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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Size Electric Vehicle Fleet and Reliability Test Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Fleet and Reliability Test...

2

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Size Electric Vehicle Basics to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Basics on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing...

3

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Size Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

4

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

5

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

6

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle...

7

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Full Size Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full Size Electric Vehicles What's New Baseline Performance Testing for 2011 Nissan Leaf Battery Testing for 2011 Nissan Leaf - When New The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

8

Scale model simulates full-size substation electric fields. [For 345-kV system  

SciTech Connect

An innovative scale model of a 345-kV substation that can be energized to produce representative electric fields has been developed. The purpose of the model is to determine how changes in substation design and operation affect ground-level voltage gradients. Recent tests of the field strengths predicted by the model and actual voltage gradients at the full-size substation at 150 different pairs of points showed excellent agreement. For 94 percent of the pairs the model error was less than 10 percent. The statistical mean of the absolute values of the discrepancies for all 150 points was only 4.6 percent.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Bookmark Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal on Delicious; Rank Full Size Image ...

10

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

A coin-sized integrated circuit developed by researchers at PNNL may help solve the nation's overworked electricity grid.

11

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. Send a link to Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portalto someone by E-mail; Share Full Size Image - Energy ...

12

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. Send a link to Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portalto someone by E-mail; Share Full Size Image ...

13

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Share Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal on Facebook; ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America;

14

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; ...

15

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

16

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; ... (i.e. target ...

17

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles  

Total Thermal Management System for Hybrid and Full Electric Vehicles Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

18

Experimental study of full-size automated venetian blind windows  

SciTech Connect

This study presents an experimental study on full-size automated venetian blind window systems consisting of horizontal pivoted louvers installed and hermetically sealed between two glass panes. The experimental study was carried out using a test cell of 2.43 m high, 1.48 m wide, and 1.92 m deep. Various parameters were measured instantaneously and recorded using a data acquisition system: interior and exterior air temperatures; various surface temperatures; and total and direct solar radiations. A linearized numerical model was used to verify the experimental results.

Rheault, S.; Bilgen, E. (Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and Resiliency Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and Resiliency May 2, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis Inside Florida Power & Light's Transmission Performance Diagnostic Center. | Photo courtesy of Florida Power & Light. Inside Florida Power & Light's Transmission Performance Diagnostic Center. | Photo courtesy of Florida Power & Light. In 2009, at the DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center, President Obama announced the launch of the $3.4 billion Smart Grid Investment Grant program. In 2009, at the DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center, President Obama announced the launch of the $3.4 billion Smart Grid Investment Grant program. Inside Florida Power & Light's Transmission Performance Diagnostic Center. | Photo courtesy of Florida Power & Light.

20

Full Text of the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUGUST AUGUST 2006 U.S. Department of Energy NATIONAL ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY AUGUST 2006 U.S. Department of Energy NATIONAL ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY AUGUST 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Acronyms Used in This Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi 1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1. Organization of This Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2. Definitions of Key Terms and Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.3. Consultation with States and Regional Entities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2. Study Approach and Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Full Text of the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DECEMBER DECEMBER 2009 U.S. Department of Energy NATIONAL ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY DECEMBER 2009 U.S. Department of Energy NATIONAL ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY DECEMBER 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Note to Readers As the Department of Energy (DOE) stated when it announced the beginning of its work on this study in May 2006, the 2009 Congestion Study focused on the identification of existing electric transmission-level congestion based on publicly available historic information and data related to transmission congestion. The information and data used by DOE in conducting the analysis in this study was that which was available through May 2009. As a result the study does not address the possible impacts of the recent recession on congestion, or any other recent events, reports, or other developments affecting congestion. Consistent with the requirements

22

Study on Electric Control System for a Full Hybrid Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For efficient and reliable operation of a novel hybrid powertrain assembled in the bus, a set of control strategy combined with the structural characteristics was researched. Based on the identification of the driver's intension, this paper presented ... Keywords: full hybrid bus, eletric control system, stretegy, fuel economy

Zhiguo Kong, Hongxiu Wang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fabrication development of full-sized components for GCFR core assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the status of the development of full-sized components for gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) core assemblies. Methods for ribbing of the fuel rod cladding, fabrication of grid spacers of two different designs, drawing of assembly flow ducts, and fabrication of fission gas collection manifolds by several methods are discussed.

Lindgren, J.R.; Flynn, P.W.; Foster, L.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

FULL SIZE U-10MO MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL AND FUEL PLATE FABRICATION-TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full-size U10Mo foils are being developed for use in high density LEU monolithic fuel plates. The application of a zirconium barrier layer too the foil is applied using a hot co-rolling process. Aluminum clad fuel plates are fabricated using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) or a Friction Bonding (FB) process. An overview is provided of ongoing technology development activities, including: the co-rolling process, foil shearing/slitting and polishing, cladding bonding processes, plate forming, plate-assembly swaging, and fuel plate characterization. Characterization techniques being employed include, Ultrasonic Testing (UT), radiography, and microscopy.

G. A. Moore; J-F Jue; B. H. Rabin; M. J. Nilles

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

26

Evaluation of a Lower-Energy Energy Storage System (LEESS) for Full-Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the evaluation of a lower-energy energy storage system for full-hybrid electric vehicles.

Gonder, J.; Ireland, J.; Cosgrove, J.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Science Accelerator : Main View : Search Results for Full Record: "electric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search: Full Record: "electric vehicles" Search: Full Record: "electric vehicles" Did you mean ? Create new alert from this search New Search My Selections (0) Alerts Source Status Activity Indicator 0 top results from at least 0 found. of sources complete 0 more results found.Add results Topics Visual Generating Clusters... Searching No clusters were found All Results Wikipedia Searching... Searching EurekAlert! Searching... Searching Text (0) Multimedia (0) Data (0) - of Sort By: Rank Date Title Author Limit to: First Page Previous Page Next Page Last Page Refine Search Enter term(s) to search for within your current results list Cancel Refine Search No results were found. Please edit your search criteria and try again. Refer to Help pages from the advanced search page if you need assistance revising your search.

28

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles: battery degradation, grid support, emissions, and battery size tradeoffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with 85% ethanol EIA ­ Energy Information Administration EVSE ­ Electric vehicle supply equipment gPlug-in hybrid electric vehicles: battery degradation, grid support, emissions, and battery size to get this thesis finished. #12;iv Intentionally blank #12;v Abstract Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles

29

Exploring a Full-Sized Black Hole 30 This black ball shown below is the exact size of a black hole with a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring a Full-Sized Black Hole 30 This black ball shown below is the exact size of a black hole with a diameter of 9.0 centimeters. Such a black hole would have a mass of 5 times the mass of our Earth. All of this mass would be INSIDE the ball below. Although it looks pretty harmless, if this black hole were at arms

30

Digital computer code for simulating the dynamics of full-size dual-purpose desalting plants using a pressurized water reactor as a heat source  

SciTech Connect

A digital simulator was developed for use in calculating the dynamic response of full-size dual-purpose desalting plants. This simulator consists of a multistage flash (MSF) evaporator, a pressurized water reactor (PWR) as the heat source, a drumtype steam generator, and a turbine plant utilizing a back- pressure turbine. A bypass steam system was modeled to achieve flexible operation of the electric power and water portions of the combined plant. The proposed use of this simulator is to investigate various coupling and control schemes and to help determine possible problem areas in full back-pressure turbine dual-purpose desalting plant designs. (auth)

Delene, J.G.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Using harmony search algorithm for optimization the component sizing of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an optimal design to minimize the mass, cost and volume of the supercapacitor (SC) and fuel cell (FC) ina fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle is presented. Because of the hybrid powertrain, component sizing significantly affects vehicle ... Keywords: fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle (FCHEV), harmony search algorithm, particle swarm optimization, power management, powertrain modeling

Amir Khanjanzadeh; Alireza Rezazadeh; Mostafa Sedighizadeh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Standard Test Method for Particle Size Distribution of Alumina or Quartz Powders by Electrical Sensing Zone Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard Test Method for Particle Size Distribution of Alumina or Quartz Powders by Electrical Sensing Zone Technique

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

" Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size(b)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",,,,,"1,000","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "

34

Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Wham, Robert M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Rainfall Rate and Electric Charge and Size of Raindrops of Six Spring Showers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two ground-based instruments were designed and built in order to accomplish the present research. The first, based on the principle of the induction ring, measures the electric charge as well as the size of the individual raindrops. The other is ...

Serge Chauzy; Serge Despiau

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cobra-IE Evaluation by Simulation of the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Test (BFBT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The COBRA-IE computer code is a thermal-hydraulic subchannel analysis program capable of simulating phenomena present in both PWRs and BWRs. As part of ongoing COBRA-IE assessment efforts, the code has been evaluated against experimental data from the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Tests (BFBT). The BFBT experiments utilized an 8 x 8 rod bundle to simulate BWR operating conditions and power profiles, providing an excellent database for investigation of the capabilities of the code. Benchmarks performed included steady-state and transient void distribution, single-phase and two-phase pressure drop, and steady-state and transient critical power measurements. COBRA-IE effectively captured the trends seen in the experimental data with acceptable prediction error. Future sensitivity studies are planned to investigate the effects of enabling and/or modifying optional code models dealing with void drift, turbulent mixing, rewetting, and CHF.

Burns, C. J. and Aumiler, D. L.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

" Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.4,1.5,1,0.9,1,1

38

Influence of charging process and size distribution of dust grain on the electric conductivity of dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of dust size distribution and charging process of dust grains on the complex electric conductivity of dusty plasmas have been investigated in the present paper. Comparisons are made between real dusty plasma in which there are many different dust grain species and the mono-sized dusty plasma (MDP) in which there is only one kind of dust grain whose size is the average dust size. In some cases the complex electric conductivity of real dusty plasma is larger than that of MDP, while in other cases it is smaller than that of MDP, it depends on the dust size distribution function.

Duan Jizheng; Wang Canglong; Zhang Jianrong; Ma Shengqian; Hong Xueren; Sun Jianan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) and Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Duan Wenshan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) and Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Yang Lei [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) and Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Impact of Residential Air Conditioner Charging and Sizing on Peak Electrical Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities have had a number of air conditioner rebate and maintenance programs for many years. The purpose of these programs was to improve the efficiency of the stock of air conditioning equipment and provide better demand-side management. This paper examines the effect of refrigerant charging (proper servicing of the equipment), system sizing, and efficiency on the steady-state, coincident peak utility demand of a residential central air conditioning system. The study is based on the results of laboratory tests of a three-ton, capillary tube expansion, split-system air conditioner, system capacity and efficiency data available from manufacturer's literature, and assumptions about relative sizing of the equipment to cooling load on a residence. A qualitative discussion is provided concerning the possible impacts of transient operation and total energy use on utility program decisions. The analysis indicates that proper sizing of the unit is the largest factor affecting energy demand of the three factors (sizing, charging, and efficiency) studied in this paper. For typical oversizing of units to cooling loads in houses, both overcharging and undercharging showed significant negative impact on peak demand. The impacts of SEER changes in utility peak demand were found to be virtually independent of oversizing. For properly sized units, there was a small peak benefit to higher efficiency air conditioners.

Neal, L.; O'Neal, D. L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Electric double layer for spherical particles in salt-free concentrated suspensions including ion size effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equilibrium electric double layer (EDL) that surrounds the colloidal particles is determinant for the response of a suspension under a variety of static or alternating external fields. An ideal salt-free suspension is composed by the charged colloidal particles and the ionic countercharge released by the charging mechanism. The existing macroscopic theoretical models can be improved by incorporating different ionic effects usually neglected in previous mean-field approaches, which are based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PB). The influence of the finite size of the ions seems to be quite promising because it has been shown to predict phenomena like charge reversal, which has been out of the scope of classical PB approximations. In this work we numerically obtain the surface electric potential and the counterions concentration profiles around a charged particle in a concentrated salt-free suspension corrected by the finite size of the counterions. The results show the large importance of such corrections for moderate to high particle charges at every particle volume fraction, specially, when a region of closest approach of the counterions to the particle surface is considered. We conclude that finite ion size considerations are obeyed for the development of new theoretical models to study nonequilibrium properties in concentrated colloidal suspensions, particularly the salt-free ones with small and highly charged particles.

R. Roa; F. Carrique; E. Ruiz-Reina

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Thermo-Mechanical Performance of 230-345kV High Pressure Pipe Type Cable Systems: Selection of Full Size Test Rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a front-end project to the wider experimental study of the thermo-mechanical performance of high-pressure fluid-filled (HPFF) transmission class cables in pipe systems. The project first reviews published work on the mechanisms of deterioration of HPFF cables due to thermo-mechanical bending activity (TMB). The principal mechanisms are the reduction in electrical strength caused by a) damage and opening of the outer electrostatic shield layers and b) the increase in the size of the fluid filled b...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Determination of the potential market size and opportunities for biomass to electricity projects in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts are currently underway to assess the market potential and prospects for the US private sector in biomass energy development in Yunnan Province. Among the specific objectives of the study are to: estimate the likely market size and competitiveness of biomass energy, assess the viability of US private sector ventures; assess non-economic factors (e.g., resource, environmental, social, political, institutional) that could affect the viability of biomass energy; and recommend appropriate actions to help stimulate biomass initiatives. Feasibility studies show that biomass projects in Yunnan Province are financially and technically viable. Biomass can be grown and converted to electricity at costs lower than other alternatives. These projects if implemented can ease power shortages and help to sustain the region`s economic growth. The external environmental benefits of integrated biomass projects are also potentially significant. This paper summarizes a two-step screening and rank-ordering process that is being used to identify the best candidate projects for possible US private sector investment. The process uses a set of initial screens to eliminate projects that are not technically feasible to develop. The remaining projects are then rank-ordered using a multicriteria technique.

Perlack, R.D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Sizing the Electrical Grid Omid Ardakanian, S. Keshav, and Catherine Rosenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. To validate our analysis, we conduct a fine-grained measurement study of household electrical load. We compare energy sources and battery-operated electric vehicles, it is expected that the future grid would have non network or the amount of energy brought to a storage battery in the electrical grid. In this paper, we

Waterloo, University of

44

Multidisciplinary Optimization of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Component Sizing and Power Management Logic.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A survey of the existing literature indicates that optimization on the power management logic of hybrid electric vehicle is mostly performed after the design of (more)

Fan, Brian Su-Ming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Grain size distributions and photo-electric heating in ionized media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ever since the pioneering study of Spitzer, it has been widely recognized that grains play an important role in the heating and cooling of photo-ionized environments. A detailed code is necessary to model grains in a photo-ionized medium. In this paper we will use the spectral synthesis code Cloudy for this purpose. The grain model of this code has recently undergone a comprehensive upgrade. Part of this is the newly developed hybrid grain charge model, which will be described in detail. This model allows discrete charge states of very small grains to be modelled accurately while simultaneously avoiding the overhead of fully resolving the charge distribution of large grains, thus making the model both accurate and computationally efficient. A comprehensive comparison with the fully resolved charge state models of Weingartner & Draine (2001) shows that the agreement is very satisfactory for realistic size distributions. The effect of the grain size distribution on the line emission from photo-ionized regions is studied by taking standard models for an H II region and a planetary nebula and adding a dust component to the models with varying grain size distributions. A comparison of the models shows that varying the size distribution has a dramatic effect on the emitted spectrum, and affects the ionization balance as well. These results clearly demonstrate that the grain size distribution is an important parameter in photo-ionization models.

P. A. M. van Hoof; J. C. Weingartner; P. G. Martin; K. Volk; G. J. Ferland

2004-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Full multi grid method for electric field computation in point-to-plane streamer discharge in air at atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Streamers dynamics are characterized by the fast propagation of ionized shock waves at the nanosecond scale under very sharp space charge variations. The streamer dynamics modelling needs the solution of charged particle transport equations coupled to ... Keywords: Elliptic equation solver, Full multi-grid method, Plasma discharge, Streamer simulation

S. Kacem; O. Eichwald; O. Ducasse; N. Renon; M. Yousfi; K. Charrada

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Impact of Component Sizing in Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Energy Resource and Greenhouse Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread use of alternative hybrid powertrains currently appears inevitable and many opportunities for substantial progress remain. The necessity for environmentally friendly vehicles, in conjunction with increasing concerns regarding U.S. dependency on foreign oil and climate change, has led to significant investment in enhancing the propulsion portfolio with new technologies. Recently, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have attracted considerable attention due to their potential to reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. PHEVs are especially appealing for short daily commutes with excessive stop-and-go driving. However, the high costs associated with their components, and in particular, with their energy storage systems have been significant barriers to extensive market penetration of PEVs. In the research reported here, we investigated the implications of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions in a medium duty PHEV. An optimization framework is proposed and applied to two different parallel powertrain configurations, pre-transmission and post-transmission, to derive the Pareto frontier with respect to motor/generator and battery size. The optimization and modeling approach adopted here facilitates better understanding of the potential benefits from proper selection of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions. This understanding can help us identify the appropriate sizing of these components and thus reducing the PHEV cost. Addressing optimal sizing of PHEV components could aim at an extensive market penetration of PHEVs.

Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Grain size distributions and photo-electric heating in ionised media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ever since the pioneering study of Spitzer, it has been widely recognised that grains play an important role in the heating and cooling of photo-ionised environments. A detailed code is necessary to model grains in a photo-ionised medium. In this paper we will use the spectral synthesis code Cloudy for this purpose. The grain model of this code has recently undergone a comprehensive upgrade. Part of this is the newly developed hybrid grain charge model, which will be described in detail. This model allows discrete charge states of very small grains to be modelled accurately while simultaneously avoiding the overhead of fully resolving the charge distribution of large grains, thus making the model both accurate and computationally efficient. A comprehensive comparison with the fully resolved charge state models of Weingartner & Draine (2001) shows that the agreement is very satisfactory for realistic size distributions. The effect of the grain size distribution on the line emission from photo-ionised regio...

Van Hoof, P A M; Martin, P G; Volk, K; Ferland, G J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

COMMERCIALIZATION DEMONSTRATION OF MID-SIZED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR ELECTRIC UTILITYAPPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an outgrowth of the Technology Reinvestment Program of the 1990s, an Agreement was formed between BWXT and the DOE to promote the commercialization of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology. Business and marketing studies showed that the performance of electric transmission lines could be improved with this SMES technology by stabilizing the line thereby allowing the reserved stability margin to be used. One main benefit sought was to double the capacity and the amount of energy flow on an existing transmission line by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin, thereby doubling revenue. Also, electrical disturbances, power swings, oscillations, cascading disturbances and brown/black-outs could be mitigated and rendered innocuous; thereby improving power quality and reliability. Additionally, construction of new transmission lines needed for increased capacity could be delayed or perhaps avoided (with significant savings) by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin of the existing lines. Two crucial technical aspects were required; first, a large, powerful, dynamic, economic and reliable superconducting magnet, capable of oscillating power flow was needed; and second, an electrical power interface and control to a transmission line for testing, demonstrating and verifying the benefits and features of the SMES system was needed. A project was formed with the goals of commercializing the technology by demonstrating SMES technology for utility applications and to establish a domestic capability for manufacturing large superconducting magnets for both commercial and defense applications. The magnet had very low AC losses to support the dynamic and oscillating nature of the stabilizing power flow. Moreover, to economically interface to the transmission line, the magnet had the largest operating voltage ever made. The manufacturing of that design was achieved by establishing a factory with newly designed and acquired equipment, tooling, methods and skilled personnel. The final magnet system measured 14 feet in diameter, 10 feet in height, and weighed about 35 tons. The superconducting magnet and design technology was successfully implemented and demonstrated. The project was not successfully concluded however; as the critical planned final demonstration was not achieved. The utilities could not understand or clarify their future business needs and the regulatory requirements, because of the deregulation policies and practices of the country. Much uncertainty existed which prevented utilities from defining business plans, including asset allocation and cost recovery. Despite the technical successes and achievements, the commercial development could not be implemented and achieved. Thus, the demonstration of this enhancement to the utilitys transmission system and to the reliability of the nations electrical grid was not achieved. The factory was ultimately discontinued and the technology, equipment and product were placed in storage.

CHARLES M. WEBER

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Survey and screening of intermediate-size photovoltaic total energy and electric applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the principal objectives of this photovoltaic mission analysis effort has been to identify and evaluate applications for photovoltaic solar energy conversion that could lead to significant contributions to the national energy supply and that would provide attractive opportunities for application experiments aimed at stimulating the adoption of photovoltaic technology. The scope of the study has included applications both for electric-only photovoltaic (PV) systems and for photovoltaic total energy systems (PTES), i.e., systems that provide both photovoltaic electricity and solar thermal energy to meet all or part of the energy demand at a single load point or a group of related load points. In either case, both flat-plate and concentrating systems have been considered and it has been assumed that the thermal energy is collected in and transported by the fluid used in an active cooling system for the photovoltaic cells. Because the efficiency of photovoltaic devices decreases rapidly with increasing temperature and because the operational lifetime of such devices is reduced by prolonged operation at elevated temperatures, a practical upper limit of about 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) was assumed for the temperature at which arrays can be allowed to be operated. This limitation, in turn, places an upper bound on the temperature at which solar thermal energy is available in PTES applications. An initial screening aimed at identifying the most promising applications has therefore been required, with the expectation that detailed evaluation will be made of only the higher-ranking candidates. A description of the screening procedure that was adopted and a discussion of the results are presented.

Rattin, E.J.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

52

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

53

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative-condenser size on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A special study was conducted to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 30/sup 0/F in order to achieve the lowest cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

The Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials with Coatings (IN-07-070) Anodes for advanced batteries from a readily-available ...

55

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

VERDE: Visualizing Energy Resources Dynamically on Earth. Return to Marketing Summary. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site ...

56

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

A seismic line from Ai Pim Western Siberia oil field was used to image two different types of oil-saturated reservoirs.

57

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

New Ionic Liquids with Diverse Properties. Return to Marketing Summary. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. ...

58

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Nanowire Solar Energy Harvesting. Return to Marketing Summary. Dense array of SiGe alloy nanowires. Skip footer navigation to end of page.

59

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Innovation Portal. Home SRNL Marketing Summaries Talon Heavy Hoist and Safety Latch. Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. About; Search ...

60

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Nano Structure Control and Selectivity of Hydrogen Release from Hydrogen Storage . Return to Marketing Summary.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

New Argonne-Developed Catalyst Can Reduce NOx Emissions From Diesel Engines by 8085%. ... Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov

62

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

End-to-End Supply Chain Tracking. Return to Marketing Summary. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov

63

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Lyotropic Liquid Crystal (LLC) Nanofiltration Membranes Applications in biofuels and bio-process mixture separations

64

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Trojan Horse Project Biorefinery in a Plant. Return to Marketing Summary. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of ...

65

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

... (above/below ground and either side of ductwork that delivers heating, ventilation and air conditioning in buildings) are applications. ...

66

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels; Wind ...

67

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels; Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent ...

68

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Building Energy Efficiency; ... Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Return to Marketing Summary. Sandia's National Solar Thermal Test Facility

69

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass Gasification processes can be very large scale. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov

70

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Aluminum-Based Catalysts for Low-Cost, High-Yield Biomass-to-Biofuel-Intermediate or Feedstock Chemical Catalyst

71

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

A schematic of an upgraded vanadium redox batter shows how using both hydrochloric and sulfuric acids in the electrolyte significantly improves the ...

72

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

This figure shows the high-rate performance of the new class of cathode materials featuring bi-layered structures. The highest current rate of 1500 ...

73

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Batch oxidation of 3 wt% HMF at 60C and 150 psi O2 in neutral solution over 9%Pt/C Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site ...

74

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Water heaters can be retrofitted to incorporate the Water Heater Controller with the Grid Friendly Appliance chip to provide control over the appliance to meet price ...

75

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

This schematic of the magneto-optic detection system illustrates a magnetic nanoparticle stimulated by external time-varying magnetic fields. The dynamic magnetic ...

76

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building ... Simulation of an experimental engine with DOHC quasi-symmetric pent-roof combustion chamber and 4 valves. Skip footer ...

77

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Home PNNL Marketing Summaries Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Software. Site Map; Printable Version;

78

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

79

Full Hybrid: Overview  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button OVERVIEW Full hybrids use a gasoline engine as the primary source of power, and an electric motor provides additional power when needed. In addition, full hybrids can use the electric motor as the sole source of propulsion for low-speed, low-acceleration driving, such as in stop-and-go traffic or for backing up. This electric-only driving mode can further increase fuel efficiency under some driving conditions. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

80

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optimal Sizing of Energy Storage System in Solar Energy Electric Vehicle Using Genetic Algorithm and Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owing to sun's rays distributing randomly and discontinuously and load fluctuation, energy storage system is very important in Solar Energy Electric Vehicle (SEEV). The combinatorial optimization by genetic algorithm and neural network was used to optimize ... Keywords: battery flywheel, genetic algorithm, neural network

Shiqiong Zhou; Longyun Kang; Miaomiao Cheng; Binggang Cao

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Full Hybrid: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlighted Stop/Start button banner graphic: blue bar highlighted Stop/Start button banner graphic: blue bar subbanner graphic: gray bar Overview Button highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button OVERVIEW Full hybrids use a gasoline engine as the primary source of power, and an electric motor provides additional power when needed. In addition, full hybrids can use the electric motor as the sole source of propulsion for low-speed, low-acceleration driving, such as in stop-and-go traffic or for backing up. This electric-only driving mode can further increase fuel efficiency under some driving conditions. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

83

Variability of Battery Wear in Light Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles Subject to Ambient Temperature, Battery Size, and Consumer Usage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery wear in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is a complex function of ambient temperature, battery size, and disparate usage. Simulations capturing varying ambient temperature profiles, battery sizes, and driving patterns are of great value to battery and vehicle manufacturers. A predictive battery wear model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory captures the effects of multiple cycling and storage conditions in a representative lithium chemistry. The sensitivity of battery wear rates to ambient conditions, maximum allowable depth-of-discharge, and vehicle miles travelled is explored for two midsize vehicles: a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with a nominal range of 75 mi (121 km) and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with a nominal charge-depleting range of 40 mi (64 km). Driving distance distributions represent the variability of vehicle use, both vehicle-to-vehicle and day-to-day. Battery wear over an 8-year period was dominated by ambient conditions for the BEV with capacity fade ranging from 19% to 32% while the PHEV was most sensitive to maximum allowable depth-of-discharge with capacity fade ranging from 16% to 24%. The BEV and PHEV were comparable in terms of petroleum displacement potential after 8 years of service, due to the BEV?s limited utility for accomplishing long trips.

Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A. D.; Gonder, J.; Smith, K. A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Choosing wind power plant locations and sizes based on electric reliability measures using multiple-year wind speed measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To project the US potential to meet future electricity demands with wind energy, estimates of available wind resource and costs to access that resource are critical. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) annually estimates the US market penetration of wind in its Annual Energy Outlook series. For these estimates, the EIA uses wind resource data developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for each region of the country. However, the EIA multiplies the cost of windpower by several factors, some as large as 3, to account for resource quality, market factors associated with accessing the resource, electric grid impacts, and rapid growth in the wind industry. This paper examines the rationale behind these additional costs and suggests alternatives.

Milligan, M.R.; Artig, R.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Electrical Mobility Spectrometer Using a Diethylene Glycol Condensation Particle Counter for Measurement of Aerosol Size Distributions Down to 1 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a new scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) for measuring number size distributions of particles down to {approx}1 nm mobility diameter. This SMPS includes an aerosol charger, a TSI 3085 nano differential mobility analyzer (nanoDMA), an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid, and a conventional butanol CPC (the 'booster') to detect the small droplets leaving the DEG UCPC. The response of the DEG UCPC to negatively charged sodium chloride particles with mobility diameters ranging from 1-6 nm was measured. The sensitivity of the DEG UCPC to particle composition was also studied by comparing its response to positively charged 1.47 and 1.70 nm tetra-alkyl ammonium ions, sodium chloride, and silver particles. A high resolution differential mobility analyzer was used to generate the test particles. These results show that the response of this UCPC to sub-2 nm particles is sensitive to particle composition. The applicability of the new SMPS for atmospheric measurement was demonstrated during the Nucleation and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (NCCN) field campaign (Atlanta, Georgia, summer 2009). We operated the instrument at saturator and condenser temperatures that allowed the efficient detection of sodium chloride particles but not of air ions having the same mobility. We found that particles as small as 1 nm were detected during nucleation events but not at other times. Factors affecting size distribution measurements, including aerosol charging in the 1-10 nm size range, are discussed. For the charger used in this study, bipolar charging was found to be more effective for sub-2 nm particles than unipolar charging. No ion induced nucleation inside the charger was observed during the NCCN campaign.

Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; Attoui, M.; McMurry, P. H.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Full Hybrid: Starting  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

highlighted Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button highlighted Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button STARTING When a full hybrid vehicle is initially started, the battery typically powers all accessories. The gasoline engine only starts if the battery needs to be charged or the accessories require more power than available from the battery. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Battery (highlighted): The battery stores energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the electric motor. Since the battery powers the vehicle at low speeds, it is larger and holds much more energy than batteries used to start conventional vehicles. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection.

87

A Method to Determine the Optimal Tank Size for a Chilled Water Storage System Under a Time-of-Use Electricity Rate Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the downtown area of Austin, it is planned to build a new naturally stratified chilled water storage tank and share it among four separated chilled water plants. An underground piping system is to be established to connect these four plants together. This paper presents the method of determining the optimal tank size as well as corresponding optimal operating strategies for this project. Based on the analysis of the historical log data, utility rate structures, and equipment information, the baseline profiles of electricity fed to buildings, plant cooling load, and utility billing cost for each plant are generated. A simplified TES plus four plants model is built based on some assumptions. The results show that a 3.5 million gallon tank has the shortest payback time and the projected total capital cost is within the budget. The annual billing cost savings are $907,231 and the simple payback time is 12.5 years.

Zhang, Z.; Turner, W. D.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.; Deng, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Productivity and Firm Size Distribution: Evidence from India's Organized and Unorganized Manufacturing Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Size Distribution - Credit, Electricity, and Labor Reg-Change in Employment Size Distribution Electricity SurplusChange in Employment Size Distribution Electricity Surplus

Nataraj, Shanthi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Prospects for Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improved, neighborhood electric cars will likely be seen aseven general-purpose electric cars. They con- size orgasoline-like electric cars, they wilt undoubtedlybecome

Sperling, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Full Hybrid: Braking  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Braking button highlighted Stopped button Braking button highlighted Stopped button BRAKING PART 1 Regenerative braking converts otherwise wasted energy from braking into electricity and stores it in the battery. In regenerative braking, the electric motor is reversed so that, instead of using electricity to turn the wheels, the rotating wheels turn the motor and create electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the motor slows the vehicle down. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is decelerating. There are arrows flowing from the front wheels to the power split device to the electric motor to the battery. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is decelerating. There are arrows flowing from the front wheels to the power split device to the electric motor to the battery.

91

Full Hybrid: Low Speed  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

highlighted Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button highlighted Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button LOW SPEED For initial acceleration and slow-speed driving, as well as reverse, the electric motor uses electricity from the battery to power the vehicle. If the battery needs to be recharged, the generator starts the engine and converts energy from the engine into electricity, which is stored in the battery. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is moving at a low speed. There are arrows flowing from the battery to the electric motor to the power split device to the front wheels. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is moving at a low speed. There are arrows flowing from the battery to the electric motor to the power split device to the front wheels.

92

Stable hole doping of graphene for low electrical resistance and high optical transparency This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable hole doping of graphene for low electrical resistance and high optical transparency.1088/0957-4484/22/42/425701 Stable hole doping of graphene for low electrical resistance and high optical transparency S Tongay1 display high transmittance in the visible and near-infrared spectrum, preserving graphene's optical

Tanner, David B.

93

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Full Hybrid: Stopped  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Braking button Stopped button Braking button Stopped button STOPPED When the vehicle is stopped, such as at a red light, the gasoline engine and electric motor shut off automatically so that energy is not wasted in idling. All other systems, including the electric air conditioning, continue to run. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Battery (highlighted): The battery stores energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the electric motor. Since the battery powers the vehicle at low speeds, it is larger and holds much more energy than batteries used to start conventional vehicles. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection.

95

Full Hybrid: Cruising  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cruising button highlighted Passing button Braking button Stopped button Cruising button highlighted Passing button Braking button Stopped button CRUISING PART 1 At speeds above mid-range, both the engine and electric motor are used to propel the vehicle. The gasoline engine provides power to the drive-train directly and to the electric motor via the generator. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is moving. There are blue arrows flowing from the generator to the electric motor to the power split device to the front wheels. There are red arrows flowing from the gasoline engine to the generator to the power split device to the front wheels. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is moving. There are blue arrows flowing from the generator to the electric motor to the power split device to the front wheels. There are red arrows flowing from the gasoline engine to the generator to the power split device to the front wheels.

96

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

?nay, Devrim

97

Madrid Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Page 1 of 2 ELECTRIC LIGHTING QUALITY MAGIC BOX is a versatile home. Its design allows to change the room size by opening and closing the movable walls...

98

Full Hybrid: Passing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

highlighted Braking button Stopped button highlighted Braking button Stopped button PASSING PART 1 During heavy accelerating or when additional power is needed, the gasoline engine and electric motor are both used to propel the vehicle. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible while passing another vehicle. There are purple arrows flowing from the generator to the electric motor to the power split device to the front wheels. There are red arrows flowing from the gasoline engine to the generator to the power split device to the front wheels. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible while passing another vehicle. There are purple arrows flowing from the generator to the electric motor to the power split device to the front wheels. There are red arrows flowing from the gasoline engine to the generator to the power split device to the front wheels.

99

An innovation and policy agenda for commercially competitive plug-in hybrid electric vehicles This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on-peak charging uneconomical and off-peak charging very attractive. However, unless battery prices is smaller than the marginal vehicle costs, likely slowing PHEV market penetration in California. We also if PHEV adoption becomes mainstream. Keywords: plug-in, hybrid, electric vehicle, battery, charging

Kammen, Daniel M.

100

Size-dependent piezoelectricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a consistent theory is developed for size-dependent piezoelectricity in dielectric solids. This theory shows that electric polarization can be generated as the result of coupling to the mean curvature tensor, unlike previous flexoelectric theories that postulate such couplings with other forms of curvature and more general strain gradient terms ignoring the possible couple- stresses. The present formulation represents an extension of recent work that establishes a consistent size-dependent theory for solid mechanics. Here by including scale-dependent measures in the energy equation, the general expressions for force- and couple-stresses, as well as electric displacement, are obtained. Next, the constitutive relations, displacement formulations, the uniqueness theorem and the reciprocal theorem for the corresponding linear small deformation size-dependent piezoelectricity are developed. As with existing flexoelectric formulations, one finds that the piezoelectric effect can also exist in isotrop...

Hadjesfandiari, Ali R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Small- and Medium-Sized Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to essentially the same concept. As defined by the IAEA, a small reactor has an output electrical power of 300 MWe or less while a medium-sized reactor has an electrical power...

102

Size Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... An Explanation of the Power-Exponent in the Size Effect on Strength in ... in terms of the Taylor-type resistance in the dislocation network in the specimen. ... hysteresis and loss in pseudoelasticity with decrease in sample size.

103

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Buildings - Full Report Office Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS2003/PBA%20report/office%20report/office_pdf.html[9/24/2010 3:33:25 PM] Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a

104

Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebates & Savings Homes Vehicles Building Design Manufacturing National Security & Safety Energy Economy Funding Opportunities State & Local Government Science & Innovation...

105

Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation Solar Energy Center, President Obama announced the launch of the 3.4 billion Smart Grid Investment Grant program. In 2009, at the DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy...

106

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

107

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

108

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing (Batteries and Fuel Economies)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Hybrid Electric Vehicle Energy Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery and Fuel Economy Testing Donald Karner a , James Francfort b a Electric Transportation Applications 401 South 2nd Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85003, USA b Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Abstract The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), part of the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, has conducted testing of advanced technology vehicles since August, 1995 in support of the AVTA goal to provide benchmark data for technology modeling, and research and development programs. The AVTA has tested over 200 advanced technology vehicles including full size electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, and hydrogen internal combustion engine powered vehicles.

109

Management of electric vehicle battery charging in distribution networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigated the management of electric vehicle battery charging in distribution networks. Different electric vehicle fleet sizes and network locations were considered. The energy (more)

Grau, Iaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) ●

111

Power Full | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full Jump to: navigation, search Name Power Full Place China Sector Wind energy Product China-based investment holding company that owns 100% of Ruifeng Windpower. References Power...

112

Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government incentives or subsidies in the near future. Companies active in the electric automobile area There are no companies directly active in the electric automobile...

113

Electricity Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lines and bar graph Electricity Reliability The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) conducts research, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools,...

114

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 gm/mifor the mid-size electric car. All the emissions areemissions for the mid-size electric cars vary from about Isize. In the case of electric cars, the efficiency standard

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Science Accelerator : Main View : Search Results for Full Record...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search: Full Record: "electric vehicles" Did you mean ? Create new alert from this search New Search My Selections (0) Alerts Source Status Activity Indicator 0 top results from at...

116

The model electric restaurant  

SciTech Connect

Restaurants are the most intensive users of energy of all types of commercial buildings. As a result, they have some of the highest energy costs. New and existing restaurants are important customers to electric utilities. Many opportunities exist to use electricity to improve restaurant energy performance. This report discusses a project in which computer simulations were used to investigate restaurant energy subsystem performance and to assess the potential for electric equipment to reduce energy consumption, reduce peak demand improve load factors, and reduce energy cost in new all-electric restaurants. The project investigated typical restaurant designs for all-electric and gas/electric facilities and compared them to high efficiency electric options in all-electric restaurants. This analysis determined which investiments in high-efficiency electric equipment are attractive for restaurant operators. Improved equipment for food preparation, heating and cooling, ventilation, sanitation, and lighting subsystem was studied in cafeteria, full menu, fast food, and pizza restaurants in Atlanta, Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Phoenix. In addition to the actual rate structures, four synthetic rate structures were used to calculate energy costs, so that the results can be applied to other locations. The results indicate that high efficiency and improved all-electric equipment have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption, peak demand, and operating costs in almost all restaurants in all locations. The all-electric restaurants, with a combination of improved equipment, also offer the customer a competitive choice in fuels in most locations. 12 refs., 26 figs., 55 tabs.

Frey, D.J.; Oatman, P.A. (Architectural Energy Corp., Boulder, CO (USA)); Claar, C.N. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Quantities of Electricity Demand for AgriculturalLarge Size of the Market Electricity demand for agriculturalconstraints, and electricity demand in MH state to simulate

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

IBM Presentation Template Full Version  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10 IBM Corporation 10 IBM Corporation Smart Grid: Impacts on Electric Power Supply and Demand 2010 Energy Conference: Short-Term Stresses, Long-Term Change Michael Valocchi, Global Energy and Utilities Industry Leader, IBM Global Business Services April, 2010 © 2010 IBM Corporation 2 Discussion Topics The Business Model will Evolve The Consumer Value Model will Transform A New Energy Consumer will Emerge Customers Segmentation will be Done in a Different Manner Information and Data Sources will Change © 2010 IBM Corporation 3 The emerging value chain will allow consumers to have a different relationship with their energy providers © 2010 IBM Corporation 4 1. Smart, Connected Devices 2. Integrated Communication Networks 3. System Integration

119

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

120

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Adoption Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The imminent introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the automotive marketplace has the potential to dramatically affect electricity service providers. The vehicles will require infrastructure that facilitates recharging, and the resulting electric load could have a combination of positive and negative effects on utility systems. To characterize the effects, it is necessary to forecast the size of the PEV fleet and its electricity consumption. The electricity use must be analyzed over long ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Micromachined electrical cauterizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micromachined electrical cauterizer. Microstructures are combined with microelectrodes for highly localized electro cauterization. Using boron etch stops and surface micromachining, microneedles with very smooth surfaces are made. Micromachining also allows for precision placement of electrodes by photolithography with micron sized gaps to allow for concentrated electric fields. A microcauterizer is fabricated by bulk etching silicon to form knife edges, then parallelly placed microelectrodes with gaps as small as 5 .mu.m are patterned and aligned adjacent the knife edges to provide homeostasis while cutting tissue. While most of the microelectrode lines are electrically insulated from the atmosphere by depositing and patterning silicon dioxide on the electric feedthrough portions, a window is opened in the silicon dioxide to expose the parallel microelectrode portion. This helps reduce power loss and assist in focusing the power locally for more efficient and safer procedures.

Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This consumer fact sheet provides an overview of battery power for residential solar electric systems, including sizing, estimating costs, purchasing, and performing maintenance.

Not Available

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

124

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

125

California Electric Energy Crisis - Electricity Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Information Available Formats; Status of Electric Industry Restructuring Activity in California: html: California State Electricity Profil ...

126

Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Subject Areas. Electrical ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Savings Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate...

128

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

129

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources for electric power generation. i. Plant size ii.SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation Systems NonelectricFLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

Byard D. Wood

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cat heart Size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heart Size Name: Iris Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: OR Country: USA Date: NA Question: Can you tell me the size of a cats heart? Replies: Iris A cat's heart is about the...

132

Cat heart Size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cat heart Size Name: Rebecca Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: What is the average size of a cat's heart? Replies: Hi Rebecca, That...

133

Hopper Job Size Charts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

charts shows the fraction of hours used on Hopper in each of 5 job-core-size bins. 2012 Usage by Job Size Chart 2011 . This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Hopper by jobs...

134

The revised National Electrical Code reg sign for new restaurants  

SciTech Connect

A recent change in the 1990 National Electrical Code{reg sign} now makes it possible for restaurant owners and other foodservice operators to save substantial amounts of money on the electrical systems for any new facilities they build. This report discusses the code change in detail, shows how to apply the new code change effectively, and provides detailed information on the code change process. This report is a user's guide which includes a user's manual, containing all technical details necessary for a full understanding of the new provision in Section 220-36 of the 1990 National Electrical Code{reg sign}. The manual can help utility representatives, food-service consultants, and others determine the size of the electric service entrance and the main electrical panel for a new restaurant. It can also be used to determine if additional electrical loads can be added to an existing restaurant's electric service. Only a calculator is needed to work with the manual. In addition, this report details a cost impact study undertaken by EPRI to estimate likely savings resulting from implementing the new code section. In this study, 60% of the cases averaged savings of $9300 per facility. The report also details steps leading to successful adoption of a code change and the supporting documentation presented in the code change process. 40 figs.

Hart, G.K. (Hart, McMurphy and Parks, Inc., Middleburg, VA (United States)); Claar, C.N. (State College, PA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Electric machine  

SciTech Connect

An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

Usage by Job Size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage by Job Usage by Job Size Table Usage by Job Size Table page loading animation Usage Query Interface System All Hopper Edison Carver Planck Matgen Franklin Hopper 1 Magellan Dirac Bassi Jacquard Seaborg User Account (Repo) Execution Queue All Debug Interactive Premium Regular Short Regular Long Regular Small Regular Medium Regular Big Regular Extra Big Killable Low Transfer IO Task Special System Serial Big Memory Westmere === Inactive === Magellan Serial Magellan Short Magellan Small Magellan Medium Magellan Big Magellan Long Regular 1 Regular 1 Long Regular 16 Regular 32 Regular 48 Full Config Seaborg Serial Batch 16 Batch 32 Batch 64 Submit Queue all interactive debug premium regular low DOE Office all ASCR BER BES FES HEP NP Summary for jobs that completed after Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 @ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 : 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

137

SHARP, a first step towards a full sized Jules Verne Launcher  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vital element for space exploration and utilization is the ability to affordably place large quantities of consumables and building material into low earth orbit. Calculations and supportive data indicate this can be done with a large hydrogen gas gun referred to as the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). We present a design for the JVL based upon the concept of side injecting preheated hydrogen along a long barrel. This dramatically reduces the peak pressures in the launcher as well as the pressures and g-loads at the vehicle. The JVL has the promise of reducing payload delivery costs to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to below $500/kg. The Super High Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a conventional two-stage hydrogen gas gun which is configured to launch 5 kg packages on suborbital trajectories. It is the first step towards the much larger Jules Verne system and will demonstrate several important features of the larger system. SHARP is currently in the middle of a series of tests aimed at its first milestone. This is to launch 5 kg at 4 km/sec horizontally. In its inclined configuration SHARP should launch vehicles to apogees in excess of 400 km and ranges in excess of 700 km.

Bertolini, L.R.; Hunter, J.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Powell, J.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Tidman, D.A. [GT-Devices, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Michigan/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan/Wind Resources/Full Version Michigan/Wind Resources/Full Version < Michigan‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Michigan Wind Resources MichiganMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

139

Texas/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas/Wind Resources/Full Version Texas/Wind Resources/Full Version < Texas‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Texas Wind Resources TexasMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

140

Wyoming/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming/Wind Resources/Full Version Wyoming/Wind Resources/Full Version < Wyoming‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Wyoming Wind Resources WyomingMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mississippi/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi/Wind Resources/Full Version Mississippi/Wind Resources/Full Version < Mississippi‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Mississippi Wind Resources MississippiMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

142

Washington/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington/Wind Resources/Full Version Washington/Wind Resources/Full Version < Washington‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Washington Wind Resources WashingtonMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

143

Vermont/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Wind Resources/Full Version Vermont/Wind Resources/Full Version < Vermont‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Vermont Wind Resources VermontMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

144

Missouri/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Wind Resources/Full Version Missouri/Wind Resources/Full Version < Missouri‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Missouri Wind Resources MissouriMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

145

Idaho/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho/Wind Resources/Full Version Idaho/Wind Resources/Full Version < Idaho‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Idaho Wind Resources IdahoMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

146

Louisiana/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Wind Resources/Full Version Louisiana/Wind Resources/Full Version < Louisiana‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Louisiana Wind Resources LouisianaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

147

Massachusetts/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Wind Resources/Full Version Massachusetts/Wind Resources/Full Version < Massachusetts‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Massachusetts Wind Resources MassachusettsMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

148

Connecticut/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Connecticut/Wind Resources/Full Version Connecticut/Wind Resources/Full Version < Connecticut‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Connecticut Wind Resources ConneticutMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

149

Tennessee/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee/Wind Resources/Full Version Tennessee/Wind Resources/Full Version < Tennessee‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Tennessee Wind Resources Tennessee.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

150

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources/Full Version Pennsylvania/Wind Resources/Full Version < Pennsylvania‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Pennsylvania Wind Resources PennsylvaniaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

151

Virginia/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia/Wind Resources/Full Version Virginia/Wind Resources/Full Version < Virginia‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Virginia Wind Resources VirginiaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

152

Kentucky/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Wind Resources/Full Version Kentucky/Wind Resources/Full Version < Kentucky‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Kentucky Wind Resources KentuckyMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

153

Utah/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah/Wind Resources/Full Version Utah/Wind Resources/Full Version < Utah‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Utah Wind Resources UtahMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

154

Hawaii/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Wind Resources/Full Version Hawaii/Wind Resources/Full Version < Hawaii‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Hawaii Wind Resources HawaiiMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

155

Georgia/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia/Wind Resources/Full Version Georgia/Wind Resources/Full Version < Georgia‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Georgia Wind Resources GeorgiaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

156

California/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California/Wind Resources/Full Version California/Wind Resources/Full Version < California‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF California Wind Resources CaliforniaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

157

Kansas/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Wind Resources/Full Version Kansas/Wind Resources/Full Version < Kansas‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Kansas Wind Resources KansasMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

158

Wisconsin/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin/Wind Resources/Full Version Wisconsin/Wind Resources/Full Version < Wisconsin‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Wisconsin Wind Resources WisconsinMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

159

Nebraska/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Wind Resources/Full Version Nebraska/Wind Resources/Full Version < Nebraska‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Nebraska Wind Resources NebraskaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

160

Oklahoma/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oklahoma/Wind Resources/Full Version Oklahoma/Wind Resources/Full Version < Oklahoma‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Oklahoma Wind Resources OklahomaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Maryland/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Wind Resources/Full Version Maryland/Wind Resources/Full Version < Maryland‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Maryland Wind Resources MarylandMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

162

Indiana/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indiana/Wind Resources/Full Version Indiana/Wind Resources/Full Version < Indiana‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Indiana Wind Resources IndianaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

163

Illinois/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois/Wind Resources/Full Version Illinois/Wind Resources/Full Version < Illinois‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Illinois Wind Resources IllinoisMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

164

Electric moped  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two electrically powered mopeds were designed and built. These vehicles offer single-person transportation which is convenient, quiet, low-cost, smooth, and pollution-free. The first moped has a 12 volt electrical system. The second has a 24 volt electrical system. They both have top speeds of about 20 miles per hour. They both use transistorized speed controls and deep-discharge, lead-acid batteries. These mopeds were put through a 750 mile test program. In this program, the 12 volt bike had an average range of nine miles. The 24 volt bike, with a smaller battery capacity, had an average range of six miles.

Ferschl, M.S.

1981-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

165

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

168

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

169

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

170

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

171

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

172

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

173

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

174

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

175

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

176

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

177

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

178

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

179

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

180

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

182

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

183

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

184

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

185

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

186

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

187

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

188

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

189

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

190

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

191

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

192

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

193

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

194

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

195

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

196

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

197

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

198

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

199

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

200

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

202

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

203

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

204

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

205

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

206

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

207

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

208

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

209

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

210

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

211

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

212

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

213

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

214

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

215

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

216

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

217

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

218

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

219

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

220

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

222

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

223

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

224

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

225

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

226

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

227

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

228

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

229

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

230

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

231

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

232

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

233

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

234

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

235

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

236

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

237

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

238

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

239

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

240

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

242

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

243

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

244

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

245

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

246

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

247

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

248

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

249

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

250

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

251

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

252

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Trade and Reliability; All Reports See all Electricity Reports State Electricity Profiles. ... Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010:

253

Alignment of fee Crystals due to Transient Electric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alignment of columnar ice crystals due to the electric field surrounding a moving charged object, such as an aircraft, is modeled. The model allows the conditions of charge, velocity, ambient electric field, and size and shape of crystal to ...

D. A. Burrows; J. L. Stith

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Storage Size Determination for Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the problem of determining the size of battery storage used in grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems. In our setting, electricity is generated from PV and is used to supply the demand from loads. Excess electricity generated from the PV can be stored in a battery to be used later on, and electricity must be purchased from the electric grid if the PV generation and battery discharging cannot meet the demand. The objective is to minimize the electricity purchase from the electric grid while at the same time choosing an appropriate battery size. More specifically, we want to find a unique critical value (denoted as $E_{max}^c$) of the battery size such that the cost of electricity purchase remains the same if the battery size is larger than or equal to $E_{max}^c$, and the cost is strictly larger if the battery size is smaller than $E_{max}^c$. We propose an upper bound on $E_{max}^c$, and show that the upper bound is achievable for certain scenarios. For the case with ideal PV generat...

Ru, Yu; Martinez, Sonia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Electricity 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 EIA announces the proposal of Form EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report Released: August 15, 2011 Background On August 11, 2011, a Federal Register Notice was published soliciting comments for the new EIA-111 survey form. The EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report will replace the OE-781R, Monthly Electricity Imports and Exports Report. The OE-781R has been suspended and will be terminated upon the approval of the EIA-111. The OE-781R administered from July 2010 through May 2011, proved complex and confusing for the repondents. As a result, the EIA-111 was developed to more effectively and efficiently collect more accurate and meaningful data. The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 requires that each Federal agency obtains approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before undertaking to collect information from ten or more persons, or continuing a collection for which the OMB approval and the OMB control number are about to expire. The approval process, which is popularly known as the "OMB clearance process," is extensive. It requires two Federal Register notices and a detailed application ("supporting statement") to OMB. The first Federal Register Notice was published on August 11, 2011. EIA is prepared to address the comments submitted by each individual.

256

Illinois Municipal Electric Agency - Electric Efficiency Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Agency - Electric Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Home...

257

The impact of electricity pricing schemes on storage adoption in Ontario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ontario electrical grid is sized to meet peak electricity load. If this worst-case load were reduced, the government and Ontario tax-payers could defer large infrastructural costs, reducing the cost of generation and electricity prices. Storage, ...

Tommy Carpenter; Sahil Singla; Parsiad Azimzadeh; S. Keshav

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

BARRIER SYSTEM FULL SCALE FIRE TESTING ADDRESSEES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All holders of operating licenses for nuclear power reactors, except those who have permanently ceased operations and have certified that fuel has been permanently removed from the reactor vessel, and fuel facilities licensees. PURPOSE The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing this information notice (IN) to inform addressees of the results of Hemyc electrical raceway fire barrier system (ERFBS) full-scale fire tests. The Hemyc ERFBS did not perform for one hour as designed because shrinkage of the Hemyc ERFBS occurred during the testing. It is expected that recipients will review the information for applicability to their facilities and consider actions as appropriate to avoid similar problems. However, suggestions contained in this information notice are not NRC requirements; therefore, no specific action or written response is required. BACKGROUND The Hemyc ERFBS, manufactured by Promatec, Inc., has been installed at nuclear power plants (NPPs) to protect circuits in accordance with regulatory requirements (Reference 1) and plant-specific commitments. As a result of fire protection inspections, unresolved items (URIs) were opened at some nuclear power stations due to questions raised regarding the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 2). The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) performed a review of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 3) and requested the NRCs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to perform confirmatory testing of this ERFBS. RES performed the testing at the Omega Point Laboratories in Elmendorf, Texas. DISCUSSION This information notice describes the results of the investigation of the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Attachment 1). The NRC performed two ASTM E 119 furnace tests on a number of cable raceway types that are protected by the Hemyc ERFBS (with and without air gaps) in accordance with the Hemyc ERFBS test plan (see ADAMS Accession No. ML043210141 for a preliminary version of the test plan). The test plan provides ML050890089 IN 2005-07

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Electrical aspects of rainout  

SciTech Connect

Rainout commonly denotes the aggregate of phenomena associated with precipitation scavenging of radioactivity from a cloud of nuclear debris that is within a natural rain cloud. (In contrast, the term, washout, is applicable when the nuclear cloud is below the rain cloud and the term, fallout, commonly denotes the direct gravitational settling of contaminated solid material from a nuclear cloud.) Nuclear debris aerosols may be scavenged within natural clouds by a variety of different physical processes which may involve diffusion, convection, impaction, nucleation, phoresis, turbulence, and/or electricity among others. Processes which involve electrical aspects are scrutinized for their susceptibility to the intimate presence of the radioactive-cloud environment. This particular choice of electrical processes is not accidental. Nearly all of the listed processes were examined earlier by Williams. His rough estimates suggested that electrical effects, and to a lesser extent turbulence, could enhance the scavenging of those submicron aerosols which reside in the size-range that bridges the minimum in the scavenging rate coefficient which is commonly called the Greenfield gap. This minimum in the scavenging-rate coefficient is created by the simultaneous reduction of scavenging via diffusion and the reduction of scavenging via inertial impaction. However, Williams omitted the specific influence of a radioactive environment. This report aims to remedy this omission.

Rosenkilde, C.E.

1981-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

The CO2 Abatement Potential of California's Mid-sized Commerical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities, and performance data of available technology in 2020,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Electrical Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering photo Electrical engineers at Sandia design and develop advanced instrumentation systems for in-flight weapons system evaluations and other applications. Sandia creates innovative, science-based, systems-engineering solutions to our nation's most challenging national security problems. Sandia electrical engineers are an integral part of multidisciplinary teams tasked with defining requirements, creating system designs, implementing design methodologies, building prototypes, ground-testing the systems, and supporting the full-up system tests. Electrical engineers participate in all aspects of the analysis, design, testing, and integration of complex systems. For example, Sandia electrical engineers are applying advanced miniaturization packaging techniques to

262

High-Resolution Measurement of Size Distributions of Asian Dust Using a Coulter Multisizer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Coulter Multisizer, which is based on the electrical sensing zone (ESZ) or the Coulter principle, was used to measure the size distribution of Asian dust. Coulter Multisizer analysis provides high-resolution size measurements of water-insoluble ...

Hiroshi Kobayashi; Kimio Arao; Toshiyuki Murayama; Kengo Iokibe; Ryuji Koga; Masataka Shiobara

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Optimization of Preprocessing and Densification of Sorghum Stover at Full-scale Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation costs can be a prohibitive step in bringing biomass to a preprocessing location or biofuel refinery. One alternative to transporting biomass in baled or loose format to a preprocessing location, is to utilize a mobile preprocessing system that can be relocated to various locations where biomass is stored, preprocess and densify the biomass, then ship it to the refinery as needed. The Idaho National Laboratory has a full scale 'Process Demonstration Unit' PDU which includes a stage 1 grinder, hammer mill, drier, pellet mill, and cooler with the associated conveyance system components. Testing at bench and pilot scale has been conducted to determine effects of moisture on preprocessing, crop varieties on preprocessing efficiency and product quality. The INLs PDU provides an opportunity to test the conclusions made at the bench and pilot scale on full industrial scale systems. Each component of the PDU is operated from a central operating station where data is collected to determine power consumption rates for each step in the process. The power for each electrical motor in the system is monitored from the control station to monitor for problems and determine optimal conditions for the system performance. The data can then be viewed to observe how changes in biomass input parameters (moisture and crop type for example), mechanical changes (screen size, biomass drying, pellet size, grinding speed, etc.,), or other variations effect the power consumption of the system. Sorgum in four foot round bales was tested in the system using a series of 6 different screen sizes including: 3/16 in., 1 in., 2 in., 3 in., 4 in., and 6 in. The effect on power consumption, product quality, and production rate were measured to determine optimal conditions.

Neal A. Yancey; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Craig C. Conner; Christopher T. Wright

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitating recovery from disruptions to energy supply. MajorElectricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization on the nation's energy delivery system Superconductors are important to meeting the nation's energy needs

265

Land animal sizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land animal sizes Name: tamar c Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Why are today's land mammals so much smaller than prehistoric mammals?...

266

Multimodal Raindrop Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The raindrop size distributions (DSDs) observed over a short span usually have an erratic shape, with several relative maxima. This multimodal structure is studied from disdrometer data acquired in tropical and midlatitude areas. It is shown that ...

Henri Sauvageot; Manlandon Koffi

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Raindrop Size Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews some of the published results relating to raindrop-size distributions and couples this with some of the authors' results in order to show that the mathematical description of the distribution can be divided into three ...

M. C. Hodson

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

size size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hydrometeor size The size of a hydrometeor, measured directly or derived from other measurements . Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer External Instruments CPOL : C-Band Polarimetric Radar Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters

269

Water Use in Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use is increasingly viewed as an important sustainability metric for electricity generation technologies. Most of the attention on the link between electricity generation and water use focuses on the water used in cooling thermoelectric power plants during operations. This is warranted given the size of these withdrawals; however, all electricity generation technologies, including those that do not rely on thermoelectric generation, use water throughout their life cycles. Each life cycle stage cont...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

270

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Building Size Smaller commercial buildings are much more numerous than larger commercial buildings, but comprise less total floorspace-the 1,001 to 5,000 square feet category includes more than half of total buildings, but just 11 percent of total floorspace. In contrast, just 5 percent of buildings are larger than 50,000 square feet, but they account for half of total floorspace. Lighting consumes 38 percent of total site electricity. Larger buildings consume relatively more electricity for lighting than smaller buildings. Nearly half (47%) of electricity is consumed by lighting in the largest buildings (larger than 500,000 square feet). In the smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet), one-fourth of electricity goes to lighting

271

Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV Source Department of Energy's Buildings Performance Database Date Released July 09th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Buildings Performance Database Dayton Electricity Gainesville Natural Gas open data Residential Data application/zip icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential csv files in a zip file (zip, 2.8 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential Building Characteristics data (csv, 1.4 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential data headers (csv, 5.8 KiB)

272

Reducing Leaking Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Reducing Leaking Electricity Figure 1. Full and standby power draws of some compact audio systems. A surprisingly large number of appliances-from computer peripherals to cable TV boxes to radios-consume electricity even after they have been switched off. Other appliances, such as cordless telephones, remote garage door openers, and battery chargers don't get switched off but draw power even when they are not performing their principal functions. The energy used while the appliance is switched off or not performing its primary purpose is called "standby consumption" or "leaking electricity." This consumption allows TVs, VCRs and garage-door openers to be ready for instant-on with a remote control, microwave ovens to display a digital

273

Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Minimum project size for the full $5,000 grant is 20 fixtures; smaller projects will receive a $250 per-fixture grant. Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Up to $5,000 Provider MidAmerican Energy Company MidAmerican Energy offers grants to munipalities which implement solid-state roadway street lighting upgrades. Grants of up to $5,000 are available to participating entities who install eligible roadway lighting fixtures. Participants must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of

275

Electricity Transmission, A Primer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the electric power system, 2) gives electricity customers flexibility to diversify the mix of fuels that produces their electricity by giving them access to power plants, 3)...

276

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

277

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities...

278

Designing Electricity Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. (2002) Why Did Electricity Prices Fall in England &Why Did British Electricity Prices Fall After 1998? ,The Fall in British Electricity Prices: Market Rules, Market

Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Retail Electricity Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets mimeo, MITCSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition * Paul Joskow andwww.ucei.org Retail Electricity Competition ? Paul Joskow

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market, Power WorkingFelder (1996), Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Designing Electricity Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market performance in electricity auctions, it appears thatMcSorely (2001) Regulating Electricity Markets: Experiencethe United Kingdom, The Electricity Journal, December, 81-

Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Superconductivity for electric power systems: Program overview  

SciTech Connect

Largely due to government and private industry partnerships, electric power applications based upon high-temperature superconductivity are now being designed and tested only seven years after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductors. These applications offer many benefits to the national electric system including: increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, reduced emissions, increased stability/reliability, deferred expansion, and flexible electricity dispatch/load management. All of these benefits have a common outcome: lower electricity costs and improved environmental quality. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors research and development through its Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. This program will help develop the technology needed for U.S. industries to commercialize high-temperature superconductive electric power applications. DOE envisions that by 2010 the U.S. electric power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Pore size estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method for characterization of any porous structure is presented. The principle of the method is simple scanning a plane surface of a cellular material and consequent digital image analysis of the scan. Eleven samples of bread baked from dough ... Keywords: foams, image analysis, modelling the structure, plane cut visualization, pore size distribution, voronoi tessellation

Tomas Matousek; Petr Ponizil; Filip Kremen; Iva Buresova; Petra Dvorakova

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric vehicle testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric Vehicle Testing (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Jim Francfort Discovery Center of Idaho - September 2005 INLCON-05-00693 HEV & EV Testing...

285

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Electricity, Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together diverse groups of experts...

286

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (New York) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as...

287

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, Robert (Dublin, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing  

SciTech Connect

The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

Burdick, A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Category:FullServiceRestaurant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FullServiceRestaurant FullServiceRestaurant Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Pages in category "FullServiceRestaurant" This category contains only the following page. O Openei test page Media in category "FullServiceRestaurant" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 66 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Baltimore MD Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 69 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 72 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Boulder CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png

293

Parametric electric motor study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology for the axial gap motor was developed by DOE with an investment of approximately $15 million. This development effort is for motor technologies of high power density and high efficiency. Such motors that are also small and light-weight are not available on the commercial market because high-power motors have typically been used in large industrial applications where small size and light weight are not requirements. AC Delco has been developing motors since 1918 and is interested in leveraging its research and development dollars to produce an array of motor systems for vehicles and to develop a future line of propulsion products. The DOE focus of the study was applied to machining applications. The most attractive feature of this motor is the axial air gap, which may make possible the removal of the motor`s stationary component from a total enclosure of the remainder of the machine if the power characteristics are adequate. The objectives of this project were to evaluate alternative electric drive systems for machine tools and automotive electric drive systems and to select a best machine type for each of those applications. A major challenge of this project was to produce a small, light-weight, highly efficient motor at a cost-effective price. The project developed machine and machine drive systems and design criteria for the range of applications. The final results included the creation of a baseline for developing electric vehicle powertrain system designs, conventional vehicle engine support system designs, and advanced machine tool configurations. In addition, an axial gap permanent magnet motor was built and tested, and gave, said one engineer involved, a sterling performance. This effort will commercialize advanced motor technology and extend knowledge and design capability in the most efficient electric machine design known today.

Adams, D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stahura, D. [GM-AC Delco Systems, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1995-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Garrett Electric Boosting Systems (EBS) Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-Turbo{trademark} designs do both The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-Turbo{trademark}, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-Turbo{trademark} can be used to generate modest amounts of electrical power and supplement the alternator under most load-speed conditions. It is shown that a single (large) e-Turbo{trademark} consumes slightly less electrical power for the same steady state torque shaping than a bi-Turbo configuration. However, the transient response of a bi-Turbo configuration is slightly better. It was shown that in order to make full use of additional capabilities of e-Turbo{trademark} wide compressor flow range is required. Variable geometry compressor (VGC) technology developed under a separate project was evaluated for incorporation into e-Turbo{trademark} designs. It was shown that the combination of these two technologies enables very high torque at low engine speeds. Designs and hardware combining VGC and e-Turbo{trademark} are to be developed in a future project. There is concern about high power demands (even though momentary) of e-Turbo{trademark}. Reducing the inertia of the turbocharger can reduce power demand and increase battery life. Low inertia turbocharger technology called IBT developed under a separate project was evaluated for synergy with e-Turbo{trademark} designs. It was concluded that inertial reduction provided by IBT is very beneficial for e-Turbo{trademark}. Designs and hardware combining IBT and e-Turbo{trademark} are to be developed in a future project. e-Turbo{trademark} provides several additional flexibilities including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for emissions reduction with minimum fuel economy penalty and exhaust temperature control for aftertreatment. In integrated multi-parameter control system is needed to realize the full potential of e-Turbo{trademark} performance. Honeywell expertise in process control systems involving hundreds of sensors and actuators was applied to demonstrate the potential benefits of multi-parameter, model based control systems.

Steve Arnold; Craig Balis; Pierre Barthelet; Etienne Poix; Tariq Samad; Greg Hampson; S. M. Shahed

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

296

Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

297

Electric Resistance Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to...

298

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of an electric bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage...

299

Florida/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Florida/Wind Resources/Full Version < Florida‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Florida Wind Resources FloridaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the

300

Oregon/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Oregon/Wind Resources/Full Version < Oregon‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Oregon Wind Resources OregonMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Maine/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Maine/Wind Resources/Full Version < Maine‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Maine Wind Resources MaineMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the

302

Nevada/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nevada/Wind Resources/Full Version < Nevada‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Nevada Wind Resources NevadaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the

303

Arkansas/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Arkansas/Wind Resources/Full Version < Arkansas‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Arkansas Wind Resources ArkansasMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the

304

Alabama/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Alabama/Wind Resources/Full Version < Alabama‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Alabama Wind Resources AlabamaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the

305

Delaware/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Delaware/Wind Resources/Full Version < Delaware‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Delaware Wind Resources DelawareMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the

306

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

307

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity;

308

Suppressant: Electric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Suppressant:Electric Fields. Fire Extinguishment of Pool Flames by Means of a DC electric Field.. ...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test. Description/Summary: ... Details. Type of software: Virtual concrete electrical conductivity test. Authors: ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

Electric Power Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid Our country's way of life depends on the electric power distribution system. ...

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

312

Electrical Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by the Office of Health, Safety and Security and is available to all DOE components and their contractors. 2. Specific comments (recommendations, additions, deletions, and any pertinent data) to enhance this document should be sent to: Patrick Tran

313

Full-duplex underwater networking using CDMA .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Establishing a full-duplex underwater network, researching and applying a CDMA protocol to this network, providing a recommendation for a full-duplex underwater network and providing recommendations (more)

Bektas, Kurtulus

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The SSC Full Cell Prototype String Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power testing of a string of 50 mm aperture dipoleThe SSC Full Cell Prototype String Test A.D. McInturff, P.The SSC Full Cell Prototype String Test P. Kraushaar, W.

McInturff, A.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEVs. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEVs. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

Jeffrey R. Belt

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEVs. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

Jeffrey R. Belt

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

319

Afghanistan Geospatial Toolkit - Full Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full Data Full Data Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): This Geospatial Toolkit contains the full (with high resolution data) version of the GsT interfaced to HOMER for Afghanistan. (Purpose): The products contained on this web site were developed by the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) South Asia Regional Initiative for Energy Cooperation (SARI/E). (Supplemental Information): The GsT allows the user to examine the resource data in a geospatial context along with other key information relevant to renewable energy development, such as transportation networks, transmission corridors, existing power facilities, load centers, terrain conditions, and land use. Working within the GsT, the user can also incorporate location-specific data directly into NREL's Micropower Optimization Model, HOMER, to design least-cost hybrid renewable power systems to meet electric-load requirements at the village level.

320

Pakistan Geospatial Toolkit - Full Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full Data Full Data Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): This Geospatial Toolkit contains the full (with high resolution data) version of the GsT interfaced to HOMER for Pakistan. (Purpose): The products contained on this web site were developed by the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) South Asia Regional Initiative for Energy Cooperation (SARI/E). (Supplemental Information): The GsT allows the user to examine the resource data in a geospatial context along with other key information relevant to renewable energy development, such as transportation networks, transmission corridors, existing power facilities, load centers, terrain conditions, and land use. Working within the GsT, the user can also incorporate location-specific data directly into NREL's Micropower Optimization Model, HOMER, to design least-cost hybrid renewable power systems to meet electric-load requirements at the village level.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

322

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data for 2010 | Release Date: January 30, 2012 | Next Release: September 2013 | full report. Archived State Electricity Profiles. Choose a ...

323

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

size styles) 5. Compressed natural gas, ranges 80 or 120,Hybrid electric: Compressed natural gas: Reformulatedof electric, compressed natural gas and methanol fueled

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Capacity Capacity Conductor Characteristics Data Year Country NERC Region NERC Sub- region Type Operating (kV) Design (kV) Rating (MVa) Month Year From Terminal To Terminal Length (Miles) Type Pole Type Pole Material Size (MCM) Material Bundling Arrange- ment Present Ultimate Company Code Company Name Organizational Type Ownership (Percent) Project Name Level of Certainty Primary Driver 1 Primary Driver 2 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 300-399 5 2018 DeCordova Benbrook 27 OH 44372 Delivery 100 00TPIT0004 Conceptual Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 300-399 5 2018 Loma Alta Substation Rio Hondo Substation 35 OH 2409 BPUB 100 00TPITno07 Conceptual Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 121-150 6 2014 Highway 32 Wimberley 4 OH 14626 PEC 100 05TPIT0065 Planned Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 121-150 5 2018 Ennis Switch Ennis 6.32 OH 44372 Oncor Electric Delivery 100

325

Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 76. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic Table 3. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 4. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 5. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 6. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 7. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central Table 8. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain Table 9. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Pacific Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity

326

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

327

bioinformatics.bts429.full.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: Pseudocode Description of the MetaProdigal Algorithm As a result of running a full dynamic programming algorithm multiple times, which admittedly is complete overkill on...

328

Pantex Emergency Management Full Participatin Exercise, October...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Pantex Emergency Management Full...

329

Real-time power management of parallel full hybrid electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lastly, the fuel saving capability of the HEV through intelligent driving was investigated. The intelligent vehicle velocity modification algorithm proposed by Manzie et al. is (more)

Adhikari, Sunil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Combined-Cycle Power Generation System. NREL. http://extensively for electric power generation, and for dieselextensively for electric power generation, and for diesel

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

4, 277316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 277­316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas balance of abandoned peat meadow D. M. D. Hendriks et al greenhouse gas balance of an abandoned peat meadow D. M. D. Hendriks, J. van Huissteden, A. J. Dolman, and M (dimmie.hendriks@falw.vu.nl) 277 #12;BGD 4, 277­316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas balance of abandoned peat

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Microsoft Word - SSL Roadmap Full_092302.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emitting Diodes (LEDs) for Emitting Diodes (LEDs) for General Illumination A A N N O O I I D D A A T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G Y Y R R O O A A D D M M A A P P U U P P D D A A T T E E 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 Including Tutorial Source Material October 2002 Sponsored by: Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA) National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Department of Energy - Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs Edited by: Jeff Y. Tsao, Sandia National Laboratories Published by: OIDA Member Use Only  OIDA Copyright 2002 Optoelectronics Industry Development Association All data contained in this report is proprietary to OIDA and may not be distributed in either original or reproduced form to anyone outside the client's internal organization without prior written permission of the Optoelectronics

333

2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Atlanta Workshop |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Atlanta 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Atlanta Workshop 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Atlanta Workshop On July 29, 2008, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Atlanta, GA to receive input and suggestions concerning the 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The agenda and full transcript are available below. 7-29-08 Congestion Workshop Agenda - Atlanta, GA.pdf Transcript - 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Atlanta Workshop.pdf More Documents & Publications 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - San Francisco Workshop 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - St. Louis Workshop 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Las Vegas Workshop

334

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Full- Scale Testing of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control in Wet FGD Full-Scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control in Wet FGD The goal of this project is to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The two specific objectives of this project are 1) ninety percent (90%) total mercury removal and 2) costs below 1/4 to 1/2 of today's commercially available activated carbon mercury removal technologies. Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc's (B&W/MTI's) will demonstrate their wet scrubbing mercury removal technology (which uses very small amounts of a liquid reagent to achieve increased mercury removal) at two locations burning high-sulfur Ohio bituminous coal: 1) Michigan South Central Power Agency's (MSCPA) 55 MWe Endicott Station located in Litchfield, Michigan and 2) Cinergy's 1300 MWe Zimmer Station located near Cincinnati, Ohio.

335

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS%20analysis/CBECS%20lighting/lighting_pdf.html[4/28/2009 9:20:44 AM] Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the

336

Electrical Quantities Programs/Projects in Quantum Electrical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical Quantities Programs/Projects in Quantum Electrical Metrology. Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid. Contact. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

337

Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electrical Safety" (DOE )-HDBK-1092-2004 Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, "Labor" , Chapter 17

Wechsler, Risa H.

338

Living with Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Living with Electric Vehicles Living with Electric Vehicles JOHN DAVIS: On any given weekend, somewhere you'll find a gathering of cars and a group of enthusiasts assembled around them. Be the hotrods classics or sports cars, each genre of the car's evolution has developed loyal following. And electric cars are no exception. The recent National Plug-in day included events held at hundreds of sites across the U.S. enticing EV aficionados to check out the latest models and share their passion for gas-free motoring. JOHN BARRACCA: The dealer gives you 9.3 gallons. I haven't used all of that yet. But, when I get 3 gallons low, I put 3 gallons in. So, I'm still at almost a full tank. The last time I put 3 gallons in was February and this is September 23rd. JOHN DAVIS: All of the owners we talked with were pleased with their plug-in car's fuel

339

Electricity in the Body  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity in the Body Name: SEAN Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: OUR BRAINS SEND ELECTRICAL IMPULSES RIGHT. IS IT BASICALLY SAME AS NORMAL ELECTRICITY? IS IT LIKE...

340

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Electric Power Industry - U.S. Electricity Imports from and Electricity Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2001-2011 (Megawatthours) Canada Mexico U.S. Total Year Imports from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Retail Electricity Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the savings in their electricity bill. While these consumerssavings in their electricity bill. A potential argumentsurplus S(s) minus the electricity bill: E j [S(s) ? p j D

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Matter & Energy Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Also: Matter & Energy Electricity Energy Technology Computers & Math Distributed Computing Computer Science Science & Society Energy Issues Environmental Policies Reference Electric power transmission Distributed generation Electric power Grid computing ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2010) -- A new study

Hines, Paul

343

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The...

344

Electrical safety guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

DOE handbook electrical safety  

SciTech Connect

Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Battery availability for near-term (1998) electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Battery Requirements were determined for a wide spectrum of electric vehicles ranging from 2-passenger sports cars and microvans to full-size vans with a payload of 500 kg. All the vehicles utilize ac, high voltage (340--360 V) powertrains and have acceleration performance (0--80 km/h in less than 15 seconds) expected to be the norm in 1988 electric vehicles. Battery packs were configured for each of the vehicles using families of sealed lead-acid and nickel-cadmium modules which are either presently available in limited quantities or are being developed by battery companies which market a similar battery technology. It was found that the battery families available encompass the Ah cell sizes required for the various vehicles and that they could be packaged in the space available in each vehicle. The acceleration performance and range of the vehicles were calculated using the SIMPLEV simulation program. The results showed that all the vehicles had the required acceleration characteristics and ranges between 80--160 km (50--100 miles) with the ranges using nickel-cadmium batteries being 40--60% greater than those using lead-acid batteries. Significant changes in the design of electric vehicles over the last fifteen years are noted. These changes make the design of the batteries more difficult by increasing the peak power density required from about 60 W/kg to 100--150 W/kg and by reducing the Ah cell size needed from about 150 Ah to 30--70 Ah. Both of these changes in battery specifications increase the difficulty of achieving low $/kWh cost and long cycle life. This true for both lead-acid and nickel-cadmium batteries. 25 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

Burke, A.F.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Dog's Heart Size and Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dog's Heart Size and Activity Name: Addie Status: Student Grade: 4-5 Location: IN Country: USA Date: Winter 2009-2010 Question: Does the size of a dog affect it's heart rate before...

348

Sustainable Electricity | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Electricity SHARE Sustainable Electricity Outdoor power line accelerated testing. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program...

349

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Net Generation from Wind by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent...

350

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors)...

351

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy....

352

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

354

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 8, 2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study...

355

Electric:SpaceCharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Electric:SpaceCharge. Prev, 6.4.1. Material Properties, Next. Name. Electric:SpaceCharge Spatial charge density. Details. ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3:30 - 3:40 pm Welcome and Opening Comments Kevin Kolevar, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Linda Stuntz, Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee...

357

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 3.19. Net Generation from Geothermal by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric...

358

California's electricity crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Electricity Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

CorrectionUpdate November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas...

360

EIA Energy Kids - Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The energy sources we use to make electricity can be renewable or non-renewable, but electricity itself is neither renewable nor non-renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electrical Safety Committee Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

safety and electrical safety awareness within the APS. The committee shall implement policies and practices adopted by the ANL Electrical Safety Committee and shall assist the ANL...

362

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is 4-wheeled vehicle, larger than a golf cart but smaller than most light-duty passenger vehicles. NEVs are...

363

Electricity market module: Electricity fuel dispatch submodule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO), international electricity trade was represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Electricity Market Module (EMM) modeling framework as an exogenous input. The exception to this exogenous treatment was for firm power projections, i.e., new Canadian hydroelectric model builds. The AEO95 implementation of EMM allowed Canadian hydroelectric projects to be selected in the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) submodule on an annual basis and otherwise addressed as any other purchased power commitments. This technical memorandum addresses modifications to the Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule implemented in AEO96 to enhance the treatment of international electricity trade through the representation of economy imports from Canada.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Full Circle Developments Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full Circle Developments Inc Full Circle Developments Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Full Circle Developments Inc Place Plymouth, Michigan Zip 48170 Sector Renewable Energy Product Private Michigan-based clean energy project developer, with focus on brownfield site biofuel projects that are powered by renewable energy. Coordinates 43.75681°, -87.984809° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.75681,"lon":-87.984809,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY Size and Expectations for Growth Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy

366

Automated size analysis for OCL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An essential tool in object oriented modeling is the specification of cardinalities of associations between classes. In Object Constraint Language (OCL) such constraints are expressed as conditions on the sizes of the collections that correspond to associations. ... Keywords: OCL, size abstraction, size analysis

Fang Yu; Tevfik Bultan; Erik Peterson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electricity Restructuring: Deregulation or Reregulation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power in the British Electricity Spot Market. American805. Catherine Wolfram. Electricity Markets: Should thePower in Wholesale Electricity Markets. The Electricity

Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, James

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energy Basics: Electric Resistance Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance...

369

Full abstraction for nominal Scott domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a domain theory within nominal sets and present programming language constructs and results that can be gained from this approach. The development is based on the concept of orbit-finite subset, that is, a subset of a nominal sets that is ... Keywords: denotational semantics, domain theory, full abstraction, nominal sets, symmetry

Steffen Lsch; Andrew M. Pitts

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Prepaid Services Full-time students receive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a medical provider · Unlimited nutritional consultations with RD #12;Prepaid Services · Health education for student only #12;PUSH Services Allergy and Immunizations Laboratory Radiology Physical Therapy Sports#12;Prepaid Services Full-time students receive: · Unlimited visits to medical clinic to consult

Holland, Jeffrey

371

Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion in Full Bloom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion in Full Bloom James W. Hagadorn T he middle cambrian burgess shale is one of the world's best-known and best-studied fossil deposits. The story of the discovery in the Burgess Shale Formation of the Canadian Rockies, Charles Walcott discovered a remarkable "phyl- lopod

Hagadorn, Whitey

372

Electrical Safety - Monthly Analyses of Electrical Safety Occurrences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Analysis Office of Analysis Operating Experience Committee Safety Alerts Safety Bulletins Annual Reports Special Operations Reports Safety Advisories Special Reports Causal Analysis Reviews Contact Us HSS Logo Electrical Safety Monthly Analyses of Electrical Safety Occurrences 2013 September 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences August 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences July 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences June 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences May 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences April 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences March Electrical Safety Occurrence February Electrical Safety Occurrence January Electrical Safety Occurrence 2012 December Electrical Safety Occurrence November Electrical Safety Occurrence October Electrical Safety Occurrence September Electrical Safety Occurrence

373

Property:Full-Scale Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full-Scale Test Full-Scale Test Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Full-Scale Test Property Type Text Pages using the property "Full-Scale Test" Showing 13 pages using this property. M MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + The AN150 system was connected to the SPAusNet Victorian electricity grid exporting renewable power for from 2008 to 2012 Atlantis received power sales revenue and RECs Renewable Energy Certificates during this period of operation MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + Atlantis connect its 1MW AR1000 tidal turbine to the grid at the European Marine Energy Centre EMEC in Orkney Scotland on Thursday the 11th August 2011 Atlantis Resources Corporation will continue its AR1000 tidal turbine testing programme at the National Renewable Energy Centre Narec in Blyth Northumberland The company s AR1000 nacelle was retrieved from its test berth at the European Marine Energy Centre EMEC in Orkney in late November following successful open ocean testing It will be transported to Blyth for preparation ahead of the spring opening of Narec s 3MW capacity turbine drive train testing facility The independent onshore facility has been developed to de risk in field activities conducting reliability and performance appraisals of new devices and system components through accelerated lifetime testing

374

e00053-12.full.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10.1128/mBio.00053-12. 10.1128/mBio.00053-12. 3(2): . mBio . Temperature-Dependent Product Formation Engineering a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon for 2012. Mirko Basen, Junsong Sun and Michael W. W. Adams Product Formation Archaeon for Temperature-Dependent Engineering a Hyperthermophilic http://mbio.asm.org/content/3/2/e00053-12.full.html Updated information and services can be found at: REFERENCES http://mbio.asm.org/content/3/2/e00053-12.full.html#ref-list-1 This article cites 28 articles, 13 of which can be accessed free at: CONTENT ALERTS more>> article), Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new articles cite this http://journals.asm.org/subscriptions/ To subscribe to another ASM Journal go to: http://mbio.asm.org/misc/contentdelivery.xhtml Information about Print on Demand and other content delivery options:

375

The Full Cost of Intercity Highway Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction There has been a great deal of recent interest in identifying and measuring the full costs of transportation, particularly highways (see for instance: Keeler et al. 1974, Fuller et al. 1983, Quinet 1990, Mackenzie et al. 1992, INRETS 1993, Miller and Moffet 1993, IWW/INFRAS 1995, IBI 1995, Levinson et al. 1996, Delucchi 1996). This debate questions whether various modes of transportation are implicitly subsidized and to what extent this biases investment and usage decisions. While environmental impacts are used to stop new infrastructure, the full costs to society of transportation are not generally calculated for financing projects or charging for their use. In this paper we review the theoretical and empirical literature on the cost structure of the provision of intercity highway transportation and specify and estimate our own cost functions . In defining this framework we distinguish between internal (private) and external (social) costs, long and short run cos

David Gillen; David Levinson; David M. Levinson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Full Nexus between Newtonian and Relativistic Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A full nexus between Newtonian and relativistic mechanics is set. Contrarily to what is commonly thought, Newtonian mechanics can be amended to suit all speeds up to c. It is demonstrated that when introducing the fact that the pulse of oscillators, i.e. emitters and clocks, is sensitive to speed, the Newtonian framework can be extended to all speeds. For this aim, it is formulated the concept of actor scenario vs. observer scenario. This differentiation is essential to avoid confusion between effective reality (actor scenario) and appearance (observer scenario). Measurements are subjected to kinematical aberrations, the observer scenario being inertial. These must be removed to attain intrinsic reality, i.e. that of actors. The lack of demarcation between the two scenarios leads to conceptual confusions. The amended Newtonian mechanics is of full application. Here, it has been mainly applied to the Newtonian Doppler effect, amended to suit all speeds.

G. Sardin

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Electric car Gasoline car  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENAC/ Electric car (Renault) Gasoline car (competitors) Gasoline car (Renault) Market shares of an electric vehicle? Electric car (Renault) Gasoline car (competitors) Gasoline car (Renault) Market shares preferences. · Identification of population segments with a strong interest for electric cars. · Forecasting

378

Approximating game-theoretic optimal strategies for full-scale poker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computation of the first complete approximations of game-theoretic optimal strategies for full-scale poker is addressed. Several abstraction techniques are combined to represent the game of 2-player Texas Hold'em, having size O(1018), ...

D. Billings; N. Burch; A. Davidson; R. Holte; J. Schaeffer; T. Schauenberg; D. Szafron

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

380

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

382

Electric vehicle design, racing and distance to empty algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research began with the goal of designing and building an electric motorcycle to compete in the Isle of Man TT Zero race. A set of parametric physics-based models was derived to size the batteries and motors, predict ...

Rodgers, Lennon Patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

Custom Reporting: Full List of Available Information and Metrics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Custom Reporting: Custom Reporting: Full List of Available Information and Metrics Cost Performance Metrics Units Energy Cost Dollars Energy Cost Intensity Dollars National Median Energy Cost Dollars Total Water Cost (All Water Types) Dollars Indoor Water Cost (All Water Types) Dollars Indoor Water Cost Intensity (All Water Types) Dollars/ft2 Outdoor Water Cost (All Water Types) Dollars Investment in Energy Projects, Cumulatve Dollars Investment in Energy Projects, Cumulatve Dollars/ft2 Water/Wastewater Investment in Energy Projects, Cumulative Dollars/GPD Estimated Savings from Energy Projects, Cumulative Dollars Estimated Savings from Energy Projects, Cumulative Dollars/ft2 Water/Wastewater Estimated Savings from Energy Projects, Cumulative Dollars/GPD Electricity (Grid Purchase) Cost Dollars

385

Full Counting Statistics of Photons Emitted by Double Quantum Dot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the full counting statistics of photons emitted by a double quantum dot (DQD) coupled to a high-quality microwave resonator by electric dipole interaction. We show that at the resonant condition between the energy splitting of the DQD and the photon energy in the resonator, photon statistics exhibits both a sub-Poissonian distribution and antibunching. In the ideal case, when the system decoherence stems only from photodetection, the photon noise is reduced below one-half of the noise for the Poisson distribution and is consistent with current noise. The photon distribution remains sub-Poissonian even at moderate decoherence in the DQD. We demonstrate that Josephson junction based photomultipliers can be used to experimentally assess statistics of emitted photons.

Canran Xu; Maxim G. Vavilov

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios 2009/11/30­12/01 István Maros Electricity Portfolio #12;Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Outline 1 Introduction 2 Computational Efficiency 3 Electricity Portfolio Approximate

387

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

electric customers who upgrade heating, cooling or ventilation systems with specific types of energy efficient equipment. These rebates include efficient central air...

388

Theoretical Prediction of Ion Clusters Relevant to the Atmosphere: Size and Mobility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clustering of water vapor about ions is important because of its relevance to atmospheric electrical processes. For this reason we have placed our emphasis particularly on the description of the size distribution (concentrations) and ...

S. H. Suck; J. L. Kassner Jr.; R. E. Thurman; P. C. Yue; R. A. Anderson

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Full Circle Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Full Circle Fuels Place Oberlin, Ohio Zip 44074 Sector Biofuels Product Alternative fuels center dedicated to increasing awareness and use of biofuels in northeast Ohio. Coordinates 41.292925°, -82.217354° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.292925,"lon":-82.217354,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

Chromo-Electric flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profiles of the chromo-electric field generated by static quark-antiquark, $Q{\\bar Q}$ and three-quark, $QQQ$ sources are calculated in Coulomb gauge. Using a variational ansatz for the ground state, we show that a flux tube-like structure emerges and combines to the ``Y''-shape field profile for three static quarks. The properties of the chromo-electric field are, however, not expected to be the same as those of the full action density or the Wilson line and the differences are discussed.

Patrick O. Bowman; Adam P. Szczepaniak

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

392

Electric arc saw apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

Deichelbohrer, Paul R. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's electricity integration research is conducted in state-of-the-art facilities. These facilities assist industry in the development of power systems and address the operational challenges of full system integration. The Energy Systems Integration Facility can be used to design, test, and analyze components and systems to enable economic, reliable integration of renewable electricity, fuel production, storage, and building efficiency technologies with the U.S. electricity delivery infrastructure. New grid integration capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center will allow testing of many grid integration aspects of multi-megawatt, utility-scale variable renewable generation and storage technologies. The Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility can be used to characterize,

394

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor Size Distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Size Distribution Size Distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hydrometeor Size Distribution The number of hydrometeors observed in a given size range. Categories Cloud Properties, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments LDIS : Laser Disdrometer Datastreams LDIS : Laser Disdrometer Datastreams PARS2 : OTT Parsivel2 Laser Disdrometer VDIS : Video Disdrometer Datastreams VDIS : Video Disdrometer Drop Size Distribution

395

Full-rate full-diversity space-frequency codes with optimum coding advantage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general space-frequency (SF) block code structure is proposed that can guarantee full-rate (one channel symbol per subcarrier) and full-diversity transmission in multiple-input multiple-output-orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) ... Keywords: Frequency-selective fading channels, full diversity, multiple-input multiple-outputorthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) systems, permutation, space frequency (SF) coding

W. Su; Z. Safar; K. J.R. Liu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Development of Design and Control Methodology for Next Generation Parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercially available Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) have been around for more than ten years. However, their market share remains small. Focusing only on the improvement of fuel economy, the design tends to reduce the size of the internal combustion engine in the HEV, and uses the electrical drive to compensate for the power gap between the load demand and the engine capacity. Unfortunately, the low power density and the high cost of the combined electric motor drive and battery packs dictate that the HEV has either worse performance or much higher price than the conventional vehicle. In this research, a new design philosophy for parallel HEV is proposed, which uses a full size engine to guarantee the vehicle performance at least as good as the conventional vehicle, and hybridizes with an electrical drive in parallel to improve the fuel economy and performance beyond the conventional cars. By analyzing the HEV fuel economy versus the increasing of the electrical drive power on typical driving conditions, the optimal hybridization electric power capacity is determined. Thus, the full size engine HEV shows significant improvement in fuel economy and performance, with relatively short cost recovery period. A new control strategy, which optimizes the fuel economy of parallel configured charge sustained hybrid electric vehicles, is proposed in the second part of this dissertation. This new approach is a constrained engine on-off strategy, which has been developed from the two extreme control strategies of maximum SOC and engine on-off, by taking their advantages and overcoming their disadvantages. A system optimization program using dynamic programming algorithm has been developed to calibrate the control parameters used in the developed control strategy, so that the control performance can be as close to the optimal solution as possible. In order to determine the sensitivity of the new control strategy to different driving conditions, a passenger car is simulated on different driving cycles. The performances of the vehicle with the new control strategy are compared with the optimal solution obtained on each driving condition with the dynamic programming optimization. The simulation result shows that the new control strategy always keeps its performance close to the optimal one, as the driving condition changes.

Lai, Lin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Electricity Distribution System Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discussion Summary Discussion Summary Electricity Transmission System Workshop 1 Grid Tech Team Discussion Summary Electricity Transmission System Workshop 2 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................. 4 Process ...................................................................................................................................................... 4 Synthesized Challenges ............................................................................................................................. 5

398

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5.70 SUN PV 2011 10 10393 PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Electric Utility Roosevelt Biogas 1 WA 7832 7 10.00 LFG CT 2011 10 10393 PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Electric Utility...

399

Annual Power Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Annual Revision Final Data for 2011 Released: January 30, 2013 Revison Date: May 16, 2013 May 16, 2013 Data revision. 2011 Total (all sectors) and electric utility...

400

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Heart and Electric Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heart and Electric Potential Name: Pete Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What is the electrical output that the SA Node andor AV Node put out when emitting an...

403

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fish in electrical storms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish in electrical storms Name: Kelly A Krugeger Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I have always been told to stay out of water during an electrical storm...

405

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric...

407

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric...

408

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric...

409

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 36,636 7 Electric Utilities 26,639 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 9,998 11 Net Generation (megawatthours) 137,576,941 8 Electric...

410

Designing electricity transmission auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UK has ambitious plans for exploiting offshore wind for electricity production in order to meet its challenging target under the EU Renewable Energy Directive. This could involve investing up to 20bn in transmission assets to bring electricity...

Greve, Thomas; Pollitt, Michael G.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

International Electricity Regulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and its trading partners. Within the Office of Electricity Delivery ...

412

2014 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is proposing changes to its electricity data collection in 2014. These changes involve the following surveys: Form EIA-63B, "Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report," Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," Form EIA-826, "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions," Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-860M, "Monthly Update to the Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form)," and

413

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand forand distribution facilities that supply electricity demand.55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand for

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discusses how electricity demands for vehicle charging cantiming of vehicle electricity demands. challenges associatedand timing of vehicle electricity demand. As the number of

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statewide California Electricity Demand. [accessed June 22,fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV)

418

Arizona Electricity Restructuring Suspended  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This inactivity strongly suggests that electricity restructuring in Arizona has ... demand side management, environmental, ... United States Departmen ...

419

Electric Power Metrology News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next-generation "smart" electrical meters for residential and commercial ... NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction Devices Release ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

General Dynamics, Electric Boat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Dynamics, Electric Boat. NVLAP Lab Code: 100560-0. Address and Contact Information: 75 Eastern Point Road ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Electric arc saw apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

Deichelbohrer, P.R.

1983-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 of 139 3.0 HAZARD ANALYSIS 3.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter provides tools for assessing electrical hazards error. This chapter does not provide an exhaustive list of sources of electrical energy

423

PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Buying a PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEM A Consumer Guide 2003 System: A Consumer Guide i Buying a Photovoltaic Solar Electric System A Consumer Guide California Energy water system that uses the sun's energy to heat water, solar electric or photovoltaic technology uses

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

424

CCPPolicyBriefing Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-57942 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY The Effects of Electricity Tariff of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State Prepared for the Distributed of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State #12;The Effects

Feigon, Brooke

425

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering University of Colorado--Boulder Monday, April 2, 2012, 11:00 a an Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder. He hadELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "A Random Walk on Image Patches" by Prof. Francois Meyer

426

Electrically charged pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n the present work we investigate one possible variation on the usual electrically neutral pulsars: the inclusion of electric charge. We study the effect of electric charge in pulsars assuming that the charge distribution is proportional to the energy density. All calculations were performed for zero temperature and fixed entropy equations of state.

M. D. Alloy; D. P. Menezes

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

427

Electrically charged pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n the present work we investigate one possible variation on the usual electrically neutral pulsars: the inclusion of electric charge. We study the effect of electric charge in pulsars assuming that the charge distribution is proportional to the energy density. All calculations were performed for zero temperature and fixed entropy equations of state.

Alloy, M D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Size-dependent same-material tribocharging in insulating grains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of flowing granular matter have suggested that same-material tribocharging de- pends on particle size, rendering large grains positive and small ones negative. Models assuming the transfer of trapped electrons can explain this, but so far have not been validated. Tracking individual grains in an electric field, we show quantitatively that charge is transferred based on size between materially identical grains. However, the surface density of trapped electrons, measured independently by thermoluminescence techniques, is orders of magnitude too small to account for the scale of charge transferred. This suggests that another negatively charged species, such as ions, is responsible.

Scott R. Waitukaitis; Victor Lee; James M. Pierson; Steven L. Forman; Heinrich M. Jaeger

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Machines to Electrical Machines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Electrical Machines Emphasis in the electrical machines activity is on advanced motor

431

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior in a Competitive Electricity Market, InternationalDemand Response in Electricity Markets, Hewlett FoundationGreen, R. (1999) The Electricity Contract Market in England

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have put practical electric cars within reach, but politicsthat markets for electric cars might actually emergeratherTO CAR WorldResources Insnmte, 1994 TAKING CWARGE ELECTRIC

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Electric vehicles | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric vehicles Jump to: navigation, search TODO: add content Electric vehicles first came into existence in the mid-19th century, when electricity was among the preferred...

434

Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse effect, and electric vehicles," Proceedingso/9thInternational Electric Vehicles Symposium, 1988. 14. R. M.of 9th International Electric Vehicles Sympo- sium, 1988.

Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment More Documents &...

437

Electric demand growth: An uncertain future for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Broadly conceived, the demand for electricity depends upon three sets of variables: (i) the growths of the many individual demands for energy services; (ii) the competitiveness of electrically driven technologies in meeting these demands; and (iii) the energy-conversion efficiencies of installed electrical technologies. The first set of variables establishes the size of the potential market; the second, the market penetration of electrical equipment; and the third, the quantity of electricity required to operate the equipment. All forecasts of electricity consumption ultimately depend upon inferred or assumed relationships to describe the future behavior of these variables. In this paper, the authors review recent forecasts of electricity demand growth. They also examine, in a qualitative way, some of the causes for the systematic, downward revisions of these forecasts over recent years. Graphical presentations of data are extensively used in the discussions. In an important sense, forecasting, whatever the number of variables, remains a matter of ''curve fitting.''

Asbury, J.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

RIGHT SIZING AN OFF-GRID SOLAR HOUSE Eleventh International IBPSA Conference Glasgow, Scotland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power reliability is one of the biggest concerns for people living off-grid. Current practice in off-grid solar house tends to either oversize solar power system or oversize the backup generator to ensure available electricity at all times, which often leads to a high system capital cost. Research has shown that right-sizing is essential to achieve a more efficient system with reduced energy consumption. Sound, responsible system sizing can only happen when liability issues become part of the design methodology, i.e. actively communicating with prospective owners/occupants regarding the risk that the thermal comfort, and full time use of appliances cannot be fully guaranteed. The risk of nonfulfilments may be related to extraordinary environmental conditions for a certain amount of time of the year, the chance that certain components will fail for some reason, and the fact that predictions of the operation of houses are based on design idealizations, whereas its real operation is to some degree uncertain. This paper presents a value-based approach to find the balancing point between the acceptable reliability level and the affordable system capital cost. The value-based approach is illustrated through a sizing practice of an existing off-grid solar house in Atlanta, GA.

Huafen Hu; Godfried Augenbroe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

droplet size droplet size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud droplet size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of a cloud particle Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments SPEC-CPI : Stratton Park Engineering Company - Cloud particle imager

440

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particle size particle size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of an aerosol particle. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer CPI : Cloud Particle Imager DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments DRUM-AEROSOL : Drum Aerosol Sampler AEROSOL-TOWER-EML : EML Tower based Aerosol Measurements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Exponential Size Distributions for Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using airborne data from several recent field projects, the authors have taken another look at the properties of exponential ice particle size distributions (PSDs) when the PSDs are broad. Two primary questions are addressed: for what ranges of ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Paul Field; Aaron Bansemer

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Parameterizing the Raindrop Size Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of finding a parametric form for the raindrop size distribution (DSD) that 1) is an appropriate model for tropical rainfall, and 2) involves statistically independent parameters. Such a parameterization is derived ...

Ziad S. Haddad; Stephen L. Durden; Eastwood Im

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Method for sizing hollow microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow Microspheres may be effectively sized by placing them beneath a screen stack completely immersed in an ultrasonic bath containing a liquid having a density at which the microspheres float and ultrasonically agitating the bath.

Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

1975-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

444

Size Effects in Multilayer Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories through USDOE NNSA Contract DE-AC04 94AL85000. 5:40 PM Size Effect in...

445

Search by EPA Size Class  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPA Size Class Select Year... 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985...

446

ARM - Measurement - Particle size distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

size distribution size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Particle size distribution The number of particles present in any given volume of air within a specified size range. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer UHSAS : Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer Field Campaign Instruments

447

Electric Power Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2006 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2005 January February March April May June July August September October November December

448

EIA Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Forms Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms EIA- 411 EIA- 826 EIA- 860 EIA- 860M EIA- 861 EIA- 923 Frame Information Utility identification and iocation -- -- -- -- X -- Plant identification and iocation -- -- -- X -- X Generation and fuel Latitude and longitude -- -- X -- -- --

449

Electric car arrives - again  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first mass-produced electric cars in modern times are here, although they are expensive, limited in capability and unfamiliar to most prospective consumers. This article presents a brief history of the reintroduction of the modern electric car as well as discussions of the limitations of development, alternative routes to both producing and selling electric cars or some modified version of electric cars, economic incentives and governmental policies, and finally a snapshot description of the future for electric cars. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Dunn, S.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 20 Number 2 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shape of ~ or cucumber in Chinese called fi!ffl rrr (Shish Hulo). Some are sweet and some are not. They are of different sizes. ~ (Go hum Ta) or ~ Lvo Gva is orange in colour. les size varies from the size of a Tibetan water jar to that of a man...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

451

Study of the Advantages of Internal Permanent Magnet Drive Motor with Selectable Windings for Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research performed on the viability of changing the effectively active number of turns in the stator windings of an internal permanent magnet (IPM) electric motor to strengthen or weaken the magnetic fields in order to optimize the motor's performance at specific operating speeds and loads. Analytical and simulation studies have been complemented with research on switching mechanisms to accomplish the task. The simulation studies conducted examine the power and energy demands on a vehicle following a series of standard driving cycles and the impact on the efficiency and battery size of an electrically propelled vehicle when it uses an IPM motor with turn-switching capabilities. Both full driving cycle electric propulsion and propulsion limited starting from zero to a set speed have been investigated.

Otaduy, P.J.; Hsu, J.S.; Adams, D.J.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cybersecurity Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Electricity Advisory Committee...

453

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

454

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

455

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

456

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

457

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

458

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

459

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

460

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

462

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

463

Inductive power coupling for an electric highway system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Dual Mode Electric Transporation (DMET) system is under development in which energy is electromagnetically transferred from a powered roadway to moving vehicles. Energy from the roadway can be used for high-speed, long-range travel and for replenishing energy stored in the vehicle in batteries or flywheels. The stored energy is then available for short-range travel off the powered highway network. The power coupling between roadway and vehicle is functionally similar to a transformer. A source is embedded in the roadway flush with the surface. When the vehicle's pickup is suspended over the source, energy is magnetically coupled through the clearance air gap between pickup and roadway source. The electromagnetic coupling mechanism was extensively studied through computer models, circuit analyses, and by tests of a full-size physical prototype. The results of these tests are described.

Bolger, J.G.; Kirsten, F.A.; Ng, L.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

2009 Electric Transmission Congestion Study | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Electric Transmission Congestion Study 9 Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 Electric Transmission Congestion Study The 2009 National Congestion Electric Transmission Study, required by section 216(a) of the Federal Power Act, examines transmission congestion constraints across the Nation and identifies areas that are transmission-constrained, but does not make recommendations concerning existing or new National Corridor designations. This is the second Congestion Study the Department has conducted, with the first issued in 2006. Public comments received after the release of the 2009 Congestion Study can be found here. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 Executive Summary Full Text of the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 More Documents & Publications

465

2009 Electric Transmission Congestion Study | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2009 Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 Electric Transmission Congestion Study The 2009 National Congestion Electric Transmission Study, required by section 216(a) of the Federal Power Act, examines transmission congestion constraints across the Nation and identifies areas that are transmission-constrained, but does not make recommendations concerning existing or new National Corridor designations. This is the second Congestion Study the Department has conducted, with the first issued in 2006. Public comments received after the release of the 2009 Congestion Study can be found here. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 Executive Summary Full Text of the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 More Documents & Publications

466

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs), are among the most promising of the advanced vehicle

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

West Virginia/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia/Wind Resources/Full Version West Virginia/Wind Resources/Full Version < West Virginia‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF West Virginia Wind Resources WestVirginiaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

468

New Jersey/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Jersey/Wind Resources/Full Version New Jersey/Wind Resources/Full Version < New Jersey‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF New Jersey Wind Resources NewJerseyMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

469

South Carolina/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Carolina/Wind Resources/Full Version South Carolina/Wind Resources/Full Version < South Carolina‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF South Carolina Wind Resources SouthCarolinaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

470

South Dakota/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Dakota/Wind Resources/Full Version South Dakota/Wind Resources/Full Version < South Dakota‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF South Dakota Wind Resources SouthDakotaMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

471

Rhode Island/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island/Wind Resources/Full Version Rhode Island/Wind Resources/Full Version < Rhode Island‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Rhode Island Wind Resources RhodeIslandMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

472

Argonne CNM Highlight: Patterned Copper Nanowires with Novel Electrical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Patterned Copper Nanowires with Novel Electrical Effects Patterned Copper Nanowires with Novel Electrical Effects Micrograph of copper nanowire A micrograph of the sample layout and the copper nanowire (l = 2.04 um, w = 90 nm, t = 50 nm) between the contact pads. Metallic nanowires have various applications such as sensors and high-density interconnects in field-effect transistors. Monitoring the influence of size and surface effects on material properties, such as electrical resistivity and failure properties, is important in designing new, reliable nanowires. Copper nanowires were patterned with e-beam lithography and fabricated with a copper film deposited by e-beam evaporation. Electrical measurements show that surface and size have effects on the electrical properties. Smaller values for the temperature coefficient of resistance and higher failure

473

Electrically actuatable temporal tristimulus-color device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electrically actuated light filter operates in a cyclical temporal mode to effect a tristimulus-color light analyzer. Construction is based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer comprised of a high-speed movable mirror pair and cyclically powered electrical actuators. When combined with a single vidicon tube or a monochrome solid state image sensor, a temporally operated tristimulus-color video camera is effected. A color-generated is accomplished when constructed with a companion light source and is a flicker-free colored-light source for transmission type display systems. Advantages of low cost and small physical size result from photolithographic batch-processing manufacturability.

Koehler, Dale R. (1332 Wagontrain Dr., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Full fuel-cycle comparison of forklift propulsion systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has received considerable attention as an alternative to fossil fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigates the technical and economic feasibility of promising new technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells. A recent report for DOE identified three near-term markets for fuel cells: (1) Emergency power for state and local emergency response agencies, (2) Forklifts in warehousing and distribution centers, and (3) Airport ground support equipment markets. This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell propulsion for existing technologies based on batteries and fossil fuels. Industry data and the Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model are used to estimate full fuel-cycle emissions and use of primary energy sources, back to the primary feedstocks for fuel production. Also considered are other environmental concerns at work locations. The benefits derived from using fuel-cell propulsion are determined by the sources of electricity and hydrogen. In particular, fuel-cell forklifts using hydrogen made from the reforming of natural gas had lower impacts than those using hydrogen from electrolysis.

Gaines, L. L.; Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

475

Electric Boosting System for Light Truck/SUV Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems. One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-TurboTM designs do both. The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-TurboTM, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-TurboTM can be used to generate modest amounts of electrical power and supplement the alternator under most load-speed conditions. It is shown that a single (large) e-TurboTM consumes slightly less electrical power for the same steady state torque shaping than a bi-Turbo configuration. However, the transient response of a bi-Turbo configuration in slightly better. It was shown that in order to make full use of additional capabilities of e-TurboTM wide compressor flow range is required. Variable geometry compressor (VGC) technology developed under a separate project was evaluated for incorporation into e-TurboTM designs. It was shown that the combination of these two technologies enables very high torque at low engine speeds. Designs and hardware combining VGC and e-TurboTM are to be developed in a future project. There is concern about high power demands (even though momentary) of e-TurboTM. Reducing the inertia of the turbocharger can reduce power demand and increase battery life. Low inertia turbocharger technology called IBT developed under a separate project was evaluated for synergy with e-TurboTM designs. It was concluded that inertial reduction provided by IBT is very beneficial for e-TurboTM. Designs and hardware combining IBT and e-TurboTM are to be developed in a future project. e-TurboTM provides several additional flexibilities including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for emissions reduction with minimum fuel economy penalty and exhaust temperature control for aftertreatment. In integrated multi-parameter control system is needed to realize the full potential of e-TurboTM performance. Honeywell expertise in process control systems involving hundreds of sensors and actuators was applied to demonstrate the potential benefits of multi-parameter, model based control systems.

Steve Arnold, Craig Balis, Pierre Barthelet, Etienne Poix, Tariq Samad, Greg Hampson, S.M. Shahed

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

476

Energy Management System for an Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Using Ultracapacitors and Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Management System for an Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Using Ultracapacitors and Neural Networks management system for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), using neural networks (NN), was developed and tested, similar in shape and size to a Chevrolet S-10, which was converted to an electric vehicle

Rudnick, Hugh

477

Comparative Modeling Analysis of Plug-in Electric Vehicle Architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the assumptions and results for advanced vehicle simulation analysis. A midsize sedan was used to investigate the conventional, pre-transmission parallel, input power-split, series, and full electric architectures. Variations of these architectures were also investigated such as charge-sustaining hybrid electric vehicles, charge-depleting plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and extended-range electric-vehicles (EREVs). The differences in these vehicle architectures and variations are ...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

478

Design and Analysis of Hybrid Solar Lighting and Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a systems-level design and analysis of a new approach for improving the energy efficiency and affordability of solar energy in buildings, namely, hybrid solar lighting and full-spectrum solar energy systems. By using different portions of the solar spectrum simultaneously for multiple end-use applications in buildings, the proposed system offers unique advantages over other alternatives for using sunlight to displace electricity (conventional topside daylighting and solar technologies). Our preliminary work indicates that hybrid solar lighting, a method of collecting and distributing direct sunlight for lighting purposes, will alleviate many of the problems with passive daylighting systems of today, such as spatial and temporal variability, glare, excess illumination, cost, and energy efficiency. Similarly, our work suggests that the most appropriate use of the visible portion of direct, nondiffuse sunlight from an energy-savings perspective is to displace electric light rather than generate electricity. Early estimates detailed in this paper suggest an anticipated system cost of well under $2.0/Wp and 5-11 {cents}/kWh for displaced and generated electricity in single-story commercial building applications. Based on a number of factors discussed in the paper, including sunlight availability, building use scenarios, time-of-day electric utility rates, cost, and efficacy of the displaced electric lights, the simple payback of this approach in many applications could eventually be well under 5 years.

Muhs, J.D.

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

479

Electric:DielectricPermittivity:Isotropic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Electric:DielectricPermittivity:Isotropic. ... Name. Electric:DielectricPermittivity:Isotropic Isotropic dielectric permittivity. Details. ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

480

Applied Electrical Metrology Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart GridOur country's way of life depends on the electric power distribution system. ...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full size electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Utility Rate Design Revision - A Frisbee Full of Boomerangs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising electricity prices have prompted investigation of utility rates and proposals for changed in their design. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current design of electric rates, changes proposed, actual trends, and predictable results of the proposals and trends.

Dannenmaier, J. H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO the full spectrum of research AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage systems, enabling longer range and broader use of hybrid and pure electric vehicles-generated models that simulate vehicle behaviour in dangerous driving scenarios and advanced stability systems to help drivers maintain traction and control, » Smart chargers that allow plug-in electric vehicles

Waterloo, University of

483

Size does matter: how image size affects aesthetic perception?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is no doubt that an image's content determines how people assess the image aesthetically. Previous works have shown that image contrast, saliency features, and the composition of objects may jointly determine whether or not an image is perceived ... Keywords: crowdsourcing, human percpetion, image aesthetics, quality assessment, size-dependent aesthetics

Wei-Ta Chu, Yu-Kuang Chen, Kuan-Ta Chen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Compare All CBECS Activities: Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Building Size By Building Size Compare Activities by ... Building Size Total Floorspace by Building Type There was approximately 67.3 billion square feet of commercial floorspace in the U.S. in 1999. Because there are many of them, office buildings comprised the largest amount of commercial floorspace. Figure showing total floorspace by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Square Feet per Building by Building Type Inpatient health buildings were by far the largest building type, on average, while food service and food sales buildings were the smallest. Figure showing square feet per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Establishments per Building by Building Type

485

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Stocks Above normal temperatures in January have allowed electric utilities to significantly replinish stockpiles of coal. The upswing in coal stockpiles corresponds to decreasing consumption of coal at electric generators seen in the resource use section across all regions of the country. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. Along with coal stockpiles at electric power plants, the supply of coal significantly increased in January of 2012. Total bituminous coal days of burn increased 10 percent from January 2011 to 87, while subbituminous supply increased nearly 10

486

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: December 2011 End Use: December 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

487

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: August 2011 End Use: August 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

488

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: November 2011 End Use: November 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

489

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute  Investor-Owned Electric Companies  Membership includes  200 US companies,  More than 65 international affiliates and  170 associates  US members  Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and  Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and  Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda Significant Industry Trends Utility Infrastructure Investments Generation and Fuel Landscape

490

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2011 End Use: October 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

491

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: March 2012 End Use: March 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

492

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: September 2011 End Use: September 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

493

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2013 End Use: October 2013 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

494

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: January 2012 End Use: January 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

495

Electrical system architecture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

496

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

497

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: February 2012 End Use: February 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

498

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Sheraton National Hotel May 20, 2008 Minutes Members Present: Linda Stuntz, Esquire, Stuntz, Davis, and Staffier, P.C. (Chair) Yakout Mansour, California ISO (Vice Chair) Paul J. Allen, Constellation Energy Guido Bartels, IBM Gerry Cauley, SERC Reliability Corporation Jose Delgado, American Transmission Company The Honorable Jeanne Fox, New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Rob Gramlich, American Wind Energy Association The Honorable Dian Grueneich, California Public Utilities Commission Michael Heyeck, American Electric Power Hunter Hunt, Sharyland Utilities Susan Kelly, American Public Power Association Irwin Kowenski, Occidental Energy Ventures Corporation Barry Lawson, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

500

ELECTRIC BLASTING INITIATOR  

SciTech Connect

An electric blasting initiator comprises a shell, a high explosive material within the shell, and an exploding bridge wire in contact with said explosive material. (AEC)

Johnston, L.H.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z