National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for functional nanomaterials cfn

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  3. The Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven National Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, James

    2015-07-09

    Scientists from all over the world visit the Center for Functional Nanomaterials to explore strange phenomena hidden on the nanoscale—an exciting and powerful landscape spanning just billionths of a meter. The U.S. Department of Energy opened the CFN, one of its five nanoscale science research centers in the United States, to develop unprecedented energy technologies and solve fundamental scientific puzzles. Learn more about the CFN: https://www.bnl.gov/cfn/.

  4. Editorial: Functional nanomaterials for energy applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Devan, Rupesh S.; Ma, Yuan -Ron; Kim, Jin -Hyeok; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Ghosh, Kartik C.

    2015-02-16

    In order to leap forward from the energy crisis issues and improve lifestyle, we all are looking positively toward nanomaterials or nanostructures. Thus, the exploration of new features of both typical and novel materials at the nanoscale level is playing important role in the development of innovative and improved energy technologies that have the capability of conserve/convert energy at large extend. By tailoring the surface morphology of materials in its nanoforms, the functional properties can be significantly adapted and specifically combined to produce highly potent multifunctional materials for conversion, storage, and consumption of energy in various forms. The papers selectedmore » for this special issue represent a good panel for addressing various energy applications including solar cell, fuel cells, nanofluid twisters, and gas sensors. Of course, the selected topic and the papers are not an exhaustive representation of the utilization of functional nanomaterials for energy applications. Nevertheless, they represent the rich and many-facet knowledge, which we have the pleasure of sharing with the readers.« less

  5. Editorial: Functional nanomaterials for energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devan, Rupesh S.; Ma, Yuan -Ron; Kim, Jin -Hyeok; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Ghosh, Kartik C.

    2015-02-16

    In order to leap forward from the energy crisis issues and improve lifestyle, we all are looking positively toward nanomaterials or nanostructures. Thus, the exploration of new features of both typical and novel materials at the nanoscale level is playing important role in the development of innovative and improved energy technologies that have the capability of conserve/convert energy at large extend. By tailoring the surface morphology of materials in its nanoforms, the functional properties can be significantly adapted and specifically combined to produce highly potent multifunctional materials for conversion, storage, and consumption of energy in various forms. The papers selected for this special issue represent a good panel for addressing various energy applications including solar cell, fuel cells, nanofluid twisters, and gas sensors. Of course, the selected topic and the papers are not an exhaustive representation of the utilization of functional nanomaterials for energy applications. Nevertheless, they represent the rich and many-facet knowledge, which we have the pleasure of sharing with the readers.

  6. Nanomaterials for bio-functionalized electrodes: recent trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walcarius, Alain; Minteer, Shelley D.; Wang, Joseph; Lin, Yuehe; Merkoci, Arben

    2013-09-10

    This review intends to highlight the interest of nanomaterials for building biologically-modified electrodes. Rather than giving a comprehensive overview of the topic, the present work intends to give a flavour on the most exciting achievements and most recent approaches to get (and use) nanostructured electrode surfaces (or electrodes modified with nano-objects) comprising biomolecules. It will mainly consider nano-engineered functional polymers, nano-sized objects such as nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene or related materials, as well as template-based nanostructures, as modifiers for bio-functionalised electrodes.

  7. Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design. From Fundamentals to Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2003-12-01

    Vision2020 agreed to join NNI and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EERE) in sponsoring the "Nanomaterials and the Chemical Industry Roadmap Workshop" on September 30-October 2, 2002. This roadmap, Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design: From Fundamentals to Function, is based on the scientific priorities expressed by workshop participants from the chemical industry, universities, and government laboratories.

  8. An overviewFunctional nanomaterials for lithium rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hua Kun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanomaterials play important role in lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. - Highlights: Nanomaterials play important role for lithium rechargeable batteries. Nanostructured materials increase the capacitance of supercapacitors. Nanostructure improves the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. Nanomaterials enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts in fuel cells. - Abstract: There is tremendous worldwide interest in functional nanostructured materials, which are the advanced nanotechnology materials with internal or external dimensions on the order of nanometers. Their extremely small dimensions make these materials unique and promising for clean energy applications such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and other applications. This paper will highlight the development of new approaches to study the relationships between the structure and the physical, chemical, and electrochemical properties of functional nanostructured materials. The Energy Materials Research Programme at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, the University of Wollongong, has been focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of functional nanomaterials, including nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanoporous materials, and nanocomposites. The emphases are placed on advanced nanotechnology, design, and control of the composition, morphology, nanostructure, and functionality of the nanomaterials, and on the subsequent applications of these materials to areas including lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells.

  9. Multi-functional carbon nanomaterials: Tailoring morphology for multidisciplinary applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dervishi, Enkeleda

    2015-05-14

    Carbon based nanomaterials are being developed to have many new properties and applications. Graphene, is a mono-layer 2D atomic thick structure formed from hexagons of carbon atoms bound together by sp^2hybrid bonds. A carbon nanotube (CNT) can be viewed as a sheet of graphene rolled up into a cylinder, usually 1-2 nanometers in diameter and a few microns thick. A few applications of graphene and carbon nanotubes include the development of Nanoelectronics, nanocomposite materials, Hydrogen storage and Li⁺ battery, etc.

  10. Chemical Functionalization, Self-Assembly, and Applications of Nanomaterials and Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Tifeng; Yan, Xingbin; Balan, Lavinia; Stepanov, Andrey; Chen, Xinqing; Hu, Michael Z.

    2014-01-01

    This special issue addresses the research studies on chemical functionalization, self-assembly, and applications of nanomaterials and nanocomposites. It contains twentyfour articles including two reviews and twenty-two research articles. It is used to create new functional nanomaterials and nanocomposites with a variety of sizes and morphologies such as Zn/Al layered double hydroxide, tin oxide nanowires, FeOOH-modified anion resin, Au nanoclusters silica composite nanospheres, Ti-doped ZnO sol-composite films, TiO2/ZnO composite, graphene oxide nanocomposites, LiFePO4/C nanocomposites, and chitosan nanoparticles. These nanomaterials and nanocomposites have widespread applications in tissue engineering, antitumor, sensors, photoluminescence, electrochemical, and catalytic properties. In addition, this themed issue includes some research articles about self-assembly systems covering organogels and Langmuir films. Furthermore, B. Blasiak et al. performed a literature survey on the recent advances in production, functionalization, toxicity reduction, and application of nanoparticles in cancer diagnosis, treatment, and treatment monitoring. P. Colson et al. performed a literature survey on the recent advances in nanosphere lithography due to its compatibility with wafer-scale processes as well as its potential to manufacture a wide variety of homogeneous one-, two-, or three-dimensional nanostructures.

  11. Self Assembly for Nanostructured Electronic Devices at the Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charles Black Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory BlackChuckD0331112 abstract: The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven ...

  12. Density functional study of H-induced defects as nucleation sites in hybrid carbon nanomaterials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, A.; Terranova, M. L.; Rossi, M.; Dip. Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche; Dip di Energetica; INFM

    2005-01-01

    Recently we have reported on the growth of an exciting new class of hybrid nanostructured carbon materials, coupling nanosized diamond with single-walled carbon nanotubes. The inner structures were shown to be single-walled C nanotubes or bundles of single-walled nanotubes up to 15 {micro}m long, and the outer deposit consisted of faceted diamond crystallites with diameters in the range of 20-100 nm. To aid in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the formation of such materials, the present study uses density functional theory to examine the role of atomic hydrogen in creating localized sp{sup 3} hybridized defects on the outer wall of carbon nanotubes. The results illustrate that certain absorption configurations may produce defects containing dangling carbon bonds, and thus promote the formation of suitable sites for nanodiamond nucleation.

  13. Sustainable Nanomaterials Industry Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by MeadWestvaco Corporation held on June 26, 2012

  14. Metrology for Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Michael Postek (National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST) for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop on June 26, 2012

  15. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products ...

  16. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; Orr, Galya; Rosenzweig, Ze'ev

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterial effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.

  17. Microreactor-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition for Photovoltaic Thin-Film Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop and demonstrate a scalable microreactor-assisted nanomaterial deposition pilot platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for PV applications.

  18. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop (held in Washington, D.C., on June 26, 2012) gathered stakeholders from industry and academia to discuss the current state of the art for sustainable nanomat...

  19. Biological responses to engineered nanomaterials: Needs for the next decade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D.; et al

    2015-06-09

    In this study, the interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) measurement of the chemical nature of nanomaterials in dynamic, complex aqueous environments; (ii) real-time measurements of nanomaterial-biological interactions with chemical specificity; (iii) delineation of molecular modes of action for nanomaterialmore » effects on living systems as functions of nanomaterial properties; and (iv) an integrated systems approach that includes computation and simulation across orders of magnitude in time and space.« less

  20. Self Assembly for Nanostructured Electronic Devices at the Center for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functional Nanomaterials | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Self Assembly for Nanostructured Electronic Devices at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials November 3, 2009 at 3pm/36-428 Charles Black Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory Black_Chuck_D0331112 abstract: The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a science-based user facility devoted to nanotechnology research addressing challenges in energy security. Five

  1. Nanomaterials Information | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticles Department of Energy Nanoscale Science Research Centers Approach to Nanomaterial ES&H, Revision 3a - May 2008 NIOSH (2013). Current Intelligence Bulletin 65:...

  2. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop - Participants List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop June 26 th , 2012 - Washington, D.C. Participant List ... of Maine Barry Goodell Department of Sustainable Biomaterials Gopal Goyal International ...

  3. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors and Bioassays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Mao, Xun; Gurung, Anant; Baloda, Meenu; Lin, Yuehe; He, Yuqing

    2010-08-31

    This book chapter summarizes the recent advance in nanomaterials for electrochemical biosensors and bioassays. Biofunctionalization of nanomaterials for biosensors fabrication and their biomedical applications are discussed.

  4. Nanomaterials for renewable energy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Shimou; Li, Liang; Sun, Hanwen; Sun, Jian; Lu, Baowang

    2015-05-19

    With demand for sustainable energy, resource, and environment protection, new material technologies are constantly expanding during the last few couple of decades. An intensive attention has been given by the scientific communities. In particular, nanomaterials are increasingly playing an active role either by increasing the efficiency of the energy storage and conversion processes or by improving the device design and performance. This special issue presents recent research advances in various aspects of energy storage technologies, advanced batteries, fuel cells, solar cell, biofuels, and so on. Design and synthesis of novel materials have demonstrated great impact on the utilization of themore » sustainable energy, which need to solve the increasing shortage of resource and the issues of environmental pollution.« less

  5. Nanomaterials for renewable energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shimou; Li, Liang; Sun, Hanwen; Sun, Jian; Lu, Baowang

    2015-05-19

    With demand for sustainable energy, resource, and environment protection, new material technologies are constantly expanding during the last few couple of decades. An intensive attention has been given by the scientific communities. In particular, nanomaterials are increasingly playing an active role either by increasing the efficiency of the energy storage and conversion processes or by improving the device design and performance. This special issue presents recent research advances in various aspects of energy storage technologies, advanced batteries, fuel cells, solar cell, biofuels, and so on. Design and synthesis of novel materials have demonstrated great impact on the utilization of the sustainable energy, which need to solve the increasing shortage of resource and the issues of environmental pollution.

  6. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshops » Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop June 26, 2012 The Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop (held in Washington, D.C., on June 26, 2012) gathered stakeholders from industry and academia to discuss the current state of the art for sustainable nanomaterials as well as manufacturing challenges and opportunities. Sustainable nanomaterial production from forest products enables the use of renewable and sustainable resources as substitutes for

  7. Nanomanufacturing Portfolio: Manufacturing Processes and Applications to Accelerate Commercial Use of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Industrial Technologies Program

    2011-01-05

    This brochure describes the 31 R&D projects that AMO supports to accelerate the commercial manufacture and use of nanomaterials for enhanced energy efficiency. These cost-shared projects seek to exploit the unique properties of nanomaterials to improve the functionality of industrial processes and products.

  8. Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable Biomaterials Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable Biomaterials Integrating ...

  9. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  10. Nanomaterials Safety Implementation Plan, Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ames Laboratory has limited activities involving nanomaterials.  Potential hazards associated with nanomaterials work are addressed through the Laboratory’s Integrated Safety Management System ...

  11. Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop - Tuesday June 26, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop - Tuesday June 26, 2012 P a g e | 1 Overall Purpose To ... on the current state of the art for Sustainable Nanomaterials, the vision for the ...

  12. Implementation Plan for Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this effort is to develop an implementation plan to realize the vision and goals identified in the Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design: From Fundamentals to Function.

  13. Nano-material and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menchhofer, Paul A; Seals, Roland D; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-03

    A fluffy nano-material and method of manufacture are described. At 2000.times. magnification the fluffy nanomaterial has the appearance of raw, uncarded wool, with individual fiber lengths ranging from approximately four microns to twenty microns. Powder-based nanocatalysts are dispersed in the fluffy nanomaterial. The production of fluffy nanomaterial typically involves flowing about 125 cc/min of organic vapor at a pressure of about 400 torr over powder-based nano-catalysts for a period of time that may range from approximately thirty minutes to twenty-four hours.

  14. Nanomaterial Laboratory Safety, Boise State University | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A nanomaterial, as defined by The ASTM Committee on Nanotechnology, is a particle ... Safety Implementation Plan, Ames Laboratory Approaches to Safe Nanotechnology

  15. Nanomaterials Analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanomaterials Analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope Technology available for licensing: Steradian X-ray detection system increases the detection capability of SEMs during...

  16. Nanomaterial Labels in Electrochemical Immunosensors and Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-12-15

    This article reviews recent advances in nanomaterial labels in electrochemical immunosensors and immunoassays. Various nanomaterial labels are discussed, including colloidal gold/silver, semiconductor nanoparticles, and markers loaded nanocarriers (carbon nanotubes, apoferritin, silica nanoparticles, and liposome beads). The enormous signal enhancement associated with the use of nanomaterial labels and with the formation of nanomaterialantibody-antigen assemblies provides the basis for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of disease-related protein biomarkers, biothreat agents, or infectious agents. In general, all endeavors cited here are geared to achieve one or more of the following goals: signal amplification by several orders of magnitude, lower detection limits, and detecting multiple targets.

  17. Associate Research Physicist (Nanomaterial) | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanomaterial) Department: Theory Supervisor(s): Igor Kaganovich Requisition Number: 1500935 Position Summary: Princeton Plasma Physics Lab (PPPL) is affiliated with both Princeton...

  18. Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory June 26, 2012 Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21 st Century Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop * Wood: a Sustainable & Renewable ...

  19. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators'

  20. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators'

  1. Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home

  2. The Molecular Foundry (TMF) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) The Molecular Foundry (TMF) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home

  3. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2010-05-11

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  4. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2012-10-02

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  5. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  6. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Nanomaterials Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlos Gutierrez Carlos Gutierrez Acting Manager Resources Department Outlook Calendar (PCs only) Link for others: Outlook Public Folders/ All Public Folders/ VP-01000/ Centers/ 01100/ 01112/ 01112 Calendar" 01112 Sharepoint Diamond Coatings Socorro DFT Code Departments Nanomaterials Sciences The Nanomaterials Sciences Department develops innovative science to enable integrated self-powered sensors and actuators for national security needs and provides a basis for a secure national energy

  7. Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable Biomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Sistainable Biomaterials, ICTAS, and Virginia Tech held on June 26, 2012

  8. The Tactical and Strategic Implementation of Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Verso Paper Corp. and TAPPI held on June 26, 2012

  9. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by U.S. Forest Service and Purdue University held on June 26, 2012

  10. Using DNA to Build Nanomaterials

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Walsh, Karen McNulty

    2011-05-09

    Scientists use complementary strands of synthetic DNA to build functional materials from the bottom up. Future applications include biosensors, optical nano-devices, and new kinds of solar cells.

  11. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, George D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-04-09

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. In addition, one intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are one of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments. Biotechnol. Bioeng.

  12. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, George D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-04-09

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. In addition, one intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are one of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments.

  13. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bachand, George D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-04-09

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. In addition, one intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are onemore » of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments.« less

  14. Electrocatalytic interface based on novel carbon nanomaterials for advanced electrochemical sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ming; Guo, Shaojun

    2015-07-17

    The rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology provides new opportunities for the sustainable progress of nanoscale catalysts (i.e., nanocatalysts). The introduction of nanocatalysts into electronic devices implants their novel functions into electronic sensing systems, resulting in the testing of many advanced electrochemical sensors and the fabrication of some highly sensitive, selective, and stable sensing platforms. In this Review, we will summarize recent significant progress on exploring advanced carbon nanomaterials (such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, highly ordered mesoporous carbons, and electron cyclotron resonance sputtered nanocarbon film) as nanoscale electrocatalysts (i.e., nanoelectrocatalysts) for constructing the catalytic nanointerfaces of electronic devices to achieve high-sensitivity and high-selectivity electrochemical sensors. Furthermore, different mechanisms for the extraordinary and unique electrocatalytic activities of these carbon nanomaterials will be also highlighted, compared and discussed. An outlook on the future trends and developments in this area will be provided at the end. Notably, to elaborate the nature of carbon nanomaterial, we will mainly focus on the electrocatalysis of single kind of carbon materials rather than their hybrid composite materials. As a result, we expect that advanced carbon nanomaterials with unique electrocatalytic activities will continue to attract increasing research interest and lead to new opportunities in various fields of research.

  15. Electrocatalytic interface based on novel carbon nanomaterials for advanced electrochemical sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Ming; Guo, Shaojun

    2015-07-17

    The rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology provides new opportunities for the sustainable progress of nanoscale catalysts (i.e., nanocatalysts). The introduction of nanocatalysts into electronic devices implants their novel functions into electronic sensing systems, resulting in the testing of many advanced electrochemical sensors and the fabrication of some highly sensitive, selective, and stable sensing platforms. In this Review, we will summarize recent significant progress on exploring advanced carbon nanomaterials (such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, highly ordered mesoporous carbons, and electron cyclotron resonance sputtered nanocarbon film) as nanoscale electrocatalysts (i.e., nanoelectrocatalysts) for constructing the catalytic nanointerfaces of electronic devices to achievemore » high-sensitivity and high-selectivity electrochemical sensors. Furthermore, different mechanisms for the extraordinary and unique electrocatalytic activities of these carbon nanomaterials will be also highlighted, compared and discussed. An outlook on the future trends and developments in this area will be provided at the end. Notably, to elaborate the nature of carbon nanomaterial, we will mainly focus on the electrocatalysis of single kind of carbon materials rather than their hybrid composite materials. As a result, we expect that advanced carbon nanomaterials with unique electrocatalytic activities will continue to attract increasing research interest and lead to new opportunities in various fields of research.« less

  16. Hongyou Fan Chosen for Prestigious Lecture on Creating Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the development of new synthesis methods and self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional nanomaterials for applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, and energy storage. ...

  17. Sustainable Nano-Materials: What is happening at the cellular...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nano-Materials What is happening at the cellular level? Art J. Ragauskas, Institute of Paper Science and Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Advanced Materials: Cellular ...

  18. Computational Design of Self-Assembling Protein Nanomaterials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Computational Design of Self-Assembling Protein Nanomaterials with Atomic Level Accuracy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  19. Quick, Efficient Film Deposition for Nanomaterials - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Quick, Efficient Film Deposition for Nanomaterials Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This ...

  20. Inverse Opals, a New Nanomaterial | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion Inverse Opals, a New Nanomaterial Seminar Wednesday Apr 6, 2016 12:00pm Location: 1-150 S3TEC welcomes Prof. Gerald Mahan

  1. Microsoft Word - CFN ref. IO-14-CFT-9560-ACS CP3 CFN Technical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - French Order 2005 December 12 th for nuclear pressurised equipment (ESPN) 5 Directive 200642EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 May 2006 on...

  2. Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors for Detection of Pesticides and Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting OP pesticides and explosives. CNTs and functionalized silica nanoparticles have been chosen for this study. The biosensors were combined with the flow-injection system, providing great advantages for onsite, real-time, and continuous detection of environmental pollutants such as OPs and TNT. The sensors take advantage of the electrocatalytic properties of CNTs, which makes it feasible to achieve a sensitive electrochemical detection of the products from enzymatic reactions at low potential. This approach uses a large aspect ratio of silica nanoparticles, which can be used as a carrier for loading a large amount of electroactive species, such as poly(guanine), for amplified detection of explosives. These methods offer a new environmental monitoring tool for rapid, inexpensive, and highly sensitive detection of OPs or TNT compounds.

  3. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Niemann, Michael U.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Phani, Ayala R.; Kumar, Ashok; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2008-01-01

    Nmore » anomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices.anostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS 2 / MoS 2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc.) and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.« less

  4. Quarterly Report: Microchannel-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition Technology for Photovoltaic Material Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, Daniel R.

    2011-04-26

    Quarterly report to ITP for Nanomanufacturing program. Report covers FY11 Q2. The primary objective of this project is to develop a nanomanufacturing process which will reduce the manufacturing energy, environmental discharge, and production cost associated with current nano-scale thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing approaches. The secondary objective is to use a derivative of this nanomanufacturing process to enable greener, more efficient manufacturing of higher efficiency quantum dot-based photovoltaic cells now under development. The work is to develop and demonstrate a scalable (pilot) microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. The high level task duration is shown. Phase I consists of a pilot platform for Gen II PV films along with parallel efforts aimed at Gen III PV quantum dot materials. Status of each task is described.

  5. Packaging Materials of the 21st Century: "Sustainable Nano-Materials- Benefits to the industry"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Nanocellulose Work Group held on June 26, 2012

  6. Sustainable Nano-Materials: What is happening at the cellular level?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Georgia Institute of Technology held on June 26, 2012

  7. Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21st Century

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by USDA Forest Service held on June 26, 2012

  8. In situ XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications to Fuel Cells and Batteries Friday, July 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Qingying ...

  9. Electron beam assisted synthesis of cadmium selenide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, M. C.; Guleria, A.; Singh, S.; Singh, A. K.; Adhikari, S.; Sarkar, S. K.

    2013-02-05

    Cadmium selenide nanomaterials of various shapes and sizes have been synthesized in different condensed media through electron beam irradiation using a 7 MeV linear accelerator. The microstructures in different media as well as the presence of capping reagents play a crucial role in the formation of nanomaterials of different shapes and sizes. Their optical properties could be efficiently tuned by controlling the synthetic parameters.

  10. Project Profile: Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants Project Profile: Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants National Renewable National Laboratory logo The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an ARRA CSP Award, is extending previous work on nanoscale phase change materials to develop materials with technologically relevant temperature ranges and encapsulation structures. Approach Image of round and square particles floating together on

  11. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F.

    2014-03-31

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH{sub 2} and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI)

  12. Engineered Nanomaterials, Sexy New Technology and Potential Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-05-04

    Engineered nanomaterials enhance exciting new applications that can greatly benefit society in areas of cancer treatments, solar energy, energy storage, and water purification. While nanotechnology shows incredible promise in these and other areas by exploiting nanomaterials unique properties, these same properties can potentially cause adverse health effects to workers who may be exposed during work. Dispersed nanoparticles in air can cause adverse health effects to animals not merely due to their chemical properties but due to their size, structure, shape, surface chemistry, solubility, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, mutagenicity, dermal toxicity, and parent material toxicity. Nanoparticles have a greater likelihood of lung deposition and blood absorption than larger particles due to their size. Nanomaterials can also pose physical hazards due to their unusually high reactivity, which makes them useful as catalysts, but has the potential to cause fires and explosions. Characterization of the hazards (and potential for exposures) associated with nanomaterial development and incorporation in other products is an essential step in the development of nanotechnologies. Developing controls for these hazards are equally important. Engineered controls should be integrated into nanomaterial manufacturing process design according to 10CFR851, DOE Policy 456.1, and DOE Notice 456.1 as safety-related hardware or administrative controls for worker safety. Nanomaterial hazards in a nuclear facility must also meet control requirements per DOE standards 3009, 1189, and 1186. Integration of safe designs into manufacturing processes for new applications concurrent with the developing technology is essential for worker safety. This paper presents a discussion of nanotechnology, nanomaterial properties/hazards and controls.

  13. Challenges for In vitro to in Vivo Extrapolation of Nanomaterial Dosimetry for Human Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jordan N.

    2013-11-01

    The proliferation in types and uses of nanomaterials in consumer products has led to rapid application of conventional in vitro approaches for hazard identification. Unfortunately, assumptions pertaining to experimental design and interpretation for studies with chemicals are not generally appropriate for nanomaterials. The fate of nanomaterials in cell culture media, cellular dose to nanomaterials, cellular dose to nanomaterial byproducts, and intracellular fate of nanomaterials at the target site of toxicity all must be considered in order to accurately extrapolate in vitro results to reliable predictions of human risk.

  14. Microsoft Word - CFN_Summary_PCR_Test-Facility.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SUMMARY Call for Nominations IO/16/CFT/13145/JTR Contract for The provision of a Test Facility for the Full Size Pre-Compression Rings Page 2 of 11 Table of Contents 1 PURPOSE AND BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................... 3 2 SCOPE OF THE CONTRACT ..................................................................................................................... 3 3 PROCUREMENT STRATEGY

  15. Combustion process for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials from liquid hydrocarbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diener, Michael D.; Alford, J. Michael; Nabity, James; Hitch, Bradley D.

    2007-01-02

    The present invention provides a combustion apparatus for the production of carbon nanomaterials including fullerenes and fullerenic soot. Most generally the combustion apparatus comprises one or more inlets for introducing an oxygen-containing gas and a hydrocarbon fuel gas in the combustion system such that a flame can be established from the mixed gases, a droplet delivery apparatus for introducing droplets of a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock into the flame, and a collector apparatus for collecting condensable products containing carbon nanomaterials that are generated in the combustion system. The combustion system optionally has a reaction zone downstream of the flame. If this reaction zone is present the hydrocarbon feedstock can be introduced into the flame, the reaction zone or both.

  16. Excited State Processes in Electronic and Bio Nanomaterials (ESP-2016)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June » Center for Nonlinear Studies Excited State Processes in Electronic and Bio Nanomaterials (ESP-2016) WHEN: Jun 13, 2016 8:00 AM - Jun 16, 2016 5:00 PM WHERE: Hilton Santa Fe Historic Plaza CONTACT: Sergei Tretiak (505) 667-8351 CATEGORY: Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description This interdisciplinary conference will provide an open forum for active interactions between researchers from different subfields. The scope of the conference is a variety of excited

  17. Development of Integrated Microanalysis of Nanomaterials (06-ERI-001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J P

    2009-10-07

    Comets--small extraterrestrial bodies of ice, dust, and small rocky particles--are considered the oldest, most primitive bodies in the solar system. They were thought to be composed of preserved interstellar particles from 4.6 billion years ago, when the Sun and the planets began to form from a primordial disk of dust and gas. The nonvolatile mineral components of comets are probably natural nanomaterials that include preserved interstellar dust as well as the first solids condensed in the solar system. Thus, comet samples may be considered as forensic 'time capsules' from the presolar molecular cloud and the earliest stages of solar system formation. Cometary material was captured in 2004, when the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Stardust spacecraft flew through the coma of comet Wild as it neared the orbit of Mars. As Stardust approached the 4.5-kilometer-diameter comet, the spacecraft briefly extended a collector filled with lightweight aerogel glass foam to capture thousands of tiny particles. On January 15, 2006, the spacecraft ejected its sample return capsule onto the Utah desert southwest of Salt Lake City. Researchers at LLNL supported by this LDRD were part of a collaborative team investigating the mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions of natural cometary nanomaterials from the Stardust mission using the unique array of analytical facilities at Livermore. The studies have provided provide new insight into cosmically primitive materials that will enable a better understanding of the earliest stages of disk accretion around stars. The skills and analysis techniques developed for the characterization of these natural nanomaterials are synergistic with several Livermore programmatic needs in the emerging fields of nanomaterials, nanotechnology and forensics. The Stardust samples are also ideal training materials for a new generation of young scientists using state-of-the-art analytical instruments at the Laboratory.

  18. Petascale Simulations of Self-Healing Nanomaterials | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility simulation of the oxidation of a fractured alumina matrix embedded with silicon carbide nanoparticles Reactive molecular dynamics simulation of the oxidation of a fractured alumina matrix embedded with silicon carbide nanoparticles. Credit: Rajiv Kalia, Ying Li, Aiichiro Nakano, Ken-ichi Nomura, Pankaj Rajak, and Priya Vashishta, University of Southern California Petascale Simulations of Self-Healing Nanomaterials PI Name: Rajiv Kalia PI Email: rkalia@usc.edu Institution:

  19. Multitasking mesoporous nanomaterials for biorefinery applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandel, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have attracted great interest for last two decades due to their unique and advantageous structural properties, such as high surface area, pore volume, stable mesostructure, tunable pore size and controllable particle morphology. The robust silica framework provides sites for organic modifications, making MSNs ideal platforms for adsorbents and supported organocatalysts. In addition, the pores of MSNs provide cavities/ channels for incorporation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticle catalysts. These supported metal nanoparticle catalysts benefit from confined local environments to enhance their activity and selectivity for various reactions. Biomass is considered as a sustainable feedstock with potential to replace diminishing fossil fuels for the production of biofuels. Among several strategies, one of the promising methods of biofuel production from biomass is to reduce the oxygen content of the feedstock in order to improve the energy density. This can be achieved by creating C-C bonds between biomass derived intermediates to increase the molecular weight of the final hydrocarbon molecules. In this context, pore size and organic functionality of MSNs are varied to obtain the ideal catalyst for a C-C bond forming reaction: the aldol condensation. The mechanistic aspects of this reaction in supported heterogeneous catalysts are explored. The modification of supported organocatalyst and the effect of solvent on the reaction are rationalized. The significance of two functional surfaces of MSNs is exploited by enzyme immobilization on the external surface and organo catalyst functionalization on the internal surface. Using this bifunctional catalyst, the tandem conversion of small chain alcohols into longer chain hydrocarbon molecules is demonstrated. The ability to incorporate metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in the pores and subsequent functionalization led to develop organic modified magnetic MSNs (OM-MSNs) for applications

  20. An integrated approach for the in vitro dosimetry of engineered nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Demokritou, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a great need for screening tools capable of rapidly assessing nanomaterial toxicity. One impediment to the development of reliable in vitro screening methods is the need for accurate measures of cellular dose. We present here a methodology that enables accurate determination of delivered to cell dose metrics. This methodology includes (1) standardization of engineered nanomaterial (ENM) suspension reparation; (2) measurement of ENM characteristics controlling delivery to cells in culture; and (3) calculation of delivered dose as a function of exposure time using the ISDD model. The approach is validated against experimentally measured doses, and simplified analytical expressions for the delivered dose (Relevant In Vitro Dose (RID)f function) are derived for 20 ENMs. These functions can be used by nanotoxicologists to accurately calculate the total mass (RIDM), surface area (RIDSA), or particle number (RIDN) delivered to cells as a function of exposure time. Results: The proposed methodology was used to derive the effective density, agglomerate diameter and RID functions for 17 industrially-relevant metal and metal oxide ENMs, two carbonaceous nanoparticles, and non-agglomerating gold nanospheres, for two well plate configurations (96 and 384 well plates). For agglomerating ENMs, the measured effective density was on average 60% below the material density. We report great variability in delivered dose metrics, with some materials depositing within 24 hours while others require over 100 hours for delivery to cells. A neutron-activated tracer particle system was employed to validate the proposed in vitro dosimetry methodology for a number of ENMs (measured delivered to cell dose within 9% of estimated). Conclusions: Our findings confirm and extend experimental and computational evidence that agglomerate characteristics affect the dose delivered to cells. Therefore measurement of these characteristics is critical for effective use of in vitro

  1. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  2. Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches (474th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gang, Oleg

    2012-01-18

    In the field of nanoscience, if you can control how nanoparticles self-assemble in particular structures — joining each other, for example, as molecules can form, atom-by-atom — you can design new materials that have unique properties that industry needs. Nature already uses the DNA genetic code to instruct the building of specific proteins and whole organisms in both plants and people. Taking a cue from nature, scientists at BNL devised a way of using strands of synthetic DNA attached to the surface of nanoparticles to instruct them to self-assemble into specific nanoscale structures, clusters, and three-dimensional organizations. Novel materials designed and fabricated this way promise use in photovoltaics, energy storage, catalysis, cell-targeted systems for more effective medical treatments, and biomolecular sensing for environmental monitoring and medical applications. To find out more about the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method and its applications, join Physicist Oleg Gang of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) as he gives the 474th Brookhaven Lecture, titled “Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches." Gang, who has led this work at the CFN, will explain the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method, and discuss its present and future applications in highly specific biosensors, optically active nano-materials, and new ways to fabricate complex architectures in a rational manner via self-assembly. Gang and his colleagues used the CFN and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facilities to perform their groundbreaking research. At the CFN, the scientists used electron microscopes and optical methods to visualize the clusters that they fabricated. At the NSLS, they applied x-rays to study a particles-assembly process in solution, DNA’s natural environment. Gang earned a Ph.D. in soft matter physics from Bar-Ilan University in 2000, and he was a Rothschild Fellow at Harvard

  3. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

    2007-10-09

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  4. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  5. Advanced Nanomaterials for High-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Junhong

    2013-11-29

    Energy supply has arguably become one of the most important problems facing humankind. The exponential demand for energy is evidenced by dwindling fossil fuel supplies and record-high oil and gas prices due to global population growth and economic development. This energy shortage has significant implications to the future of our society, in addition to the greenhouse gas emission burden due to consumption of fossil fuels. Solar energy seems to be the most viable choice to meet our clean energy demand given its large scale and clean/renewable nature. However, existing methods to convert sun light into electricity are not efficient enough to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels. This DOE project aims to develop advanced hybrid nanomaterials consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots or QDs) supported on graphene for cost-effective solar cells with improved conversion efficiency for harvesting abundant, renewable, clean solar energy to relieve our global energy challenge. Expected outcomes of the project include new methods for low-cost manufacturing of hybrid nanostructures, systematic understanding of their properties that can be tailored for desired applications, and novel photovoltaic cells. Through this project, we have successfully synthesized a number of novel nanomaterials, including vertically-oriented graphene (VG) sheets, three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanostructures comprising few-layer graphene (FLG) sheets inherently connected with CNTs through sp{sup 2} carbons, crumpled graphene (CG)-nanocrystal hybrids, CdSe nanoparticles (NPs), CdS NPs, nanohybrids of metal nitride decorated on nitrogen-doped graphene (NG), QD-carbon nanotube (CNT) and QD-VG-CNT structures, TiO{sub 2}-CdS NPs, and reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-SnO{sub 2} NPs. We further assembled CdSe NPs onto graphene sheets and investigated physical and electronic interactions between CdSe NPs and the graphene. Finally we have demonstrated various applications of these

  6. Antimicrobial nanomaterials derived from natural products—A review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Ji; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-03-30

    Modern medicine has relied heavily on the availability of effective antibiotics to manage infections and enable invasive surgery. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, novel approaches are necessary to prevent the formation of biofilms on sensitive surfaces such as medical implants. Advances in nanotechnology have resulted in novel materials and the ability to create novel surface topographies. This review article provides an overview of advances in the fabrication of antimicrobial nanomaterials that are derived from biological polymers or that rely on the incorporation of natural compounds with antimicrobial activity in nanofibers made from synthetic materials. Furthermore, the availability of thesemore » novel materials will contribute to ensuring that the current level of medical care can be maintained as more bacteria are expected to develop resistance against existing antibiotics.« less

  7. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistrymore » of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.« less

  8. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistry of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.

  9. Through a glass, warmly: Argonne nanomaterials can help make windows more

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficient | Argonne National Laboratory Through a glass, warmly: Argonne nanomaterials can help make windows more efficient By Greg Cunningham * May 31, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory is using nanomaterials to improve the energy efficiency of existing single-pane windows in commercial and residential buildings. The team was recently awarded a $3.1 million grant from DOE's Advanced Research Projects

  10. Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Yang, Guohai; Li, He; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-10-29

    We report that considerable attention has been devoted to the integration of recognition elements with electronic elements to develop electrochemical sensors and biosensors.Various electrochemical devices, such as amperometric sensors, electrochemical impedance sensors, and electrochemical luminescence sensors as well as photoelectrochemical sensors, provide wide applications in the detection of chemical and biological targets in terms of electrochemical change of electrode interfaces. Here, this review focuses on recent advances in electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures during 2013 to 2014. The aim of this effort is to provide the reader with a clear and concise view of new advancesmore » in areas ranging from electrode engineering, strategies for electrochemical signal amplification, and novel electroanalytical techniques used in the miniaturization and integration of the sensors. Moreover, the authors have attempted to highlight areas of the latest and significant development of enhanced electrochemical nanosensors and nanobiosensors that inspire broader interests across various disciplines. Electrochemical sensors for small molecules, enzyme-based biosensors, genosensors, immunosensors, and cytosensors are reviewed herein (Figure 1). Such novel advances are important for the development of electrochemical sensors that open up new avenues and methods for future research. In conclusion, we recommend readers interested in the general principles of electrochemical sensors and electrochemical methods to refer to other excellent literature for a broad scope in this area.(3, 4) However, due to the explosion of publications in this active field, we do not claim that this Review includes all of the published works in the past two years and we apologize to the authors of excellent work, which is unintentionally left out.« less

  11. Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Yang, Guohai; Li, He; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-10-29

    We report that considerable attention has been devoted to the integration of recognition elements with electronic elements to develop electrochemical sensors and biosensors.Various electrochemical devices, such as amperometric sensors, electrochemical impedance sensors, and electrochemical luminescence sensors as well as photoelectrochemical sensors, provide wide applications in the detection of chemical and biological targets in terms of electrochemical change of electrode interfaces. Here, this review focuses on recent advances in electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures during 2013 to 2014. The aim of this effort is to provide the reader with a clear and concise view of new advances in areas ranging from electrode engineering, strategies for electrochemical signal amplification, and novel electroanalytical techniques used in the miniaturization and integration of the sensors. Moreover, the authors have attempted to highlight areas of the latest and significant development of enhanced electrochemical nanosensors and nanobiosensors that inspire broader interests across various disciplines. Electrochemical sensors for small molecules, enzyme-based biosensors, genosensors, immunosensors, and cytosensors are reviewed herein (Figure 1). Such novel advances are important for the development of electrochemical sensors that open up new avenues and methods for future research. In conclusion, we recommend readers interested in the general principles of electrochemical sensors and electrochemical methods to refer to other excellent literature for a broad scope in this area.(3, 4) However, due to the explosion of publications in this active field, we do not claim that this Review includes all of the published works in the past two years and we apologize to the authors of excellent work, which is unintentionally left out.

  12. Macro-ions collapse leading to hybrid bio-nanomaterials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2009-10-01

    I used supramolecular self-assembling cyanine and the polyamine spermine binding to Escherichia coli genomic DNA as a model for DNA collapse during high throughput screening. Polyamine binding to DNA converts the normally right handed B-DNA into left handed Z-DNA conformation. Polyamine binding to DNA was inhibited by the supramolecular self-assembling cyanine. Self-assembly of cyanine upon DNA scaffold was likewise competitively inhibited by spermine as signaled by fluorescence quench from DNA-cyanine ensemble. Sequence of DNA exposure to cyanine or spermine was critical in determining the magnitude of fluorescence quench. Methanol potentiated spermine inhibition by >10-fold. The IC{sub 50} for spermine inhibition was 0.35 {+-} 0.03 {micro}M and the association constant Ka was 2.86 x 10{sup -6}M. Reversibility of the DNA-polyamine interactions was evident from quench mitigation at higher concentrations of cyanine. System flexibility was demonstrated by similar spermine interactions with {lambda}DNA. The choices and rationale regarding the polyamine, the cyanine dye as well as the remarkable effects of methanol are discussed in detail. Cyanine might be a safer alternative to the mutagenic toxin ethidium bromide for investigating DNA-drug interactions. The combined actions of polyamines and alcohols mediate DNA collapse producing hybrid bio-nanomaterials with novel signaling properties that might be useful in biosensor applications. Finally, this work will be submitted to Analytical Sciences (Japan) for publication. This journal published our earlier, related work on cyanine supramolecular self-assembly upon a variety of nucleic acid scaffolds.

  13. Can Ionic Liquids Be Used As Templating Agents For Controlled Design of Uranium-Containing Nanomaterials?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, A.; Bridges, N.; Tosten, M.

    2013-04-09

    Nanostructured uranium oxides have been prepared in ionic liquids as templating agents. Using the ionic liquids as reaction media for inorganic nanomaterials takes advantage of the pre-organized structure of the ionic liquids which in turn controls the morphology of the inorganic nanomaterials. Variation of ionic liquid cation structure was investigated to determine the impact on the uranium oxide morphologies. For two ionic liquid cations, increasing the alkyl chain length increases the aspect ratio of the resulting nanostructured oxides. Understanding the resulting metal oxide morphologies could enhance fuel stability and design.

  14. Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han,W.Q.

    2008-08-01

    rhombohedral system consists of three-layered units: ABCABC..., whose honeycomb layers are arranged in a shifted phase, like as those of graphite. Reflecting its weak interlayer bond, the h-BN can be cleaved easily along its layers, and hence, is widely used as a lubricant material. The material is stable up to a high temperature of 2300 C before decomposition sets in [2] does not fuse a nitrogen atmosphere of 1 atm, and thus, is applicable as a refractory material. Besides having such properties, similar to those of graphite, the material is transparent, and acts as a good electric insulator, especially at high temperatures (10{sup 6} {Omega}m at 1000 C) [1]. c-BN and w-BN are tetrahedrally linked BN. The former has a cubic sphalerite-type structure, and the latter has a hexagonal wurtzite-type structure. c-BN is the second hardest known material (the hardest is diamond), the so-called white diamond. It is used mainly for grinding and cutting industrial ferrous materials because it does not react with molten iron, nickel, and related alloys at high temperatures whereas diamond does [1]. It displays the second highest thermal conductivity (6-9 W/cm.deg) after diamond. This chapter focuses principally upon information about h-BN nanomaterials, mainly BN nanotubes (BNNTs), porous BN, mono- and few-layer-BN sheets. There are good reviews book chapters about c-BN in [1, 4-6].

  15. Lab Breakthrough: Nanomaterials Discoveries Lead to Possible Cancer Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Argonne nanoscientists are capable of building materials atom by atom and controlling their advanced functions to repair biological systems at unprecedentedly small scales.

  16. Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities Print Wednesday, 29 April 2015 00:00 Researchers at the ALS have recently observed peptoid nanosheets-two-dimensional biomimetic materials with customizable properties-as they self-assemble at an oil-water interface. These nanosheets are an emerging class of two-dimensional nanomaterials that have the potential for use in a variety of applications ranging from molecular sensors to

  17. Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells; Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopal Rao, MRS Web-Editor; Yury Gogotsi, Drexel University; Karen Swider-Lyons, Naval Research Laboratory

    2010-08-05

    Symposium T: Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are under intense investigation worldwide for applications ranging from transportation to portable power. The purpose of this seminar is to focus on the nanomaterials and nanostructures inherent to polymer fuel cells. Symposium topics will range from high-activity cathode and anode catalysts, to theory and new analytical methods. Symposium U: Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storage Electricity, which can be generated in a variety of ways, offers a great potential for meeting future energy demands as a clean and efficient energy source. However, the use of electricity generated from renewable sources, such as wind or sunlight, requires efficient electrical energy storage. This symposium will cover the latest material developments for batteries, advanced capacitors, and related technologies, with a focus on new or emerging materials science challenges.

  18. In situ XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Fuel Cells and Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications to Fuel Cells and Batteries Friday, July 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Qingying Jia, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA The development of novel electrode materials is hindered by the lack of fundamental understanding of the precise structural effects on the catalytic activity and

  19. OSTIblog Articles in the nanomaterials Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information nanomaterials Topic Plasmas - The Greatest Show on Earth by Kathy Chambers 24 Jun, 2013 in Products and Content Perhaps the most beautiful and eerie displays of light in our sky are a phenomenon known as the auroras. This natural glow of light in the sky in high latitude regions usually displays ribbons of colors from a fluorescent green to brilliant purple to a vivid crimson somewhat like an unexpected beautiful sunrise or sunset. Observers

  20. Final Report: Nanomaterials in Secondary Battery Research and Development, July 1, 1995 - September 14, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Charles R.

    2000-01-31

    We have been exploring the rate capabilities of nanostructured Li-ion battery electrodes. These nanostructured electrodes are prepared via the template method - a general procedure used to prepare nanomaterials pioneered in the P.I.'s laboratory. The nanostructured electrodes consist of nanofibers or tubules of the electrode material that protrude from a current-collector surface like the bristles of a brush. These nanostructured electrodes show dramatically improved rate capabilities relative to conventional electrode designs.

  1. From thermoelectric bulk to nanomaterials: Current progress for Bi 2 Te 3 and CoSb 3: From thermoelectric bulk to nanomaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Peranio, N.; Eibl, O.; Bäßler, S.; Nielsch, K.; Klobes, B.; Hermann, R. P.; Daniel, M.; Albrecht, M.; Görlitz, H.; Pacheco, V.; et al

    2015-10-29

    We synthesized Bi2Te3 and CoSb3 based nanomaterials and their thermoelectric, structural, and vibrational properties analyzed to assess and reduce ZT-limiting mechanisms. The same preparation and/or characterization methods were applied in the different materials systems. Single-crystalline, ternary p-type Bi15Sb29Te56, and n-type Bi38Te55Se7 nanowires with power factors comparable to nanostructured bulkmaterialswere prepared by potential-pulsed electrochemical deposition in a nanostructured Al2O3 matrix. p-type Sb2Te3, n-type Bi2Te3, and n-type CoSb3 thin films were grown at room temperature using molecular beam epitaxy and were subsequently annealed at elevated temperatures. It yielded polycrystalline, single phase thin films with optimized charge carrier densities. In CoSb3 thin filmsmore » the speed of sound could be reduced by filling the cage structure with Yb and alloying with Fe yielded p-type material. Bi2(Te0.91Se0.09)3/SiC and (Bi0.26Sb0.74)2Te3/SiC nanocomposites with low thermal conductivities and ZT values larger than 1 were prepared by spark plasma sintering. Nanostructure, texture, chemical composition, as well as electronic and phononic excitations were investigated by X-ray diffraction, nuclear resonance scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, M ossbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, for Bi2Te3 materials, ab-initio calculations together with equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for point defects yielded their formation energies and their effect on lattice thermal conductivity, respectively. Current advances in thermoelectric Bi2Te3 and CoSb3 based nanomaterials are summarized. Advanced synthesis and characterization methods and theoreticalmodelingwere combined to assess and reduce ZT-limiting mechanisms in these materials.« less

  2. Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities Print Researchers at the ALS have recently observed peptoid nanosheets-two-dimensional biomimetic materials with customizable properties-as they self-assemble at an oil-water interface. These nanosheets are an emerging class of two-dimensional nanomaterials that have the potential for use in a variety of applications ranging from molecular sensors to artificial enzymes. Because peptoids are highly designable polymers, nanosheets provide a

  3. Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities Print Researchers at the ALS have recently observed peptoid nanosheets-two-dimensional biomimetic materials with customizable properties-as they self-assemble at an oil-water interface. These nanosheets are an emerging class of two-dimensional nanomaterials that have the potential for use in a variety of applications ranging from molecular sensors to artificial enzymes. Because peptoids are highly designable polymers, nanosheets provide a

  4. Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities Print Researchers at the ALS have recently observed peptoid nanosheets-two-dimensional biomimetic materials with customizable properties-as they self-assemble at an oil-water interface. These nanosheets are an emerging class of two-dimensional nanomaterials that have the potential for use in a variety of applications ranging from molecular sensors to artificial enzymes. Because peptoids are highly designable polymers, nanosheets provide a

  5. Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities Print Researchers at the ALS have recently observed peptoid nanosheets-two-dimensional biomimetic materials with customizable properties-as they self-assemble at an oil-water interface. These nanosheets are an emerging class of two-dimensional nanomaterials that have the potential for use in a variety of applications ranging from molecular sensors to artificial enzymes. Because peptoids are highly designable polymers, nanosheets provide a

  6. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  7. Microsoft Word - Summary_PBS-56-CFN-TBS-Conection_Pipes.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    floors, walls and ceilings - Perform the relevant analyses (ex. fire analysis and seismic analysis) related to the credit of safety given to the pipings that are Hard Core...

  8. From thermoelectric bulk to nanomaterials: Current progress for Bi 2 Te 3 and CoSb 3: From thermoelectric bulk to nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peranio, N.; Eibl, O.; Bäßler, S.; Nielsch, K.; Klobes, B.; Hermann, R. P.; Daniel, M.; Albrecht, M.; Görlitz, H.; Pacheco, V.; Bedoya-Martínez, N.; Hashibon, A.; Elsässer, C.

    2015-10-29

    We synthesized Bi2Te3 and CoSb3 based nanomaterials and their thermoelectric, structural, and vibrational properties analyzed to assess and reduce ZT-limiting mechanisms. The same preparation and/or characterization methods were applied in the different materials systems. Single-crystalline, ternary p-type Bi15Sb29Te56, and n-type Bi38Te55Se7 nanowires with power factors comparable to nanostructured bulkmaterialswere prepared by potential-pulsed electrochemical deposition in a nanostructured Al2O3 matrix. p-type Sb2Te3, n-type Bi2Te3, and n-type CoSb3 thin films were grown at room temperature using molecular beam epitaxy and were subsequently annealed at elevated temperatures. It yielded polycrystalline, single phase thin films with optimized charge carrier densities. In CoSb3 thin films the speed of sound could be reduced by filling the cage structure with Yb and alloying with Fe yielded p-type material. Bi2(Te0.91Se0.09)3/SiC and (Bi0.26Sb0.74)2Te3/SiC nanocomposites with low thermal conductivities and ZT values larger than 1 were prepared by spark plasma sintering. Nanostructure, texture, chemical composition, as well as electronic and phononic excitations were investigated by X-ray diffraction, nuclear resonance scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, M ossbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, for Bi2Te3 materials, ab-initio calculations together with equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for point defects yielded their formation energies and their effect on lattice thermal conductivity, respectively. Current advances in thermoelectric Bi2Te3 and CoSb3 based nanomaterials are

  9. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue Fang, Jing

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  10. Dynamics of soft Nanomaterials captured by transmission electron microscopy in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proetto, Maria T.; Rush, Anthony M.; Chien, Miao-Ping; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Patterson, Joseph P.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Olson, Norman H.; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Andolina, Christopher; Millstone, Jill; Howell, Stephen B.; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2014-01-14

    In this paper we present in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft, synthetic nanoparticles with a comparative analysis using conventional TEM methods. This comparison is made with the simple aim of describing what is an unprecedented example of in situ imaging by TEM. However, we contend the technique will quickly become essential in the characterization of analogous systems, especially where dynamics are of interest in the solvated state. In this case, particles were studied which were obtained from the direct polymerization of an oxaliplatin analog, designed for an ongoing program in novel chemotherapeutic delivery systems. The resulting nanoparticles provided sufficient contrast for facile imaging in situ, and point toward key design parameters that enable this new characterization approach for organic nanomaterials. We describe the preparation of the synthetic micellar nanoparticles to- gether with their characterization in liquid water.

  11. Computational Design of Self-Assembling Protein Nanomaterials with Atomic Level Accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Neil P.; Sheffler, William; Sawaya, Michael R.; Vollmar, Breanna S.; Sumida, John P.; André, Ingemar; Gonen, Tamir; Yeates, Todd O.; Baker, David

    2015-09-17

    We describe a general computational method for designing proteins that self-assemble to a desired symmetric architecture. Protein building blocks are docked together symmetrically to identify complementary packing arrangements, and low-energy protein-protein interfaces are then designed between the building blocks in order to drive self-assembly. We used trimeric protein building blocks to design a 24-subunit, 13-nm diameter complex with octahedral symmetry and a 12-subunit, 11-nm diameter complex with tetrahedral symmetry. The designed proteins assembled to the desired oligomeric states in solution, and the crystal structures of the complexes revealed that the resulting materials closely match the design models. The method can be used to design a wide variety of self-assembling protein nanomaterials.

  12. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials: Nonlinear Emission and Ultrafast Electrodynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear and non-equilibrium properties of low-dimensional quantum materials are fundamental in nanoscale science yet transformative in nonlinear imaging/photonic technology today. These have been poorly addressed in many nano-materials despite of their well-established equilibrium optical and transport properties. The development of ultrafast terahertz (THz) sources and nonlinear spectroscopy tools facilitates understanding these issues and reveals a wide range of novel nonlinear and quantum phenomena that are not expected in bulk solids or atoms. In this paper, we discuss our recent discoveries in two model photonic and electronic nanostructures to solve two outstanding questions: (1) how to create nonlinear broadband terahertz emittersmore » using deeply subwavelength nanoscale meta-atom resonators? (2) How to access one-dimensional (1D) dark excitons and their non-equilibrium correlated states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWMTs)?« less

  13. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials: Nonlinear Emission and Ultrafast Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear and non-equilibrium properties of low-dimensional quantum materials are fundamental in nanoscale science yet transformative in nonlinear imaging/photonic technology today. These have been poorly addressed in many nano-materials despite of their well-established equilibrium optical and transport properties. The development of ultrafast terahertz (THz) sources and nonlinear spectroscopy tools facilitates understanding these issues and reveals a wide range of novel nonlinear and quantum phenomena that are not expected in bulk solids or atoms. In this paper, we discuss our recent discoveries in two model photonic and electronic nanostructures to solve two outstanding questions: (1) how to create nonlinear broadband terahertz emitters using deeply subwavelength nanoscale meta-atom resonators? (2) How to access one-dimensional (1D) dark excitons and their non-equilibrium correlated states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWMTs)?

  14. Ultrafast and Highly Reversible Sodium Storage in Zinc-Antimony Intermetallic Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, Anmin; Gan, Li-yong; Cheng, Yingchun; Tao, Xinyong; Yuan, Yifei; Sharifi-Asl, Soroosh; He, Kun; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Vasiraju, Venkata; Lu, Jun; Mashayek, Farzad; Klie, Robert; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2015-12-17

    The progress on sodium-ion battery technology faces many grand challenges, one of which is the considerably lower rate of sodium insertion/deinsertion in electrode materials due to the larger size of sodium (Na) ions and complicated redox reactions compared to the lithium-ion systems. Here, it is demonstrated that sodium ions can be reversibly stored in Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires at speeds that can exceed 295 nm s-1. Remarkably, these values are one to three orders of magnitude higher than the sodiation rate of other nanowires electrochemically tested with in situ transmission electron micro­scopy. It is found that the nanowires display about 161% volume expansion after the first sodiation and then cycle with an 83% reversible volume expansion. Despite their massive expansion, the nanowires can be cycled without any cracking or facture during the ultrafast sodiation/desodiation process. Additionally, most of the phases involved in the sodiation/desodiation process possess high electrical conductivity. More specifically, the NaZnSb exhibits a layered structure, which provides channels for fast Na+ diffusion. This observation indicates that Zn-Sb intermetallic nanomaterials offer great promise as high rate and good cycling stability anodic materials for the next generation of sodium-ion batteries.

  15. Preface of the “Computational quantum chemistry and from small clusters to functional building blocks of novel nanomaterials symposium”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maroulis, George; Pouchan, C.; Xenides, D.; Karamanis, P.

    2015-01-22

    This symposium included papers with emphasis on Theoretical and Computational Quantum Chemistry and special focus on Materials Science perspectives.

  16. Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Brozik, Susan Marie; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Bachand, George David; Bachand, Marlene; Aaron, Jesse S.; Allen, Amy; Seagrave, Jean-Clare

    2011-12-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in commercial products, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, and clothing industries. For example, pants and shirts are routinely manufactured with silver nanoparticles to render them 'wrinkle-free.' Despite the growing applications, the associated environmental health and safety (EHS) impacts are completely unknown. The significance of this problem became pervasive within the general public when Prince Charles authored an article in 2004 warning of the potential social, ethical, health, and environmental issues connected to nanotechnology. The EHS concerns, however, continued to receive relatively little consideration from federal agencies as compared with large investments in basic nanoscience R&D. The mounting literature regarding the toxicology of ENMs (e.g., the ability of inhaled nanoparticles to cross the blood-brain barrier; Kwon et al., 2008, J. Occup. Health 50, 1) has spurred a recent realization within the NNI and other federal agencies that the EHS impacts related to nanotechnology must be addressed now. In our study we proposed to address critical aspects of this problem by developing primary correlations between nanoparticle properties and their effects on cell health and toxicity. A critical challenge embodied within this problem arises from the ability to synthesize nanoparticles with a wide array of physical properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, surface chemistry, etc.), which in turn creates an immense, multidimensional problem in assessing toxicological effects. In this work we first investigated varying sizes of quantum dots (Qdots) and their ability to cross cell membranes based on their aspect ratio utilizing hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy. We then studied toxicity of epithelial cell lines that were exposed to different sized gold and silver nanoparticles using advanced imaging techniques, biochemical analyses, and optical and mass spectrometry methods

  17. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic properties of novel zinc germanate nano-materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boppana, Venkata Bharat Ram; Hould, Nathan D.; Lobo, Raul F.

    2011-05-15

    We report the first instance of a hydrothermal synthesis of zinc germanate (Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}) nano-materials having a variety of morphologies and photochemical properties in surfactant, template and catalyst-free conditions. A systematic variation of synthesis conditions and detailed characterization using X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering led to a better understanding of the growth of these particles from solution. At 140 {sup o}C, the zinc germanate particle morphology changes with pH from flower-shaped at pH 6.0, to poly-disperse nano-rods at pH 10 when the Zn to Ge ratio in the synthesis solution is 2. When the Zn to Ge ratio is reduced to 1.25, mono-disperse nano-rods could be prepared at pH 7.5. Nanorod formation is also independent of the addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in contrast to previous reports. Photocatalytic tests show that Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4} nano-rods (by weight) and flower shaped (by surface area) are the most active for methylene blue dye degradation among the synthesized zinc germanate materials. -- Graphical abstract: Zinc germanate materials were synthesized possessing unique morphologies dependent on the hydrothermal synthesis conditions in the absence of surfactant, catalyst or template. These novel materials are characterized and evaluated for their photocatalytic activities. Display Omitted highlights: > Zinc germanate synthesized hydrothermally (surfactant free) with unique morphologies. > Flower-shaped, nano-rods, globular particles obtained dependent on synthesis pH. > At 140 {sup o}C, they possess the rhombohedral crystal irrespective of synthesis conditions. > They are photocatalytically active for the degradation of methylene blue. > Potential applications could be photocatalytic water splitting and CO{sub 2} reduction.

  18. Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong

    2011-12-01

    INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The

  19. Scientific Evaluation of Nanomaterials of TiO{sub 2} and Related Derivatives in a Variety of Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitler, Timothy M; Stewart, Matthew; Pasquier, Aurelien Du; Coleman, Michael; Gunasinghe, Thushara; Manev, Veselin; Stucky, Galen; Holden, Patricia; Neal, Andrea; Suh, Won Hyuk

    2008-09-30

    Altair Nanotechnolgies, Inc. (Altair) has performed and hereby reports on research and development of novel nanomaterials for applications in 1) advanced power storage devices, 2) sensors for chemical, biological and radiological agents and on an 3) investigation into mechanisms of living cell-nanoparticle interactions that will allow predictions of health and safety issues and potentially result in novel agents for remediation of chemical and biological hazards. The project was organized around four distinct objectives. Two of the objectives are focused on developments designed to dramatically improve the performance of rechargeable Li-Ion batteries. These efforts are based on extensions of Altair's proprietary TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and nanoparticle aggregates in the form of lithium titanate spinel, lithium manganates and lithium cobaltates. A third objective leverages the core Altair nanomaterials technology to develop a unique (nanosensor) platform for the error-free, "lab on a chip" detection of chemical, biological and radiological agents for hazardous materials remediation and threat detection. The innovative approach taken by the Altair/Western Michigan team develops individual nanosensor elements built upon a construct that includes a target-specific receptor molecule coupled through a signal transducing nanomolecule to a gold, TiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2} nanoparticle coated with a high density of strongfluorescing molecules for signal amplification The final objective focuses on interaction mechanisms between cells and nanoparticles with the goal of understanding how specific chemical and physical properties of these nanoparticles influence that interaction. The effort will examine a range of microbes that have environmental or societal importance.

  20. Wave-function functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan Xiaoyin; Slamet, Marlina; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-15

    We extend our prior work on the construction of variational wave functions {psi} that are functionals of functions {chi}:{psi}={psi}[{chi}] rather than simply being functions. In this manner, the space of variations is expanded over those of traditional variational wave functions. In this article we perform the constrained search over the functions {chi} chosen such that the functional {psi}[{chi}] satisfies simultaneously the constraints of normalization and the exact expectation value of an arbitrary single- or two-particle Hermitian operator, while also leading to a rigorous upper bound to the energy. As such the wave function functional is accurate not only in the region of space in which the principal contributions to the energy arise but also in the other region of the space represented by the Hermitian operator. To demonstrate the efficacy of these ideas, we apply such a constrained search to the ground state of the negative ion of atomic hydrogen H{sup -}, the helium atom He, and its positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+}. The operators W whose expectations are obtained exactly are the sum of the single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i{delta}}(r{sub i}), W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i{nabla}i}{sup 2}, and the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|. Comparisons with the method of Lagrangian multipliers and of other constructions of wave-function functionals are made. Finally, we present further insights into the construction of wave-function functionals by studying a previously proposed construction of functionals {psi}[{chi}] that lead to the exact expectation of arbitrary Hermitian operators. We discover that analogous to the solutions of the Schroedinger equation, there exist {psi}[{chi}] that are unphysical in that they lead to singular values for the expectations. We also explain the origin of the singularity.

  1. Muge Acik | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanomaterials important to energy and biotechnology applications function, and she ... nanomaterials important to energy and biotechnology applications function, and she ...

  2. Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    up, through the self-assembly of small molecule, protein, or polymer building blocks. Polymer-based two-dimensional nanomaterials, in particular, hold promise as templates for...

  3. Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as in molecular sensors, artificial membranes, and as catalysts. Recent advances in the design, synthesis, and characterization of two-dimensional nanomaterials with atomic...

  4. Calibration and data collection protocols for reliable lattice parameter values in electron pair distribution function (ePDF) studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Hu, Hefei; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-02-01

    We explore and describe different protocols for calibrating electron pair distribution function (ePDF) measurements for quantitative studies on nano-materials. We find the most accurate approach to determine the camera-length is to use a standard calibration sample of Au nanoparticles from National Institute of Standards and Technology. Different protocols for data collection are also explored, as are possible operational errors, to find the best approaches for accurate data collection for quantitative ePDF studies.

  5. Synthesis of Shape-Anisotropic Nanomaterials using Spontaneous Galvanic Displacement Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leong, G. J.; Strand, M.; Schulze, M.; Maloney, D.; Larson, D.; Alia, S.; Perry, K.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Pivovar, B.; Wise, A. M.; Toney, M.; Richards, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    The direct synthesis of nanostructures using wet chemical reduction methods has had a major impact on catalysis and materials design. However, no mechanism has yet been reported that explicitly provides growth parameters for shapes and sizes as a function of desired metals, making it difficult to directly synthesize shaped particles from specific metals. There have been reports in the literature using this method to obtain core-shell, porous cage-like and irregular structures, however only one report proposing a mechanism of the displacement process exists, which does not explain surface and bulk morphology changes as a function of reaction condition. Here, we demonstrate the use of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and microscopy to study the Ag-to-Pt displacement process of nanoparticles, nanowires and nanoplates at known intervals throughout the reaction. Obtaining a fundamental understanding of the displacement process will allow us to tune composition, morphology, and thus electronic properties of novel materials.

  6. Interlaboratory Evaluation of in Vitro Cytotoxicity and Inflammatory Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: The NIEHS Nano GO Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Tian; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Bonner, James C.; Crandall, Edward D.; Elder, Alison C.; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Girtsman, Teri A.; Mitra, Somenath; Ntim, Susana A.; Orr, Galya; Tagmount, Mani; Taylor, Alexia J.; Telesca, Donatello; Tolic, Ana; Vulpe, Chris D.; Walker, Andrea J.; Wang, Xiang; Witzmann, Frank A.; Wu, Nianqiang; Xie, Yumei; Zink, Jeffery I.; Nel, Andre; Holian, Andrij

    2013-06-01

    Background: Differences in interlaboratory research protocols contribute to the conflicting data in the literature regarding engineered nanomaterial (ENM) bioactivity. Objectives: Grantees of a National Institute of Health Sciences (NIEHS)-funded consortium program performed two phases of in vitro testing with selected ENMs in an effort to identify and minimize sources of variability. Methods: Consortium program participants (CPPs) conducted ENM bioactivity evaluations on zinc oxide (ZnO), three forms of titanium dioxide (TiO2), and three forms of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In addition, CPPs performed bioassays using three mammalian cell lines (BEAS-2B, RLE-6TN, and THP-1) selected in order to cover two different species (rat and human), two different lung epithelial cells (alveolar type II and bronchial epithelial cells), and two different cell types (epithelial cells and macrophages). CPPs also measured cytotoxicity in all cell types while measuring inflammasome activation [interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release] using only THP-1 cells. Results: The overall in vitro toxicity profiles of ENM were as follows: ZnO was cytotoxic to all cell types at ≥ 50 μ g/mL, but did not induce IL-1β. TiO2 was not cytotoxic except for the nanobelt form, which was cytotoxic and induced significant IL-1β production in THP-1 cells. MWCNTs did not produce cytotoxicity, but stimulated lower levels of IL-1β production in THP-1 cells, with the original MWCNT producing the most IL-1β. Conclusions: The results provide justification for the inclusion of mechanism-linked bioactivity assays along with traditional cytotoxicity assays for in vitro screening. In addition, the results suggest that conducting studies with multiple relevant cell types to avoid false-negative outcomes is critical for accurate evaluation of ENM bioactivity.

  7. Bioremediation of nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-05-14

    The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

  8. Method for making nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou; Wu, Huimeng

    2013-06-04

    A method of making a nanostructure by preparing a face centered cubic-ordered metal nanoparticle film from metal nanoparticles, such as gold and silver nanoparticles, exerting a hydrostatic pressure upon the film at pressures of several gigapascals, followed by applying a non-hydrostatic stress perpendicularly at a pressure greater than approximately 10 GPA to form an array of nanowires with individual nanowires having a relatively uniform length, average diameter and density.

  9. Metrology for Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Do instruments of the same class provide the same answers to the question: "How XXX* is it" * Interlab Study data from the same lab XXX*- fill in the blank: big, composition, etc. ...

  10. "Energetics of Nanomaterials"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor Alexandra Navrotsky

    2005-01-31

    This project represents a three-year collaboration among Alexandra Navrotsky, Brian Woodfield, Juliana Bocrio-Goates and Frances Hellman. It's purpose has been to explore the differences between bulk materials, nanoparticles, and thin films in terms of their thermodynamic properties, with an emphasis on heat capacities and entropies, as well as enthalpies. The three groups have brought very different expertise and capabilities to the project. Navrotsky is a solid-state chemist and geochemist, with a unique Thermochemistry Facility emphasizing enthalpy of formation measurements by high temperature oxide melt and room temperature acid solution calorimetry. Bocrio-Goates and Woodfield are physical chemists with unique capabilities in accurate cryogenic heat capacity measurements using adiabatic calorimetry. Hellman is a physicist with expertise in magnetism and heat capacity measurements using microscale ''detector on a chip'' calorimetric technology that she pioneered. The overarching question of the work is ''How does the free energy play out in nanoparticles''? or ''How do differences in free energy affect overall nanoparticle behavior''? Because the free energy represents the temperature-dependent balance between the enthalpy of a system and its entropy, there are two separate, but related, components to the experimental investigations: Solution calorimetric measurements provide the energetics and two types of heat capacity measurements the entropy. They use materials that are well characterized in other ways (structurally, magnetically, and chemically), and samples are shared across the collaboration.

  11. Nanomaterial Procedure Checklist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    macro-sized material (e.g. flammability, corrosivity, reactivityexplosion, acute toxicity, or carcinogenicity). ...

  12. Sustainable Nanomaterials Industry Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Perspective U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Manufacturing Office Sustainable ... Uses renewable resources grown with sustainable forestry practices Encourages ...

  13. Calibration and data collection protocols for reliable lattice parameter values in electron pair distribution function studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Hu, Hefei; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-01-30

    Different protocols for calibrating electron pair distribution function (ePDF) measurements are explored and described for quantitative studies on nanomaterials. It is found that the most accurate approach to determine the camera length is to use a standard calibration sample of Au nanoparticles from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Different protocols for data collection are also explored, as are possible operational errors, to find the best approaches for accurate data collection for quantitative ePDF studies.

  14. Functional Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functional Materials Researchers in NETL's Functional Materials Development competency work to discover and develop advanced functional materials and component processing technologies to meet technology performance requirements and enable scale-up for proof-of-concept studies. Research includes separations materials and electrochemical and magnetic materials, specifically: Separations Materials Synthesis, purification, and basic characterization of organic substances, including polymers and

  15. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Functional Hybrid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transport growth from mixed evaporated powders. Time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) of nanomaterial growth kinetics by CVD For aligned nanotube arrays, utilizes stabilized HeNe laser...

  16. UPF-Related Forms | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HaulLift Plan PDF CFN-1090 UPF Lift Data Sheet - Single Crane Pick and Set PDF CFN-1091 UPF Lift Data Sheet - Two Crane Pick and Set PDF CFN-1092 UPF Pre-Lift Safety Checklist ...

  17. Elementary Functions

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1986-05-01

    The ALTERNATIVE LIBRARY is a library of elementary functions prepared for use with the standard FORTRAN compiler under 4.2 BSD UNIX as an alternative to the standard system library. The library offers improved accuracy as well as additional capabilities. It includes routines ASIN, ACOS, COSH, EXP, LOG, LOG10, POW, SIN, COS, SINH, TAN, and TANH. These alternative routines have slightly modified domains and slightly different responses to invalid arguments. Four routines, not part of themore » standard library, are provided: ADX(X,N), a double-precision function that returns the double-precision argument X scaled by 2 raised to the Nth power; INTXP(X), an integer function that returns as a signed integer the exponent of the double-precision argument X; SETXP(X,N), a double-precision function that returns the double-precision argument X with its exponent replaced by N; and DCOTAN(X), a double-precision function that returns the cotangent of the double-precision argument X, where X is given in radians.« less

  18. Function Sequencer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mFUSE: Function Sequencer for MATLAB Help Manual LANL/UCSD Engineering Institute LA-CC-10-033 LA-UR 10-01264 c Copyright 2010, Los Alamos National Security, LLC All rights reserved. July 29, 2010 LA-CC-10-033 LA-UR 10-01264 Contents I What is mFUSE? 4 1 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 Version Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3 About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4 Author Information . . . . .

  19. Ordering in bio-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials probed by in situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Kim, Kyunghoon; Bangar, Mangesh; Willey, Trevor M.; Tran, Ich C.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Noy, Aleksandr; van Buuren, Tony

    2015-04-15

    Here, phospholipid bilayer coated Si nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) composites that provide versatile bio-nanoelectronic functionality via incorporation of a wide variety of biomolecules into the phospholipid matrix. The physiochemical behaviour of the phospholipid bilayer is strongly dependent on its structure and, as a consequence, substantial modelling and experimental efforts have been directed at the structural characterization of supported bilayers and unsupported phospholipid vesicles; nonetheless, the experimental studies conducted to date have exclusively involved volume-averaged techniques, which do not allow for the assignment of spatially resolved structural variations that could critically impact the performance of the 1D phospholipid-Si NW composites. Inmore » this manuscript, we use scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe bond orientation and bilayer thickness as a function of position with a spatial resolution of ~30 nm for Δ9-cis 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine layers prepared Si NWs. When coupled with small angle X-ray scattering measurements, the STXM data reveal structural motifs of the Si NWs that give rise to multi-bilayer formation and enable assignment of the orientation of specific bonds known to affect the order and rigidity of phospholipid bilayers.« less

  20. Characterization of one-dimensional molecular chains of 4,4'...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Sutter, Peter Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Stacchiola, Dario J. ...

  1. Cell-based composite materials with programmed structures and functions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    None

    2016-03-01

    The present invention is directed to the use of silicic acid to transform biological materials, including cellular architecture into inorganic materials to provide biocomposites (nanomaterials) with stabilized structure and function. In the present invention, there has been discovered a means to stabilize the structure and function of biological materials, including cells, biomolecules, peptides, proteins (especially including enzymes), lipids, lipid vesicles, polysaccharides, cytoskeletal filaments, tissue and organs with silicic acid such that these materials may be used as biocomposites. In many instances, these materials retain their original biological activity and may be used in harsh conditions which would otherwise destroy the integrity of the biological material. In certain instances, these biomaterials may be storage stable for long periods of time and reconstituted after storage to return the biological material back to its original form. In addition, by exposing an entire cell to form CSCs, the CSCs may function to provide a unique system to study enzymes or a cascade of enzymes which are otherwise unavailable.

  2. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Klaus van Benthem is interested in the investigation of the functionalities of novel nano-materials. He uses electron microscopy tools to image nano-materials with atomic ...

  3. Wave-function functionals for the density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slamet, Marlina; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-11-15

    We extend the idea of the constrained-search variational method for the construction of wave-function functionals {psi}[{chi}] of functions {chi}. The search is constrained to those functions {chi} such that {psi}[{chi}] reproduces the density {rho}(r) while simultaneously leading to an upper bound to the energy. The functionals are thereby normalized and automatically satisfy the electron-nucleus coalescence condition. The functionals {psi}[{chi}] are also constructed to satisfy the electron-electron coalescence condition. The method is applied to the ground state of the helium atom to construct functionals {psi}[{chi}] that reproduce the density as given by the Kinoshita correlated wave function. The expectation of single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i}{delta}(r{sub i}) are exact, as must be the case. The expectations of the kinetic energy operator W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i}{nabla}{sub i}{sup 2}, the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|, and the energy are accurate. We note that the construction of such functionals {psi}[{chi}] is an application of the Levy-Lieb constrained-search definition of density functional theory. It is thereby possible to rigorously determine which functional {psi}[{chi}] is closer to the true wave function.

  4. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracting the Eliashberg Function Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print Wednesday, 23 February 2005 00:00 A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena...

  5. Transportation Organization and Functions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of Packaging and Transportation list of organizations and functions, with a list of acronyms.

  6. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  7. Portable Special Function Routines

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-27

    SPECFUN is a collection of transportable FORTRAN subroutines and accompanying test drivers to evaluate certain special functions.

  8. Ordering in bio-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials probed by in situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Kim, Kyunghoon; Bangar, Mangesh; Willey, Trevor M.; Tran, Ich C.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Noy, Aleksandr; van Buuren, Tony

    2015-04-15

    Here, phospholipid bilayer coated Si nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) composites that provide versatile bio-nanoelectronic functionality via incorporation of a wide variety of biomolecules into the phospholipid matrix. The physiochemical behaviour of the phospholipid bilayer is strongly dependent on its structure and, as a consequence, substantial modelling and experimental efforts have been directed at the structural characterization of supported bilayers and unsupported phospholipid vesicles; nonetheless, the experimental studies conducted to date have exclusively involved volume-averaged techniques, which do not allow for the assignment of spatially resolved structural variations that could critically impact the performance of the 1D phospholipid-Si NW composites. In this manuscript, we use scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe bond orientation and bilayer thickness as a function of position with a spatial resolution of ~30 nm for Δ9-cis 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine layers prepared Si NWs. When coupled with small angle X-ray scattering measurements, the STXM data reveal structural motifs of the Si NWs that give rise to multi-bilayer formation and enable assignment of the orientation of specific bonds known to affect the order and rigidity of phospholipid bilayers.

  9. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS

  10. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLER, L.

    2006-12-31

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget

  11. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  12. Parametric Hazard Function Estimation.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-09-13

    Version 00 Phaze performs statistical inference calculations on a hazard function (also called a failure rate or intensity function) based on reported failure times of components that are repaired and restored to service. Three parametric models are allowed: the exponential, linear, and Weibull hazard models. The inference includes estimation (maximum likelihood estimators and confidence regions) of the parameters and of the hazard function itself, testing of hypotheses such as increasing failure rate, and checking ofmore » the model assumptions.« less

  13. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracting the Eliashberg Function Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print Wednesday, 23 February 2005 00:00 A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these

  14. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  15. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, D.; Casero, D.; Cokus, S. J.; Merchant, S. S.; Pellegrini, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  16. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  17. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  18. Algal functional annotation tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations tomore » interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on

  19. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  20. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana, R.A.

    1988-05-24

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R[sub 1]H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R[sub 1] represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R[sub 2])[sub 3

  1. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana-Pillai, R.A.

    1984-06-12

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons with a metal complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/H/sub 2/ in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form a hydridoalkyl complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/RH; (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform CHX/sub 3/ at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) CpRhPMe/sub 3/RX; and (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex with halogen -60 to 25/sup 0/C to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  2. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at

  3. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at

  4. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at

  5. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at

  6. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracting the Eliashberg Function Print A multitude of important chemical, physical, and biological phenomena are driven by violations of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), which decouples electronic from nuclear motion in quantum calculations of solids. Recent advances in experimental techniques combined with ever-growing theoretical capabilities now hold the promise of presenting an unprecedented picture of these violations. By means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at

  7. Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    horses have ability to deliver Doxorubicin to cancer cells and induce their death. ... was able to transfect cancer cell lines, such as human HeLa and CHO cancer cell lines. ...

  8. Manufacturing Innovation Topics Workshop: Engineered Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and risks - Review of government Nano IMI planning activities to-date * Review ... Value: In 2006, the global market for Nano-enabled products was valued at 2.6 trillion. ...

  9. Nanomaterials by Design | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and properties in materials. The student will be synthesizing nanoparticles, learning and developing self-assembly strategies, and processing the materials by plasma...

  10. Composites comprising biologically-synthesized nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curran, Seamus; Dias, Sampath; Blau, Werner; Wang, Jun; Oremland, Ronald S; Baesman, Shaun

    2013-04-30

    The present disclosure describes composite materials containing a polymer material and a nanoscale material dispersed in the polymer material. The nanoscale materials may be biologically synthesized, such as tellurium nanorods synthesized by Bacillus selenitireducens. Composite materials of the present disclosure may have optical limiting properties and find use in optical limiting devices.

  11. Nanomaterials for sodium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Lifen; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Choi, Daiwon; Nie, Zimin

    2015-05-05

    A crystalline nanowire and method of making a crystalline nanowire are disclosed. The method includes dissolving a first nitrate salt and a second nitrate salt in an acrylic acid aqueous solution. An initiator is added to the solution, which is then heated to form polyacrylatyes. The polyacrylates are dried and calcined. The nanowires show high reversible capacity, enhanced cycleability, and promising rate capability for a battery or capacitor.

  12. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanomaterials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of magnetic nanosystems. Additionally, support of classical atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics methods as well as self-consistent field theoretic approaches are also...

  13. Carbon nanomaterials in silica aerogel matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Christopher E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Manuel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duque, Juan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gupta, Gautam [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obrey, Kimberly A D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Silica aerogels are ultra low-density, high surface area materials that are extremely good thermal insulators and have numerous technical applications. However, their mechanical properties are not ideal, as they are brittle and prone to shattering. Conversely, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene-based materials, such as graphene oxide, have extremely high tensile strength and possess novel electronic properties. By introducing SWCNTs or graphene-based materials into aerogel matrices, it is possible to produce composites with the desirable properties of both constituents. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs and graphene-based materials into silica gels. Subsequent supercritical drying results in monolithic low-density composites having improved mechanical properties. These nanocomposite aerogels have great potential for use in a wide range of applications.

  14. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in the Nanotech Revolution Benefits for U.S. and Society: Renewable recyclable, sustainable technology Intelligent products with nanosensors for measuring forces, loads, ...

  15. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanomaterials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THEORY INSTITUTE (NTI): THEORY, MODELING & SIMULATION CAPABILITIES NTI Computational Cluster The NTI maintains a 12 teraflop Beowulf cluster in support of the capacity-level...

  16. Nanomaterials Discovery Corporation NDC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (NDC) Place: Laramie, Wyoming Zip: WY 82072 Sector: Carbon Product: NDC's nanotechnology development efforts are focused on fuel cell technologies, rechargeable battery...

  17. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R.sub.1 H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R.sub.1 represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ]H.sub.2 wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical; Rh represents a rhodium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.2 represents a hydrocarbon radical; H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ](R.sub.1)H (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X''X'''X'''' or CHX'X''X''' wherein X', X'', X'", X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e., ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  18. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana-Pillai, Roy A.

    1985-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  19. CNEEC - Flame Synthesis Tutorial by Xiaolin Zheng

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flame Synthesis of Nanomaterials

  20. Facile fabrication and characterization of amino-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cluster@SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanocomposite spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalantari, Mohammad; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? A method developed for the preparation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} clusters@SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. ? This method permits production of core/shell nanomaterials with high yields. ? Resultant superparamagnetic particles are monodisperse with high magnetizations. - Abstract: We developed a modified straightforward method for the fabrication of uniformly sized silica-coated magnetite clusters core/shell type nanocomposite particles. Proposed simple one-step processing method permits quick production of materials in high yield. The structural, surface, and magnetic characteristics of the nanocomposite particles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR). The sphere-shaped particles almost have the average diameter of 120 nm, with a magnetic cluster core of 80 15 nm, and a silica shell of 25 10 nm thickness. The particles are superparamagnetic and present strong magnetization (18 emu/g) due to the fact that they possess core of the magnetic clusters. Subsequently, the silica surface of core/shell particles was amino-functionalized via N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EDS). Findings of the present work highlight the potential for using amino-functionalized magnetic silica core/shell nanocomposite particles in biological applications since they possess useful magnetic properties and proper structure.

  1. FFTF Plant transition function analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, D.P.; FFTF Working Group

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and function hierarchy charts that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate FFTF.

  2. Methods of making functionalized nanorods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan; Milliron, Delia; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Liu, Haitao

    2012-01-10

    A process for forming functionalized nanorods. The process includes providing a substrate, modifying the substrate by depositing a self-assembled monolayer of a bi-functional molecule on the substrate, wherein the monolayer is chosen such that one side of the bi-functional molecule binds to the substrate surface and the other side shows an independent affinity for binding to a nanocrystal surface, so as to form a modified substrate. The process further includes contacting the modified substrate with a solution containing nanocrystal colloids, forming a bound monolayer of nanocrystals on the substrate surface, depositing a polymer layer over the monolayer of nanocrystals to partially cover the monolayer of nanocrystals, so as to leave a layer of exposed nanocrystals, functionalizing the exposed nanocrystals, to form functionalized nanocrystals, and then releasing the functionalized nanocrystals from the substrate.

  3. Functional Accountability | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer exercises functional accountability over human resources authorities and human capital programs. This ensures the Department's ...

  4. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  5. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  6. Dual function conducting polymer diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heeger, Alan J.; Yu, Gang

    1996-01-01

    Dual function diodes based on conjugated organic polymer active layers are disclosed. When positively biased the diodes function as light emitters. When negatively biased they are highly efficient photodiodes. Methods of preparation and use of these diodes in displays and input/output devices are also disclosed.

  7. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; Thomas, Justin; Guerrero, Kevin; Munayco, Pablo; Munayco, Jimmy; Scorzelli, Rosa B.; Burnham, Philip; Viescas, Arthur J; Tiano, Amanda L.

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. As such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.

  8. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; et al

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. Asmore » such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.« less

  9. Automatic computation of transfer functions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atcitty, Stanley; Watson, Luke Dale

    2015-04-14

    Technologies pertaining to the automatic computation of transfer functions for a physical system are described herein. The physical system is one of an electrical system, a mechanical system, an electromechanical system, an electrochemical system, or an electromagnetic system. A netlist in the form of a matrix comprises data that is indicative of elements in the physical system, values for the elements in the physical system, and structure of the physical system. Transfer functions for the physical system are computed based upon the netlist.

  10. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  11. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  12. Quantitative Profiling of Protein S-Glutathionylation Reveals Redox-Dependent Regulation of Macrophage Function During Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Jicheng; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Guo, Jia; Chu, Rosalie K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Thrall, Brian D.; Qian, Weijun

    2015-12-23

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are emerging functional materials increasingly utilized for commercial and medical applications. Due to the potential hazard effects of ENPs to human health, it is significant to assess and understand the underlying mechanisms of nanotoxicity. Herein, we investigate protein S-glutathionylation (SSG) as an underlying regulatory mechanism for ENP-induced oxidative stress in macrophages by applying a recently developed quantitative redox proteomics approach for site-specific measurements of SSG. Three high-volume production ENPs (SiO2, Fe3O4 and CoO) were selected as representative ENPs with low, moderate, and high reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity, respectively. Among these nanoparticles, we observe that CoO led to the most significant dose-dependent oxidative stress and increase of protein SSG modifications in macrophages. Our site-specific SSG changes highlighted a broad set of redox sensitive proteins and their specific Cys residues potentially implicated in stress response. Functional analysis revealed that the most significantly enriched functional categories for SSG-modified proteins were stress response, cellular structure change, and cell death or survival. Moreover, ENPs-induce oxidative stress levels (CoO > Fe3O4 > SiO2) were found to correlate well with the levels of impairment of macrophage phagocytic activity and the overall degrees of increases in SSG. RNA silencing knockdown experiment of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) also led to a decreased phagocytic activity in macrophages, which suggested a regulatory role of SSG in phagocytosis. Together, the results provided valuable insights of protein SSG as a potential regulatory mechanism in response to nanomaterial-induced oxidative stress and immunity dysfunction.

  13. Quantitative Profiling of Protein S-Glutathionylation Reveals Redox-Dependent Regulation of Macrophage Function During Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duan, Jicheng; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Guo, Jia; Chu, Rosalie K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Thrall, Brian D.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2015-12-23

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are emerging functional materials increasingly utilized for commercial and medical applications. Due to the potential hazard effects of ENPs to human health, it is significant to assess and understand the underlying mechanisms of nanotoxicity. Here, we investigate protein S-glutathionylation (SSG) as an underlying regulatory mechanism for ENP-induced oxidative stress in macrophages by applying a recently developed quantitative redox proteomics approach for site-specific measurements of SSG. Three high-volume production ENPs (SiO2, Fe3O4 and CoO) were selected as representative ENPs with low, moderate, and high reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity, respectively. Among these nanoparticles, we observe that CoO ledmore » to the most significant dose-dependent oxidative stress and increase of protein SSG modifications in macrophages. Our site-specific SSG changes highlighted a broad set of redox sensitive proteins and their specific Cys residues potentially implicated in stress response. Functional analysis revealed that the most significantly enriched functional categories for SSG-modified proteins were stress response, cellular structure change, and cell death or survival. Moreover, ENPs-induce oxidative stress levels (CoO > Fe3O4 > SiO2) were found to correlate well with the levels of impairment of macrophage phagocytic activity and the overall degrees of increases in SSG. RNA silencing knockdown experiment of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) also led to a decreased phagocytic activity in macrophages, which suggested a regulatory role of SSG in phagocytosis. Together, the results provided valuable insights of protein SSG as a potential regulatory mechanism in response to nanomaterial-induced oxidative stress and immunity dysfunction.« less

  14. High throughput reproducible cantilever functionalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-01-21

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  15. High throughout reproducible cantilever functionalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-11-25

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  16. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S.; Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  17. Poly(ethylene oxide) functionalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pratt, Russell Clayton

    2014-04-08

    A simple procedure is provided by which the hydroxyl termini of poly(ethylene oxide) can be appended with functional groups to a useful extent by reaction and precipitation. The polymer is dissolved in warmed toluene, treated with an excess of organic base and somewhat less of an excess of a reactive acylating reagent, reacted for several hours, then precipitated in isopropanol so that the product can be isolated as a solid, and salt byproducts are washed away. This procedure enables functionalization of the polymer while not requiring laborious purification steps such as solvent-solvent extraction or dialysis to remove undesirable side products.

  18. Project X functional requirements specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support a world-leading program in Intensity Frontier physics at Fermilab. The facility is designed to support programs in elementary particle and nuclear physics, with possible applications to nuclear energy research. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions, and to assure that the facility is designed with sufficient upgrade capability to provide U.S. leadership for many decades to come. This paper will briefly review the previously described Functional Requirements, and then discuss their recent evolution.

  19. Physical unclonable functions: A primer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bauer, Todd; Hamlet, Jason

    2014-11-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) make use of the measurable intrinsic randomness of physical systems to establish signatures for those systems. Thus, PUFs provide a means to generate unique keys that don't need to be stored in nonvolatile memory, and they offer exciting opportunities for new authentication and supply chain security technologies.

  20. Functional Insights from Structural Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forouhar,F.; Kuzin, A.; Seetharaman, J.; Lee, I.; Zhou, W.; Abashidze, M.; Chen, Y.; Montelione, G.; Tong, L.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Structural genomics efforts have produced structural information, either directly or by modeling, for thousands of proteins over the past few years. While many of these proteins have known functions, a large percentage of them have not been characterized at the functional level. The structural information has provided valuable functional insights on some of these proteins, through careful structural analyses, serendipity, and structure-guided functional screening. Some of the success stories based on structures solved at the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) are reported here. These include a novel methyl salicylate esterase with important role in plant innate immunity, a novel RNA methyltransferase (H. influenzae yggJ (HI0303)), a novel spermidine/spermine N-acetyltransferase (B. subtilis PaiA), a novel methyltransferase or AdoMet binding protein (A. fulgidus AF{_}0241), an ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (B. subtilis YvqK), a novel carboxysome pore (E. coli EutN), a proline racemase homolog with a disrupted active site (B. melitensis BME11586), an FMN-dependent enzyme (S. pneumoniae SP{_}1951), and a 12-stranded {beta}-barrel with a novel fold (V. parahaemolyticus VPA1032).

  1. TRIDAC host computer functional specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilbert, S.M.; Hunter, S.L.

    1983-08-23

    The purpose of this document is to outline the baseline functional requirements for the Triton Data Acquisition and Control (TRIDAC) Host Computer Subsystem. The requirements presented in this document are based upon systems that currently support both the SIS and the Uranium Separator Technology Groups in the AVLIS Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and upon the specific demands associated with the extended safe operation of the SIS Triton Facility.

  2. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jatko, W. Bruce (Knoxville, TN); McNeilly, David R. (Maryville, TN); Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp unction which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  3. Faraday dispersion functions of galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Tashiro, Yuichi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: 136d8008@st.kumamoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: akahori@physics.usyd.edu.au

    2014-09-01

    The Faraday dispersion function (FDF), which can be derived from an observed polarization spectrum by Faraday rotation measure synthesis, is a profile of polarized emissions as a function of Faraday depth. We study intrinsic FDFs along sight lines through face-on Milky Way like galaxies by means of a sophisticated galactic model incorporating three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and investigate how much information the FDF intrinsically contains. Since the FDF reflects distributions of thermal and cosmic-ray electrons as well as magnetic fields, it has been expected that the FDF could be a new probe to examine internal structures of galaxies. We, however, find that an intrinsic FDF along a sight line through a galaxy is very complicated, depending significantly on actual configurations of turbulence. We perform 800 realizations of turbulence and find no universal shape of the FDF even if we fix the global parameters of the model. We calculate the probability distribution functions of the standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis of FDFs and compare them for models with different global parameters. Our models predict that the presence of vertical magnetic fields and the large-scale height of cosmic-ray electrons tend to make the standard deviation relatively large. In contrast, the differences in skewness and kurtosis are relatively less significant.

  4. Semiclassical propagation of Wigner functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittrich, T.; Gomez, E. A.; Pachon, L. A.

    2010-06-07

    We present a comprehensive study of semiclassical phase-space propagation in the Wigner representation, emphasizing numerical applications, in particular as an initial-value representation. Two semiclassical approximation schemes are discussed. The propagator of the Wigner function based on van Vleck's approximation replaces the Liouville propagator by a quantum spot with an oscillatory pattern reflecting the interference between pairs of classical trajectories. Employing phase-space path integration instead, caustics in the quantum spot are resolved in terms of Airy functions. We apply both to two benchmark models of nonlinear molecular potentials, the Morse oscillator and the quartic double well, to test them in standard tasks such as computing autocorrelation functions and propagating coherent states. The performance of semiclassical Wigner propagation is very good even in the presence of marked quantum effects, e.g., in coherent tunneling and in propagating Schroedinger cat states, and of classical chaos in four-dimensional phase space. We suggest options for an effective numerical implementation of our method and for integrating it in Monte-Carlo-Metropolis algorithms suitable for high-dimensional systems.

  5. Power Function Review (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PFR Public Comments Firstgov Power Function Review (PFR) Summary: This area of the Power Services web site provides information related to the Power Function Review (PFR). The PFR...

  6. Window taper functions for subaperture processing. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Window taper functions for subaperture processing. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Window taper functions for subaperture processing. You are accessing a document ...

  7. Window taper functions for subaperture processing. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Window taper functions for subaperture processing. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Window taper functions for subaperture processing. It is well known that the spectrum ...

  8. Functional Design Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Functional Design Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Functional Design Engineering Inc Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website:...

  9. Design Principles for Materials with Magnetic Functionality ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design Principles for Materials with Magnetic Functionality Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design Principles for Materials with Magnetic Functionality This report ...

  10. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional VaryMatrix.png Collaboration with mathematicians and computational...

  11. Tiny plastic lung mimics human pulmonary function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tiny plastic lung mimics human pulmonary function Tiny plastic lung mimics human pulmonary function Scientists are developing a miniature, tissue-engineered artificial lung that ...

  12. Structure-Based Design of Functional Amyloid Materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dan; Jones, Eric M.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Luo, Fang; Ivanova, Magdalena; Sievers, Stuart A.; Wang, Wenyuan; Yaghi, Omar M.; Liu, Cong; et al

    2014-12-04

    We report that amyloid fibers, once exclusively associated with disease, are acquiring utility as a class of biological nanomaterials. We introduce a method that utilizes the atomic structures of amyloid peptides, to design materials with versatile applications. As a model application, we designed amyloid fibers capable of capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas, to address the global problem of excess anthropogenic carbon dioxide. By measuring dynamic separation of carbon dioxide from nitrogen, we show that fibers with designed amino acid sequences double the carbon dioxide binding capacity of the previously reported fiber formed by VQIVYK from Tau protein. In amore » second application, we designed fibers that facilitate retroviral gene transfer. Finally, by measuring lentiviral transduction, we show that designed fibers exceed the efficiency of polybrene, a commonly used enhancer of transduction. The same procedures can be adapted to the design of countless other amyloid materials with a variety of properties and uses.« less

  13. Structure-Based Design of Functional Amyloid Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dan; Jones, Eric M.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Luo, Fang; Ivanova, Magdalena; Sievers, Stuart A.; Wang, Wenyuan; Yaghi, Omar M.; Liu, Cong; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-12-04

    We report that amyloid fibers, once exclusively associated with disease, are acquiring utility as a class of biological nanomaterials. We introduce a method that utilizes the atomic structures of amyloid peptides, to design materials with versatile applications. As a model application, we designed amyloid fibers capable of capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas, to address the global problem of excess anthropogenic carbon dioxide. By measuring dynamic separation of carbon dioxide from nitrogen, we show that fibers with designed amino acid sequences double the carbon dioxide binding capacity of the previously reported fiber formed by VQIVYK from Tau protein. In a second application, we designed fibers that facilitate retroviral gene transfer. Finally, by measuring lentiviral transduction, we show that designed fibers exceed the efficiency of polybrene, a commonly used enhancer of transduction. The same procedures can be adapted to the design of countless other amyloid materials with a variety of properties and uses.

  14. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  15. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This document provides functional organization charts for all NRC Offices and Regions, and their components.

  16. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-30

    Functional organization charts for the NRC Commission Offices, Divisions, and Branches are presented.

  17. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  18. Brownian dynamics without Green's functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delong, Steven; Donev, Aleksandar; Usabiaga, Florencio Balboa; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Griffith, Boyce E.; Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016

    2014-04-07

    We develop a Fluctuating Immersed Boundary (FIB) method for performing Brownian dynamics simulations of confined particle suspensions. Unlike traditional methods which employ analytical Green's functions for Stokes flow in the confined geometry, the FIB method uses a fluctuating finite-volume Stokes solver to generate the action of the response functions on the fly. Importantly, we demonstrate that both the deterministic terms necessary to capture the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles, as well as the stochastic terms necessary to generate the hydrodynamically correlated Brownian motion, can be generated by solving the steady Stokes equations numerically only once per time step. This is accomplished by including a stochastic contribution to the stress tensor in the fluid equations consistent with fluctuating hydrodynamics. We develop novel temporal integrators that account for the multiplicative nature of the noise in the equations of Brownian dynamics and the strong dependence of the mobility on the configuration for confined systems. Notably, we propose a random finite difference approach to approximating the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. Through comparisons with analytical and existing computational results, we numerically demonstrate the ability of the FIB method to accurately capture both the static (equilibrium) and dynamic properties of interacting particles in flow.

  19. Structures and Functions of Oligosaccharins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albersheim, Peter

    1995-12-01

    We have made considerable progress during the 2.5 year funding period just ending in our studies of the structures and functions of oligosaccharide signal molecules (oligosaccharins). We have emphasized studies of the enzymes that solubilize, process, and degrade oligosaccharins and of the proteins that inhibit those enzymes. We have been especially interested in elucidating how oligosaccharins and their processing enzymes participate in determining the outcome of challenges to plants by pathogenic microbes. We have studied, to a lesser extent, the roles of oligosaccharins in plant growth and development. Abstracts of papers describing results acquired with support from this grant that have been published, submitted, or in preparation are presented to summarize the progress made during the last two and one half years. The report highlights the most important contributions made in our oiigosaccharin research during this time period, and the corresponding abstract is referenced. Results of work in progress are described primarily in conjunction with our application for continued support.

  20. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Strategic Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... overall theme of understanding and controlling the complexity of electronic, ionic, and molecular behavior at the nanoscale to enable the design of new functional nanomaterials. ...

  1. Advanced optical measurements for characterizing photophysical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    single molecule optical methods for improved control of nanomaterial functionalization. ... Finally, Raman fingerprinting of biological conjugates has been enabled by resonant signal ...

  2. Researchers Speak at American Chemical Society Meeting | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... instrumentation, functional nanomaterials, bioinspired photonics, and wireless sensors. ... Most recent awards include 2010 Prism Award for photonics innovation by SPIE and Photonics ...

  3. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences - Summer Newsletter 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    instruments, and foster interaction with users. I work with the Macromolecular Nanomaterial group within the Functional Polymer Architectures theme. My main duty in CNMS is...

  4. April 2013 CNMS User Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our understanding of nanoscale phenomena and develop functional nanomaterials systems. Access is provided at no cost to users for research that is in the public do- main and...

  5. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water-removal technique boosts performance of carbon nanomaterials March 23, 2016 ... amount of added water that collects between the oxygen-functionalized nanosheets. ...

  6. Novel water-removal technique boosts performance of carbon nanomateria...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technique boosts performance of carbon nanomaterials Novel water-removal technique boosts ... amount of added water that collects between the oxygen-functionalized nanosheets. ...

  7. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-15

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  8. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  9. Fire Protection Engineering Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical ... by applied engineering fundamentals, research, fire hazard ...

  10. Functional Area Qualification Standard Reference Guides

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The reference guides have been developed to address the competency statements in DOE Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  11. Property:Distributed Generation Function | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Function Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Distributed Generation Function Property Type Page Description A description of the function(s) for which the Distributed...

  12. Polarized structure functions in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tehrani, S. Atashbar; Khorramian, A. N.; Monfared, S. Taheri; Arbabifar, F.

    2011-10-24

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the structure functions for the polarized nuclei {sup 3}He, and focus on the polarized distribution functions and light-cone momentum distributions of protons and neutrons. We demonstrate that the first moment of the {sup 3}He structure function can provide an incisive test of the Bjorken sum rule.

  13. Characterizing quasiconvex functions in terms of the Kronrod's tree of a function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorob'ev, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    As an application of Kronrod's construction of the tree of a function to convex analysis, a characterization of quasiconvex functions is obtained. Namely, a function is quasiconvex if and only if the associated function defined on the tree of the original function is quasiconvex. A new proof of one of the existence lemmas in Kronrod's construction of the tree of a function (the original proof of which turned out to be incorrect) is given. Bibliography: 4 titles. (paper)

  14. Holography of gravitational action functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Padmanabhan, T.

    2006-12-15

    Einstein-Hilbert (EH) action can be separated into a bulk and a surface term, with a specific ('holographic') relationship between the two, so that either can be used to extract information about the other. The surface term can also be interpreted as the entropy of the horizon in a wide class of spacetimes. Since EH action is likely to just the first term in the derivative expansion of an effective theory, it is interesting to ask whether these features continue to hold for more general gravitational actions. We provide a comprehensive analysis of Lagrangians of the form {radical}(-g)L={radical}(-g)Q{sub a}{sup bcd}R{sup a}{sub bcd}, in which Q{sub a}{sup bcd} is a tensor with the symmetries of the curvature tensor, made from metric and curvature tensor and satisfies the condition {nabla}{sub c}Q{sub a}{sup bcd}=0, and show that they share these features. The Lanczos-Lovelock Lagrangians are a subset of these in which Q{sub a}{sup bcd} is a homogeneous function of the curvature tensor. They are all holographic, in a specific sense of the term, and--in all these cases--the surface term can be interpreted as the horizon entropy. The thermodynamics route to gravity, in which the field equations are interpreted as TdS=dE+pdV, seems to have a greater degree of validity than the field equations of Einstein gravity itself. The results suggest that the holographic feature of EH action could also serve as a new symmetry principle in constraining the semiclassical corrections to Einstein gravity. The implications are discussed.

  15. Functionalized lignin, rubber containing functionalized lignin and products containing such rubber composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benko, David Andrew; Hahn, Bruce Raymond; Cohen, Martin Paul; Dirk, Shawn Matthew; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole

    2014-03-04

    The invention relates to functionalized lignin, rubber compositions which contain functionalized lignin and to products which have at least one component comprised of such rubber composition.

  16. Function point count adjustment by means of scaling touched function points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, M.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the use of scaling touched function points to adjust function point analysis in determine the usefullness, productivity, and quality of software.

  17. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.

  18. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  19. CTA/CNS Functions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CTA/CNS Functions CTA/CNS Functions CTA/CNS Functions The Secretary established the mission of the Chief Technical Authority (CTA) and supporting Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) in 2005 to provide independent analysis, advice, and recommendations to DOE senior management, program offices, field offices, and contractors on the health of the oversight and practices associated with the nuclear facility safety. Beginning in 2011, the Deputy Secretary also delegated EM CTA responsibilities to the CNS.

  20. Accurate evaluation of pionium wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suebka, P.; Yan, Y.

    2004-09-01

    A suitable numerical approach based on Sturmian functions is employed to solve the pionium problem for both local and nonlocal potentials. The approach accounts for both the short-ranged strong interaction and the long-ranged Coulomb force and provides accurately the wave function and binding energy of pionium. It is found that the ground-state pionium wave function in realistic pion-pion strong interactions might be considerably different from the hydrogen-like one at a small distance.

  1. Perturbation kernels for generalized seismological data functionals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Authors: Chen, Po., Jordan, T.H., Lee, E. In seismic waveform analysis and inversion, data ... The generalized seismological data functionals (GSDF) of Gee & Jordan quantify waveform ...

  2. Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanosheets for novel functions. The substitution of oil in place of air creates a raft of new opportunities for the engineering and production of peptoid nanosheets. For...

  3. Poly(ethyleneoxide) functionalization through alkylation (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A new and efficient method of functionalizing high molecular weight polymers through alkylation using a metal amide base is described. This novel procedure can also be used to ...

  4. Functionalized High Performance Polymer Membranes for Separation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functionalized High Performance Polymer Membranes for Separation of Carbon Dioxide and Methane Previous Next List Natalia Blinova and Frantisek Svec, J. Mater. Chem. A, 2, 600-604...

  5. Functionalized Polyacrylamide Monolith for Rapid Bacteria Pathogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Rapid Bacteria Pathogen Detection in Human Blood. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Functionalized Polyacrylamide Monolith for Rapid Bacteria Pathogen ...

  6. Dual Functional Cathode Additives for Battery Technologies -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Return to Search Dual Functional Cathode Additives for Battery Technologies Brookhaven ... activation of the cell of a lithium battery having a primary metal sulfide additive ...

  7. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow Prev Next Title: Contrasting soil microbial community...

  8. Design Principles for Materials with Magnetic Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Joe David

    2015-11-05

    This report describes the processes involved with refining and testing design principles of high density, magnetic materials and while observing their magnetic functionality.

  9. Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium ...

  10. Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domains are considered to be markers for tRNA synthetase-associated functions beyond translation (1). Although their appearance correlates with the increase of biological...