)du j f(T)e ~ )dT 4 Sg...

  7. Properties of the gamma function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, William Boyce

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ( ) + Qr} converges if snd only if rsl Loci(&+g ) converges. r=l Oc& r=l formly over the set S if for each 6 + 0, there is sn in- teger Ng such that if 'n, v & gll ~ II, j. i+ u, te] ? Ogive', f, t]) & a, for sll z in S. l. lr. tn-teat). 1TL I...~~ (iiy. i Let ~&)= h~ %(&N}i Thus Euler's A(k} function gives s n~~ factorial when x is an integer, but does it give s factorial when x is not sn integer' ? To answer this we shall show the relation between Euler ~a snd the Gamma function. To do...

  8. Electrohydrodynamic Patterning of Functional Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg Oppenheimer, Pola

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    of Publications 1. Structural Hierarchy of Functional Block Copolymer System Induced by Electro- hydrodynamic Lithography. Goldberg Oppenheimer, P., Kabra, D., Huttner, S. and Steiner, U. In preparation, 2011. 2. Patterning of Crystalline Organic Materials via... , U. In final revision before submission, 2011. 4. Electrically Conductive Polymeric Photonic Crystals. Imai, Y., Finlayson, C. E., Goldberg Oppenheimer, P., Zhao, Q., Spahn, P., Snoswell, D. R.E., Haines, A., Hellman, P. and Baumberg, J.J. Submitted...

  9. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jatko, W. Bruce (Knoxville, TN); McNeilly, David R. (Maryville, TN); Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp unction which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  10. Functional Verification through Operation Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, B.

    ICEBO'11 Abstract Burgoyne 110328.docx Page 1 of 1 ? Ebert & Baumann Consulting Engineers, Inc. A B S T R A C T ICEBO 2011 New York City March 28, 2011 Functional Verification through Operation Diagnostics One of the core objectives... of actual operation produces the most accurate results. This is accomplished through trend logging. With analysis of regularly recorded control point data through visualization (including graphs, charts, etc.), a quick and accurate diagnosis of incorrect...

  11. On higher spin partition functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Beccaria; A. A. Tseytlin

    2015-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that the partition function of the set of all free massless higher spins s=0,1,2,3,... in flat space is equal to one: the ghost determinants cancel against the "physical" ones or, equivalently, the (regularized) total number of degrees of freedom vanishes. This reflects large underlying gauge symmetry and suggests analogy with supersymmetric or topological theory. The Z=1 property extends also to the AdS background, i.e. the 1-loop vacuum partition function of Vasiliev theory is equal to 1 (assuming a particular regularization of the sum over spins); this was noticed earlier as a consistency requirement for the vectorial AdS/CFT duality. We find that Z=1 is also true in the conformal higher spin theory (with higher-derivative d^{2s} kinetic terms) expanded near flat or conformally flat S^4 background. We also consider the partition function of free conformal theory of symmetric traceless rank s tensor field which has 2-derivative kinetic term but only scalar gauge invariance in flat 4d space. This non-unitary theory has a Weyl-invariant action in curved background and corresponds to "partially massless" field in AdS_5. We discuss in detail the special case of s=2 (or "conformal graviton"), compute the corresponding conformal anomaly coefficients and compare them with previously found expressions for generic representations of conformal group in 4 dimensions.

  12. On higher spin partition functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beccaria, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that the partition function of the set of all free massless higher spins s=0,1,2,3,... in flat space is equal to one: the ghost determinants cancel against the "physical" ones or, equivalently, the (regularized) total number of degrees of freedom vanishes. This reflects large underlying gauge symmetry and suggests analogy with supersymmetric or topological theory. The Z=1 property extends also to the AdS background, i.e. the 1-loop vacuum partition function of Vasiliev theory is equal to 1 (assuming a particular regularization of the sum over spins); this was noticed earlier as a consistency requirement for the vectorial AdS/CFT duality. We find that Z=1 is also true in the conformal higher spin theory (with higher-derivative d^{2s} kinetic terms) expanded near flat or conformally flat S^4 background. We also consider the partition function of free conformal theory of symmetric traceless rank s tensor field which has 2-derivative kinetic term but only scalar gauge invariance in flat space. This non...

  13. Jacek Dobaczewski Density functional theory and energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobaczewski, Jacek

    in Poland per voivodship Energy density functional 245 647 Price voivodship functional 654 763 295 580Jacek Dobaczewski Density functional theory and energy density functionals in nuclear physics Jacek://www.fuw.edu.pl/~dobaczew/Stellenbosch/dobaczewski_lecture.pdf Home page: http://www.fuw.edu.pl/~dobaczew/ #12;Jacek Dobaczewski Nuclear Structure Energy scales

  14. Functional Accountability | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOEDepartmentaboutInformationFuelFunFunctional

  15. Microsoft Word - Equipment-Training List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning and Probing Microscopy Environmental Closed Loop Atomic Force Microscope - Asylum MFD-3D-BIO CFN Safety Module for Users - NC-ESH-USERS Cyber Security Training -...

  16. Prescription for choosing an interpolating function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohisa Takimi

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpolating functional method is a powerful tool for studying the behavior of a quantity in the intermediate region of the parameter space of interest by using its perturbative expansions at both ends. Recently several interpolating functional methods have been proposed, in addition to the well-known Pade approximant, namely the "Fractional Power of Polynomial" (FPP) and the "Fractional Power of Rational functions" (FPR) methods. Since combinations of these methods also give interpolating functions, we may end up with multitudes of the possible approaches. So a criterion for choosing an appropriate interpolating function is very much needed. In this paper, we propose reference quantities which can be used for choosing a good interpolating function. In order to validate the prescription based on these quantities, we study the degree of correlation between "the reference quantities" and the "actual degree of deviation between the interpolating function and the true function" in examples where the true functions are known.

  17. Introduction Relationship between ISS and Robust Lyapunov Functions Computing Local Robust Lyapunov Functions by Linear Programming Computing Lo Computation of Local ISS Lyapunov Function Via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafstein, Sigurður Freyr

    Introduction Relationship between ISS and Robust Lyapunov Functions Computing Local Robust Lyapunov Functions by Linear Programming Computing Lo Computation of Local ISS Lyapunov Function Via Linear;Introduction Relationship between ISS and Robust Lyapunov Functions Computing Local Robust Lyapunov Functions

  18. Brownian dynamics without Green's functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delong, Steven; Donev, Aleksandar, E-mail: donev@courant.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States); Usabiaga, Florencio Balboa; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael [Departamento de Física Teórica de la Materia Condensada and Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Univeridad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain)] [Departamento de Física Teórica de la Materia Condensada and Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Univeridad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Griffith, Boyce E. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States) [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States); Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a Fluctuating Immersed Boundary (FIB) method for performing Brownian dynamics simulations of confined particle suspensions. Unlike traditional methods which employ analytical Green's functions for Stokes flow in the confined geometry, the FIB method uses a fluctuating finite-volume Stokes solver to generate the action of the response functions “on the fly.” Importantly, we demonstrate that both the deterministic terms necessary to capture the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles, as well as the stochastic terms necessary to generate the hydrodynamically correlated Brownian motion, can be generated by solving the steady Stokes equations numerically only once per time step. This is accomplished by including a stochastic contribution to the stress tensor in the fluid equations consistent with fluctuating hydrodynamics. We develop novel temporal integrators that account for the multiplicative nature of the noise in the equations of Brownian dynamics and the strong dependence of the mobility on the configuration for confined systems. Notably, we propose a random finite difference approach to approximating the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. Through comparisons with analytical and existing computational results, we numerically demonstrate the ability of the FIB method to accurately capture both the static (equilibrium) and dynamic properties of interacting particles in flow.

  19. Brownian Dynamics without Green's Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Delong; F. Balboa Usabiaga; R. Delgado-Buscalioni; B. E. Griffith; A. Donev

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a Fluctuating Immersed Boundary (FIB) method for performing Brownian dynamics simulations of confined particle suspensions. Unlike traditional methods which employ analytical Green's functions for Stokes flow in the confined geometry, the FIB method uses a fluctuating finite-volume Stokes solver to generate the action of the response functions "on the fly". Importantly, we demonstrate that both the deterministic terms necessary to capture the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles, as well as the stochastic terms necessary to generate the hydrodynamically-correlated Brownian motion, can be generated by solving the steady Stokes equations numerically only once per time step. This is accomplished by including a stochastic contribution to the stress tensor in the fluid equations consistent with fluctuating hydrodynamics. We develop novel temporal integrators that account for the multiplicative nature of the noise in the equations of Brownian dynamics and the strong dependence of the mobility on the configuration for confined systems. Notably, we propose a random finite difference approach to approximating the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. Through comparisons with analytical and existing computational results, we numerically demonstrate the ability of the FIB method to accurately capture both the static (equilibrium) and dynamic properties of interacting particles in flow.

  20. Structure functions for light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Kulagin, R. Petti

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the nuclear EMC effect with particular emphasis on recent data for light nuclei including 2H, 3He, 4He, 9Be, 12C and 14N. In order to verify the consistency of available data, we calculate the \\chi^2 deviation between different data sets. We find a good agreement between the results from the NMC, SLAC E139, and HERMES experiments. However, our analysis indicates an overall normalization offset of about 2% in the data from the recent JLab E03-103 experiment with respect to previous data for nuclei heavier than 3He. We also discuss the extraction of the neutron/proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p from the nuclear ratios 3He/2H and 2H/1H. Our analysis shows that the E03-103 data on 3He/2H require a renormalization of about 3% in order to be consistent with the F2n/F2p ratio obtained from the NMC experiment. After such a renormalization, the 3He data from the E03-103 data and HERMES experiments are in a good agreement. Finally, we present a detailed comparison between data and model calculations, which include a description of the nuclear binding, Fermi motion and off-shell corrections to the structure functions of bound proton and neutron, as well as the nuclear pion and shadowing corrections. Overall, a good agreement with the available data for all nuclei is obtained.

  1. Harmonic Functions are Real Analytic1 On this very short note we prove that harmonic functions are real analytic functions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Marco

    Harmonic Functions are Real Analytic1 On this very short note we prove that harmonic functions prove Lemma 1 using the mean value property of harmonic functions, Green's theorem and the maximum principle. Lemma 1 (estimate on first derivative) Suppose w is harmonic in Rn , > 0, y and B

  2. A Universal Hurricane Frequency Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Robert

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence is provided that the global distribution of tropical hurricanes is principally determined by a universal function H of a single variable z that in turn is expressible in terms of the local sea surface temperature and latitude. The data-driven model presented here carries stark implications for the large increased numbers of hurricanes which it predicts for a warmer world. Moreover, the rise in recent decades in the numbers of hurricanes in the Atlantic, but not the Pacific basin, is shown to have a simple explanation in terms of the specific form of H(z), which yields larger percentage increases when a fixed increase in sea surface temperature occurs at higher latitudes and lower temperatures.

  3. Legendre polynomials and related functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Richard McGary

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )(h+3) "6ltRN. I Wj R K)! j& for ICI C I and tl svsn, q?(x) = ( ~f g $ "II f ~ (-I)" II-I)(n-))" (n-RII~I) (na)(IIit)- (aiak)j III] . H. g. . . (g g)X$ Q g K X y j IXI ) II -s-i ( ~ (n+&)(n+a) "(n+Xg) g I~BS (2h+i g ?Z? 2"N! 21+3) ahtrj. - an+2... cos &si g IP& (Cos e) QQ?I?(CoS e) D 0 H-0 op g (g?cos o e os?si toe) p?(cos e)) ds dp Aei Lff a (p (coo o)j sis s d e d s e (IB-k & due to the ox thogonality of the functione p (x) ~ ss Xhu 8 Similarly by multiplying (ig-I) by Sisi e Sie e...

  4. Elliptic Functions and Maximal Unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mads Sogaard; Yang Zhang

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering amplitudes at loop level can be reduced to a basis of linearly independent Feynman integrals. The integral coefficients are extracted from generalized unitarity cuts which define algebraic varieties. The topology of an algebraic variety characterizes the difficulty of applying maximal cuts. In this work, we analyze a novel class of integrals whose maximal cuts give rise to an algebraic variety with irrational irreducible components. As a phenomenologically relevant example we examine the two-loop planar double-box contribution with internal massive lines. We derive unique projectors for all four master integrals in terms of multivariate residues along with Weierstrass' elliptic functions. We also show how to generate the leading-topology part of otherwise infeasible integration-by-parts identities analytically from exact meromorphic differential forms.

  5. Properties of the gamma function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, William Boyce

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1-4 = u, dt=s I 'ld) I =I (u +u e +l)d 0 /lr) + /n-i + "'+ 12+ I . r~heorem . , e = I [J ~*de ? ) I&-'0) Q] Consider n s& - j (. -&I & d4. = ~ I 0 I ~t-li-+I " (" ~ & 27 Making the change of variable, t=nu, in the first integral, we get...() =~ J ' dt I' c~)f( ~rb r* l. . (M-t t r r l t M vl ). Lvt f(r, t) bv continuous in Q. ~ 4 & a for sech z in s region R. Then I s(. , ~)~~ converges uniformly over R if there exists s non-negative function 2) Let that for snd thus N...

  6. Fractal Strings and Multifractal Zeta Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel L. Lapidus; Jacques Levy Vehel; John A. Rock

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    For a Borel measure on the unit interval and a sequence of scales that tend to zero, we define a one-parameter family of zeta functions called multifractal zeta functions. These functions are a first attempt to associate a zeta function to certain multifractal measures. However, we primarily show that they associate a new zeta function, the topological zeta function, to a fractal string in order to take into account the topology of its fractal boundary. This expands upon the geometric information garnered by the traditional geometric zeta function of a fractal string in the theory of complex dimensions. In particular, one can distinguish between a fractal string whose boundary is the classical Cantor set, and one whose boundary has a single limit point but has the same sequence of lengths as the complement of the Cantor set. Later work will address related, but somewhat different, approaches to multifractals themselves, via zeta functions, partly motivated by the present paper.

  7. Proving Correctness of Modular Functional Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Christopher

    One reason for studying and programming in functional programming languages is that they are easy to reason about, yet there is surprisingly little work on proving the correctness of large functional programs. In this dissertation I show how...

  8. Reflectance Function Approximation for Material Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Charles R.

    Reflectance Function Approximation for Material Classification Edward Wild CS 766 Final Project This report summarizes the results of a project to approximate reflectance functions and classify materials to classify materials. Classification algorithms are proposed to deal with unseen materials. Experimental

  9. Structure functions for light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulagin, S. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Petti, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the nuclear EMC effect with particular emphasis on recent data for light nuclei including {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 9}Be, {sup 12}C, and {sup 14}N. In order to verify the consistency of available data, we calculate the {chi}{sup 2} deviation between different data sets. We find a good agreement between the results from the NMC, SLAC E139, and HERMES experiments. However, our analysis indicates an overall normalization offset of about 2% in the data from the recent JLab E03-103 experiment with respect to previous data for nuclei heavier than {sup 3}He. We also discuss the extraction of the neutron/proton structure function ratio F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p} from the nuclear ratios {sup 3}He/{sup 2}H and {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H. Our analysis shows that the E03-103 data on {sup 3}He/{sup 2}H require a renormalization of about 3% in order to be consistent with the F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p} ratio obtained from the NMC experiment. After such a renormalization, the {sup 3}He data from the E03-103 and HERMES experiments are in a good agreement. Finally, we present a detailed comparison between data and model calculations, which include a description of the nuclear binding, Fermi motion, and off-shell corrections to the structure functions of bound proton and neutron, as well as the nuclear pion and shadowing corrections. Overall, a good agreement with the available data for all nuclei is obtained.

  10. Parton Distribution Functions: Impact of HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunihiro Nagano; for the H1; ZEUS Collaborations

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progresses of the proton structure measurements and determination of parton distribution functions by $ep$ collisions at HERA are introduced.

  11. The Physiological Basis of BOLD Functional MRI /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffeth, Valerie Ewing McClintock

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metabolism Detailed biophysical model of the BOLD response Functional magnetic resonance imaging Generalized calibration model General linear model Gradient

  12. NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing...

  13. Parking Functions And Generalized Catalan Numbers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Paul R.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Parking Functions and Labeled Schr?oder Paths . . 28 C. p-ParkingFunctions...................... 29 D. p-Parking Functions With k Blocked ............ 30 E. Linear Probes in PB (n,k) ................... 31 IV LEFT WEIGHTED CATALAN STRUCTURES ......... 40 A... ............................. 64 vii CHAPTER Page REFERENCES ................................... 65 VITA ........................................ 68 viii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Parking function distribution for n =6 ................. 8 2 T3 4...

  14. Varying-Coefficient Functional Linear Regression Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardot, Hervé

    Varying-Coefficient Functional Linear Regression Models Herv´e Cardot1 and Pascal Sarda2 1, the ability of such non linear functional approaches to produce competitive estimations. Short title : Varying monograph. We propose here another generalization of the functional linear regression model in which

  15. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department of Mathematics Science University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278­8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions of classical groups this, we define Green functions associated to complex reflection groups G(e, 1, n), and study

  16. Restricting profile function of hedgehog Skyrmion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Yamashita; Minoru Hirayama

    2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The profile function for the hedgehog Skyrmion is investigated. After discussing how the form of the profile function is restricted by the field equation, the s tatic energy is numerically calculated. It is found that the profile functions c onsidered here sometimes give the static energy smaller than previous ones.

  17. Class of Jost-like functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Tomio, L.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of functions having the same analytic properties as the Jost function is introduced. In momentum space these functions can be calculated through solutions of some auxiliary integral equations. The present approach is applicable for both local and nonlocal potentials and suggests an unified calculational scheme for bound states and scattering problems.

  18. Lyapunov-Krasovskii Functionals Parameterized with polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Lyapunov-Krasovskii Functionals Parameterized with polynomials Alexandre Seuret ,1 Automatic-mail: alexandre.seuret@gipsa-lab.inpg.fr Abstract: A novel method based on Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals for the stability analysis of linear systems with constant is introduced. The Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals

  19. Lyapunov Functions and Feedback in Nonlinear Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

    Lyapunov Functions and Feedback in Nonlinear Control Francis Clarke Professeur `a l@igd.univ-lyon1.fr Summary. The method of Lyapunov functions plays a central role in the study to consider nonsmooth Lyapunov functions, even if the underlying control dynamics are themselves smooth. We

  20. Mapping the core mass function to the initial mass function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guszejnov, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that fragmentation within self-gravitating, turbulent molecular clouds ("turbulent fragmentation") can naturally explain the observed properties of protostellar cores, including the core mass function (CMF). Here, we extend recently-developed analytic models for turbulent fragmentation to follow the time-dependent hierarchical fragmentation of self-gravitating cores, until they reach effectively infinite density (and form stars). We show that turbulent fragmentation robustly predicts two key features of the IMF. First, a high-mass power-law scaling very close to the Salpeter slope, which is a generic consequence of the scale-free nature of turbulence and self-gravity. We predict the IMF slope (-2.3) is slightly steeper then the CMF slope (-2.1), owing to the slower collapse and easier fragmentation of large cores. Second, a turnover mass, which is set by a combination of the CMF turnover mass (a couple solar masses, determined by the `sonic scale' of galactic turbulence, and so weakly depend...

  1. Functionalized lignin, rubber containing functionalized lignin and products containing such rubber composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benko, David Andrew; Hahn, Bruce Raymond; Cohen, Martin Paul; Dirk, Shawn Matthew; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to functionalized lignin, rubber compositions which contain functionalized lignin and to products which have at least one component comprised of such rubber composition.

  2. A Flexible Method of Estimating Luminosity Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon C. Kelly; Xiaohui Fan; Marianne Vestergaard

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a Bayesian approach to estimating luminosity functions. We derive the likelihood function and posterior probability distribution for the luminosity function, given the observed data, and we compare the Bayesian approach with maximum-likelihood by simulating sources from a Schechter function. For our simulations confidence intervals derived from bootstrapping the maximum-likelihood estimate can be too narrow, while confidence intervals derived from the Bayesian approach are valid. We develop our statistical approach for a flexible model where the luminosity function is modeled as a mixture of Gaussian functions. Statistical inference is performed using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, and we describe a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to perform the MCMC. The MCMC simulates random draws from the probability distribution of the luminosity function parameters, given the data, and we use a simulated data set to show how these random draws may be used to estimate the probability distribution for the luminosity function. In addition, we show how the MCMC output may be used to estimate the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the luminosity function, such as the peak in the space density of quasars. The Bayesian method we develop has the advantage that it is able to place accurate constraints on the luminosity function even beyond the survey detection limits, and that it provides a natural way of estimating the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the luminosity function, including those that rely on information beyond the survey detection limits.

  3. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salsbury Jr., Freddie

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules.

  4. Motivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Introduction to Green's functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Motivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Introduction to Green=whiteMotivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Outline 1 Motivation 2 Green's functions 3 The GW Approximation 4 The Bethe-Salpeter Equation #12;bg=whiteMotivation Green's functions

  5. NATIONAL SCIENCE Summer Institute on Nanomechanics and Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    to subtractive manufacturing methodologies. Effectively, AM fabricators are 3D printers which allow the user manufacturing technologies which produce objects from 3D model data, usually layer upon layer, as opposed to "print" a 3D object from a computer solid model of the part. The first AM processes were developed

  6. Advancements Toward the Greener Processing of Engineered Nanomaterials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conditions. The dispersibility of the nanocrystals was obtained through the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) absorption spectra of solutions. Three models, the total interaction...

  7. Engineering Nanomaterials towards Energy Harvesting and Virological Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Ding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as radioisotope thermoelectric generators, extremely longsuch as radioisotope thermoelectric generators which are

  8. Engineering Nanomaterials towards Energy Harvesting and Virological Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Ding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sci. , 265-373, (1822). Peltier, J. C. Nouvelles experiencesto the Seebeck Effect, the Peltier Effect, and the Thomsoncombinatorial as the Peltier-Seebeck Effect, which derives

  9. MECHANICAL PROPERTY CHARACTERIZATION OF SOL-GEL DERIVED NANOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    mechanical behavior of polysilicate aerogels, prepared using the sol-gel process. Two series of materials were prepared, derivatized with silylating agents, processed into coating solutions, and characterized properties of aerogel thin films were characterized. vi #12;Table of Contents Abstract

  10. Microelectromechanical Systems and Nanomaterials: Experimental and Computational MechanicsAspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    microelectromechanical system nanomechanics nanowires Nanomechanical characterization of materials has recently attracted demonstrate a previously undescribed microelectromechanical system (MEMS) that accomplishes this goal

  11. Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of MicroElectroMechanical Systems, vol. 20, pp. 9-Chair MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technologiesby MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technologies many

  12. Nanomaterials in the Construction Industry: A Review of Their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    . This underscores the need for proactive risk assessment and regulatory guidelines to en- sure the safe use The benefits of incorporating MNMs in construction materials could be offset by concerns about their potential by gluing con- crete mixtures, that is, cementitious agents and concrete aggregates, and prevent crack

  13. Engineering Nanomaterials towards Energy Harvesting and Virological Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Ding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synthesis, 2.23 g of lead oxide and 8 mL of oleic acid were°C for about 0.5 hr. After lead oxide was completely reactedLead telluride nanocrystals were synthesized with oleic acid as ligands and served as the electron-crystal portion; while titanium oxide

  14. NANOMATERIALS TO BIOSENSORS: A BENCH-TOP RAPID PROTOTYPING APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Wei-Ssu

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    technique: nanosphere lithography .............................................................................. 6 1.3 Schematic diagram of (a) surface plasmon polariton and (b) localized surface plasmon... geometries, sizes, and spacing down to sub 100 nm. 30 Although such a high resolution can be reached, it is always time consuming to make large arrays. In addition, the expensive facility requirement restricts its applications. Various synthetic methods...

  15. The Art of Chemical Synthesis Controlled Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    : Raman spectroscopy Composition: Energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) and ICP-mass spectrometry (ICP and implications are highly dependent on these parameters. At the Nano Research Facility (NRF), our goal is to provide well controlled, high-yield nanostructures to the scientific community for a variety

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    such as coal, pe- troleum, and natural gas. Today, fossil fuels still account for 90% of the world's energy heavy and low- quality crude oil, coal, natural gas, and po- tentially biogas and methane hydrate. Hy, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State

  17. Thermal and Electrical Transport Study of One Dimensional Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Liang

    2013-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    contribution due to scattering at the wire boundaries. Three one-dimensional nanostructured thermoelectric candidates - SiGe nanowires, SrTiO3 nanowires, and ZnO nanowires – were presented and discussed in this dissertation. SiGe nanowires are successfully...

  18. Computational modeling of electrophotonics nanomaterials: Tunneling in double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlahovic, Branislav, E-mail: vlahovic@nccu.edu; Filikhin, Igor, E-mail: vlahovic@nccu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina Central University, 1801 Fayetteville Street, Durham, North Carolina 27707 (United States)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Single electron localization and tunneling in double quantum dots (DQD) and rings (DQR) and in particular the localized-delocalized states and their spectral distributions are considered in dependence on the geometry of the DQDs (DQRs). The effect of violation of symmetry of DQDs geometry on the tunneling is studied in details. The cases of regular and chaotic geometries are considered. It will be shown that a small violation of symmetry drastically affects localization of electron and that anti-crossing of the levels is the mechanism of tunneling between the localized and delocalized states in DQRs.

  19. Dynamics of soft Nanomaterials captured by transmission electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water. Citation: Proetto MT, AM Rush, MP Chien, P Abellan Baeza, JP Patterson, MP Thompson, NH Olson, CE Moore, AL Rheingold, C Andolina, J Millstone, SB Howell, ND Browning,...

  20. High performance batteries with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Wen (Littleton, CO)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to lithium-ion batteries in general and more particularly to lithium-ion batteries based on aligned graphene ribbon anodes, V.sub.2O.sub.5 graphene ribbon composite cathodes, and ionic liquid electrolytes. The lithium-ion batteries have excellent performance metrics of cell voltages, energy densities, and power densities.

  1. Cytotoxicological Response to Engineered Nanomaterials: A Pathway-Driven Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romoser, Amelia Antonia

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to deal with the ?insult? of the nanoparticle exposure by activating Nrf-2, a key transcription 10 factor involved in upregulating antioxidant genes, or the exposure may trigger more of an inflammatory response, in which NF-?B plays a role. A... disturbance of the cellular redox equilibrium and subsequent oxidative stress has been shown to trigger multiple stress pathways and transcription factors of redox-sensitive nature, such as nuclear factor-erythroid 2-p45?related factor 2 (Nrf2), which...

  2. Cooperative nanomaterial system to sensitize, target, and treat tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    as photother- mal antennas to specify tumor heating via remote near-infrared laser irradiation. We find that local tumor heating accelerates the recruitment of the second component: a targeted nanoparticle malignant tissues by converting external electromagnetic energy into heat (1­6). Furthermore, most

  3. 1Electromaterials and Nanomaterials Group Prof. Byungwoo Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    for Energy #12;Quantum-Dot- and Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells DSSC SONY DSSC KIST #12;4Electromaterials

  4. NANOMATERIALS TO BIOSENSORS: A BENCH-TOP RAPID PROTOTYPING APPROACH 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Wei-Ssu

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    methods in controlling nanoscale features and their properties were often time-consuming and expensive. The objective of my research was to design, fabricate, and test nanostructure platforms using a unique toolbox of bottom-up lithographic techniques...

  5. Femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy of coherent oscillations in nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerebtsov, Serguei Nikolaevich

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2. Regenerative amplifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 C. Transient Transmission Part . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 III COHERENT ACOUSTIC VIBRATIONS IN NANOPARTI- CLES AND NANOWIRES ..................... 22 A. Optical Properties.... ................... 7 3 Kerr-lensing effect. ............................ 9 4 Principle of a CPA process. ....................... 10 5 Schematic of the grating stretcher a) and compressor b). ....... 11 6 Regenerative cavity. ........................... 12 7 Schematic...

  6. Experiment Hazard Class 14.3 - Nanomaterials - Dispersible

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may be required as determined in a review of the activity. Gloves must be plastic or rubber, selected to also protect against any solvent used and long enough to cover wrist...

  7. Correlating Microstructure and Optoelectronic Performance of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochford, Caitlin

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . Inset shows V-I curve of individual MWNT with symmetric Pd contacts. (c) Current responsivity versus bias voltage in 4mW/mm2 IR radiation calculated from (b) …………………………………………. 72 3.4 Temporal IR Photoresponse of an individual MWNT under... ~3.5 mW/mm2 IR xv radiation biased at 10 ?A, f = 10 Hz. (b) IR photoresponse of MWNT film under ~3mW/mm2 biased at 2 mA, f = 10 Hz. The marked response time is measured from 90% to 10% of the total change ……………………………………………………… 75 3.5 D...

  8. Quantum dot-based nanomaterials for biological imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, John P. (John Philip)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum dot-based fluorescent probes were synthesized and applied to biological imaging in two distinct size regimes: (1) 100-1000 nm and (2) < 10 nm in diameter. The larger diameter range was accessed by doping CdSe/ZnS ...

  9. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    of deformation behavior of Al2O3-ZrO2-MgAl2O4 (AZM) bulk ceramic nanocomposites, strengthening mechanism of twins in YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film, work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel and deformation of 2wt% Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin film with nanorod...

  10. Synthesis, Characterization, Properties, and Tribological Performance of 2D Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xingliang

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    of lubricants using novel nanostructured particles. Experimental approaches include synthesis, characterization, and tribological and rheological investigation of nanoparticles, yttrium oxide (Y_(2)O_(3)), ?-zirconium phosphate (ZrP), and boron (B...

  11. Engineering Nanomaterials towards Energy Harvesting and Virological Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Ding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bulk device after spark plasma sintering. As a result, theSpark Plasma Sintering along the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) is a popular

  12. Smart Nanomaterials Inspired by Biology: Dynamic Assembly of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    are made of protein or protein scaffolds with inorganic minerals. Close examination of how these materials to cope with errors in protein synthesis, which assures accuracy in the downstream materials assembly. So be controlled in this way. Genetically controlled materials synthesis is "smart" in the sense

  13. Cooperative nanomaterials systems for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Ji Ho

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nu/nu) mouse bearing a MDA-MB-435 tumor were injectednanospheres (NS) conjugated with F3 peptides into MDA-MB-435nanospheres (NS) conjugated with F3 peptides into MDA-MB-435

  14. Synthesis, Characterization, Properties, and Tribological Performance of 2D Nanomaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xingliang

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand in wear and friction reduction drives continuous development of new lubricant additives for energy saving in wide engineering applications. In the present research, a new approach has been developed in order to modify the viscosity...

  15. Curvature effects in carbon nanomaterials: Exohedral versus endohedral supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel University; Yushin, Gleb [Georgia Institute of Technology; Portet, Cristelle [Drexel University

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacitive energy storage mechanisms in nanoporous carbon supercapacitors hinge on endohedral interactions in carbon materials with macro-, meso-, and micropores that have negative surface curvature. In this article, we show that because of the positive curvature found in zero-dimensional carbon onions or one-dimensional carbon nanotube arrays, exohedral interactions cause the normalized capacitance to increase with decreasing particle size or tube diameter, in sharp contrast to the behavior of nanoporous carbon materials. This finding is in good agreement with the trend of recent experimental data. Our analysis suggests that electrical energy storage can be improved by exploiting the highly curved surfaces of carbon nanotube arrays with diameters on the order of 1 nm.

  16. Curvature effects on carbon nanomaterials: Exohedral versus endhohedral supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.; Sumpter, B. G.; Meunier, V.; Yushin, G.; Portet, C.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacitive energy storage mechanisms in nanoporous carbon supercapacitors hinge on endohedral interactions in carbon materials with macro-, meso-, and micropores that have negative surface curvature. In this article, we show that because of the positive curvature found in zero-dimensional carbon onions or one-dimensional carbon nanotube arrays, exohedral interactions cause the normalized capacitance to increase with decreasing particle size or tube diameter, in sharp contrast to the behavior of nanoporous carbon materials. This finding is in good agreement with the trend of recent experimental data. Our analysis suggests that electrical energy storage can be improved by exploiting the highly curved surfaces of carbon nanotube arrays with diameters on the order of 1 nm.

  17. Cooperative nanomaterials systems for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Ji Ho

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-Infrared Imaging and Photothermal Heating” Geoffrey vonnear-infrared imaging and photothermal heating. Adv.heating were conducted under the guidance of infrared

  18. High performance ultracapacitors with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Wen; Henry, Kent Douglas

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to the use of carbon nanotubes and/or electrolyte structures in various electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors having an ionic liquid electrolyte. The carbon nanotubes are preferably aligned carbon nanotubes. Compared to randomly entangled carbon nanotubes, aligned carbon nanotubes can have better defined pore structures and higher specific surface areas.

  19. Cytotoxicological Response to Engineered Nanomaterials: A Pathway-Driven Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romoser, Amelia Antonia

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticles, while included in a growing number of consumer products, may pose risks to human health due to heavy metal leaching and/or the production of reactive oxygen species following exposures. Subcellular mechanisms of action triggered as a...

  20. Femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy of coherent oscillations in nanomaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerebtsov, Serguei Nikolaevich

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    pump-probe technique was applied for studies of acoustic vibrations in nanoparticles and nanowires, and coherent optical phonons in thin films. The elastic properties of spherical Ag nanoparticles and Ag and Bi nanowires were studied in a dual...

  1. Thermal and Electrical Transport Study of One Dimensional Nanomaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Liang

    2013-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    concentration were measured using a MEMS micro-device consisting of two suspended silicon nitride membranes in the temperature range of 60 K ~450 K. The experimental results were obtained by “simultaneously” measuring thermal conductivity, electrical...

  2. MORE RELATED ARTICLES: Nanomaterials Could Be Key to Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    , until the desired end-result was obtained. The new superbug may be used to create microbial fuel cells it says that microbial fuel cells using Geobacter could also be used to power medical implants, car Download the New, Optimized Version of Internet Explorer® for Free Now! IE8.MSN.com Windows Vista & Dell

  3. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes and metallic nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Height, Murray John, 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes are a remarkable material with many appealing properties. Despite the appeal of this material, there are few synthesis techniques capable of producing nanotubes in large quantities at low-cost. The broad ...

  4. Operating Experience Level 3, Safe Practices for Working with Nanomaterials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergy Online ClassifiedExplosives| Departmentin

  5. Nanomaterials Theory Institute Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Ridge National Laboratory (865) 576-6885 myoon@ornl.gov Publications Education: Michigan State Postdoctoral Advisor: Z.Y. Zhang, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China Thesis Advisor

  6. Nanomaterial Applications Range From Eyeliner to Turbines | GE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    email. Subscribe to all future posts Who Suchismita Sanyal What Materials Micro- & Nanotechnology Where Bangalore, India Why Building Subscribe You Might Also Like...

  7. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - BIO-Inspired Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos Laboratory Nastasi image ofHighlights

  8. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanomaterials Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos Laboratory Nastasi

  9. Size selective absorption of DNA tetrahedra in ATO nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3 Outlook forSDPPP IndividualDeptSixty-seven

  10. Lab Breakthrough: Nanomaterials Discoveries Lead to Possible Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLS Experimental RunProcedureof Energy

  11. Nanomaterial Laboratory Safety, Boise State University | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancy Sutley About Us Nancy Sutley -

  12. Nanomaterials Safety Implementation Plan, Ames Laboratory | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancy Sutley About Us Nancy Sutley -Energy

  13. Project Profile: Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of Energy TEES logo Texas

  14. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanomaterials Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMS RESEARCHInstitute (NTI): Computational

  15. The Tactical and Strategic Implementation of Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector, JanuarySunShot Swerve DickAdvanced Manufacturing

  16. Water, water, everywhere - Controlling the properties of nanomaterials |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  18. Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  19. Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry Research U.S.Biomaterials | Department of

  20. Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable Biomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  1. Quick, Efficient Film Deposition for Nanomaterials - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses: Question 1: WouldPortal Solar

  2. Grazing function g and collimation angular acceptance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peggs, Stephen G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The grazing function g is introduced—a synchrobetatron optical quantity that is analogous (and closely connected) to the Twiss and dispersion functions ?, ?, ?, and ??. It parametrizes the rate of change of total angle with respect to synchrotron amplitude for grazing particles, which just touch the surface of an aperture when their synchrotron and betatron oscillations are simultaneously (in time) at their extreme displacements. The grazing function can be important at collimators with limited acceptance angles. For example, it is important in both modes of crystal collimation operation—in channeling and in volume reflection. The grazing function is independent of the collimator type—crystal or amorphous—but can depend strongly on its azimuthal location. The rigorous synchrobetatron condition g=0 is solved, by invoking the close connection between the grazing function and the slope of the normalized dispersion. Propagation of the grazing function is described, through drifts, dipoles, and quadr...

  3. Exact fermionic Green's functions from holograpny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Ying Fan

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a series of charged dilatonic black holes which share zero entropy in the zero temperature limit using Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories. In these black holes, the wave functions and the Green's functions of massless fermions can be solved exactly in terms of special functions in the phase space of $(\\omega,k)$. We observe that for sufficiently large charge, there are many poles in the Green's function with vanishing $\\omega$, which strongly signifies that Fermi surfaces exist in these holographic systems. The new distinguishing properties of the Green's function arising in these systems were illustrated with great details. We also study the poles motion of the Green's function for arbitrary (complex) frequency. Our analytic results provide a more realistic and elegant approach to study strongly correlated fermionic systems using gauge/gravity duality.

  4. A note on the Voigt profile function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pagnini; R. K. Saxena

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Voigt profile function emerges in several physical investigations (e.g. atmospheric radiative transfer, astrophysical spectroscopy, plasma waves and acoustics) and it turns out to be the convolution of the Gaussian and the Lorentzian densities. Its relation with a number of special functions has been widely derived in literature starting from its Fourier type integral representation. The main aim of the present paper is to introduce the Mellin-Barnes integral representation as a useful tool to obtain new analytical results. Here, starting from the Mellin-Barnes integral representation, the Voigt function is expressed in terms of the Fox H-function which includes representations in terms of the Meijer G-function and previously well-known representations with other special functions.

  5. Hadron wavefunctions and structure functions in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, T.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical and empirical constraints on the hadron wave function and hadron structure functions are presented. In particular, a new type of low-energy theorem is obtained for the pion wave function from ..pi../sup 0/ ..-->.. ..gamma gamma... Thus the probability of finding the valence vertical bar q anti q > state is obtained. All these constraints allow construction of a possible model that describes hadron wavefunctions, probability amplitudes, and distributions. 3 figures.

  6. VARIATIONAL PROPERTIES OF VALUE FUNCTIONS 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 15, 2012 ... ... p(x) ? ? }. The function ? (x | X) is the indicator to a convex set X. ...... Bayesian non-linear modelling for the prediction competition. ASHRAE ...

  7. A COMPLEXITY THEORY OF CONSTRUCTIBLE FUNCTIONS AND ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 30, 2014 ... Primary 14P10, 14P25; Secondary 68W30. Key words and phrases. constructible functions, constructible sheaves, polynomial hierarchy,.

  8. GENERALIZED JACOBI FUNCTIONS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 5, 2015 ... and Karniadakis [32] proposed to use poly-fractonomials, which are eigenfunctions of a fractional. Sturm-Liouville operator, as basis functions, ...

  9. Observational Window Functions in Planet Transit Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar von Braun; David R. Ciardi

    2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Window functions describe, as a function of orbital period, the probability that an existing planetary transit is detectable in one's data for a given observing strategy. We show the dependence of this probability upon several strategy and astrophysical parameters, such as length of observing run, observing cadence, length of night, and transit duration. The ability to detect a transit is directly related to the intrinsic noise of the observations. In our simulations of the window function, we explicitly address non-correlated (gaussian or white) noise and correlated (red) noise and discuss how these two different noise components affect window functions in different manners.

  10. Molecular architecture and functionalization of graphene surface...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular architecture and functionalization of graphene surface; Synthesis and characterization Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A...

  11. Minimizing Irregular Convex Functions: Ulam Stabil... - Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Amer. Math. Soc. 328 (1991), 695-730. [3] H. Attouch, Variational convergence for functions and operators, Applicable Math. Series, Pitman, London, 1984.

  12. Maximizing Stochastic Monotone Submodular Functions Arash Asadpour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saberi, Amin

    Maximizing Stochastic Monotone Submodular Functions Arash Asadpour Hamid Nazerzadeh Amin Saberi, saberi}@stanford.edu Microsoft Research, Cambridge, MA. hamidnz@microsoft.com 1 #12;For the above

  13. Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72-2011, Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard by Diane Johnson This SSQA FAQS identifies the minimum technical competency requirements for DOE...

  14. A Wave-function for Stringy Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costas Kounnas; Nicolaos Toumbas; Jan Troost

    2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a wave-function for string theory cosmological backgrounds. We give a prescription for computing its norm following an earlier analysis within general relativity. Under Euclidean continuation, the cosmologies we discuss in this paper are described in terms of compact parafermionic worldsheet systems. To define the wave-function we provide a T-fold description of the parafermionic conformal field theory, and of the corresponding string cosmology. In specific examples, we compute the norm of the wave-function and comment on its behavior as a function of moduli.

  15. AN ELECTRONIC COMPENDIUM OF EXTREME FUNCTIONS FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 18, 2014 ... The authors acknowledge partial support from the National Science Foundation through ..... Load a function and store it in variable h. sage: h ...

  16. Holographic Quenches and Fermionic Spectral Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Callebaut; B. Craps; F. Galli; D. C. Thompson; J. Vanhoof; J. Zaanen; Hongbao Zhang

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using holographic methods we investigate the behaviour of fermionic spectral functions of strongly coupled 2+1 dimensional field theories as both temperature and chemical potential are quenched.

  17. Approximations by Orthonormal Mapped Chebyshev Functions for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    a School of Mathematical Science, Xiamen University, 361005 Xiamen, China .... suitable mapping can be used to approximate functions on the whole line R (cf.

  18. Critical function and success path summary display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of and hierarchical access to three levels of display pages containing information on critical function monitoring and success path monitoring.

  19. Functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing applications. Functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing applications. Abstract: This review summarizes the recent...

  20. Optimization problems with value function objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    max programming problem and the bilevel optimization problem. In this paper, we ... 1. Introduction. An optimization problem with value function objective is a.

  1. Suggestions for Functional Analysis Basics (FAB) Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 14, 2014 ... Page 1 ... Functional analysis is a central topic in analysis at an advanced level and is at the foundation of many parts of analysis, including ...

  2. DNA Nanotechnology DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206389

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    DNA Nanotechnology DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206389 Assembly of Heterogeneous Functional Nanomaterials on DNA Origami Scaffolds** Risheng Wang,* Colin Nuckolls, and Shalom J. Wind* Hybrid nanomaterial systems;[1] selective growth;[4,9] and DNA-mediated assem- bly,[3,8] including the formation of 3D

  3. 18.112 Functions of a Complex Variable, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgason, Sigurdur, 1927-

    The basic properties of functions of one complex variable. Cauchy's theorem, holomorphic and meromorphic functions, residues, contour integrals, conformal mapping. Infinite series and products, the gamma function, the ...

  4. 18.112 Functions of a Complex Variable, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgason, Sigurdur, 1927-

    The basic properties of functions of one complex variable. Cauchy's theorem, holomorphic and meromorphic functions, residues, contour integrals, conformal mapping. Infinite series and products, the gamma function, the ...

  5. Green's function analysis of periodic structures in computational electromagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Orden, Derek

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the two-dimensional periodic Green's function," IEEE Trans.evaluation of the Green's function for the Helmholtzrepresentations of certain Green's functions," J. Comp.

  6. MicrobesOnline: an integrated portal for comparative functional genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachimiak, Marcin P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparative functional genomics Marcin P. Joachimiak 1,2 ,for comparative functional genomics of bacteria and archaea.publicly avail- able functional genomics data from published

  7. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O Foda; M Wheeler; M Zuparic

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that the partition function of the six vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP tau function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization).

  8. Beta Functions of Topologically Massive Supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Percacci; M. J. Perry; C. N. Pope; E. Sezgin

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the one-loop beta functions of the cosmological constant, Newton's constant and the topological mass in topologically massive supergravity in three dimensions. We use a variant of the proper time method supplemented by a simple choice of cutoff function. We find that the dimensionless coefficient of the Chern-Simons term, $\

  9. Functional Data Analysis With Multi Layer Perceptrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleuret, François

    Analysis. We introduce a computation model for functional input data and we show that this model is a wellFunctional Data Analysis With Multi Layer Perceptrons Fabrice Rossi , Brieuc Conan-Guez and Fran as clas- sical multivariate data, because they are in general de- scribed by a finite set of input

  10. Green's functions for Neumann boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerrold Franklin

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Green's functions for Neumann boundary conditions have been considered in Math Physics and Electromagnetism textbooks, but special constraints and other properties required for Neumann boundary conditions have generally not been noticed or treated correctly. In this paper, we derive an appropriate Neumann Green's function with these constraints and properties incorporated.

  11. Functional Clustering in Nested Designs Abel Rodriguez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    -spline fitting coupled with k-means clustering; Tarpey & Kinateder (2003), who apply k-means clustering via functional data that employ spline representations; Garc´ia-Escudero & Gordaliza (2005), where the robust k-means profile for each woman. #12;Functional Clustering in Nested Designs 3 with k-means clustering; Heard et al

  12. Structure Functions, Form Factors, and Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Wilcox; B. Andersen-Pugh

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results towards the calculation of the pion electric form factor and structure function on a $16^3\\times 24$ lattice using charge overlap. By sacrificing Fourier transform information in two directions, it is seen that the longitudinal four point function can be extracted with reasonable error bars at low momentum.

  13. Wave function derivation of the JIMWLK equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexey V. Popov

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the stationary lightcone perturbation theory, we propose the complete and careful derivation the JIMWLK equation. We show that the rigorous treatment requires the knowledge of a boosted wave function with second order accuracy. Previous wave function approaches are incomplete and implicitly used the time ordered perturbation theory, which requires a usage of an external target field.

  14. Local Transition Functions of Quantum Turing Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanao Ozawa; Harumichi Nishimura

    2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Foundations of the notion of quantum Turing machines are investigated. According to Deutsch's formulation, the time evolution of a quantum Turing machine is to be determined by the local transition function. In this paper, the local transition functions are characterized for fully general quantum Turing machines, including multi-tape quantum Turing machines, extending the results due to Bernstein and Vazirani.

  15. Optimal Execution with Nonlinear Impact Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almgren, Robert F.

    cost per share to be a power law function of the trading rate, with an arbitrary positive exponentOptimal Execution with Nonlinear Impact Functions and Trading-Enhanced Risk Robert F. Almgren October 2001 Abstract We determine optimal trading strategies for liquidation of a large single

  16. Fuzzy Functional Dependencies and Lossless Join Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Lorraine M.

    Recognition]: Models General Terms: Design, Theory Additional Key Words and Phrases: Functional dependencyFuzzy Functional Dependencies and Lossless Join Decomposition of Fuzzy Relational Database Systems with the application of fuzzy logic in a relational database environment with the objective of capturing more meaning

  17. Network architecture functional description and design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stans, L.; Bencoe, M.; Brown, D.; Kelly, S.; Pierson, L.; Schaldach, C.

    1989-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a top level functional description and design for the development and implementation of the central network to support the next generation of SNL, Albuquerque supercomputer in a UNIX{reg sign} environment. It describes the network functions and provides an architecture and topology.

  18. Generalized Secret Sharing and Monotone Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Generalized Secret Sharing and Monotone Functions Josh Benaloh University of Toronto Jerry Leichter Yale University January 9, 1996 Abstract Secret Sharing from the perspective of threshold schemes has of the secret sharing functions which we may wish to form. For example, if it is desirable to divide a secret

  19. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  20. Lessons 6 Graphs of Functional Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 30, 2013 ... One of the problems (#1) illustrates the principle of supply and demand, ... All of the problems involve building up a function model (see Lesson 5) ... Granite Management rents out several apartment complexes in the .... Side. 0.001 per cm2. Bottom. 0.005 per cm2. Lessons 6 Graphs of Functional Models.

  1. NONSMOOTH LYAPUNOV FUNCTIONS AND DISCONTINUOUS CARATHEODORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacciotti, Andrea

    NONSMOOTH LYAPUNOV FUNCTIONS AND DISCONTINUOUS CARATH´EODORY SYSTEMS Andrea Bacciotti and Francesca in Carath´eodory sense are considered. For these systems sufficient conditions which guarantee both Lyapunov stability and asymptotic stability in terms of nonsmooth Lyapunov functions are given. An invariance

  2. Low work function, stable thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  3. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  4. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo, E-mail: mijg@mail.buct.edu.cn; Zhong, Chongli [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid?liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  5. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions and Hall-Littlewoo* *d functions associated to W are introduced, and Green functions are described

  6. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

  7. When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells | ANSER Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells...

  8. The Wave Function and Quantum Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan Gao

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the meaning of the wave function by analyzing the mass and charge density distribution of a quantum system. According to protective measurement, a charged quantum system has mass and charge density proportional to the modulus square of its wave function. It is shown that the mass and charge density is not real but effective, and it is formed by the ergodic motion of a localized particle with the total mass and charge of the system. Moreover, it is argued that the ergodic motion is not continuous but discontinuous and random. This result suggests a new interpretation of the wave function, according to which the wave function is a description of random discontinuous motion of particles, and the modulus square of the wave function gives the probability density of the particles being in certain locations. It is shown that the suggested interpretation of the wave function disfavors the de Broglie-Bohm theory and the many-worlds interpretation but favors the dynamical collapse theories, and the random discontinuous motion of particles may provide an appropriate random source to collapse the wave function.

  9. Instabilities in the Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; T. Lesinski

    2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of Energy Density Functionals (EDF) used in nuclear structure and dynamics, one of the unsolved issues is the stability of the functional. Numerical issues aside, some EDFs are unstable with respect to particular perturbations of the nuclear ground-state density. The aim of this contribution is to raise questions about the origin and nature of these instabilities, the techniques used to diagnose and prevent them, and the domain of density functions in which one should expect a nuclear EDF to be stable.

  10. Green Functions of Relativistic Field Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying-Qiu Gu

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we restudy the Green function expressions of field equations. We derive the explicit form of the Green functions for the Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac equation, and then estimate the decay rate of the solution to the linear equations. The main motivation of this paper is to show that: (1). The formal solutions of field equations expressed by Green function can be elevated as a postulate for unified field theory. (2). The inescapable decay of the solution of linear equations implies that the whole theory of the matter world should include nonlinear interaction.

  11. Photoluminescence study in diaminobenzene functionalized graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Abhisek, E-mail: guptaabhisek017@gmail.com, E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: guptaabhisek017@gmail.com, E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Being an excellent electronic material graphene is a very poor candidate for optoelectronic applications. One of the major strategies to develop the optical property in GO is the functionalization of graphene oxide (GO). In the present work GO sheets are functionalized by o-phenylenediamine to achieve diaminobenzene functionalized GO composite (DAB-GO). Formation of DAB-GO composite is further characterized by FTIR, UV, Raman studies. Excellent photoluminescence is observed in DAB-GO composite via passivation of the surface reactive sites by ring-opening amination of epoxides of GO.

  12. Direct Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Schaaf; Michelle D. Shinn; E. Carpene; J. Kaspar

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct laser synthesis of functional coatings employs the irradiation of materials with short intensive laser pulses in a reactive atmosphere. The material is heated and plasma is ignited in the reactive atmosphere. This leads to an intensive interaction of the material with the reactive species and a coating is directly formed on the materials surface. By that functional coatings can be easily produced a fast way on steel, aluminium, and silicon by irradiation in nitrogen, methane, or even hydrogen. The influence of the processing parameters to the properties of the functional coatings will be presented for titanium nitride coating produced on titanium with the free electron laser.

  13. Stochastic Quantum Trajectories without a Wave Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeroen C. Vink

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    After summarizing three versions of trajectory-based quantum mechanics, it is argued that only the original formulation due to Bohm, which uses the Schr\\"odinger wave function to guide the particles, can be readily extended to particles with spin. To extend the two wave function-free formulations, it is argued that necessarily particle trajectories not only determine location, but also spin. Since spin values are discrete, it is natural to revert to a variation of Bohm's pilot wave formulation due originally to Bell. It is shown that within this formulation with stochastic quantum trajectories, a wave function free formulation can be obtained.

  14. Spatial wave functions of photon and electron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khokhlov, D. L. [Sumy State University, R.-Korsakov St. 2, Sumy 40007 (Ukraine)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum mechanical model of the photon and electron is considered. The photon is conceived of as a particle moving with the speed of light which is accompanied by the wave function of the photon spreading out with an infinite speed. The wave function of the electron is introduced in terms of virtual photons tied to the electron. A description of electrostatic and magnetostatic interactions is given through the wave functions of electrons. The approach provides an explanation of the results of recent experiments measuring the speed of propagation of the bound magnetic field.

  15. Schwinger functions in noncommutative quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorothea Bahns

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the $n$-point functions of scalar massive free fields on the noncommutative Minkowski space are distributions which are boundary values of analytic functions. Contrary to what one might expect, this construction does not provide a connection to the popular traditional Euclidean approach to noncommutative field theory (unless the time variable is assumed to commute). Instead, one finds Schwinger functions with twistings involving only momenta that are on the mass-shell. This explains why renormalization in the traditional Euclidean noncommutative framework crudely differs from renormalization in the Minkowskian regime.

  16. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  17. Decomposition of a Nonlinear Multivariate Function using the Heaviside Step Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisuke Chikayama

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Whereas the Dirac delta function introduced by P. A. M. Dirac in 1930 in his famous quantum mechanics text has been well studied, a not famous formula related to the delta function using the Heaviside step function in a single-variable form, also given in Dirac's text, has been poorly studied. We demonstrate the decomposition of a nonlinear multivariate function into a sum of integrals in which each integrand is composed of a derivative of the function and a direct product of Heaviside step functions. It is an extension of Dirac's single-variable form to that for multiple variables. Moreover, it remains mathematically equivalent to the definition of the Dirac delta function with multiple variables, and offers a mathematically unified expression.

  18. Fractal Geometric Characterization of Functionally Graded Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    Fractal Geometric Characterization of Functionally Graded Materials A. Saharan1 ; M. Ostoja graded materials (FGM) is studied from the standpoint of fractal geometry. First, upon introducing fractals, and an interfacial fractal dimension is estimated for varying degrees of fineness. Avariation

  19. Building English Explanations from Function Descriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Bruce

    An explanatory component is an important ingredient in any complex AI system. A simple generative scheme to build descriptive phrases from Lisp function calls can produce respectable explanations if explanation generators ...

  20. Functional Integration for Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. LaChapelle

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The functional integration scheme for path integrals advanced by Cartier and DeWitt-Morette is extended to the case of fields. The extended scheme is then applied to quantum field theory. Several aspects of the construction are discussed.

  1. MDF Form and Function (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Demonstration Facilities (MDF) Form and Function video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Ylva Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

  3. Multiscale fingerprinting of neuronal functional connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Gang

    Current cellular-based connectomics approaches aim to delineate the functional or structural organizations of mammalian brain circuits through neuronal activity mapping and/or axonal tracing. To discern possible connectivity ...

  4. Predicting gene function from images of cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Thouis Raymond, 1971-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation shows that biologically meaningful predictions can be made by analyzing images of cells. In particular, groups of related genes and their biological functions can be predicted using images from large ...

  5. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, C.A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the classical Heusler material Co 2 FeSi (Appendix B).plated self-assembly. Nature Materials, 3:823–828, 2004.1 Concepts Functional materials are those with an industrial

  6. Functional quantum biology in photosynthesis and magnetoreception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Neill; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Guang-Yin; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is there a functional role for quantum mechanics or coherent quantum effects in biological processes? While this question is as old as quantum theory, only recently have measurements on biological systems on ultra-fast time-scales shed light on a possible answer. In this review we give an overview of the two main candidates for biological systems which may harness such functional quantum effects: photosynthesis and magnetoreception. We discuss some of the latest evidence both for and against room temperature quantum coherence, and consider whether there is truly a functional role for coherence in these biological mechanisms. Finally, we give a brief overview of some more speculative examples of functional quantum biology including the sense of smell, long-range quantum tunneling in proteins, biological photoreceptors, and the flow of ions across a cell membrane.

  7. Functional quantum biology in photosynthesis and magnetoreception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neill Lambert; Yueh-Nan Chen; Yuan-Chung Cheng; Che-Ming Li; Guang-Yin Chen; Franco Nori

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Is there a functional role for quantum mechanics or coherent quantum effects in biological processes? While this question is as old as quantum theory, only recently have measurements on biological systems on ultra-fast time-scales shed light on a possible answer. In this review we give an overview of the two main candidates for biological systems which may harness such functional quantum effects: photosynthesis and magnetoreception. We discuss some of the latest evidence both for and against room temperature quantum coherence, and consider whether there is truly a functional role for coherence in these biological mechanisms. Finally, we give a brief overview of some more speculative examples of functional quantum biology including the sense of smell, long-range quantum tunneling in proteins, biological photoreceptors, and the flow of ions across a cell membrane.

  8. Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual defines safety management functions, responsibilities, and authorities for DOE senior management with responsibilities for line, support, oversight, and enforcement actions. Cancels DOE M 411.1-1B. Canceled by DOE O 450.2.

  9. Identification of new functions for BRCT domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Duaa H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our lab identified the tandem BRCT domains of PTIP function as a DNA damage responsive phospho binding domain that recognizes proteins phosphorylated by ATM and ATR after DNA damage. The PTIP tandem BRCT domains are ...

  10. Functional Facilities Management Energy Management Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulliver, Robert

    Functional Facilities Management Energy Management Structure Jerome Malmquist Director Erick Van Controls Systems Jeff Davis Assistant Director, Facilities Engineering & Energy Efficiency Gene Husted Principal Engineer / Commissioning Emily Robin-Abbott St. Paul Energy Engineer & Technicians Supervisor Dan

  11. Classical Lagrange Functions for the SME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Russell

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is presented for finding the classical Lagrange function corresponding to a given dispersion relation. This allows us to study the classical analogue of the Standard-Model Extension. Developments are discussed.

  12. Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual defines safety management functions, responsibilities, and authorities for DOE senior management with responsibilities for line, support, oversight, and enforcement actions. Canceled by DOE M 411.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

  13. Mechanisms of impaired osteoblast function during disuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Matthew Robert

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the mechanisms responsible for this decline are unclear. To investigate the limitations of osteoblasts during disuse, marrow ablation was superimposed on hindlimb unloaded mice. Marrow ablation is a useful model to study osteoblast functionality as new...

  14. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lonsdale, Harold K. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Friensen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Smith, Kelly L. (Bend, OR); Johnson, Bruce M. (Bend, OR); Wamser, Carl C. (West Linn, OR)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  15. Crystallization and functionality of inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Dongfeng, E-mail: dongfeng@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Keyan [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Jun [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, 411105 (China); Sun, Congting; Chen, Kunfeng [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we briefly summarized our recent work on the studies of crystallization and functionality of inorganic materials. On the basis of the chemical bonding theory of single crystal growth, we can quantitatively simulate Cu{sub 2}O crystallization processes in solution system. We also kinetically controlled Cu{sub 2}O crystallization process in the reduction solution route. Lithium ion battery and supercapacitor performances of some oxides such as Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnO{sub 2} were shown to elucidate the important effect of crystallization on functionality of inorganic materials. This work encourages us to create novel functionalities through the study of crystallization of inorganic materials, which warrants more chances in the field of functional materials.

  16. Section 1.4 (cont.): Functional Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 27, 2014 ... a single production supervisor earning $19.20 per hour. Express the cost of producing the 8,000 kickboards as a function of the number of ...

  17. Functionalization and applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnorr, Jan M. (Jan Markus)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess a unique set of electrical and mechanical properties and have been used in a variety of applications. In this thesis, we explore strategies to functionalize CNTs as well as applications which ...

  18. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  19. Functional requirements to shape generation in CAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jinpyung, 1967-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An outstanding issue in computer-aided design (CAD) is the creation of geometric shapes from the description of functional requirements (FRs). This thesis presents a method that can generate assembled shapes from the given ...

  20. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 (Greece)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  1. Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides the responsibilities of Headquarters and field element offices required by DOE P 411.1, Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Policy, dated 1-28-97. It also contains detailed requirements to supplement the policy's direction for each DOE organization having safety management functions to establish and maintain separate documentation of their responsibilities and authorities. Cancels DOE M 411.1-1A. Canceled by DOE M 411.1-1C.

  2. Time symmetry in wave function collapse models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Bedingham

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A framework for wave function collapse models that is symmetric under time reversal is presented. Within this framework there are equivalent pictures of collapsing wave functions evolving in both time directions. The backwards-in-time Born rule can be broken by an initial condition on the Universe resulting in asymmetric behaviour. Similarly the forwards-in-time Born rule can in principle be broken by a final condition on the Universe.

  3. Quantum critical benchmark for density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul E. Grabowski; Kieron Burke

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Two electrons at the threshold of ionization represent a severe test case for electronic structure theory. A pseudospectral method yields a very accurate density of the two-electron ion with nuclear charge close to the critical value. Highly accurate energy components and potentials of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are given, as well as a useful parametrization of the critical density. The challenges for density functional approximations and the strength of correlation are also discussed.

  4. Generalized roof duality and bisubmodular functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolmogorov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consider a convex relaxation $\\hat f$ of a pseudo-boolean function $f$. We say that the relaxation is {\\em totally half-integral} if $\\hat f(\\bx)$ is a polyhedral function with half-integral extreme points $\\bx$, and this property is preserved after adding an arbitrary combination of constraints of the form $x_i=x_j$, $x_i=1-x_j$, and $x_i=\\gamma$ where $\\gamma\\in\\{0, 1, 1/2}$ is a constant. A well-known example is the {\\em roof duality} relaxation for quadratic pseudo-boolean functions $f$. We argue that total half-integrality is a natural requirement for generalizations of roof duality to arbitrary pseudo-boolean functions. Our contributions are as follows. First, we provide a complete characterization of totally half-integral relaxations $\\hat f$ by establishing a one-to-one correspondence with {\\em bisubmodular functions}. Second, we give a new characterization of bisubmodular functions. Finally, we show some relationships between general totally half-integral relaxations and relaxations based on the roof...

  5. Landscape of the exact energy functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Aron J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the great challenges of electronic structure theory is the search for the exact functional of density functional theory (DFT). Its existence is undoubted but it is hard to even conceptualize it as it is a surface in a massively multidimensional space. However, the asymmetric two-site Hubbard model has a two-dimensional universe of density matrices and the exact functional simply becomes a function of two variables whose landscape can be calculated, visualized and explored. This one unique surface contains all the possible physics of any system in this universe. A walk on this landscape, moved to the angle of any one-electron Hamiltonian, gives a valley whose minimum is the exact total energy. We show concrete examples of pure-state density matrices that are not v-representable due to the underlying non-convex nature of the exact functional. Using the Perdew, Parr, Levy and Balduz extension to fractional ensembles we calculate the exact functional for all numbers of electrons. The derivative discontinui...

  6. Variational functions in degenerate open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakob, Matthias; Stenholm, Stig [Laser Physics and Quantum Optics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Alba Nova, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived a Lyapunov functional for a degenerate open atomic system. This functional develops monotonically towards its stationary state. The open system is described by a Lindblad-type master equation. For the construction of the variational functional it is necessary that the Lindblad operator can be diagonalized. Since the generator of motion is non-Hermitian, diagonalization is, in general, only possible if the eigenvalues are nondegenerate. In this paper, we propose that in a physical system the biorthogonal eigenbasis of the Lindblad operator remains complete even when degeneracy is present. Thus diagonalization of the Lindblad operator, and consequently the construction of the variational functional, is still possible. We discuss the reasons and illustrate the theory of the variational functional for a driven {lambda}-type three-level atom with degenerate ground state. The degeneracy has interesting effects on the variational functional in the steady state with respect to its interpretation as an entropic quantity. In case of the driven three-level atom, the dark state turns out to be an isentropic state.

  7. Gribov's horizon and the ghost dressing function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucaud, Ph; Yaouanc, A Le; Micheli, J; Pène, O; Rodríguez-Quintero, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a relation recently derived by K. Kondo at zero momentum between the Zwanziger's horizon function, the ghost dressing function and Kugo's functions $u$ and $w$. We agree with this result as far as bare quantities are considered. However, assuming the validity of the horizon gap equation, we argue that the solution $w(0)=0$ is not acceptable since it would lead to a vanishing renormalised ghost dressing function. On the contrary, when the cut-off goes to infinity, $u(0) \\to \\infty$, $w(0) \\to -\\infty$ such that $u(0)+w(0) \\to -1$. Furthermore $w$ and $u$ are not multiplicatively renormalisable. Relaxing the gap equation allows $w(0)=0$ with $u(0) \\to -1$. In both cases the bare ghost dressing function, $F(0,\\Lambda)$, goes logarithmically to infinity at infinite cut-off. We show that, although the lattice results provide bare results not so different from the $F(0,\\Lambda)=3$ solution, this is an accident due to the fact that the lattice cut-offs lie in the range 1-3 GeV$^{-1}$. We show that the renor...

  8. Generating functionals and Lagrangian partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vankerschaver, Joris; Liao, Cuicui; Leok, Melvin [Department of Mathematics, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, Dept. 0112, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, Dept. 0112, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this paper is to derive an alternative characterization of the multisymplectic form formula for classical field theories using the geometry of the space of boundary values. We review the concept of Type-I/II generating functionals defined on the space of boundary data of a Lagrangian field theory. On the Lagrangian side, we define an analogue of Jacobi's solution to the Hamilton–Jacobi equation for field theories, and we show that by taking variational derivatives of this functional, we obtain an isotropic submanifold of the space of Cauchy data, described by the so-called multisymplectic form formula. As an example of the latter, we show that Lorentz's reciprocity principle in electromagnetism is a particular instance of the multisymplectic form formula. We also define a Hamiltonian analogue of Jacobi's solution, and we show that this functional is a Type-II generating functional. We finish the paper by defining a similar framework of generating functions for discrete field theories, and we show that for the linear wave equation, we recover the multisymplectic conservation law of Bridges.

  9. Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Window Functions Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lloyd Knox

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary results of most observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are estimates of the angular power spectrum averaged through some broad band, called band-powers. These estimates are in turn what are used to produce constraints on cosmological parameters due to all CMB observations. Essential to this estimation of cosmological parameters is the calculation of the expected band-power for a given experiment, given a theoretical power spectrum. Here we derive the "band power" window function which should be used for this calculation, and point out that it is not equivalent to the window function used to calculate the variance. This important distinction has been absent from much of the literature: the variance window function is often used as the band-power window function. We discuss the validity of this assumed equivalence, the role of window functions for experiments that constrain the power in {\\it multiple} bands, and summarize a prescription for reporting experimental results. The analysis methods detailed here are applied in a companion paper to three years of data from the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement.

  10. Global Study of Nuclear Structure Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Kulagin; R. Petti

    2005-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a phenomenological study of unpolarized nuclear structure functions for a wide kinematical region of x and Q^2. As a basis of our phenomenology we develop a model which takes into account a number of different nuclear effects including nuclear shadowing, Fermi motion and binding, nuclear pion excess and off-shell correction to bound nucleon structure functions. Within this approach we perform a statistical analysis of available data on the ratio of the nuclear structure functions F_2 for different nuclei in the range from the deuteron to the lead. We express the off-shell effect and the effective scattering amplitude describing nuclear shadowing in terms of few parameters which are common to all nuclei and have a clear physical interpretation. The parameters are then extracted from statistical analysis of data. As a result, we obtain an excellent overall agreement between our calculations and data in the entire kinematical region of x and Q^2. We discuss a number of applications of our model which include the calculation of the deuteron structure functions, nuclear valence and sea quark distributions and nuclear structure functions for neutrino charged-current scattering.

  11. High-resolution functional annotation of human transcriptome: predicting isoform functions by a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    functions. Our method achieved an average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0 be regarded as Joint First Authors. Nucleic Aci

  12. Low work function thermionic emission materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavadil, K.R.; King, D.B.; Ruffner, J.A.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermionic energy conversion in a microminiature format shows potential as a viable, high efficiency, on-chip power source. Microminiature thermionic converters (MTC) with inter-electrode spacings on the order of microns are currently being prototyped and evaluated at Sandia. The remaining enabling technology is the development of low work function materials and processes than can be integrated into these converters. In this report, the authors demonstrate a method of incorporating thin film emitters into converters using rf sputtering. They find that the resultant films possess a minimum work function of 1.2 eV. Practical energy conversion is hindered by surface work function non-uniformity. They postulate the source of this heterogeneity to be a result of limited bulk and surface transport of barium. Several methods are proposed for maximizing transport, including increased film porosity and the use of metal terminating layers. They demonstrate a novel method for incorporating film porosity based on metal interlayer coalescence.

  13. Smart Grid Information Security (IS) Functional Requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Amy Poh Ai

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to implement safe smart grid environment to enhance people's lives and livelihoods. This paper provides information on smart grid IS functional requirement by illustrating some discussion points to the sixteen identified requirements. This paper introduces the smart grid potential hazards that can be referred as a triggering factor to improve the system and security of the entire grid. The background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid IS is described with the adoption of hermeneutic circle as methodology. Grid information technology and security-s session discusses that grid provides the chance of a simple and transparent access to different information sources. In addition, the transformation between traditional versus smart grid networking trend and the IS importance on the communication field reflects the criticality of grid IS functional requirement identification is introduces. The smart grid IS functional requirements described in this paper are general and ...

  14. Functional Approach to Electrodynamics of Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Starke; G. A. H. Schober

    2015-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we put forward a new approach to electrodynamics of materials. Based on the identification of induced electromagnetic fields as the microscopic counterparts of polarization and magnetization, we systematically employ the mutual functional dependencies of induced, external and total field quantities. This allows for a unified, relativistic description of the electromagnetic response without assuming the material to be composed of electric or magnetic dipoles. Using this approach, we derive universal (material-independent) relations between electromagnetic response functions such as the dielectric tensor, the magnetic susceptibility and the microscopic conductivity tensor. Our formulae can be reduced to well-known identities in special cases, but more generally include the effects of inhomogeneity, anisotropy, magnetoelectric coupling and relativistic retardation. If combined with the Kubo formalism, they would also lend themselves to the ab initio calculation of all linear electromagnetic response functions.

  15. EMC effect and nuclear structure functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Atashbar Tehrani; A. Mirjalili; Ali N. Khorramian

    2006-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze experimental data of nuclear structure function ratios $F_2^A/F_2^D$ for obtaining optimum parton distribution functions (PDFs) in nuclei. Then, uncertainties of the nuclear PDFs are estimated by the Hessian method. Parametrization of nuclear parton distribution is investigated in the leading order of $\\alpha_s$. The parton distribution are provided at $Q^2=1 GeV^2$ with a number of parameters, which are determined by a $\\chi^2$ analysis of the data on nuclear structure function. From the analysis, we propose parton distributions at $Q^2=1 GeV^2$ for nuclei from deuteron to heavy ones with a mass number $A\\sim 208$.

  16. Contents ISS and Lyapunov functions Input-to-state stability and interconnections Lyapunov functions Simplicial fixed point algor Lyapunov Functions for Interconnected Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafstein, Sigurður Freyr

    Contents ISS and Lyapunov functions Input-to-state stability and interconnections Lyapunov functions Simplicial fixed point algor Lyapunov Functions for Interconnected Systems Fabian Wirth Institute of Mathematics, University of W¨urzburg Workshop on Algorithms for Dynamical Systems and Lyapunov Functions

  17. Calibrating the MKAR array using transfer functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renwald, M. D. (Marie D.); Taylor, S. R. (Steven R.); Wallace, Terry C.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing regional discriminants (RDs) at any given seismic station requires a ground-truth database of waveforms from both earthquakes and explosions. Recently installed stations used for seismic monitoring have no single charge explosions on which to base discriminants. We have developed a procedure to map information from surrogate stations, having a long recording history, to newly installed operational stations. We investigated a method to compute transfer functions using known effective 13Ds for a database of earthquakes and explosions located near the Lop Nor nuclear test site and recorded at the KNET array in Kyrgyzstan. For specific source-station paths, transfer functions work well. However, preliminary analysis of India and Pakistan nuclear tests indicate strong azimuthal dependence in the construction of reliable transfer functions. The success of the preliminary work suggests we can apply the same technique to calibrate the recently installed MKAR array using the Global Seismic Network station MAKZ as a surrogate. Both MKAR, an 11-element array operational since 2000, and MAKZ (including its earlier counterpart MAK), operating very broadband instruments since 1994, are located in Eastern Kazakhstan and separated by 25 km. To perform the calibration requires additional considerations not taken into account during the initial investigation: (1) utilizing amplitude spectra, rather than using RDs, to calculate transfer functions; (2) computing transfer functions for a range of azimuths, as we believe the transfer function are azimuthally dependent; and (3) determining whether working with each array element separately or developing a single-input/multiple-output model will provide more stable results and better error estimates.

  18. Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cristadoro

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyze low dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand even simple one dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non smooth dependence of global observable on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero.

  19. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Schunck; Jordan D. McDonnell; Jason Sarich; Stefan M. Wild; Dave Higdon

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  20. Long-time limit of correlation functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Franosch

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Auto-correlation functions in an equilibrium stochastic process are well-characterized by Bochner's theorem as Fourier transforms of a finite symmetric Borel measure. The existence of a long-time limit of these correlation functions depends on the spectral properties of the measure. Here we provide conditions applicable to a wide-class of dynamical theories guaranteeing the existence of the long-time limit. We discuss the implications in the context of the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition where a non-trivial long-time limit signals an idealized glass state.