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Sample records for full section production

  1. NAABB Full Final Report Section I

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REPORT SECTION I FULL FINAL REPORT SECTION I FULL FINAL REPORT SECTION I Program Overview Table of Contents Executive Summary ......

  2. Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Find resources to help you design a production and manufacturing process for a new clean energy technology or product. For full-scale production, other areas to consider include workforce development; R&D funding; and regional, state, and local resources. For more resources, see the Clean Energy

  3. Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production December 8, 2015 - 12:06pm Addthis Photo Courtesy | Doosan Fuel Cell ...

  4. 2014 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2014 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2015, Congress ...

  5. Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron You are accessing ...

  6. 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2016, Congress ...

  7. 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2014, Congress ...

  8. Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron An overview of the ...

  9. 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy 5 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2016, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may receive up to 1.8

  10. 2014 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2014 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2015, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may receive up to 1.8

  11. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrts13 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the top quark...

  12. 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2014, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities–existing powered or non-powered...

  13. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  14. Surface runoff from full-scale coal combustion product pavements during accelerated loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.M.; Taerakul, P.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing coal combustion products (CCPs) was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under well-controlled conditions. An equivalent of 20 years of highway traffic loading was simulated at the OSU/OU Accelerated Pavement Load Facility (APLF). Three types of portland cement concrete driving surface layers were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (PC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). In general, the concentrations of minor and trace elements were higher in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates than in the leachates obtained from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure and ASTM leaching procedures. Importantly, none of the leachate concentrations exceeded the TCLP limits or primary drinking water standards. Surface runoff monitoring results showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, whereas there were little differences in release rates between PC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for Cr, elements were released as particulates (>0.45 {mu} m) rather than dissolved constituents. The incorporation of fly ash in the PC cement concrete pavements examined in this study resulted in little or no deleterious environmental impact from the leaching of inorganic elements over the lifetime of the pavement system.

  15. EERE Success Story-Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production EERE Success Story-Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production December 8, 2015 - 12:06pm Addthis Photo Courtesy | Doosan Fuel Cell America, Inc. Photo Courtesy | Doosan Fuel Cell America, Inc. Doosan Fuel Cell, a Connecticut company which designs, engineers and manufactures clean energy fuel cell systems that produce combined heat and power systems, began operations in July 2014 at its corporate

  16. Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment ...

  17. Implementation of Division B, Title I, Section 1101(a)(2) of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 2011-04 provides implementing instructions and guidance for Section 1101(a)(2) of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, Pub. L. 112-10 (hereinafter "Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011). Section 1101(a)(2) of the Act provides that, unless otherwise specified, the authority and conditions provided for projects or activities (including the costs of direct loans and loan guarantees) appropriated, authorized, or funded in the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010, Pub. L. 111-85, still apply.

  18. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of the t-tbar production cross ...

  19. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton ... Title: Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV ...

  20. Full PWA Report: An Assessment of Energy, Waste, and Productivity Improvements for North Star Steel Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    North Star Steel's Wilton, Iowa plant (NSSI) was awarded a subcontract through a competitive process to use Department of Energy/OIT funding to examine potential processes and technologies that could save energy, reduce waste, and increase productivity.

  1. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections A measurement of the top quark pair production (t-tbar)

  2. Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005- Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program- July 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains draft guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the "Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program"

  3. Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections Colin E. Anderson 2011 Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the ef- forts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive sig- nal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understand- ing.

  4. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Colin; ,

    2010-12-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single {pi}{sup 0} (NC 1{pi}{sup 0}) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical E{sub {nu}} {approx} 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data ({approx} 10{sup 6} neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1{pi}{sup 0} cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the flux-averaged, total cross sections for NC 1{pi}{sup 0} production on CH{sub 2} to be (4.76 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.76{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at = 808 MeV for neutrino induced production and (1.48 {+-} 0.05{sub stat} {+-} 0.23{sub sys}) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleon at = 664 MeV for antineutrino induced production.

  5. Measurement of low $p_{T}$ $D^{0}$ meson production cross section at CDF II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mussini, Manuel; /Bologna U.

    2011-05-01

    In this thesis we present a study of the production of D{sup 0} meson in the low transverse momentum region. In particular the inclusive differential production cross section of the D{sup 0} meson (in the two-body decay channel D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) is obtained extending the published CDF II measurement to p{sub T} as low as 1.5 GeV/c. This study is performed at the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab with the CDF II detector.

  6. Heavy quarkonium production at collider energies: Partonic cross section and polarization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiu, Jian -Wei; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Ma, Yan -Qing; Sterman, George

    2015-01-27

    We calculate the O(α³s) short-distance, QCD collinear-factorized coefficient functions for all partonic channels that include the production of a heavy quark pair at short distances. Thus, this provides the first power correction to the collinear-factorized inclusive hadronic production of heavy quarkonia at large transverse momentum, pT, including the full leading-order perturbative contributions to the production of heavy quark pairs in all color and spin states employed in NRQCD treatments of this process. We discuss the role of the first power correction in the production rates and the polarizations of heavy quarkonia in high-energy hadronic collisions. The consistency of QCD collinearmore » factorization and nonrelativistic QCD factorization applied to heavy quarkonium production is also discussed.« less

  7. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-19

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton–proton collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider. With an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb-1, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jetmore » observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. As a result, the measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.« less

  8. New Starts, Requests for Proposals, Funding Opportunity Announcements and other Similar Arrangements as Implemented under Division B, Title I, Section 1418 of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 2011-04 implementing instructions and guidance for Section 1101(a)(2) of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, Pub. L. 112-10 (hereinafter Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011), is hereby revised to add Section 1418 on new starts, requests for proposals, requests for quotations, request for information and funding opportunity announcements.

  9. Assessment of Fission Product Cross-Section Data for Burnup Credit Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Dunn, Michael E; Mueller, Don

    2007-12-01

    Past efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and others have provided sufficient technical information to enable the NRC to issue regulatory guidance for implementation of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup credit; however, consideration of only the reactivity change due to the major actinides is recommended in the guidance. Moreover, DOE, NRC, and EPRI have noted the need for additional scientific and technical data to justify expanding PWR burnup credit to include fission product (FP) nuclides and enable burnup credit implementation for boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The criticality safety assessment needed for burnup credit applications will utilize computational analyses of packages containing SNF with FP nuclides. Over the years, significant efforts have been devoted to the nuclear data evaluation of major isotopes pertinent to reactor applications (i.e., uranium, plutonium, etc.); however, efforts to evaluate FP cross-section data in the resonance region have been less thorough relative to actinide data. In particular, resonance region cross-section measurements with corresponding R-matrix resonance analyses have not been performed for FP nuclides. Therefore, the objective of this work is to assess the status and performance of existing FP cross-section and cross-section uncertainty data in the resonance region for use in burnup credit analyses. Recommendations for new cross-section measurements and/or evaluations are made based on the data assessment. The assessment focuses on seven primary FP isotopes (103Rh, 133Cs, 143Nd, 149Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, and 155Gd) that impact reactivity analyses of transportation packages and two FP isotopes (153Eu and 155Eu) that impact prediction of 155Gd concentrations. Much of the assessment work was completed in 2005, and the assessment focused on the latest FP cross-section evaluations available in the international nuclear data community as of March 2005. The accuracy of the cross-section data was investigated by comparing existing cross-section evaluations against available measured cross-section data. When possible, benchmark calculations were also used to assess the performance of the latest FP cross-section data. Since March 2005, the U.S. and European data projects have released newer versions of their respective data files. Although there have been updates to the international data files and to some degree FP data, much of the updates have included nuclear cross-section modeling improvements at energies above the resonance region. The one exception is improved ENDF/B-VII cross-section uncertainty data or covariance data for gadolinium isotopes. In particular, ENDF/B-VII includes improved 155Gd resonance parameter covariance data, but they are based on previously measured resonance data. Although the new covariance data are available for 155Gd, the conclusions of the FP cross-section data assessment of this report still hold in lieu of the newer international cross-section data files. Based on the FP data assessment, there is judged to be a need for new total and capture cross-section measurements and corresponding cross-section evaluations, in a prioritized manner, for the nine FPs to provide the improved information and technical rigor needed for criticality safety analyses.

  10. Characterization of radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of a TRUEX flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Gary S. Groenewold; Rocklan G. McDowell; Richard D. Tillotson; Jack D. Law

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet the FCRD level 2 milestone M3FT-13IN0302053, Identification of TRUEX Strip Degradation. The INL radiolysis test loop has been used to identify radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of the TRUEX flowsheet. These data were used to evaluate impact of the formation of radiolytic degradation products in the strip section upon the efficacy of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. The nominal composition of the TRUEX solvent used in this study is 0.2 M CMPO and 1.4 M TBP dissolved in n-dodecane and the nominal composition of the TRUEX strip solution is 1.5 M lactic acid and 0.050 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Gamma irradiation of a mixture of TRUEX process solvent and stripping solution in the test loop does not adversely impact flowsheet performance as measured by stripping americium ratios. The observed increase in americium stripping distribution ratios with increasing absorbed dose indicates the radiolytic production of organic soluble degradation compounds.

  11. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurwitz, Martina; /Chicago U.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW + WZ) = 16.5{sub -3.0}{sup +3.3} pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 {+-} 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4{sigma}. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  12. Manufacturing Cost Analysis for YSZ-Based FlexCells at Pilot and Full Scale Production Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Robin Kimbrell; Kellie Chenault

    2011-05-01

    Significant reductions in cell costs must be achieved in order to realize the full commercial potential of megawatt-scale SOFC power systems. The FlexCell designed by NexTech Materials is a scalable SOFC technology that offers particular advantages over competitive technologies. In this updated topical report, NexTech analyzes its FlexCell design and fabrication process to establish manufacturing costs at both pilot scale (10 MW/year) and full-scale (250 MW/year) production levels and benchmarks this against estimated anode supported cell costs at the 250 MW scale. This analysis will show that even with conservative assumptions for yield, materials usage, and cell power density, a cost of $35 per kilowatt can be achieved at high volume. Through advancements in cell size and membrane thickness, NexTech has identified paths for achieving cell manufacturing costs as low as $27 per kilowatt for its FlexCell technology. Also in this report, NexTech analyzes the impact of raw material costs on cell cost, showing the significant increases that result if target raw material costs cannot be achieved at this volume.

  13. Process Optimization for Solid Extraction, Flavor Improvement and Fat Removal in the Production of Soymilk From Full Fat Soy Flakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley Prawiradjaja

    2003-05-31

    Traditionally soymilk has been made with whole soybeans; however, there are other alternative raw ingredients for making soymilk, such as soy flour or full-fat soy flakes. US markets prefer soymilk with little or no beany flavor. modifying the process or using lipoxygenase-free soybeans can be used to achieve this. Unlike the dairy industry, fat reduction in soymilk has been done through formula modification instead of by conventional fat removal (skimming). This project reports the process optimization for solids and protein extraction, flavor improvement and fat removal in the production of 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk from full fat soy flakes and whole soybeans using the Takai soymilk machine. Proximate analyses, and color measurement were conducted in 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk. Descriptive analyses with trained panelists (n = 9) were conducted using 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix lipoxygenase-free and high protein blend soy flake soymilks. Rehydration of soy flakes is necessary to prevent agglomeration during processing and increase extractability. As the rehydration temperature increases from 15 to 50 to 85 C, the hexanal concentration was reduced. Enzyme inactivation in soy flakes milk production (measured by hexanal levels) is similar to previous reports with whole soybeans milk production; however, shorter rehydration times can be achieved with soy flakes (5 to 10 minutes) compared to whole beans (8 to 12 hours). Optimum rehydration conditions for a 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk are 50 C for 5 minutes, 85 C for 5 minutes and 85 C for 10 minutes, respectively. In the flavor improvement study of soymilk, the hexanal date showed differences between undeodorized HPSF in contrast to triple null soymilk and no differences between deodorized HPSF in contrast to deodorized triple null. The panelists could not differentiate between the beany, cereal, and painty flavors. However, the panelists responded that the overall aroma of deodorized 8 {sup o}Brix triple null and HPSF soymilk are lower than the undeodorized triple null and HPSF soymilk. The triple null soymilk was perceived to be more bitter than the HPSF soymilk by the sensory panel due to oxidation on the triple null soy flakes. This oxidation may produce other aroma that was not analyzed using the GC but noticed by the panelists. The sensory evaluation results did show that the deodorizer was able to reduce the soymilk aroma in HPSF soymilk so it would be similar to triple null soymilk at 8 {sup o}Brix level. Regardless of skimming method and solids levels, the fat from the whole soybean milk was removed less efficiently than soy flake milk (7 to 30% fat extraction in contrast to 50 to 80% fat extraction respectively). In soy flake milk, less fat was removed as the % solid increases regardless of the processing method. In whole soybean milk, the fat was removed less efficiently at lower solids level milk using the commercial dairy skimmer and more efficient at lower solids level using the centrifuge-decant method. Based on the Hunter L, a, b measurement, the color of the reduced fat soy flake milk yielded a darker, greener and less yellow colored milk than whole soymilk ({alpha} < 0.05), whereas no differences were noticed in reduced fat soybean milk ({alpha} < 0.05). Color comparison of whole and skim cow's milk showed the same the same trend as in the soymilk.

  14. Measurements of the $ZZ$ production cross sections in the $$2\\ell2\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-29

    Measurements of the ZZ production cross sections in proton–proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. We found that candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ → 2l2ν, where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)fb-1 at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ(pp → ZZ)=5.1+1.5-1.4(stat)+1.4-1.1(syst)±0.1(lumi)pb at 7 TeV, and 7.2+0.8-0.8(stat)+1.9-1.5(syst)±0.2(lumi)pb at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. Furthermore, the selected data are analyzed to search formore » anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the ZZ final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. As a result, these limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for ZZ in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.« less

  15. Cross section standards for neutron-induced gamma-ray production in the MeV energy range.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R. O. (Ronald O.); Fotiadis, N. (Nikolaos); Devlin, M. J. (Matthew J.); Becker, J. A. (John A.); Garrett, P. E. (Paul E.); Younes, W. (Walid)

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray cross section standards for neutron-induced reactions are important in enabling the accurate determination of absolute cross sections from relative measurements of gamma-ray production. In our work we observed a need for improvement in these standards. In particular there are large discrepancies between evaluations of the {sup nat}Fe(n,n{sub 1}'{gamma}) cross section for the 847-keV gamma ray. We have performed (1) absolute cross section measurements, (2) measurements relative to the {sup nat}Cr(n,n{sub 1}'{gamma}) 1434-keV gamma ray, and (3) comparisons using measured total and elastic scattering cross sections to refine our knowledge of the Fe cross section and the closely linked inelastic channel cross section for Fe. Calculation of integral tests of the cross section libraries may indicate that adjustment of the angular distributions of the neutron elastic and inelastic scattering may be needed.

  16. Measurements of the $ZZ$ production cross sections in the $2\\ell2\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-29

    Measurements of the ZZ production cross sections in proton–proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. We found that candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ → 2l2ν, where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)fb-1 at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ(pp → ZZ)=5.1+1.5-1.4(stat)+1.4-1.1(syst)±0.1(lumi)pb at 7 TeV, and 7.2+0.8-0.8(stat)+1.9-1.5(syst)±0.2(lumi)pb at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. Furthermore, the selected data are analyzed to search for anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the ZZ final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. As a result, these limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for ZZ in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.

  17. Upsilon production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2011-06-15

    The Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV are measured using a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1±0.3 pb⁻¹. Integrated over the rapidity range |y|<2, we find the product of the Υ(1S) production cross section and branching fraction to dimuons to be σ(pp→Υ(1S)X) · B(Υ(1S)→μ⁺μ⁻)=7.37±0.13+0.61-0.42±0.81 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is associated with the estimation of the integrated luminosity of the data sample. This cross section is obtained assuming unpolarized Υ(1S) production. With themore » assumption of fully transverse or fully longitudinal production polarization, the measured cross section changes by about 20%. We also report the measurement of the Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity.« less

  18. Measurement of the Inclusive Upsilon production cross section in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-06-01

    The Upsilon production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is measured using a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1 +/- 0.3 inverse picobarns. Integrated over the rapidity range |y|<2, we find the product of the Upsilon(1S) production cross section and branching fraction to dimuons to be sigma(pp to Upsilon(1S) X) B(Upsilon(1S) to mu+ mu-) = 7.37 +/- 0.13^{+0.61}_{-0.42}\\pm 0.81 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is associated with the estimation of the integrated luminosity of the data sample. This cross section is obtained assuming unpolarized Upsilon(1S) production. If the Upsilon(1S) production polarization is fully transverse or fully longitudinal the cross section changes by about 20%. We also report the measurement of the Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(2S), and Upsilon(3S) differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity.

  19. Top quark pair production cross section in the lepton+jets channel using b-tagging at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, H.D.; /Brown U.

    2008-05-01

    The top quark pair production cross section measurement in the lepton+jets channel with b-tagging algorithm is described. About 900 pb{sup -1} data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron are used for this analysis. In this thesis, event selection, background estimation, and cross section calculation are discussed in detail. In addition, calibration of the Luminosity Monitor readout electronics and a new b-tagging algorithm, the SLTNN tagger, are also discussed in this thesis.

  20. Inclusive b-hadron production cross section with muons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the b-hadron production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV is presented. The dataset, corresponding to 85 inverse nanobarns, was recorded with the CMS experiment at the LHC using a low-threshold single-muon trigger. Events are selected by the presence of a muon with transverse momentum greater than 6 GeV with respect to the beam direction and pseudorapidity less than 2.1. The transverse momentum of the muon with respect to the closest jet discriminates events containing b hadrons from background. The inclusive b-hadron production cross section is presented as a function of muon transverse momentum and pseudorapidity. The measured total cross section in the kinematic acceptance is sigma(pp to b+X to mu + X') =1.32 +/- 0.01 (stat) +/- 0.30 (syst) +/- 0.15 (lumi) microbarns.

  1. Measurement of the B⁰ Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-06-20

    Measurements of the differential production cross sections dσ/dpBT and dσ/dyB for B⁰ mesons produced in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV are presented. The data set used was collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 40 pb⁻¹. The production cross section is measured from B⁰ meson decays reconstructed in the exclusive final state J/ψK0S, with the subsequent decays J/ψ→μ⁺μ⁻ and K0S→π⁺π⁻. The total cross section for pBT>5 GeV and |yB|<2.2 is measured to be 33.2±2.5±3.5 μb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  2. Status of the top quark: Top production cross section and top properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boisvert, V.; /Rochester U.

    2006-08-01

    This report describes the latest cross section and property measurements associated with the top quark at the Tevatron Run II. The largest data sample used is 760 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Due to its large mass, the top quark might be involved in the process of electroweak symmetry breaking, making it a useful probe for signs of new physics.

  3. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-19

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton–proton collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider. With an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb-1, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jet observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. As a result, the measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.

  4. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Koji; /Tsukuba U.

    2009-03-01

    Top quarks are predominantly produced in pairs via the strong interaction in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV . The top quark has a weak isospin 1/2, composing a weak isospin doublet with the bottom quark. This characteristic predicts not only top quark pair production via strong interaction but also single production together with a bottom quark via weak interaction. However, finding single top quark production is challenging since it is rarely produced ({sigma}{sub singletop} = 2.9 pb) against background processes with the same final state like W+jets and t{bar t}. A measurement of electroweak single top production probes the W-t-b vertex, which provides a direct determination of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V{sub tb}|. The sample offers a source of almost 100% polarized top quarks. This thesis describes an optimized search for s-channel single top quark production and a measurement of the single top production cross section using 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CDF detector. We are using events with one high-p{sub T} lepton, large missing E{sub T} and two identified b-quark jets where one jet is identified using a secondary vertex tagger, called SecVtx, and the other jet is identified using SecVtx or a jet probability tagger, called JetProb. In this analysis we have developed a kinematics fitter and a likelihood-based separator between signal and background. As a result, we found that the probability (p-value) that the candidate events originate from a background fluctuation in the absence of single top s-channel production is 0.003, which is equivalent to 2.7 {sigma} deviations in Gaussian statistics, and this excess corresponds to the single top s-channel cross section of 2.38{sub -0.84}{sup +1.01} pb. An observed value of |V{sub tb}| is 1.43{sub -0.26}{sup +0.38}(experimental) {+-} 0.11(theory). We also set the 95% CL. upper limit of {sigma}{sub s} = 4.15 pb for the s-channel production cross section.

  5. Search for production of an ?(1S) meson in association with a W or Z boson using the full 1.96 TeV proton anti-proton collision data set at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; et al

    2015-03-17

    Production of the ?(1S) meson in association with a vector boson is a rare process in the standard model with a cross section predicted to be below the sensitivity of the Tevatron. Observation of this process could signify contributions not described by the standard model or reveal limitations with the current non-relativistic quantum-chromodynamic models used to calculate the cross section. We perform a search for this process using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4/fb?. The search considers the ? ? ?? decay and the decay of themoreW and Z bosons into muons and electrons. In these purely leptonic decay channels, we observe one ?W candidate with an expected background of 1.2 0.5 events, and one ?Z candidate with an expected background of 0.1 0.1 events. Both observations are consistent with the predicted background contributions. The resulting upper limits on the cross section for ?+W/Z production are the most sensitive reported from a single experiment and place restrictions on potential contributions from non-standard-model physics.less

  6. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from p p? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of ?tt? = 7.64 0.57 (stat + syst) 0.45 (luminosity) pb.

  7. Measurement of the Isolated Prompt Photon Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-02-01

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E_T-gamma in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |eta_gamma|<1.45 and E_T-gamma > 21 GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006 < x_T < 0.086. The measured cross section is found to be in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  8. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from p p̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scalemore » with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.« less

  9. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2011-12-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 418 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 185 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions at higher energies for isotopes of F, Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides 235,238U and 239Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on 239Pu; and (9) A new Decay Data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide range of MCNP simulations of criticality benchmarks, with improved performance coming from new structural material evaluations, especially for Ti, Mn, Cr, Zr and W. For Be we see some improvements although the fast assembly data appear to be mutually inconsistent. Actinide cross section updates are also assessed through comparisons of fission and capture reaction rate measurements in critical assemblies and fast reactors. We describe the cross section evaluations that have been updated for ENDF/B-VII.1 and the measured data and calculations that motivated the changes, and therefore this paper augments the ENDF/B-VII.0 publication [1].

  10. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp collisions at 8TeV and ratio of 8 to 7TeV cross sections

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2.09024v1 [hep-ex] 29 Feb 2016 EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (CERN) CERN-EP/2016-016 2016/03/01 CMS-TOP-12-006 Measurements of the tt production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp collisions at 8 TeV and ratio of 8 to 7 TeV cross sections The CMS Collaboration* Abstract A measurement of the top quark pair production (tt) cross section in proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is presented using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC,

  11. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section using dilepton events in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. We consider final states with at least two jets and two leptons (ee, e{mu}, {mu}{mu}), and events with one jet for the the e{mu} final state as well. The measured cross section is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.36{sub -0.79}{sup +0.90} (stat + syst) pb. This result combined with the cross section measurement in the lepton + jets final state yields {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.56{sub -0.56}{sup +0.63}(stat + syst) pb, which agrees with the standard model expectation. The relative precision of 8% of this measurement is comparable to the latest theoretical calculations.

  12. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel using lepton+track selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert Emil; /Princeton U.

    2008-09-01

    The production cross section for t{bar t} pairs decaying into two lepton final states was measured using data from the D0 detector at Fermilab. The measurement was made using a lepton+track selection, where one lepton is fully identified and the second lepton is observed as an isolated track. This analysis is designed to complement similar studies using two fully identified leptons [1]. The cross section for the lepton+track selection was found to be {sigma} = 5.2{sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(stat){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst) {+-} 0.3(lumi) pb. The combined cross section using both the lepton+track data and the data from the electron+electron, electron+muon, and muon+muon samples is: {sigma} = 6.4{sub -0.9}{sup +0.9}(stat){sub -0.7}{sup +0.8}(syst) {+-} 0.4(lumi) pb.

  13. Search for production of an $$\\Upsilon$$(1S) meson in association with a W or Z boson using the full 1.96 TeV $$p\\bar{p}$$ collision data set at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-03-17

    Production of the Υ(1S) meson in association with a vector boson is a rare process in the standard model with a cross section predicted to be below the sensitivity of the Tevatron. Observation of this process could signify contributions not described by the standard model or reveal limitations with the current nonrelativistic quantum-chromodynamic models used to calculate the cross section. We perform a search for this process using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1. Our search considers the Υ→μμ decay and the decay of the Wmore » and Z bosons into muons and electrons. Furthermore, in these purely leptonic decay channels, we observe one ΥW candidate with an expected background of 1.2±0.5 events, and one ΥZcandidate with an expected background of 0.1±0.1 events. Both observations are consistent with the predicted background contributions. The resulting upper limits on the cross section for Υ+W/Zproduction are the most sensitive reported from a single experiment and place restrictions on potential contributions from non-standard-model physics.« less

  14. Search for production of an $\\Upsilon$(1S) meson in association with a W or Z boson using the full 1.96TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collision data set at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-03-17

    Production of the ?(1S) meson in association with a vector boson is a rare process in the standard model with a cross section predicted to be below the sensitivity of the Tevatron. Observation of this process could signify contributions not described by the standard model or reveal limitations with the current nonrelativistic quantum-chromodynamic models used to calculate the cross section. We perform a search for this process using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1. Our search considers the ???? decay and the decay of the W and Z bosons into muons and electrons. Furthermore, in these purely leptonic decay channels, we observe one ?W candidate with an expected background of 1.20.5 events, and one ?Zcandidate with an expected background of 0.10.1 events. Both observations are consistent with the predicted background contributions. The resulting upper limits on the cross section for ?+W/Zproduction are the most sensitive reported from a single experiment and place restrictions on potential contributions from non-standard-model physics.

  15. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb{sup -1}. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high x{sub T}. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons require a good understanding of the background, mainly dominated by light mesons ({pi}{sup 0} and {eta}) which decay into two very collinear photons. Since these photons are produced within a jet, they tend to be non-isolated in most of the cases, and can be suppressed by requiring the photon candidates to be isolated in the calorimeter. In the case the hard scattered parton hadronizes leaving most of its energy to the meson, the photon produced in the decay will not be surrounded by large energy depositions. To further reduce this remaining isolated background, we present a new technique based on the isolation distribution in the calorimeter. The measured cross section is compared to next-to-leading order (NLO) pQCD calculations, which have been corrected for non-perturbative contributions. This thesis is organized as follows: we start with a brief review of QCD theory and the formalism to calculate cross sections in Chapter 2, where we also introduce the physics of prompt photon production and summarize the current status of the prompt photon phenomenology. Chapter 3 contains a description of the Tevatron and the CDF detector. The experimental measurement is described in Chapter 4, where we provide details on the different datasets used in the measurement, the trigger, and the event selection requirements. Most of this Chapter is devoted to the explanation of the background subtraction method and the determination of the photon signal fraction. The systematic uncertainties on the measurement are evaluated in Chapter 5, while Chapter 6 discusses the final results and the comparison to the theoretical predictions. Finally, the conclusions are presented in Chapter 7.

  16. Measurement of the WW+WZ Production Cross Section Using the Lepton+Jets Final State at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-11-01

    We report two complementary measurements of the diboson (WW + WZ) cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second method uses more of the kinematic information in the event through matrix-element calculations of the signal and background processes and has a higher sensitivity. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4{sigma} and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results from both methods gives {sigma}{sub WW+WZ} = 16.0 {+-} 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  17. Precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, R.E.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z boson production by e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions has been attained at the Slac Linear Collider with the SLD detector. We describe this measurement for the 1993 data run, emphasizing the significant improvements in polarized beam operation which took place for this run, where the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization averaged 62.6 {plus_minus} 1.2 %. Preliminary 1993 results for A{sub LR} are presented. When combined with the (less precise) 1992 result, the preliminary result for the effective weak mixing angle is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W {sup eff}} = 0.2290 {plus_minus} 0.0010.

  18. Measurement of the single top production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; /Buenos Aires U.

    2010-05-01

    This thesis describes a search for singly produced top quarks via an electroweak vertex in head-on proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analysis uses a total of 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab, corresponding to two different run periods of the Tevatron collider. Two channels contribute to single top quark production at the Tevatron, the s-channel and the t-channel. In the s-channel, a virtual W boson is produced from the aniquilation of a quark and an antiquark and a top and a bottom quarks are produced from the W decay. The top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a bottom quark. Final states are considered in which the W boson decays leptonically into an electron or a muon plus a neutrino. Thus, at the detector level, the final state characterizing the s-channel contains one lepton, missing energy accounting for the neutrino, and two jets from the two bottom quarks. In the t-channel, the final state has an additional jet coming from a light quark. Clearly, a precise reconstruction of the events requires a precise measurement of the energy of the jets. A multivariate technique, Bayesian neural networks, is used to extract the single top signal from the overwhelming background still left after event selection. A Bayesian likelihood probability is then computed to measure the single top cross section. Assuming the observed excess is due to single top events, the measured single top quark production cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.70{sub -0.93}{sup +1.18} pb. The observed excess is associated with a p-value of (3.2 {+-} 2.3) x 10{sup -8}, assuming the background-only hypothesis. This p-value corresponds to an excess over background of 5.4 standard deviations for a Gaussian density. The p-value computed using the standard model signal cross section of 3.46 pb is (22.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -6}, corresponding to an expected significance of 4.08 standard deviations.

  19. Widening the envelope of UK HLW vitrification - Experimental studies with high waste loadings and new product formulations on a full scale non-active vitrification plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, R.; Gribble, N. [Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Riley, A. [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG, UK (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The Vitrification Test Rig is a full scale waste vitrification plant that processes non-radioactive liquid HLW simulants based on the active waste streams produced by the reprocessing plants in the UK. Previous work on the rig has primarily concerned increasing the operational envelopes for the active waste vitrification plants at Sellafield to accommodate higher throughputs of Blended waste streams, higher waste oxide incorporation rates in the vitrified products, and the incorporation of legacy waste streams from early reactor commissioning and reprocessing operations at Sellafield. Recent operations have focussed on four main areas; dilute liquid feeds, very high Magnox waste stream incorporation levels, alternative base glass formulations and providing an operational envelope for 28 %w/w Magnox waste vitrification. This paper details the work performed and the major findings of that work. In summary: The VTR has been successfully used to determine operational envelopes and product quality for several HLW feed variations that will allow WVP to increase overall plant throughput via increased waste loading in canisters, increased HLW feed rates or a combination of both. The VTR has also demonstrated the ability to go to waste incorporations, feed rates and glass compositions that are currently beyond WVP specified limits, but that are feasible for future vitrification regimes. In addition, the VTR has trialled dilute feeds similar to those that are likely to be received by WVP in the future and the data obtained from these experiments will allow WVP to prepare adequately for the high throughput challenge of such feeds. Furthermore, new equipment has been trialled on the VTR in water feed mode to determine its suitability and operational limitations for WVP. Future operations will, in the short term, be concerned with increasing the throughput of WVP and are likely to focus on HLW decommissioning operations waste streams in the longer term. (authors)

  20. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-05-01

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8*|1. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radiusmoreparameters, R = 0.4 and R = 0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.less

  1. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8<|Y*|<10. These measurements use a sample of data recorded using the ATLAS detector in 2011, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4more » and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.« less

  2. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section with an in situ Calibration of $b$-jet Identification Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-07-01

    A measurement of the top-quark pair-production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.12 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab is presented. Decays of top-quark pairs into the final states e{nu} + jets and {mu}{nu} + jets are selected, and the cross section and the b-jet identification efficiency are determined using a new measurement technique which requires that the measured cross sections with exactly one and multiple identified b-quarks from the top-quark decays agree. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of 8.5 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) pb is measured.

  3. Measurement of the $$B_c^{\\pm}$$ production cross section in $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=1.96$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2016-03-01

    Here, we describe a measurement of the ratio of the cross sections times branching fractions of the Bc+ meson in the decay mode Bc+ → J/ψμ+ν to the B+ meson in the decay mode B+ → J/ψK+ in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement is based on the complete CDF Run II data set, which comes from an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1. The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions for Bc+ and B+ mesons with momentum transverse to the beam greater than 6 GeV/c and rapidity magnitude smaller than 0.6 ismore » 0.211 ± 0.012(stat)-0.020+0.021(syst). Using the known B+ → J/ψK+ branching fraction, the known B+ production cross section, and a selection of the predicted Bc+ → J/ψμ+ν branching fractions, the range for the total Bc+ production cross section is estimated.« less

  4. Measurement of the production cross-section of a single top quark in association with a W boson at 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-11

    The cross-section for the production of a single top quark in association with a W boson in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 is measured. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Events containing two leptons and one central b-jet are selected. The Wt signal is separated from the backgrounds using boosted decision trees, each of which combines a number of discriminating variables into one classifier. Production of Wt events is observed with a significance of 7.7σ. The cross-section is extracted in amore » profile likelihood fit to the classifier output distributions. The Wt cross-section, inclusive of decay modes, is measured to be 23.0±1.3(stat.)-3.5+3.2(syst.)±1.1(lumi.) pb. The measured cross-section is used to extract a value for the CKM matrix element |Vtb| of 1.01 ± 0.10 and a lower limit of 0.80 at the 95% confidence level. Furthermore, the cross-section for the production of a top quark and a W boson is also measured in a fiducial acceptance requiring two leptons with p T > 25 GeV and |η| < 2.5, one jet with pT > 20 GeV and |η| < 2.5, and ETmiss >20 GeV, including both Wt and top-quark pair events as signal. The measured value of the fiducial cross-section is 0.85 ± 0.01(stat.) -0.07 +0.06 (syst.)±0.03(lumi.) pb.« less

  5. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Heather Lynn

    2004-02-01

    The direct observation of the top quark was first achieved at the Tevatron proton anti-proton collider at Fermilab. This discovery completed the third generation quark sector where the top quark is expected to accompany the bottom quark in the weak isospin doublet. This dissertation discusses the experimental verification of the production cross section as predicted by the Standard Model. A measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using 107.9 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab between March of 2003 and June of 2003 is presented. The measurement focuses on the t{bar t} production in the ''lepton plus jets'' final state in which one of the W bosons from the t{bar t} decay subsequently decays leptonically to an electron or a muon, and the other decays hadronically. The B-tagging technique which utilizes the precision silicon detector tracking is used to enhance the signal for t{bar t} events relative to the background through identification of the bottom quark from its measurable lifetime. The t{bar t} production cross section is measured to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 4.5 {+-} 1.4(stat) {+-} 0.8(sys) pb.

  6. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-18

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at √s= 13 TeV by theCMS experiment at the CERN LHC, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 42 pb-1. The measurement is performed by analyzing events with at least one electron and one muon of opposite charge, and at least two jets. We then measured the cross section and found that was 769 ± 60 (stat) ± 55 (syst) ± 92 (lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectation from the standard model.

  7. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross-section in dimuon final states in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konrath, Jens Peter; /Freiburg U.

    2008-09-01

    Particle physics deals with the fundamental building blocks of matter and their interactions. The vast number of subatomic particles can be reduced to twelve fundamental fermions, which interact by the exchange of spin-1 particles as described in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The SM provides the best description of the subatomic world to date, despite the fact it does not include gravitation. Following the relation {lambda} = h/p, where h is Planck's constant, for the examination of physics at subatomic scales with size {lambda} probes with high momenta p are necessary. These high energies are accessible through particle colliders. Here, particles are accelerated and brought to collision at interaction points at which detectors are installed to record these particle collisions. Until the anticipated start-up of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron collider at Fermilab near Chicago is the highest energy collider operating in the world, colliding protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Its two interaction points are covered by the multi purpose particle detectors D0 and CDF. During the first data-taking period, known as Run I, the Tevatron operated at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. This run period lasted from 1992 to 1996. During this period, the long-predicted top quark was discovered. From 1996 and 2001, the accelerator was upgraded to deliver higher instantaneous luminosities at its current center-of-mass energy. At the same time, the experiments were upgraded to take full advantage of the upgraded accelerator complex. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator in the world with a sufficient energy to produce top quarks. Studying top quark production, decay and properties is an important part of the D0 and CDF physics programs. Because of its large mass, the top quark is a unique probe of the Standard Model, and an interesting environment to search for new physics. In this thesis, a measurement of the production cross-section of top quark pairs decaying to two muons is presented. In addition, a Monte Carlo study of the top quark spin correlation measurement was carried out. This thesis is laid out as follows: chapter two gives a short overview over the Standard Model of particle physics and the theoretical aspects of unpolarized and polarized top quark production and decay, chapter three describes the accelerator complex and the D0 experiment whose data is used in this analysis. The Reconstruction of events recorded with the D0 detector is explained in chapter four and the data and Monte Carlo samples used are presented in chapter five. Finally, the cross-section measurement is described in chapter six and the Monte Carlo study of top quark spin correlations in chapter seven.

  8. Power Full | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Sector: Wind energy Product: China-based investment holding company that owns 100% of Ruifeng Windpower. References: Power Full1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  9. Measurement of the W+ W- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) =1.96-TeV using dilepton events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Arguin, J.-F.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U.

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the W{sup +}W{sup -} production cross section using 184 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Using the dilepton decay channel W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{sup -}{ovr {nu}}, where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons, we find 17 candidate events compared to an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting W{sup +}W{sup -} production cross section measurement of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.6{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb agrees well with the Standard Model expectation.

  10. First Measurement of the Cross Section for Top-Quark Pair Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-01-01

    The first measurement of the cross section for top-quark pair production in pp collisions at the LHC at center-of-mass energy sqrt(s)= 7 TeV has been performed using 3.1 {\\pm} 0.3 inverse pb of data recorded by the CMS detector. This result utilizes the final state with two isolated, highly energetic charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and two or more jets. Backgrounds from Drell-Yan and non-W/Z boson production are estimated from data. Eleven events are observed in the data with 2.1 {\\pm} 1.0 events expected from background. The measured cross section is 194 {\\pm} 72 (stat.) {\\pm} 24 (syst.) {\\pm} 21 (lumi.) pb, consistent with next-to-leading order predictions.

  11. Measurement of the ttbar production cross section in the all-jets final state in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-22

    The cross section for tt production in the all-jets final state is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector, in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 fb-1. The inclusive cross section is found to be 275.6 6.1 (stat) 37.8 (syst) 7.2 (lumi) pb. The normalized differential cross sections are measured as a function of the top quark transverse momenta, pT, and compared to predictions from quantum chromodynamics. The results are reported at detector, parton, and particle levels. In all cases, the measured top quark pT spectra are significantly softer than theoretical predictions.

  12. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? and Z?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.

  13. Measurement of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections using leptonic final states in 8.6 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-06-12

    We study the processes pp̄→WZ→l±νl⁺l⁻ and pp̄→ZZ→l⁺l⁻νν¯, where l=e or μ. Using 8.6 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we measure the WZ production cross section to be 4.50+0.63–0.66 pb which is consistent with, but slightly larger than, the prediction of the standard model. The ZZ cross section is measured to be 1.64±0.46 pb, in agreement with a prediction of the standard model. Combination with an earlier analysis of the ZZ→l⁺l⁻l⁺l⁻ channel yields a ZZ cross section of 1.44+0.35–0.34 pb.

  14. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section in p p̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-07-06

    The authors present a new measurement of the production cross section σ(pp̄ = ZZ) at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, obtained from the analysis of the four charged lepton final state ℓ+ℓ-ℓ`+ℓ`- (ℓ, ℓ` = e or μ). They observe ten candidate events with an expected background of 0.37 ± 0.13 events. The measured cross section σ(pp̄ =ZZ) = 1.26-0.37+0.47 (stat) ± 0.14 (syst) pb is in agreement with NLO QCD predictions. This result is combined with a previous result from the ZZ = ℓ+ℓ- νν̄ channel resulting in a combined cross section of σ(pp̄ = ZZ) =more » 1.40-0.37+0.43 (stat) ±0.14 (syst) pb.« less

  15. Measurement of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections using leptonic final states in 8.6 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Oteroy y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.

    2012-06-12

    We study the processes pp??WZ?l?l?l? and pp??ZZ?l?l???, where l=e or ?. Using 8.6 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we measure the WZ production cross section to be 4.50+0.630.66 pb which is consistent with, but slightly larger than, the prediction of the standard model. The ZZ cross section is measured to be 1.640.46 pb, in agreement with a prediction of the standard model. Combination with an earlier analysis of the ZZ?l?l?l?l? channel yields a ZZ cross section of 1.44+0.350.34 pb.

  16. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? andmoreZ?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.less

  17. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gaugemore » couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  18. Measurement of the ttbar Production Cross Section in ppbar Collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV using Soft Electron b-Tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-02-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to 1.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We reconstruct t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel, consisting of e{nu}+jets and {mu}{nu}+jets final states. The dominant background is the production of W bosons in association with multiple jets. To suppress this background, we identify electrons from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor jets ('soft electron tags'). From a sample of 2196 candidate events, we obtain 120 tagged events with a background expectation of 51 {+-} 3 events, corresponding to a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.8 {+-} 2.4 (stat) {+-} 1.6 (syst) {+-} 0.5 (lumi) pb. We assume a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of the t{bar t} cross section with soft electron tags in Run II of the Tevatron.

  19. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore »Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  20. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore » Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  1. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevalier-Thery, Solene; /Paris U., VI-VII /Saclay

    2010-06-01

    The top quark has been discovered by CDF and D0 experiments in 1995 at the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately study the properties of this quark: its mass is now known to better than 1% accuracy. This thesis describes the measurement of the top pair cross section in the electron muon channel with 4, 3 fb{sup -1} recorded data between 2006 and 2009 by the D0 experiment. Since the final state included a muon, improvements of some aspects of its identification have been performed : a study of the contamination of the cosmic muons and a study of the quality of the muon tracks. The cross section measurement is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations and the other experimental measurements. This measurement has been used to extract a value for the top quark mass. This method allows for the extraction of a better defined top mass than direct measurements as it depends less on Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainty on this extracted mass, dominated by the experimental one, is however larger than for direct measurements. In order to decrease this uncertainty, the ratio of the Z boson and the top pair production cross sections has been studied to look for some possible theoretical correlations. At the Tevatron, the two cross sections are not theoretically correlated: no decrease of the uncertainty on the extracted top mass is therefore possible.

  2. A measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-02

    In this study, the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is based on the entire 2011 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb–1. Inclusive and differential cross-section ratios for massive vector bosons decaying to electrons and muons are measured in association with jets with transverse momentum pT > 30GeV and jet rapidity |y| < 4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and to predictions from differentmore » Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.« less

  3. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt¯) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/μ +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e–, μ+μ–, and e±μ∓) decay channels. The tt¯ cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt¯ system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic upmore » to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.« less

  4. Measurement of the $t \\bar{t}$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-12-29

    The top-antitop quark (t t-bar) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 inverse femtobarns. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239 +/- 2 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) +/- 6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV,morein agreement with the prediction of the standard model.less

  5. A measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-02

    In this study, the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is based on the entire 2011 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb–1. Inclusive and differential cross-section ratios for massive vector bosons decaying to electrons and muons are measured in association with jets with transverse momentum pT > 30GeV and jet rapidity |y| < 4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and to predictions from different Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.

  6. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  7. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; DellOrso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Martnez-Ballarn, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.

    2011-09-01

    This article reports a measurement of the production cross section of prompt isolated photon pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.36 fb?. The cross section is presented as a function of kinematic variables sensitive to the reaction mechanisms. The results are compared with three perturbative QCD calculations: (1) a leading-order parton shower Monte Carlo, (2) a fixed next-to-leading-order calculation and (3) a next-to-leading-order/next-to-next-to-leading-log resummed calculation. The comparisons show that, within their known limitations, all calculations predict the main features of the data, but no calculation adequately describes all aspects of the data.

  8. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a τ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2012-06-19

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying τ lepton from the decay tt¯→(lνl)(τhντ)bb¯, (l=e,μ). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb⁻¹ for the electron channel and 2.2 fb⁻¹ for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including τ leptons in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV. The measured value σtt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  9. Erratum: Measurement of the $$t \\bar{t}$$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-05

    In this study, the top-antitop quark (tt¯) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb–1. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239±2 (stat.)±11 (syst.)±6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV, in agreement with the predictionmore » of the standard model.« less

  10. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-09-15

    This article reports a measurement of the production cross section of prompt isolated photon pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.36 fb⁻¹. The cross section is presented as a function of kinematic variables sensitive to the reaction mechanisms. The results are compared with three perturbative QCD calculations: (1) a leading-order parton shower Monte Carlo, (2) a fixed next-to-leading-order calculation and (3) a next-to-leading-order/next-to-next-to-leading-log resummed calculation. The comparisons show that, within their known limitations, all calculations predict the main features of themore » data, but no calculation adequately describes all aspects of the data.« less

  11. Full Final Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Lauren Davis, Amanda Barry, Tarryn E. Miller 1 1 Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2 ... Large-scale Algal Fuel Production Henry L. Bryant * , James W. Richardson ...

  12. Section C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 Standard 1: Management Products and Controls ... High-Level Waste Product ...... 102 Specification 2: Immobilized Low-Activi...

  13. Measurement of the tt, WW and Z -> tautau Production Cross Sections in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carron Montero, Sebastian Fernando; /Duke U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis we present a new technique to analyze events containing two highly energetic leptons, as a probe of the Standard Model. The philosophy is to consider the data in a more global way, as opposed to the more traditional process dependent approach of extracting a given signal over the expected backgrounds by using various kinematical requirements. We use our global technique to simultaneously measure the cross sections of the main Standard Model processes; the t{bar t}, WW and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} production from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF detector at Fermilab. We select events by requiring they contain two highly energetic leptons (e{mu}, ee, or {mu}{mu}), and make no other kinematic requirements, except for the ee and {mu}{mu} channels. We then use a likelihood fit of the data in the two-dimensional phase space defined by the missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) and the number of jets in the event (N{sub jet}), to the expected Standard Model distributions, to simultaneously extract the production cross-sections of the main process contributing to our dilepton sample.

  14. Measurements of single top quark production cross sections and |Vtb| in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Alverson, George O; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; et al

    2011-12-05

    We present measurements of production cross sections of single top quarks in pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We select events with an isolated electron or muon, an imbalance in transverse energy, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of them containing a bottom hadron. We obtain an inclusive cross section of Σ(pp̄ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.43-0.74+0.73 pb and use it to extract the CKM matrix element 0.79 production rates as predicted by the standard model.« less

  15. Measurement of differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-01

    We presented a measurement of differential cross sections for the Higgs boson (H) production in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The analysis exploits the H →γγ decay in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the diphoton system and of the associated jets. Results corrected for detector effects are compared with predictions at next-to-leading order and nextto-next-to-leading order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics, as well as with predictions beyond the standard model. Furthermore, for isolated photons with pseudorapidities |η| < 2.5, and with the photon of largest and next-to-largest transverse momentum (pγT) divided by the diphoton mass mgg satisfying the respective conditions of pγT/mγγ > 1/3 and >1/4, the total fiducial cross section is 32 ±10 fb.

  16. Measurement of the production cross sections for a Z boson and one or more b jets in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-06

    The production of a Z boson, decaying into two leptons and produced in association with one or more b jets, is studied using proton-proton collisions delivered by the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The data were recorded in 2011 with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb-1. The Z(ℓℓ) + b-jets cross sections (where ℓℓ = μμ or ee) are measured separately for a Z boson produced with exactly one b jet and with at least two b jets. In addition, a cross section ratio is extracted for a Z boson producedmore » with at least one b jet, relative to a Z boson produced with at least one jet. The measured cross sections are compared to various theoretical predictions, and the data favour the predictions in the five-flavour scheme, where b quarks are assumed massless. The kinematic properties of the reconstructed particles are compared with the predictions from the MadGraph event generator using the pythia parton shower simulation.« less

  17. Measurement of the tanti-t Production Cross Section in p anti-ptnipbar Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-06-01

    The authors present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 318 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. They select t{bar t} decays into the final states e{nu} + jets and {mu}{nu} + jets, in which at least one b quark from the t-quark decays is identified using a secondary vertex-finding algorithm. Assuming a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c{sup 2}, they measure a cross section of 8.7 {+-} 0.9(stat.){sub -0.9}{sup +1.1}(syst.) pb. They also report the first observation of t{bar t} with significance greater than 5{sigma} in the subsample in which both b quarks are identified, corresponding to a cross section of 10.1{sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(stat.){sub -1.3}{sup +2.0}(syst.) pb.

  18. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at ?s=7TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at ?s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |?|<2.5, |?|?[1.44,1.57] and with an angular separation ?R>0.45, is 17.20.2(stat)1.9(syst)0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthal angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the CollinsSoper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.

  19. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at ?s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |?|0.45, is 17.20.2(stat)1.9(syst)0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthalmoreangle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the CollinsSoper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.less

  20. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at √s=7TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in proton–proton collisions at √s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |η|<2.5, |η|ϵ[1.44,1.57] and with an angular separation ΔR>0.45, is 17.2±0.2(stat)±1.9(syst)±0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthalmore » angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the Collins–Soper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.« less

  1. SECTION E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. A143 E - i SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE WTP Contract Section E Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru...

  2. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Contract Section H Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 360 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE ...

  3. SECTION G

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CORRESPONDENCE PROCEDURES ......

  4. Full Proposal Instructions_2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Full Proposal Instructions NIF Facility Time Proposal Please prepare your full proposal according to the following instructions. Append biographical sketches(CVs) for the Principal Investigator (PI) and no more than 5 additional key team members to the end of this proposal. Submission Deadlines: Save the entire document as a single file in pdf format, and submit via the Web submission tool before 11:59 p.m. on September 1, 2015, PDT. I. COVER SHEET: (1 page) 1) Please provide the proposal title,

  5. A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

    2011-07-01

    The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

  6. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt¯) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/μ +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e, μ+μ, and e±μ) decay channels. The tt¯ cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt¯ system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic up to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.

  7. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/γ*→ττ production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W⁺W⁻, and Z/γ∗ → ττ production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6  fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s = 7  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore »cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/γ∗ → ττ underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be σ(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8⁺⁹̣˙⁷₋₉̣₅ ± 3.3 ± 3.3  pb, σ(W⁺W⁻) = 53.3 ± 2.7⁺⁷˙³₋₈̣₀ ± 1.0 ± 0.5  pb, and σ(Z/γ∗ → ττ) = 1174 ± 24⁺⁷²₋₈₇ ± 21 ± 9  pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W⁺W⁻ measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H → W⁺W⁻.« less

  8. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/γ*→ττ production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W⁺W⁻, and Z/γ∗ → ττ production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6  fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s = 7  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore » cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/γ∗ → ττ underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be σ(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8⁺⁹̣˙⁷₋₉̣₅ ± 3.3 ± 3.3  pb, σ(W⁺W⁻) = 53.3 ± 2.7⁺⁷˙³₋₈̣₀ ± 1.0 ± 0.5  pb, and σ(Z/γ∗ → ττ) = 1174 ± 24⁺⁷²₋₈₇ ± 21 ± 9  pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W⁺W⁻ measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H → W⁺W⁻.« less

  9. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    K-1 SECTION J APPENDIX K CONTRACTOR'S TRANSITION PLAN (RESERVED) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-K-2

  10. Section 16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are compared with measured values determined from vertical time sections of signal-to- noise ratio (proportional to the structure function of the index of refraction, ) from the...

  11. WW production cross section measurement and limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings at sqrt(s) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Michael P.; /Rice U.

    2008-04-01

    The cross section for WW production is measured and limits on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ trilinear gauge couplings are set using WW {yields} ee/e{mu}/{mu}{mu} events collected by the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Across the three final states, 108 candidate events are observed with 40.8 {+-} 3.8 total background expected, consistent with {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW) = 11.6 {+-} 1.8(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst) {+-} 0.7(lumi) pb. Using a set of SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(1){sub Y} conserving constraints, the one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits on trilinear gauge couplings are -0.63 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.99, -0.15 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.19, and -0.14 < {Delta}g{sub 1}{sup Z} < 0.34.

  12. H.R. 4751: A Bill to reauthorize appropriations for the weatherization program under section 422 of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, July 13, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The report H.R. 4944 is a bill to reauthorize appropriations for the weatherization program under section 422 of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. The proposed legislative text is included.

  13. Full page fax print

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 (U) April 26, 1995 Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River S~e Aiken, SC 29808 HLW-OVP-95-0031 @ Westinghouse Savannah River Company. April 27, 1995 A. B. Scoa, Jr. Va Preoident and General...,. Hgh Level Was .. ManagamenI DiviIion P. O. Box 61' Allen, SC 29602 HLW-OVP-95-0031 Keywords: Retention: High Level W88te SyslemPIan Production Plan 25 years, offer to NARA at end of retention. Disposal Auth: DOEF 1324.5 95-0002 Track .: 7605 File Record: 773-52A, Records Mr. Steven D.

  14. Full Circle Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Full Circle Fuels Place: Oberlin, Ohio Zip: 44074 Sector: Biofuels Product: Alternative fuels center dedicated to increasing awareness and use of biofuels in...

  15. SECTION I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section I, Page i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE OF CONTENTS I-1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (NOV 2013) (AS MODIFIED BY DEAR 952.202-1) (REPLACED MODS 020, 029, 0084) ................................................................................................................................ 1 I-2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ................................................................................................. 1 I-3 FAR

  16. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Contract Section H Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 370 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE TRANSITION .......................................................................................................... 1 H.2 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS ................................................................. 1 H.3 POST-CONTRACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PENSION AND OTHER BENEFIT PLANS ........ 19 H.4

  17. Full containment spray drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, K.

    1999-11-01

    Aspects of safety, environmental protection, and powder quality will continue to influence advances within spray dryer design and operation, and the concept of full containment spray drying offers a means to meet future industrial requirements. Process air recycle and powder containment within the drying chamber leads to no process air discharge to atmosphere, provides a more favorable operator environment around the spray dryer installation, reduces regions within the dryer layout where potential explosive powder/air mixtures can exist, improves yields, reduces powder losses, and provides easier cleaning operations with reduced wash water requirements.

  18. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; et al

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased asmore » the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.« less

  19. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section as a function of jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-08

    Tmore » he tt¯ production cross-section dependence on jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum is reported for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 eV in the single-lepton channel. his data was collected with the ALAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and comprise the full 2011 data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet multiplicity for up to eight jets using jet transverse momentum thresholds of 25, 40, 60, and 80 GeV, and as a function of jet transverse momentum up to the fifth jet. he results are shown after background subtraction and corrections for all known detector effects, within a kinematic range closely matched to the experimental acceptance. Several QCD-based Monte Carlo models are compared with the results. Sensitivity to the parton shower modelling is found at the higher jet multiplicities, at high transverse momentum of the leading jet and in the transverse momentum spectrum of the fifth leading jet. As a result, the MC@NLO+HERWIG MC is found to predict too few events at higher jet multiplicities.« less

  20. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8<|Y*|<10. These measurements use a sample of data recorded using the ATLAS detector in 2011, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4 and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.

  1. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section as a function of jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-08

    The tt¯ production cross-section dependence on jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum is reported for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV in the single-lepton channel. This data was collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and comprise the full 2011 data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet multiplicity for up to eight jets using jet transverse momentum thresholds of 25, 40, 60, and 80 GeV, and as a function of jet transverse momentum up to the fifth jet. The results are shown after background subtraction and corrections for all known detector effects, within a kinematic range closely matched to the experimental acceptance. Several QCD-based Monte Carlo models are compared with the results. Sensitivity to the parton shower modelling is found at the higher jet multiplicities, at high transverse momentum of the leading jet and in the transverse momentum spectrum of the fifth leading jet. As a result, the MC@NLO+HERWIG MC is found to predict too few events at higher jet multiplicities.

  2. Section I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Near-symmetric Collisions of 10A MeV Heavy Ions with Solid Targets V. Horvat, . Smit, R. L. Watson and K. Zaharakis Energy Dependence of Electron Loss Cross Sections for...

  3. SECTION F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Occupational Medical Services at Hanford F-1 PART I- THE SCHEDULE SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS F.1 PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE ...........................................................................................................................2 F.2 PRINCIPAL PLACE OF PERFORMANCE .........................................................................................................2 F.3 HOURS OF SERVICE

  4. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    J-1 SECTION J APPENDIX J PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (TO BE NEGOTIATED AFTER CONTRACT AWARD) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-J-2 Page Blank

  5. Section 66

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ) (CF 2 Cl 2 ) (CHFCl 2 ) SF 6 CF 4 CCl 4 Session Papers 277 Figure 1. Spectral absorption cross-sections of CF 4 between 1281 and 1284 cm . The experimental -1 conditions...

  6. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, hadronic top decays with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegeman, Jeroen Guido; /Twente U. Tech., Enschede

    2009-01-16

    Of the six quarks in the standard model the top quark is by far the heaviest: 35 times more massive than its partner the bottom quark and more than 130 times heavier than the average of the other five quarks. Its correspondingly small decay width means it tends to decay before forming a bound state. Of all quarks, therefore, the top is the least affected by quark confinement, behaving almost as a free quark. Its large mass also makes the top quark a key player in the realm of the postulated Higgs boson, whose coupling strengths to particles are proportional to their masses. Precision measurements of particle masses for e.g. the top quark and the W boson can hereby provide indirect constraints on the Higgs boson mass. Since in the standard model top quarks couple almost exclusively to bottom quarks (t {yields} Wb), top quark decays provide a window on the standard model through the direct measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element V{sub tb}. In the same way any lack of top quark decays into W bosons could imply the existence of decay channels beyond the standard model, for example charged Higgs bosons as expected in two-doublet Higgs models: t {yields} H{sup +}b. Within the standard model top quark decays can be classified by the (lepton or quark) W boson decay products. Depending on the decay of each of the W bosons, t{bar t} pair decays can involve either no leptons at all, or one or two isolated leptons from direct W {yields} e{bar {nu}}{sub e} and W {yields} {mu}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} decays. Cascade decays like b {yields} Wc {yields} e{bar {nu}}{sub e}c can lead to additional non-isolated leptons. The fully hadronic decay channel, in which both Ws decay into a quark-antiquark pair, has the largest branching fraction of all t{bar t} decay channels and is the only kinematically complete (i.e. neutrino-less) channel. It lacks, however, the clear isolated lepton signature and is therefore hard to distinguish from the multi-jet QCD background. It is important to measure the cross section (or branching fraction) in each channel independently to fully verify the standard model. Top quark pair production proceeds through the strong interaction, placing the scene for top quark physics at hadron colliders. This adds an additional challenge: the huge background from multi-jet QCD processes. At the Tevatron, for example, t{bar t} production is completely hidden in light q{bar q} pair production. The light (i.e. not bottom or top) quark pair production cross section is six orders of magnitude larger than that for t{bar t} production. Even including the full signature of hadronic t{bar t} decays, two b-jets and four additional jets, the QCD cross section for processes with similar signature is more than five times larger than for t{bar t} production. The presence of isolated leptons in the (semi)leptonic t{bar t} decay channels provides a clear characteristic to distinguish the t{bar t} signal from QCD background but introduces a multitude of W- and Z-related backgrounds.

  7. Section 7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Values in parentheses are (contour interval, maximum value) in g kg . Horizontal scale ... in precipitation efficiency are much less than the changes in cloud water production. ...

  8. Measurements of normalized differential cross sections for tt¯ production in pp collisions at (s)=7  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2014-10-13

    We present measurements of normalized differential cross sections for top-quark pair production as a function of the top-quark transverse momentum, and of the mass, transverse momentum, and rapidity of the t¯t system, in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √ s=7 TeV. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb₋1, recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected in the lepton + jets channel, requiring exactly one lepton and at least four jets with at least one of the jets tagged as originating from a b-quark. The measuredmore » spectra are corrected for detector efficiency and resolution effects and are compared to several Monte Carlo simulations and theory calculations. The results are in fair agreement with the predictions in a wide kinematic range. Nevertheless, data distributions are softer than predicted for higher values of the mass of the t¯t system and of the top-quark transverse momentum. Lastly, the measurements can also discriminate among different sets of parton distribution functions.« less

  9. Cross Section and Parity-Violating Spin Asymmetries of W{sup {+-}} Boson Production in Polarized p+p Collisions at {radical}(s)=500 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Kinney, E.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Nagle, J. L.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Brooks, M. L.; Butsyk, S.; Guo, L.; Jiang, X.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Lee, D. M.

    2011-02-11

    Large parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetries A{sub L}{sup e+}=-0.86{sub -0.14}{sup +0.30} and A{sub L}{sup e-}=0.88{sub -0.71}{sup +0.12} are observed for inclusive high transverse momentum electrons and positrons in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=500 GeV with the PHENIX detector at RHIC. These e{sup {+-}} come mainly from the decay of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons, and their asymmetries directly demonstrate parity violation in the couplings of the W{sup {+-}} to the light quarks. The observed electron and positron yields were used to estimate W{sup {+-}} boson production cross sections for the e{sup {+-}} channels of {sigma}(pp{yields}W{sup +}X)xBR(W{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e})=144.1{+-}21.2(stat){sub -10.3}{sup +3.4}(syst){+-}21.6(norm) pb, and {sigma}(pp{yields}W{sup -}X)xBR(W{sup -}{yields}e{sup -}{nu}{sub e})=31.7{+-}12.1(stat){sub -8.2}{sup +10.1}(syst){+-}4.8(norm) pb.

  10. Cross Section and Parity-Violating Spin Asymmetries of W± Boston Production in Polarized p + p Collisions at √sNN = 500 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2011-02-11

    Large parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetries A{sub L}{sup e+} = -0.86{sub -0.14}{sup +0.30} and A{sub L}{sup e-} = 0.88{sub -0.71}{sup +0.12} are observed for inclusive high transverse momentum electrons and positrons in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 500 GeV with the PHENIX detector at RHIC. These e{sup {+-}} come mainly from the decay of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons, and their asymmetries directly demonstrate parity violation in the couplings of the W{sup {+-}} to the light quarks. The observed electron and positron yields were used to estimate W{sup {+-}} boson production cross sections for the e{sup {+-}} channels of {sigma}(pp {yields} W{sup +}X) x BR(W{sup +} e{sup +}v{sub e}) 144.1 {+-} 21.2(stat){sub -10.3}{sup +3.4}(syst) {+-} 21.6(norm) pb, and {sigma}(pp {yields} W{sup -}X) x BR(W{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}v{sup -}) = 31.7 {+-} 12.1(stat){sub -8.2}{sup +10.1}(syst) {+-} 4.8(norm) pb.

  11. 14655 Section I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A099 I-i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES River Corridor Closure Contract Section I Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 649 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2 CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available.

  12. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING ON HUMAN RESOURCES (TO BE NEGOTIATED DURING CONTRACT TRANSITION) The personnel appendix required by DEAR Subpart 970.31 entitled "Contract Cost Principles and Procedures" as referenced in Section I Clause, DEAR 970.5232-2, "Payments and Advances" will be Appendix A of the contract. The personnel appendix will be negotiated between DOE OCRWM and the selected offeror during the contract transition period. Contract No.: DE-RW0000005

  13. Section CC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 J-12-1 ATTACHMENT J-12 GOVERNMENT FURNISHED SERVICES AND INFORMATION TABLE J-12.1 GFS/I LIST FROM SECTION C (SOW) ID GFS/I GFS/I Due Contract Section GF0001 DOE will administer MOUs with other law enforcement agencies or other Federal agencies (e.g., U.S. Department of Defense [Yakima Training Center]). DOE will provide copies of MOUs and/or contracts to the MSC. As required C.2.1.1.1 GF0002 DOE will provide Federal Commissions for Hanford Patrol personnel. As required C.2.1.1.1 GF0003 DOE

  14. Section CC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 464 J-11-1 ATTACHMENT J-11 CONTRACT DELIVERABLES TABLE J-11.1 DELIVERABLE LIST FROM SECTION C (SOW) ID Deliverable DOE Contract Deliverable Due Contract Section Action Response Time a CD0001 Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix Approve 30 days July 24, 2009; thereafter by request as applicable C.1.3 CD0002 Annual Forecast of Services and Infrastructure Review NA November 21, 2009; annually thereafter by November 31 C.1.3 CD0003

  15. SECTION C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C-1 PART 1 - THE SCHEDULE SECTION C DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATIONS/PERFORMANCE WORK STATEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS C.1 Hanford Occupational Medical Program .................................................................C-3 C.2 Description of Program Performance Requirements ................................................C-6 C.2.1 Firm Fixed Price Scope...................................................................................C-6 C.2.1.1 Medical Monitoring and Qualification Examinations

  16. SECTION E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mod 042 Occupational Medical Services at Hanford E-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS E.1 INSPECTION..........................................................................................................E-2 E.2 ACCEPTANCE........................................................................................................E-2 E.3 FIXED PRICE CLAUSES.......................................................................................E-2 E.4 COST

  17. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Modification 499 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE TRANSITION .......................................................................................................... 1 H.2 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS ................................................................. 1 H.3 POST-CONTRACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PENSION AND OTHER BENEFIT PLANS ........ 14 H.4 NO THIRD PARTY BENEFICIARIES

  18. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H Contract No: DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 491 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE TRANSITION ............................................................................................................ 1 H.2 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS ................................................................... 1 H.3 POST-CONTRACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PENSION AND OTHER BENEFIT PLANS .......... 14 H.4 NO THIRD PARTY

  19. Measurement of the ratios of the Z/gamma* + >= n jet production cross sections to the total inclusive Z/gamma* cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-08-01

    We present a study of events with Z bosons and jets produced at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample consists of nearly 14,000 Z/{gamma}* {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} candidates corresponding to the integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1} collected using the D0 detector. Ratios of the Z/{gamma}* + {ge} n jet cross sections to the total inclusive Z/{gamma}* cross section have been measured for n = 1 to 4 jet events. Our measurements are found to be in good agreement with a next-to-leading order QCD calculation and with a tree-level QCD prediction with parton shower simulation and hadronization.

  20. Section J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    M-1 Section J Appendix M Key Design, Licensing and Site Management M&O Milestone Chart Activity Planned Date Develop and Submit CD-2 (25%-30%) 08/2009 Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Balance of Plant Support Facilities (OCRWM Start of Construction 3/2012) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Initial Handling Facility (IHF) (OCRWM Start of Construction for IHF: 9/2013) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Wet Handling

  1. Section Number:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives," the following list of directives is applicable to this contract. List A Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives," the Contractor shall comply with the requirements of applicable Federal, State, and local laws and regulations, unless relief has been granted in writing by the appropriate

  2. SECTION B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 7, 2013 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) AWARD FEE PLAN (AFP) 1 OCTOBER 2013 THROUGH 30 SEPTEMBER 2014 CONTRACT DE-EM0001971 I. INTRODUCTION This Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) provides a standard process for development, administration, and coordination of all phases of the fee determination process consistent with Section B.2 of the subject contract. Fee determinations are not subject to the Disputes Clause of the contract. II. ORGANIZATIONAL

  3. SECTION B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY16 PEMP 10-22-15 Mod 119 1 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) ANNUAL FEE PLAN (AFP) 1 OCTOBER 2015 THROUGH 30 SEPTEMBER 2016 CONTRACT DE-EM0001971 October 22, 2015 I. INTRODUCTION This Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) contains a standard process for development, administration, and coordination of all phases of the fee determination process consistent with Section B.2 of the subject contract. II. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND DUTIES The following organizational

  4. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    D-1 SECTION J APPENDIX D KEY PERSONNEL Name Position Doug Cooper General Manager John Donnell Repository Licensing Lead Al Ebner, PE, PhD Repository Design Lead Steve Piccolo Deputy General Manager Steve White Quality & Performance Assurance Lead George Clare Project Management & Integration Lead Mike Hitchler Preclosure Safety Analysis Lead Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-D-2 POSITION DESCRIPTIONS OCRWM SPECIFIED KEY PERSONNEL 1. General Manager: Requires 10 years experience as a

  5. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    J-F-1 SECTION J APPENDIX F CRITICAL STAFF Subject Matter Expert Subject Matter Canister Transfer Machine Engineering Waste Package Transfer Trolley Engineering Transport and Emplacement Vehicle Engineering Cask Transfer Trolley Engineering Criticality and Nuclear Engineering Subsurface Thermal Management Engineering Pre-closure Safety Analysis Specialist Waste Package and Drip Shields Engineering Waste Package Closure System Engineering NOG-1 Cranes Engineering Subsurface Design Engineering

  6. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    H-1 SECTION J APPENDIX H CONTRACT GUIDANCE FOR PREPARATION OF DIVERSITY PLAN This Guidance is to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the Diversity elements and where these issues may already be addressed in the contract. To the extent these issues are already addressed in the contract, the Contractor need only cross reference the location. Contractor's Workforce The Department's contracts contain clauses on Equal Employment

  7. Section L

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Section L - Attachment F - Past Performance Cover Letter and Questionnaire Date: ________________ Dear _________________: Our firm is submitting a proposal for a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Contract for the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site with an estimated value of approximately $550M per year. Our firm is seeking your assistance. We are asking you to complete the attached questionnaire evaluating our performance on

  8. Measurements of the total and differential Higgs boson production cross sections combining the H ? ?? and H ? ZZ* ? 4? decay channels at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-27

    Measurements of the total and differential cross sections of Higgs boson production are performed using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at a center-of-mass energy of ?s = 8 TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector. Cross sections are obtained from measured H ? ?? and H ? ZZ* ? 4? event yields, which are combined accounting for detector efficiencies, fiducial acceptances, and branching fractions. Differential cross sections are reported as a function of Higgs boson transverse momentum, Higgs boson rapidity, number of jets in the event, and transverse momentum of the leading jet. Themoretotal production cross section is determined to be ?pp?H = 33.0 5.3 (stat) 1.6 (syst) pb. The measurements are compared to state-of-the-art predictions.less

  9. Section J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    L-1 Section J Appendix L MEMORANDUM FROM DAVID R. HILL, GENERAL COUNSEL, DATED NOVEMBER 30, 2006, SUBJECT: ONGOING LICENSING SUPPORT NETWORK ("LSN") OBLIGATIONS Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-2 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-3 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-4 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-5 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-6 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-7 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-8 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-9 Contract No.:

  10. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  11. Measurement of νμ-induced charged-current neutral pion production cross sections on mineral oil at Evϵ0.5–2.0 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Bazarko, A. O.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Cox, D. C.; et al

    2011-03-23

    Using a custom 3-Cerenkov ring fitter, we report cross sections for νμ-induced charged-current single π⁰ production on mineral oil (CH₂) from a sample of 5810 candidate events with 57% signal purity over an energy range of 0.5–2.0 GeV. This includes measurements of the absolute total cross section as a function of neutrino energy, and flux-averaged differential cross sections measured in terms of Q², μ⁻ kinematics, and π⁰ kinematics. The sample yields a flux-averaged total cross section of (9.2±0.3stat±1.5syst)×10⁻³⁹ cm²/CH² at mean neutrino energy of 0.965 GeV.

  12. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  13. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $$ s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $ is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 $\\,\\text {fb}^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25 $\\,\\text {GeV}$ respectively, in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta |<2.5$ , $|\\eta |\

  14. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  15. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  16. Full hoop casing for midframe of industrial gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Gerald A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2015-12-01

    A can annular industrial gas turbine engine, including: a single-piece rotor shaft spanning a compressor section (82), a combustion section (84), a turbine section (86); and a combustion section casing (10) having a section (28) configured as a full hoop. When the combustion section casing is detached from the engine and moved to a maintenance position to allow access to an interior of the engine, a positioning jig (98) is used to support the compressor section casing (83) and turbine section casing (87).

  17. Top physics: measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev using lepton + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-07

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. In these events, heavy flavor quarks from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, a total of 48 candidate events are selected, where 13.5 {+-} 1.8 events are expected from background contributions. We measure a t{bar t} production cross section of 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup _1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb.

  18. Measurement of the tt? production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV using events with large Missing ET and jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-08-09

    In this paper we report a measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron accelerator. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and high jet multiplicity. This measurement vetoes the presence of explicitly identified electrons and muons, thus enhancing the tau contribution of ttMs; decays. Signal events are discriminated from the background using a neural network and heavy flavor jets are identified by a secondary-vertex tagging algorithm. We measure a tt? production cross section of 7.99 0.55(stat) 0.76(syst) 0.46(lumi) pb, assuming a top mass mtop = 172.5 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous measurements and standard model predictions.

  19. Monte Carlo Study of the Measurement of the top - anti-top Production Cross-Section in the Muon + Jets Channel with the D0-Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Jorg Manfred; /Bonn U.

    2004-03-01

    A measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 detector using simulated events is performed. The final state containing a muon and jets is examined including all methods of measuring signal efficiencies and the estimation of the background contributions. Especially, the identification efficiency and properties of muons are studied.

  20. Measurement of the production and differential cross sections of W⁺W⁻ bosons in association with jets in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; et al

    2015-06-23

    We present a measurement of the W-boson-pair production cross section in pp¯ collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy and the first measurement of the differential cross section as a function of jet multiplicity and leading-jet energy. The W⁺W⁻ cross section is measured in the final state comprising two charged leptons and neutrinos, where either charged lepton can be an electron or a muon. Using data collected by the CDF experiment corresponding to 9.7 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity, a total of 3027 collision events consistent with W⁺W⁻ production are observed with an estimated background contribution of 1790 ± 190 events. Themore » measured total cross section is σ(pp¯→ W⁺W⁻) = 14.0 ± 0.6(stat)⁺1.2⁻1.0(syst) ± 0.8(lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction.« less

  1. American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Bar Association Section on Environment Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60610 Product: The Section of...

  2. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-24

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section, $ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |?| 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements aremorecompared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. The predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.less

  3. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-06-03

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section, $ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |?| 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements aremorecompared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. Lastly, the predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.less

  4. Measurement of differential production cross-sections for a Z boson in association with b-jets in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-10-24

    We report measurements of differential production cross-sections of a Z boson in association with b-jets in pp collisions at √ s = 7 TeV. The data analysed correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1 recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Particle-level cross-sections are determined for events with a Z boson decaying into an electron or muon pair, and containing b-jets. For events with at least one b-jet, the cross-section is presented as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum and rapidity, together with the inclusive b-jet cross-section as a function of b-jet transverse momentum,more » rapidity and angular separations between the b-jet and the Z boson. For events with at least two b-jets, the cross-section is determined as a function of the invariant mass and angular separation of the two highest transverse momentum b-jets, and as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum and rapidity. Lastly, results are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.« less

  5. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-06-03

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section,more » $$ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $$ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s} $$ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$$^{-1}$$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |η| < 2.5, and are required to have transverse momenta in the range 40 < $$ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $$ < 300 GeV and $$ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $$ > 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. Lastly, the predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.« less

  6. Guidelines to assist rural electric cooperatives to fulfill the requirements of Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA for cogeneration and small power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    These guidelines were designed to assist National Rural Electric Cooperative Association staff and consultants involved in the implementation of Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The guidelines were structured to meet anticipated use as: a self-contained legal, technical and economic reference manual helpful in dealing with small power producers and cogenerators; a roadmap through some of the less obvious obstacles encountered by utilities interacting with small power producers and cogenerators; a starting point for those utilities who have not yet formulated specific policies and procedures, nor developed rates for purchasing power from small power producers and cogenerators; a discussion vehicle to highlight key issues and increase understanding in workshop presentations to rural electric cooperatives; and an evolutionary tool which can be updated to reflect changes in the law as they occur. The chapters in these Guidelines contain both summary information, such as compliance checklists, and detailed information, such as cost rate calculations, on regulatory requirements, operational considerations, and rate considerations. The appendices contain more specific material, e.g. rural electric cooperative sample policy statements. (LCL)

  7. Measurement of differential and integrated fiducial cross sections for Higgs boson production in the four-lepton decay channel in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-01

    Integrated fiducial cross sections for the production of four leptons via the H → 4ℓ decays (ℓ = e, μ) are measured in pp collisions atmore » $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8TeV. Measurements are performed with data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb$$^{–1}$$ at 7TeV, and 19.7 fb$$^{–1}$$ at 8 TeV, collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Differential cross sections are measured using the 8 TeV data, and are determined as functions of the transverse momentum and rapidity of the four-lepton system, accompanying jet multiplicity, transverse momentum of the leading jet, and difference in rapidity between the Higgs boson candidate and the leading jet. A measurement of the Z → 4ℓ cross section, and its ratio to the H → 4ℓ cross section is also performed. All cross sections are measured within a fiducial phase space defined by the requirements on lepton kinematics and event topology. Here, the integrated H → 4ℓ fiducial cross section is measured to be 0.56$$_{–0.44}^{+0.67}$$ (stat)$$_{–0.06}^{+0.21}$$ (syst) fb at 7 TeV, and 1.11$$_{–0.35}^{+0.41}$$ (stat)$$_{–0.10}^{+0.14}$$ (syst) fb at 8 TeV. The measurements are found to be compatible with theoretical calculations based on the standard model.« less

  8. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯Wmore » nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.« less

  9. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯W nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.

  10. Measurement of the Top-antitop Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using the Kinematic Properties of Events with Leptons and Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-09-01

    A measurement of the top-antitop production cross section in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been performed at the LHC with the CMS detector. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns and is based on the reconstruction of the final state with one isolated, high transverse-momentum electron or muon and three or more hadronic jets. The kinematic properties of the events are used to separate the top-antitop signal from W+jets and QCD multijet background events. The measured cross section is 173 + 39 - 32 (stat. + syst.) pb, consistent with standard model expectations.

  11. Mesure de la section efficace de production de paires de quarks top dans l'etat final di-electron avec les donnees collectees par l'experience D0 au RunIIa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Dit Latour, Bertrand; /LPSC, Grenoble

    2008-09-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 by CDF and D0 collaborations in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately measure the properties of this very massive quark. This thesis is devoted to the measurement of the top pair production cross-section via the strong interaction, in a final state composed of two electrons, two particle jets and missing transverse energy. It is based on a 1 fb{sup -1} data set collected by the D0 experiment between 2002 and 2006. The reconstruction and identification of electrons and jets is of major importance in this analysis, and have been studied in events where a Z boson is produced together with one or more jets. The Z+jets process is indeed the dominant physics background to top pair production in the dielectron final state. The primary goal of this cross-section measurement is to verify Standard Model predictions. In this document, this result is also interpreted to indirectly extract the top quark mass. Moreover, the cross-section measurement is sensitive to new physics such as the existence of a charged Higgs boson. The selection established for the cross-section analysis has been used to search for a H{sup +} boson lighter than the top quark, where the latter can decay into a W{sup +} or H{sup +} boson and a b quark. The model that has been studied makes the assumption that the H{sup +} boson can only decay into a tau lepton and a neutrino.

  12. Measurements of fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b-jets in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-07

    Fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b -jets are reported, using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, collected with the ATLAS detector. The cross-section times branching ratio for tt¯ events with at least one additional b-jet is measured to be 950 ± 70 (stat.) +240-190 (syst.) fb in the lepton-plus-jets channel and 50 ± 10 (stat.) +15-10 (syst.) fb in the eμ channel. The cross-section times branching ratio for events with at least two additional b -jets is measured to bemore » 19.3 ± 3.5 (stat.) ± 5.7 (syst.) fb in the dilepton channel ( eμ , μμ , and ee ) using a method based on tight selection criteria, and 13.5 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 3.6 (syst.) fb using a looser selection that allows the background normalisation to be extracted from data. The latter method also measures a value of 1.30 ± 0.33 (stat.) ± 0.28 (syst.)% for the ratio of tt¯ production with two additional b-jets to tt¯ production with any two additional jets. As a result, all measurements are in good agreement with recent theory predictions.« less

  13. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1973MC12 16O(p, α): σ threshold - 7.7 X4 10/17/2012 1981DY03 16O(p, pα): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 4.44-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 16O(p, p'): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1997MO27 16O(p, p), (p, γ): elastic, capture σ Ecm = 200 - 3750 keV X4 03/28/2013 1973RO34 16O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 3.1 S-Factor X4 05/10/2011 16O(p, γ): differential σ for the DC → ground

  14. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'γ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 20Ne(p, pαγ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1975RO08 20Ne(p, γ): S-factors 0.37 - 2.10 Direct Capture (DC) → 332-keV state, DC → 2425-keV state, tail of 2425-keV state X4 04/19/2011 20Ne(p, γ): differential σ at θγ = 90° DC → 332-keV state, 332-keV state →

  15. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $$\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$= 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) =more » 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.« less

  16. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the |Vtb| CKM matrix element in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2014-06-01

    Measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb? recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop $ \\left(\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}\\right) $ , in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is ?t-ch. = 83.6 2.3 (stat.) 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and $ \\overline{\\mathrm{t}} $ cross sections are measured to be ?t-ch.(t) = 53.8 1.5 (stat.) 4.4 (syst.) pb and ?$_{t-ch.}$ $ \\left(\\overline{t}\\right) $ = 27.6 1.3 (stat.) 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is Rt-ch. = ?t-ch.(t)/?t-ch. $ \\left(\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}\\right) $ = 1.95 0.10 (stat.) 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. The modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element Vtb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at ?s = 7 TeV, a value |Vtb| = 0.998 0.038 (exp.) 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.

  17. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $$ s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $ is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 $\\,\\text {fb}^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25 $\\,\\text {GeV}$ respectively, in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta | 0.45$ , is $17.2 \\pm 0.2\\,\\text {(stat)} \\pm 1.9\\,\\text {(syst)}more\\pm 0.4\\,\\text {(lumi)} $ $\\text {\\,pb}$ . Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthal angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the CollinsSoper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.less

  18. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 10/28/2014 1993CH02 12C(p, X): σ for η production ≤ 0.9 GeV X4 03/07/2012 1974RO29 12C(p, γ): σ 150 - 3000 keV X4 08/27/2013 1951GO1B 12C(p, p): yield curve of elastic scattering 0.2 - 4.0 θ = 164° 11/05/2014 1976ME22 12C(p, p): absolute σ 0.3 - 2.0 X4 08/07/2013 2008BU19 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors. 354, 390, 460, 463, 565,

  19. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jet from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.

  20. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jetmore » from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.« less

  1. Effect of pH treatment on K-shell x-ray intensity ratios and K-shell x-ray-production cross sections in ZnCo alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kup Aylikci, N.; Aylikci, V.; Tirasoglu, E.; Cengiz, E.; Kahoul, A.; Karahan, I. H.

    2011-10-15

    In this study, empirical and semiempirical K-shell fluorescence yields ({omega}{sub K}) and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios from the available experimental data for elements with 23{<=}Z{<=}30 were calculated to compare them with elements in different alloys. The experimental data are fitted using the quantity [{omega}{sub K}/(1-{omega}{sub K})]{sup 1/4} vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios. The empirical and semiempirical K-shell fluorescence yield values were used to calculate the K x-ray-production cross-section values for pure Co and Zn elements. Also, {sigma}{sub K{alpha}}, {sigma}{sub K{beta}} production cross sections and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios of Co and Zn have been measured in pure metals and in different alloy compositions which have different pH values. The samples were excited by 59.5-keV {gamma} rays from a {sup 241}Am annular radioactive source. K x rays emitted by samples were counted by an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The effect of pH values on alloy compositions and the effect of alloying on the fluorescence parameters of Co and Zn were investigated. The x-ray fluorescence parameters of Co and Zn in the alloying system indicate significant differences with respect to the pure metals. These differences are attributed to the reorganization of valence shell electrons and/or charge transfer phenomena.

  2. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).

  3. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).

  4. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  5. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leadingmore » order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).« less

  6. Measurement of the B0s. Production Cross Section withB0s→J/ψΦ Decays in pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-09-20

    The B0s differential production cross section is measured as functions of the transverse momentum and rapidity in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV, using the B0s→J/ψΦ decay, and compared with predictions based on perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order. The data sample, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 40 pb⁻¹. The B0s is reconstructed from the decays J/ψ→μ⁺μ⁻ and Φ→K⁺K⁻. The integrated B0s cross section times B0s→J/ψΦ branching fraction in the range 8BT <50 GeV/c and |yB|<2.4 is measured to be 6.9±0.6±0.6 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second ismore » systematic.« less

  7. Measurement of the tt̄ production cross section in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using events with large Missing ET and jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-09

    In this paper we report a measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section in pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron accelerator. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and high jet multiplicity. This measurement vetoes the presence of explicitly identified electrons and muons, thus enhancing the tau contribution of ttMs; decays. Signal events are discriminated from the background using a neural network and heavy flavor jets are identified by a secondary-vertex tagging algorithm. We measure a tt̄ productionmore » cross section of 7.99 ± 0.55(stat) ± 0.76(syst) ± 0.46(lumi) pb, assuming a top mass mtop = 172.5 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous measurements and standard model predictions.« less

  8. Measurement of the inclusive production cross sections for forward jets and for dijet events with one forward and one central jet in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2012-06-01

    The inclusive production cross sections for forward jets, as well for jets in dijet events with at least one jet emitted at central and the other at forward pseudorapidities, are measured in the range of transverse momenta pt = 35-150 GeV/c in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Forward jets are measured within pseudorapidities 3.2<|eta|<4.7, and central jets within the |eta|<2.8 range. The double differential cross sections with respect to pt and eta are compared to predictions from three approaches in perturbative quantum chromodynamics: (i) next-to-leading-order calculations obtained with and without matching to parton-shower Monte Carlo simulations, (ii) PYTHIA and HERWIG parton-shower event generators with different tunes of parameters, and (iii) CASCADE and HEJ models, including different non-collinear corrections to standard single-parton radiation. The single-jet inclusive forward jet spectrum is well described by all models, but not all predictions are consistent with the spectra observed for the forward-central dijet events.

  9. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD atmorenext-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).less

  10. Determination of the top-quark pole mass and strong coupling constant from the t t-bar production cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-21

    The inclusive cross section for top-quark pair production measured by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is compared to the QCD prediction at next-to-next-to-leading order with various parton distribution functions to determine the top-quark pole mass,more » $$m_t^{pole}$$, or the strong coupling constant, $$\\alpha_S$$. With the parton distribution function set NNPDF2.3, a pole mass of 176.7$$^{+3.0}_{-2.8}$$ GeV is obtained when constraining $$\\alpha_S$$ at the scale of the Z boson mass, $m_Z$, to the current world average. Alternatively, by constraining $$m_t^{pole}$$ to the latest average from direct mass measurements, a value of $$\\alpha_S(m_Z)$$ = 0.1151$$^{+0.0028}_{-0.0027}$$ is extracted. This is the first determination of $$\\alpha_S$$ using events from top-quark production.« less

  11. RFP Section H and Section L Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 26, 2011, two draft RFP Section H templates "Performance Requirements" and "Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan" and one draft RFP Section L template "Proposal Preparation Instructions – Cover Letter and Volume I, Offer and Other Documents" were distributed for Procurement Director (PD), Head of Contracting Activity (HCA), General Counsel and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate. The final version of the three aforementioned RFP Section H and L templates are available in STRIPES.

  12. SECTION L… ATTACHMENT H

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    III-SECTION J APPENDIX K TRANSITION PLAN To be Added at a Later Date

  13. A Meaurement of the W+- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at sqroot(s)=1.96 TeV in the DiLepton channel and limits on anomalous WWZ/gamma couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGivern, Dustin; /University Coll. London

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of the production cross section of W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV and limits on trilinear gauge boson coupling (TGC) parameters are presented. The data were recorded with the CDF experiment at Tevatron during the 2001 and 2002 data taking periods in which a total integrated luminosity of 184 pb{sup -1} was collected. The data sample was filtered for events with two leptonic w boson decays where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons. 17 events are observed against an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting cross-section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.5{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb and agrees well with the Standard Model expectation. Limits on the TGC parameters {Delta}{kappa} and {lambda} are set under both the equal coupling scheme, that assumes the W boson couples identically to the Z and {gamma}, and the HISZ coupling scheme, that requires the couplings to respect SU(2){sub L} x &(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry. In both cases this is achieved by using a likelihood fit to the lepton-P{sub T} distribution of the 17 candidate events. The resulting limits are found to be: -0.4 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.6({lambda} = 0); -0.3 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the EQUAL couplings and -0.7 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.9 ({lambda} = 0); -0.4 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the HISZ couplings.

  14. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  15. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8O(p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008LA06 18O(p, α): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0 - 1.5 θα = 46° 12/03/2012 1990CH32 18O(p, α): σ < 2 X4 10/04/2012 1990VO06 18O(p, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.22 X4 02/13/2012 2008LA13 18O(p, α): deduced σ 0 - 250 keV X4 10/20/2014 1973BA31 18O(p, n): total neutron-production σ < 5 1 X4 05/10/2011 1990WA10 18O(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1979LO01 18O(p, α): σ 72 - 935 keV X4

  16. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| -1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomoremeasure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.less

  17. Cross Section and Parity Violating Spin Asymmetries of W plus or minus Boson Production in Polarized p+p Collisions at s=500 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Large parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetries A{sub L}{sup e+} = -0.86{sub -0.14}{sup +0.30} and A{sub L}{sup e-} = 0.88{sub -0.71}{sup +0.12} are observed for inclusive high transverse momentum electrons and positrons in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 500 GeV with the PHENIX detector at RHIC. These e{sup {+-}} come mainly from the decay of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons, and their asymmetries directly demonstrate parity violation in the couplings of the W{sup {+-}} to the light quarks. The observed electron and positron yields were used to estimate W{sup {+-}} boson production cross sections for the e{sup {+-}} channels of {sigma}(pp {yields} W{sup +}X) x BR(W{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}) = 144.1 {+-} 21.2(stat){sub -10.3}{sup +3.4}(syst) {+-} 21.6(norm) pb, and {sigma}(pp {yields} W{sup -}X) x BR(W{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub e}) = 31.7 {+-} 12.1(stat){sub -8.2}{sup +10.1}(syst) {+-} 4.8(norm) pb.

  18. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    E SECTION J APPENDIX E PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT(S) [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to contract award. For Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) template, see Section L, Attachment A.]

  19. Section D - G

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING Request for Proposal DE-RFP 36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging......

  20. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I SECTION J APPENDIX I SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to...

  1. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I SECTION J APPENDIX I SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to

  2. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX B AWARD FEE PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....

  3. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX M CONTRACTOR COMMITMENTS, AGREEMENTS, AND UNDERSTANDINGS Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....

  4. 14655 Section D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING......

  5. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION AGREEMENT FOR USE WITH THE ... and ... the Financial Institution a financial institution ...

  6. Section 106 Archaeology Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation's Section 106 guidance is designed to assist federal agencies in making effective management decisions about archaeological resources in completing the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). This guidance highlights the decision-making role of the federal agency in the Section 106 process. It is also designed for use by State and Tribal Historic Preservation Officers, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and cultural resource management professionals when assisting federal agencies to meet their responsibilities under Section 106.

  7. 14655 Section D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING......................................................................................................................................1 D.2 MARKING ..........................................................................................................................................1 D-i River Corridor Closure Contract Section D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I

  8. 14655 Section H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section H Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 INCUMBENT EMPLOYEES HIRING PREFERENCES ................................................................... 1 H.2 PAY AND BENEFITS ....................................................................................................................... 1 H.3 LABOR RELATIONS

  9. Sectional device handling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candee, Clark B.

    1988-07-12

    Apparatus for remotely handling a device in an irradiated underwater environment includes a plurality of tubular sections interconnected end-to-end to form a handling structure, the bottom section being adapted for connection to the device. A support section is connected to the top tubular section and is adapted to be suspended from an overhead crane. Each section is flanged at its opposite ends. Axially retractable bolts in each bottom flange are threadedly engageable with holes in the top flange of an adjacent section, each bolt being biased to its retracted position and retained in place on the bottom flange. Guide pins on each top flange cooperate with mating holes on adjacent bottom flanges to guide movement of the parts to the proper interconnection orientation. Each section carries two hydraulic line segments provided with quick-connect/disconnect fittings at their opposite ends for connection to the segments of adjacent tubular sections upon interconnection thereof to form control lines which are connectable to the device and to an associated control console.

  10. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  11. Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE (MB) is a e search (B. Fleming, next session) - High rates and good particle ID also allow accurate cross section measurements. - Important for MB and...

  12. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, Mod 332 J.6-1 ATTACHMENT J.6 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.6, Mod 332 J.6-2 SMALL...

  13. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    E SECTION J APPENDIX E PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT(S) Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to contract award. For Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) template,...

  14. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, Revision 4 ATTACHMENT J.10 WAGE DETERMINATIONS - SERVICE CONTRACT ACT (SCA) AND DAVIS-BACON ACT J.10-1 Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788...

  15. Section I - Contract Clauses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and protections under 41 U.S.C. 4712, as described in section 3.908 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation. (c) The Contractor shall insert the substance of this clause, including...

  16. Section 1705 Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Section 1705 Loan Program authorizes loan guarantees for U.S.-based projects that commenced construction no later than September 30, 2011 and involve certain renewable energy systems, electric...

  17. Section 1251 Report Update

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    November 2010 Update to the National Defense Authorization Act of FY2010 Section 1251 Report New START Treaty Framework and Nuclear Force Structure Plans 1. Introduction This paper updates elements of the report that was submitted to Congress on May 13, 2010, pursuant to section 1251 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84) ("1251 Report"). 2. National Nuclear Security Administration and modernization of the complex - an overview From FY 2005

  18. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX J DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE In accordance with Section I clause DEAR 970.5226-1, Diversity Plan, this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) for each of the diversity elements within the clause. The Contractor shall submit a Diversity Plan to the Contracting Officer for approval within 90 days after the effective date of this

  19. Section II INT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/14/11 Page 1 of 9 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-IN (06/14/11) SECTION II GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE SIGNATURE PAGE OR SECTION I OF THIS CONTRACT. IN01 ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS This Contract

  20. Full Circle Developments Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Product: Private Michigan-based clean energy project developer, with focus on brownfield site biofuel projects that are powered by renewable energy. Coordinates: 43.75681,...

  1. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, Mod 420 J.6-1 ATTACHMENT J.6 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.6, Mod 420 J.6-2 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN for United States Department of Energy Plateau Remediation Contract Submitted by: CH2M HILL PLATEAU REMEDIATION COMPANY Prime Contractor FISCAL YEARS 2009-2018 (Base and Option Period) CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC06-08RL14788 Revision 4 December 30, 2014 Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract

  2. SECTION III. NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cascade B. Zhang, M. Gyulassy and C.M. Ko Charmonium Production from Hot Hadronic Matter C.M. Ko, X.N. Wang, B. Zhang and X.F. Zhang Excitation Function of Nucleon and Pion...

  3. 14655 Section B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 166 B-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT - ITEMS BEING ACQUIRED ..................................................................... 1 B.2 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS .............................................................................. 2 B.3 ALLOWABILITY OF SUBCONTRACTOR FEE ............................................................................... 2 B.4

  4. 14655 Section C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 226 C-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION C - STATEMENT OF WORK TABLE OF CONTENTS C.1 PURPOSE, OVERVIEW, END-STATES, AND ORGANIZATION ................................................... 1 C.1.1 PURPOSE AND OVERVIEW ................................................................................................ 1 C.1.2 END-STATES ........................................................................................................................ 1 C.1.3

  5. 14655 Section E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS E.1 FAR 52.246-5 INSPECTION OF SERVICES - COST REIMBURSEMENT (APR 1984) .................1 E.2 FIELD INSPECTION ..........................................................................................................................1 E.3 DOE INSPECTION ............................................................................................................................2 E.4

  6. SECTIONS B THROUGH H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Modification 492 B-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT ................................................................................................ B-1 B.2 ITEM(S) BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................... B-1 B.3 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS ........................................................... B-5 B.4 CONTRACT

  7. SECTIONS B THROUGH H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 372 B-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT .................................................................................................... 2 B.2 ITEM(S) BEING ACQUIRED ........................................................................................... 2 B.3 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS ............................................................. 3 B.4

  8. Full Permit Application Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HandbookLegal Abstract Permit Applicant Hnadbook for Full RCRA Equivalent Hazardous Waste Facility Permits, current through August 7, 2014. Published NA Year Signed or Took...

  9. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enercon Services, Inc.

    2011-03-14

    Enercon Services, Inc. (ENERCON) was requested under Task Order No.2 to identify scientific and technical data needed to benchmark and justify Full Burnup Credit, which adds 16 fission products and 4 minor actinides1 to Actinide-Only burnup credit. The historical perspective for Full Burnup Credit is discussed, and interviews of organizations participating in burnup credit activities are summarized as a basis for identifying additional data needs and making recommendation. Input from burnup credit participants representing two segments of the commercial nuclear industry is provided. First, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been very active in the development of Full Burnup Credit, representing the interests of nuclear utilities in achieving capacity gains for storage and transport casks. EPRI and its utility customers are interested in a swift resolution of the validation issues that are delaying the implementation of Full Burnup Credit [EPRI 2010b]. Second, used nuclear fuel storage and transportation Cask Vendors favor improving burnup credit beyond Actinide-Only burnup credit, although their discussion of specific burnup credit achievements and data needs was limited citing business sensitive and technical proprietary concerns. While Cask Vendor proprietary items are not specifically identified in this report, the needs of all nuclear industry participants are reflected in the conclusions and recommendations of this report. In addition, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were interviewed for their input into additional data needs to achieve Full Burnup Credit. ORNL was very open to discussions of Full Burnup Credit, with several telecoms and a visit by ENERCON to ORNL. For many years, ORNL has provided extensive support to the NRC regarding burnup credit in all of its forms. Discussions with ORNL focused on potential resolutions to the validation issues for the use of fission products. SNL was helpful in ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost compared to the acquisition of equivalent experimental data. ENERCON concludes that even with the costs of code data library updating, the use of S/U analysis methodologies could be accomplished on a shorter schedule and a lower cost than the gathering of sufficient experimental data. ENERCON estimates of the costs of an updated S/U computer code and data suite are $5M to $10M with a schedule of two to three years. Recent ORNL analyses using the S/U analysis method show that the bias and uncertainty values for fission product cross sections are smaller than previously expected. This result is confirmed by a similar EPRI approach using different data and computer codes. ENERCON also found that some issues regarding the implementation of burnup credit appear to have been successfully resolved especially the axial burnup profile issue and the depletion parameter issue. These issues were resolved through data gathering activities at the Yucca Mountain Project and ORNL.

  10. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 19F(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2008CO03 19F(p, γ): σ Ecm = 200 - 700 keV X4 05/14/2014 1979SU13 19F(p, γ): σ 0.2 - 1.2 X4 05/06/2014 2006COZY 19F(p, γ1): capture yield 200 - 800 keV thin target 12/08/2014 19F(p, γ): capture yield thick target 19F(p, α2γ): capture yield thin target, thick target 2008CO03 19F(p, γ1): reaction cross section Ecm = 200 - 800 keV thin target, thick target

  11. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, Modification 332 J.7-1 ATTACHMENT J.7 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.7, Modification 332 J.7-2 Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) Participation Program Targets ATTACHMENT J.7 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS (a) OFFEROR - CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company - Prime: AREVA Federal Services, LLC; Fluor Federal Services, Inc. (base period only); East

  12. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, Revision 3, 420 J.8-1 ATTACHMENT J.8 ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF COSTS In accordance with the Section H Clause entitled, Advance Understanding of Costs, this attachment sets forth the basis for determining the allowability of costs associated with expenditures that have cost implications under the Contract, that are not identified in other documents requiring the review and approval of the contracting officer. Unless a date is provided within an item of cost identified below, all items within

  13. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 J-1 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J -- LIST OF ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Attachment Number Title of Attachment Modification Number Number of Pages J.1 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYM LIST 0 6 J.2 REQUIREMENTS SOURCES AND IMPLEMENTING DOCUMENTS 331 8 J.3 HANFORD SITE SERVICES AND INTERFACE REQUIREMENTS MATRIX 246 107 J.4 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) 249 50 J.5 PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT 0 3 J.6 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN

  14. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14655 640 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ATTACHMENT J-1 TABLE OF RIVER CORRIDOR CLOSURE CONTRACT WORK SCOPE ATTACHMENT J-2 DOE DIRECTIVES APPLICABLE TO THE RIVER CORRIDOR CLOSURE CONTRACT ATTACHMENT J-3 PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENTS ATTACHMENT J-4 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN ATTACHMENT J-5 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS ATTACHMENT J-6 ADVANCE AGREEMENT,

  15. Notices SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    112 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 182 / Wednesday, September 19, 2012 / Notices SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 3506 of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. chapter 35) requires that Federal agencies provide interested parties an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. The Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Privacy, Information and Records Management Services, Office of Management, publishes this notice containing proposed information

  16. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION AGREEMENT FOR USE WITH THE PAYMENTS-CLEARED FINANCING ARRANGEMENT Note: (1) The Contractor shall enter into a new banking agreement(s) during the Transition Term of the Contract, utilizing the format contained in this Appendix and include other applicable Contract terms and conditions. (2) Items in brackets [ ] below are provided for clarification and will be removed from the document prior to execution. Agreement entered into this,

  17. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Corporation Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. 585 Attachment 2 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the

  18. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    H DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE To Be Updated during Transition With regard to the Contract Section I Clause entitled "Diversity Plan", this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the clause's Diversity elements. If the Contractor's current policy or procedure already addresses the following elements, the Contractor need only provide a copy of the policy or procedure to the Contracting Officer and

  19. Measuring the top anti-t Production Cross-Section in the Electron + Jets Channel in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV with the D0 Detector at the Tevatron: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Su-Jung; /Bonn U.

    2004-02-01

    The measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the final state with an electron and jets is studied with Monte Carlo event samples. All methods used in the real data analysis to measure efficiencies and to estimate the background contributions are examined. The studies focus on measuring the electron reconstruction efficiencies as well as on improving the electron identification and background suppression. With a generated input cross section of 7 pb the following result is obtained: {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = (7 {+-} 1.63(stat){sub -1.14}{sup +0.94} (syst)) pb.

  20. Section 999 Program Library | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offshore Drilling » Section 999 Program Library Section 999 Program Library Cost-Shared Program Publications October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 October 2, 2013 URTAC Meeting - October 2013 September 10, 2013 Draft 2014 Annual Plan More Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee (UDAC) Activities and Products January 27, 2014 UDAC 2014 Report November 27, 2013 UDAC Meeting - December 16, 2013 November 20, 2013 UDAC Meeting - December 9, 2013 More Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory

  1. Full Text Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Text Glossary Full Text Glossary The full-text glossary includes terms used throughout the website and in Biomass Program publications. Terms are listed alphabetically for easy reference. The term index lists all of the terms defined in the glossary. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A acid: A solution that has an excess of hydrogen ions (H+), with a pH of less than 7. acetic acid: An acid with the structure of C2H4O2.

  2. 10Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1970GO04 10Be(p, γ0): σ 0.6 - 6.3 θ = 0°, θ = 90° 06/05/2012 1987ERZY 10Be(p, n): σ 0.9 - 2 X4 05/15/2012 The following references may be related but not included. 1991GOZV Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March 2016

  3. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, Modification 476 J.2-1 ATTACHMENT J.2 REQUIREMENTS SOURCES AND IMPLEMENTING DOCUMENTS The following lists are provided in accordance with the Section I Clause entitled, DEAR 970.5204-2, Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives. LIST A: APPLICABLE FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS Table J.2.1 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Document Number Title 10 CFR 63 Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada 10 CFR 71 Packaging And Transportation Of

  4. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, Revision 5 J.10-1 ATTACHMENT J.10 WAGE DETERMINATIONS - SERVICE CONTRACT ACT (SCA) AND DAVIS-BACON ACT Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.10, Revision 5 J.10-2 SERVICE CONTRACT ACT WAGE DETERMINATION WD 05-2569 (Rev.-18) was first posted on www.wdol.gov on 07/14/2015 ***************************************************************************** REGISTER OF WAGE DETERMINATIONS UNDER | U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE SERVICE CONTRACT ACT | EMPLOYMENT

  5. HASQARD Section 4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HASQARD Section 4.2.4, Volume 2, Revision 3 requires: "The field custodian shall seal the cap of the individual sample container so that any tampering is easy to detect. Custody seals shall be used to verify that sample integrity has been maintained during transport." The HASQARD Focus Group provides the following clarification to the requirement: Note: The presence of, or fixative residue from, custody seals can interfere with the functionality of equipment used during analysis (e.g.,

  6. HASQARD Section 4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    text of the sixth paragraph in HASQARD Volume 2, Revision 3, Section 4.2.4 is revised to say: "Custody seals shall be used to verify that sample integrity has been maintained during transport. The field custodian shall seal the cap of the individual sample container so that any tampering is easy to detect. In lieu of using a custody seal directly applied to sample containers, the sample container may be placed inside a secondary container that is sealed with a custody seal. Custody tape

  7. Section II INT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (11-03-2010) Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for International Commercial Transactions Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Initial Release Date: 11/3/10 Page 1 of 8 PPQD-TMPLT-008R01 Template Release Date: 12/01/09 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Before using a printed copy to perform work, verify the version against the electronic document to ensure you are using the correct version. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-IN (11-03-2010) SECTION II GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR

  8. Section II INT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IN (01-12-2010) Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for International Commercial Transactions Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Initial Release Date: 01/12/10 Page 1 of 6 PPQD-TMPLT-008R01 Template Release Date: 12/01/09 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Before using a printed copy to perform work, verify the version against the electronic document to ensure you are using the correct version. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-IN (01-12-2010) SECTION II GENERAL PROVISIONS

  9. Section L, Paragraph L-4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION L ATTACHMENT D CROSS REFERENCE MATRIX Section L Section M Offeror's Proposal Criterion 1: PAST PERFORMANCE L-15 (a) M-3 (a) Criterion 2: SITE ORGANIZATION AND...

  10. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 01/21/2015) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1992MC03 10B(α, α): σ relative to Rutherford scattering 1 - 3.3 X4 05/02/2012 1969GA01 10B(α, p), (α α'): relative σ at θ = 90° for Eγ = 1.0 - 3.5 0.170 MeV, 3.088 MeV, 3.682 MeV, 3.852 MeV, 0.717 MeV 06/18/2012 1973VA25 10B(α, n): laboratory differential σ 1.0 - 5.0 for n0: θ = 0°, θ = 90°, θ = 160° X4 04/04/2011 for n1: θ = 0°, θ = 90° for n23: θ = 0°, θ = 90° 10B(α, n):

  11. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1991WA02 11B(α, n): thick-target yield of Eα = 411, 605 and 606 keV resonance 350 - 2400 keV 1 X4 04/04/2011 11B(α, n): for 606-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): for 411-keV resonance after subtraction of the 605-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): S-factor 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thick-target 400 - 500 keV 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thin-target 1 1966MA04, Errata 11B(α, n): excitation curve < 4.5 for

  12. 11C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013SO11 11C(p, γ): deduced astrophysical reaction rates and S-factors X4 12/14/2015 2003LI51 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor low X4 09/12/2011 2003TA02 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor 0 - 0.7 X4 09/12/2011 2003KU36 11C(p, p): elastic scattering σ ~ 0.2 - 3.2 θcm = 180° 09/08/2011 Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March

  13. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 13C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 09/12/2011 1994KI02 13C(p, γ): γ-ray yield, calculated S(E) 120 - 950 keV X4 09/12/2011 2008HE11 13C(p, γ): reaction yield at the resonance 448.5-keV for a fresh target and after an integrated charge of 1C 435 - 470 keV σ X4 11/07/2011 1991BR19 13C(p, γ): reaction yield near the resonance 0.44 - 0.6 483.3-keV, 0.55-MeV X4 11/07/2011

  14. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2006JO11 13C(α, n): deduced S(E) ~ 0 - 1 from (1993BR17), from (1993DR08) X4 08/04/2011 2001HE22 13C(α, n): S(E) 0 - 2 S-factor 11/15/2011 2003KA51 13C(α, n): deduced S-factors, reaction rate Ecm ~ 200 - 800 keV X4 05/01/2012 1993DR08 13C(α, n): excitation function and S(E) ~ 275 - 1075 keV σ, S-factor X4 08/04/2011 2008HE11 13C(α, n): σ, reaction yields and S(E) Ecm = 320 - 700 keV σ, Table

  15. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003MU12 14N(p, γ): deduced astrophysical S-factors < 600 keV X4 05/06/2013 1990WA10 14N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2005CO16, 2006BE50 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors, resonance strength 70 - 228 keV X4 05/08/2013 2006LE13 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors 70 - 228 keV X4 05/30/2013 2005BR04, 2005BR15 14N(p, γ): astrophysical S-factors ~ 0.1 - 2.5 1 08/15/2013 2004FO02,

  16. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971CO27 14N(α, γ): thick target yield 0.5 - 1.2 1 08/04/2011 2000GO43 14N(α, γ): resonance yields, deduced astrophysical reaction rates 550 - 1300 keV X4 03/01/2012 1973RO03 14N(α, γ): γ-ray yield 1.0 - 3.2 1 04/30/2012 1980MA26 14N(α, α): σ 1.5, 1.6 X4 03/01/2012 2007CH25 14N(α, γ): deduced resonance parameters 1620 - 1775 keV X4 03/01/2012 1994YE11 14N(α, α): σ(θ)/σ(Rutherford) 2

  17. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013DA10 4He(α, γ): deduced σ 19 - 29 X4 01/27/2016 1978HI04 4He(α, α): elastic scattering excitation function 32.6 - 35.4 θ = 30.5°, θ = 53.7°, θ = 54.7°, θ = 71.5°, θ = 90.0° 04/24/2012 1995DE18 4He(α, γ): excitation function for the decay to the 3 MeV level 33 - 34.7 θlab = 90.0° 04/24/2012 1975NA12 4He(α, γ): excitation function 33 - 36 1 07/19/2011 1977PA26 4He(α, γ): γ

  18. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004TU02 6Li(p, α): coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low 1, S-factors from direct data, S-factors from indirect data 03/20/2012 2004TU06 6Li(p, α): σ, coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low σ, coincidence yields, S-factors from direct data, S-factors from indirect data 03/20/2012 1966GE11 6Li(p, α): S-factor Ec.m. = 0.01 - 1.00 X4 12/15/2015 2005CR05 6Li(p, α): S-factor 20 - 100 keV X4

  19. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(α, γ): γ thick target yield resonance X4 02/15/2012 1966FO05 6Li(α, γ): σ 0.9 - 3.0 2 < Eγ < 4 MeV, 4 < Eγ < 7 MeV, thick target capture γ-ray yield, capture γ-ray yield of 2.43 MeV resonance 02/29/2012 1989BA24 6Li(α, γ): σ 1.085, 1.175 X4 02/15/2012 1979SP01 6Li(α, γ): thick target yield curve for 718 keV γ-rays 1140 - 1250 keV 1175 keV resonance 07/19/2011

  20. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12/16/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997GO13 7Li(pol. p, γ): total σ, S-factor for capture to third-excited state 0 - 80 keV X4 06/12/2014 1994CH23 7Li(pol. p, γ): deduced S-factor ≤ 80 keV X4 06/12/2014 1999SP09 7Li(p, α): deduced S-factor < 0.4 X4 06/12/2014 1974BU16 7Li(p, n): σ < 3.8 X4 03/14/2012 2011PI04 7Li(p, α): analyzed excitation functions Ecm = 0 - 7 X4 06/12/2014 2001LA35 7Li(p, α): deduced S(E)-factor 10 -

  1. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003DA19 18O(α, γ): deduced resonance strengths ~ 470 - 770 keV X4 02/13/2012 1978TR05 18O(α, γ): excitation function for the 1.27 MeV secondary γ-ray transition 0.6 - 2.3 θγ = 0° 02/29/2012 1990VO06 18O(α, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.78 X4 02/13/2012 1973BA10 18O(α, n): σ with target thickness 1 - 5 6 keV, 13 keV 06/06/2011 1956BO61 18O(α, n): neutron yields 1.8 - 5.3 0° - 30° X4

  2. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008UG01 19F(α, p): yield curves, σ 792 - 1993 keV X4 09/14/2011 2005UG04 19F(α, p1γ): excitation curve 1238 - 2009 keV 1 11/30/2011 19F(α, p0): excitation curve 1 19F(α, p1): excitation curve 1 1984CS01 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 3.7 X4 09/14/2011 1994CH36 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 4.5 X4 09/14/2011 2000WR01 19F(α, n): neutron yields and σ 2.28 - 3.10 X4 09/14/2011 1977VA10 19F(α, n): differential

  3. SECTION J, APPENDIX B - PEP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION J APPENDIX B PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PLAN Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084 Intentionally left blank for Internet posting purposes. Section J, Appendix B, Page 1

  4. PART III-SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C SECTION J APPENDIX C TRANSITION PLAN Plan: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer. Requirements: In accordance with Section F, Deliverables During Transition, the Contractor...

  5. SECTION J, APPENDIX B - PEP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION J APPENDIX B PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PLAN Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084 Intentionally left blank for Internet posting purposes. Section J, Appendix B, Page 1...

  6. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  7. Measurement of differential J/ψ production cross sections and forward-backward ratios in p + Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Kluge, E. -E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. 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B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of differential cross sections for J/ψ production in p+Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 28.1 nb-1. The J/ψ mesons are reconstructed in the dimuon decay channel over the transverse momentum range 8section for production of nonprompt J/ψ is compared to a FONLL calculation that does not include nuclear effects. Forward-backward production ratios are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. These results complement previously published results by covering a region of higher transverse momentum and more central rapidity. They thus constrain the kinematic dependence of nuclear modifications of charmonium and b-quark production in p+Pb collisions.

  8. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010LA11 10B(p, α): deduced S(E) E(cm) = 0 - 0.15 1 11/30/2011 1993AN06 10B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/07/2011 1993AN09 10B(p, α): absolute fusion σ and S(E) E(cm) = 48 - 159 keV X4 11/07/2011 1972SZ02 10B(p, α): total reaction σ and S(E) 60 - 180 keV 1 X4 03/03/2011 1983WI09 10B(p, γ): γ yield, capture σ(E) 0.07 - 2.2 X4 11/07/2011 2003TO21 10B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced

  9. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12/17/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, α): deduced σ, S-factor Ecm ~ 0 - 1 X4 11/07/2012 2010LA11 11B(p, α): deduced S-factor E(cm) = 0 - 0.6 1 11/30/2011 2000KE10 11B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor < 100 keV X4 11/07/2012 1993AN06 11B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/29/2012 1979DA03 11B(p, 3α): σ 35.4 - 1500 keV X4 07/30/2014 1992CE02 11B(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012

  10. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2009MA70 12C(α, γ0): σ 0 - 2.27 X4 05/01/2012 2012OU01 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.3 - 3.5 X4 02/12/2015 1997KU18 12C(α, γ): analyzed S-factor Ecm = 0.9 - 3 X4 05/10/2012 1987RE02 12C(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 0.94 - 2.84 X4 05/09/2012 2001HA31 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.95 - 2.78 E1, E2 06/18/2012 2001KU09 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.95 - 2.8 X4 05/09/2012

  11. 14C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1969SI04 14C(p, γ): γ-rays yield for 230 - 690 keV Eγ ≥ 2.8 MeV 08/15/2013 1990GO25 14C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 250 - 740 keV X4 10/28/2014 1968HE12 14C(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.6 - 2.7 γ0 01/06/2015 1991WA02 14C(p, n): σ 1.0 - 1.55 X4 10/28/2014 1968HA27 14C(p, p): σ at θcm = 1.0 - 2.7 39.2°, 54.7°, 90°, 125.3°, 161.4° 08/15/2013 1971KU01 14C(p, γ0): excitation function at θ = 90° 1.3 - 2.6 1

  12. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 15N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1982RE06 15N(p, α): σ 78 - 810 keV X4 09/12/2011 1979ZY02 15N(p, α0): σ, deduced S-factor 93 - 418 keV X4 09/12/2011 2010LE21, 2013DE03 15N(p, γ): σ, S-factors 130 - 1800 keV X4 05/01/2012 & 02/01/2016 2012IM02 15N(p, γ), (p, αγ): σ, S-factors 0.14 - 1.80 X4 02/01/2016 1974RO37 15N(p, γ), (p, αγ): σ 150 - 2500 keV X4 09/12/2011 1968GO07

  13. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2002WI18 15N(α γ): σ 461 - 2642 keV X4 09/12/2011 1997WI12 15N(α γ): σ 0.65 - 2.65 X4 09/12/2011 1995WI26 15N(α γ): σ 0.67 - 0.69 X4 09/12/2011 1969AI01 15N(α γ): γ-ray excitation curve for 3.0 ≤ Eγ ≤ 7.0 MeV 2.5 - 3.2 1 11/30/2011 1977DI08 15N(α, γ): γ-ray excitation curve near Eα = 3.15 MeV for transitions to 3146 - 3158 keV five low-lying states, 4.65 MeV (13/2+) state

  14. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6O(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971TO06 16O(α, γ): σ 0.85 - 1.8 X4 09/15/2011 1953CA44 16O(α, α): σ 0.94 - 4.0 X4 09/15/2011 1997KU18 16O(α, γ): analyzed S-factor 1 - 3.25 X4 05/10/2012 1980MA27 16O(α, α): σ 1.305 - 1.330; 2.950 - 3.075 X4 02/14/2012 16O(α, γ): σ 1.37, 2.6, 2.9, 3.036 1987HA24 16O(α, γ): σ Ecm = 1.7 - 2.35 X4 02/14/2012 1990LE06 16O(α, α): σ 1.8 - 5 X4 03/12/2011 1985JA17 16O(α, α): σ 2

  15. 17O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010SE11 17O(p, α): nuclear excitation function 0 - 0.7 1 06/22/2011 1973RO03 17O(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.15 - 1.4 1 08/01/2012 2015BU02 17O(p, γ): total S(E)-factors 0.17 - 0.53 X4 03/03/2016 2012SC16, 2014DI01 17O(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.2 - 0.4 X4 03/03/2016 1973RO34 17O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 1.9 S-Factor X4 06/22/2011 17O(p, γ): σ for the γ-ray transition 0.94 → 0 MeV 17O(p, γ):

  16. 17O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013BE11; see also 2012BEZP 17O(α, n), (α, γ): σ, S-factors 0.8 - 2.3 X4 02/12/2015 1973BA10 17O(α, n): neutron yields with target thickness 0.9 - 5.3 ~ 2.5 keV, 6 keV, 13 keV, ~ 35 keV 06/06/2011 1976MC12 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.4 - 2.3 θγ = 50° 04/28/2011 17O(α, n0): yield of neutrons θn = 120° 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.825 - 1.885 θγ = 0° 05/03/2011 17O(α,

  17. 3H Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3H(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001TO07 3H(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.05 - 0.8 X4 01/09/2012 1994BR25 3H(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor Ecm = 50 - 1200 keV X4 01/09/2012 1987SC18 3H(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor Ecm = 79 - 464 keV X4 01/09/2012 1988SA13 3H(α, α): recoil σ 0.5 - 2.5 X4 01/09/2012 1987BU18 3H(α, γ): σ and S-factor 0.7 - 2 X4 01/09/2012 1968IV01 3H(α, α): elastic scattering σ 3 - 11 Table 9 X4

  18. 3He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1982KR05 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 107 - 1266 keV X4 01/05/2012 1969NA24 3He(α, γ): σ and S-factor 164 - 245 keV σ, S(E) X4 07/19/2011 1984OS03 3He(α, γ): σ 165 - 1169 keV X4 01/05/2012 1982OS02 3He(α, γ): S-factor 165 - 1170 keV S34(Ecm) X4 07/19/2011 1988HI06 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 195 - 686 keV X4 01/05/2012 2007CO17 3He(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor 220, 250, 400 keV X4 01/05/2012

  19. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1974KR07 4He(p, p): σ 0.5 - 3 X4 10/23/2014 2004PU02 4He(p, p): σ(θ = 128.7°) 1.2 - 5.2 X4 10/23/2014 1997NU02 4He(p, p): σ 1.4 - 6 X4 10/23/2014 1976BR17 4He(p, p): σ(168.8°)/σ(104.4°) 2.24 - 5.90 X4 10/23/2014 1977DO01 4He(p, p): σ 11 - 14 X4 10/23/2014 1969GA12 4He(p, p): σ 12.04, 14.23, 17.45 X4 10/23/2014 1974SO06 4He(p, X): total reaction σ 18 - 48 1 03/08/2011 1976SO01 4He(p, X),

  20. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997ZA06 9Be(p, α), (p, d): S-factor 16 - 390 keV X4 01/23/2013 1973SI27 9Be(p, α), (p, d): σ 30 - 700 keV X4 01/24/2013 1992CE02 9Be(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012 1995ZA04 9Be(p, γ): deduced σ 75 - 1800 keV X4 01/23/2013 1994LI51 9Be(p, p): σ at θ = 170° 0.15- 3 X4 01/11/2012 1973SZ07 9Be(p, γ): σ 200 - 750 keV X4 01/09/2013 1972RE07 9Be(p, γ): σ 0.20 - 0.85 X4

  1. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  2. The Full Function Test Explosive Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Griffith, L V; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-12-13

    We have conducted three tests of a new pulsed power device called the Full Function Test (FFT). These tests represented the culmination of an effort to establish a high energy pulsed power capability based on high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) technology. This involved an extensive computational modeling, engineering, fabrication, and fielding effort. The experiments were highly successful and a new US record for magnetic energy was obtained.

  3. On Boolean matrices with full factor rank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shitov, Ya

    2013-11-30

    It is demonstrated that every (0,1)-matrix of size nm having Boolean rank n contains acolumn with at least ?n/2?1 zero entries. This bound is shown to be asymptotically optimal. As acorollary, it is established that the size of afull-rank Boolean matrix is bounded from above by afunction of its tropical and determinantal ranks. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  4. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

  5. Full particle orbit tracing with RIO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18/12/2014 at 22:28 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Full particle orbit tracing with the RIO code in the presence of broad-spectrum MHD activity in a reversed-field pinch View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104007 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/54/10/104007) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience | International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Fusion Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 104007 (10pp)

  6. Full body powder antichip. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-17

    Chipping is the major paint defect listed for automobile customer dissatisfaction. The improved chip resistance and smoother paint surfaces produced by full body powder antichip will result in greater customer satisfaction and greater demand for US-produced automobiles. Powder antichip contains virtually no solvent, thereby reducing the potential VOC emissions from Newark Assembly by more than 90 tons per year as compared to the solvent-borne material presently applied in most full body applications. Since Newark Assembly Plant is in a severe non-attainment air quality area, which must demonstrate a 15% reduction in emissions by 1996, projects such as this are crucial to the longevity of industry in this region. The liquid paint spray systems include incineration of the oven volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) at 1,500 F. Since there are minimal VOC`s in powder coatings and the only possible releases occur only during polymerization, incineration is not required. The associated annual savings resulting from the elimination of the incinerator utilized on the liquid spray system is 1.44 {times} 10{sup 10} BTU`s per unit installed. The annual cost savings is approximately $388 thousand, far below the original estimates.

  7. Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program This document contains the Final Guidance for the EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program. Applications are due February 20, 2015. In 2014, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered

  8. Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Act of 2005 - Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program - July 2014 Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 - Hydroelectric Production Incentive ...

  9. Large Pt processes in ppbar collisions at 2 TeV: measurement of ttbar production cross section in ppbar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV in the dielectron final states at the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Ashish; /Delhi U.

    2005-10-01

    The measurement of the top-antitop pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the dielectron decay channel using 384 pb{sup -1} of D0 data yields a t{bar t} production cross-section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.9{sub -3.8}{sup +5.2}(stat){sub -1.0}{sup +1.3}(syst) {+-} 0.5 (lumi) pb. This measurement [98] is based on 5 observed events with a prediction of 1.04 background events. The cross-section corresponds to the top mass of 175 GeV, and is in good agreement with the Standard Model expectation of 6.77 {+-} 0.42 pb based on next-to-next-leading-order (NNLO) perturbative QCD calculations [78]. This analysis shows significant improvement from our previous cross-section measurement in this channel [93] with 230 pb{sup -1} dataset in terms of significantly better signal to background ratio and uncertainties on the measured cross-section. Combination of all the dilepton final states [98] yields a yields a t{bar t} cross-section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 8.6{sub -2.0}{sup +2.3}(stat){sub -1.0}{sup +1.2}(syst) {+-} 0.6(lumi) pb, which again is in good agreement with theoretical predictions and with measurements in other final states. Hence, these results show no discernible deviation from the Standard Model. Fig. 6.1 shows the summary of cross-section measurements in different final states by the D0 in Run II. This measurement of cross-section in the dilepton channels is the best dilepton result from D0 till date. Previous D0 result based on analysis of 230 pb{sup -1} of data (currently under publication in Physics Letters B) is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 8.6{sub -2.7}{sup +3.2}(stat){sub -1.1}{sup +1.1}(syst) {+-} 0.6(lumi) pb. It can be seen that the present cross-section suffers from less statistical uncertainty. This result is also quite consistent with CDF collaboration's result of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 8.6{sub -2.4}{sup +2.5}(stat){sub -1.1}{sup +1.1}(syst) pb. These results have been presented as D0's preliminary results in the high energy physics conferences in the Summer of 2005 (Hadron Collider Physics Symposium, European Physical Society Conference, etc.). The uncertainty on the cross-section is still dominated by statistics due to the small number of observed events. It can be seen that we are at a level where statistical uncertainties are becoming closer to the systematic ones. Future measurements of the cross section will benefit from considerably more integrated luminosity, leading to a smaller statistical error. Thus the next generation of measurements will be limited by systematic uncertainties. Monte Carlo samples with higher statistics are also being generated in order to decrease the uncertainty on the background estimation. In addition, as the jet energy scale, the electron energy scale, the detector resolutions, and the luminosity measurement are fine-tuned, the systematic uncertainties will continue to decrease.

  10. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  11. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  12. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separatemore » the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.« less

  13. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separate the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.

  14. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  15. Section L, Paragraph L-4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION L ATTACHMENT D CROSS REFERENCE MATRIX Section L Section M Offeror's Proposal Criterion 1: PAST PERFORMANCE L-15 (a) M-3 (a) Criterion 2: SITE ORGANIZATION AND QUALIFICATIONS OF KEY PERSONNEL L-15 (b)(1) M-3 (b)(1) L-15 (b)(2) M-3 (b)(2) Criterion 3: SMALL BUSINESS PARTICIPATION L-15 (c) M-3 (c)

  16. Lightweight alumina refractory aggregate: Phase 3, Full-scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swansiger, T.G.; Pearson, A.

    1996-07-16

    Technical problems (higher than target fired density, and poor intermediate strength after burnout but before sintering) were addressed and solved; solution involved use of large loading of CP-5 alumina (controlled pore, rehydratable), increased loading of one of the binders, and a steam aging step. Resistance of the lightweight aggregate in a brick formulation to steel slag penetration was assessed in a preliminary test and found to be almost as good as that of T-64. Pelletized process economic feasibility study was updated, based on production levels of 10,000 and 20,000 mt/year, the most up- to-date raw material costs, and the assumption of a retrofit into the Arkansas plant tabular production facility. For the 10,000 mt/y production level, the required selling price of 35% more than the T- 64 selling price exceeds the {le}25% objective. The market survey will determine whether to proceed with the full scale demonstration that will produce at least 54.4 mt (120,000 lb) of the aggregate for incorporation into products, followed by end-user testing and evaluation.

  17. Full waveform inversion of solar interior flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2014-12-10

    The inference of flows of material in the interior of the Sun is a subject of major interest in helioseismology. Here, we apply techniques of full waveform inversion (FWI) to synthetic data to test flow inversions. In this idealized setup, we do not model seismic realization noise, training the focus entirely on the problem of whether a chosen supergranulation flow model can be seismically recovered. We define the misfit functional as a sum of L {sub 2} norm deviations in travel times between prediction and observation, as measured using short-distance filtered f and p {sub 1} and large-distance unfiltered p modes. FWI allows for the introduction of measurements of choice and iteratively improving the background model, while monitoring the evolution of the misfit in all desired categories. Although the misfit is seen to uniformly reduce in all categories, convergence to the true model is very slow, possibly because it is trapped in a local minimum. The primary source of error is inaccurate depth localization, which, due to density stratification, leads to wrong ratios of horizontal and vertical flow velocities ({sup c}ross talk{sup )}. In the present formulation, the lack of sufficient temporal frequency and spatial resolution makes it difficult to accurately localize flow profiles at depth. We therefore suggest that the most efficient way to discover the global minimum is to perform a probabilistic forward search, involving calculating the misfit associated with a broad range of models (generated, for instance, by a Monte Carlo algorithm) and locating the deepest minimum. Such techniques possess the added advantage of being able to quantify model uncertainty as well as realization noise (data uncertainty).

  18. LLNL Section I Clauses/Prescriptions

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AC52-06NA27344 LLNL Section I, Page 56 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I I-1 CONTRACT CLAUSES Unless conditionally "Noted", all contract clauses are hereby incorporated by full text. The references cited herein are from the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) (48 CFR Chapter 1) and the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) (48 CFR Chapter 9). Note: The titles and page locations of the clauses are as follows: CLAUSE TITLE PAGE I001 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JUL 2004)

  19. Measurements of the Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section in Lepton + Jets Final States using a Topological Multivariate Technique as well as Lifetime b-Tagging in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96 TeV with the D0 Detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golling, Tobias F

    2005-01-01

    Two alternative measurements of the t{bar t} production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions in the lepton+jets channel are presented. The t{bar t} production cross section is extracted by combining the kinematic event information in a multivariate discriminant. The measurement yields {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 5.13{sub -1.57}{sup +1.76}(stat){sub -1.10}{sup +0.96}(syst) {+-} 0.33 (lumi) pb in the muon+jets channel, using 229.1 pb{sup -1}, and in the combination with the electron+jets channel 226.3 pb{sup -1} {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 6.60{sub -1.28}{sup +1.37}(stat){sub -1.11}{sup +1.25}(syst) {+-} 0.43 (lumi) pb. The second measurement presented reconstructs explicitly secondary vertices to d lifetime b-tagging. The measurement combines the muon+jets and the electron+jets channel, using 158.4 pb{sup -1} and 168.8 pb{sup -1}, respectively: {sigma}{sub p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + x} = 8.24{sub -1.25}{sup +1.34}(stat){sub -1.63}{sup +1.89}(syst) {+-} 0.54 (lumi) pb.

  20. PART III-SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C SECTION J APPENDIX C TRANSITION PLAN Plan: [To be inserted by the Contracting Officer.] Requirements: In accordance with Section F, Deliverables During Transition, the Contractor shall submit a Transition Plan for the Contracting Officer's approval 10 days after Contract award. The Transition plan shall describe the process, details, schedule, and cost for providing an orderly transition during the Contract's Transition Term stated in Section F, F-3 Period of Performance. The Transition Plan

  1. SECTION J, APPENDIX A - SOW

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0007749 SECTION J, APPENDIX A: STATEMENT OF WORK TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. OBJECTIVES, SCOPE, AND REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................... 1 1.0 OBJECTIVE .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND

  2. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX B AWARD FEE PLAN [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award.]

  3. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX M CONTRACTOR COMMITMENTS, AGREEMENTS, AND UNDERSTANDINGS [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award.]

  4. State Energy Data System 2013 Production Technical Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Section 1. Introduction 1 Section 2. Coal 3 Section 3. Crude Oil 5 Section 4. Natural Gas (Marketed Production) 7 Section 5. Renewable Energy and Nuclear Energy 11 U.S. Energy ...

  5. Cross sections for nuclide production in a {sup 56}Fe target irradiated by 300, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, and 2600 MeV protons compared with data on a hydrogen target irradiated by 300, 500, 750, 1000, and 1500 MeV/nucleon {sup 56}Fe ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Butko, M. A.; Pavlov, K. V.; Florya, S. N.; Tikhonov, R. S.; Mashnik, S. G.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Titarenko, N. N.; Gudowski, W.; Tesinsky, M.; Persson, C.-M. L.; Abderrahim, H. Ait; Kumawat, H.; Duarte, H.

    2008-09-15

    This work presents the cross sections for radioactive nuclide production in {sup 56}Fe(p,x) reactions determined in six experiments using 300, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, and 2600 MeV protons of the external beam from the ITEP U-10 proton accelerator. In total, 221 independent and cumulative yields of radioactive residuals of half-lives from 6.6 min to 312 d have been obtained. The radioactive product nuclide yields were determined by direct {gamma}-spectrometry. The measured data have been compared with the experimental data obtained elsewhere by the direct and inverse kinematics methods and with calculation results of 15 different codes that simulated hadron-nucleus interactions: MCNPX (INCL, CEM2K, BERTINI, ISABEL), LAHET (BERTINI, ISABEL), CEM03 (.01, .G1, .S1), LAQGSM03 (.01, .G1, .S1), CASCADE-2004, LAHETO, and BRIEFF. Most of the data obtained here are in a good agreement with the inverse kinematics results and disprove the results of some earlier activation measurements that were quite different from the inverse kinematics measurements. The most significant calculation-to-experiment differences are observed in the yields of the A<30 light nuclei, indicating that further improvements in nuclear reaction models are needed, and pointing out as well to a necessity of more complete experimental measurements of such reaction products.

  6. Updated Section H Greening Clauses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section H Greening Clauses Updated Section H Greening Clauses We are updating the Section H Green clauses. The intent of these clauses is to ensure that our contractors are aware of the Department's commitment to environmentally preferable and sustainable products and services in our procurement program. There are variations of the clause for architect-engineer, construction, janitorial service, computer equipment, and general service contracts. Each variation cross references its related

  7. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental & Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control.

  8. 1996 Central New Mexico Section [American Chemical Society] annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M.E.

    1997-02-07

    The main goal of the Central New Mexico Section this year was to increase attendance at the local meetings. Throughout the course of the year attendance at the meeting more than doubled. This was brought on by several factors: having the meeting spread throughout the section (Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Socorro, Los Alamos); supplementing the ACS National Tour speakers with interesting local sections speakers; and making full use of the newly formed Public Relations Committee. Activities during 1996 are summarized.

  9. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD ...................................................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA ..........................................................3 M-4 COST CRITERION .............................................................................................................6 Section M, Page 2 M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS

  10. SECTION J - TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Conformed to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section J Page i PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Statement of Work (Replaced by Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029) Appendix B Performance Evaluation Plan (Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084) Appendix C Contractor's Transition Plan Appendix D Sensitive Foreign Nations Control Appendix E Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) Appendix F National Work Breakdown

  11. RFP Section H Clause Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 3, 2011, twenty two draft Section H clause templates were distributed for Procurement Director (PD), Head of Contracting Activity (HCA), General Counsel and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate including the elimination of six clauses. The final version of the sixteen RFP Section H clause templates identified below will be available in STRIPES.

  12. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for heavy element production...II-1 P. K.Sahu, J. B. Natowitz, R. Wada, K. Hagel, T. Materna, Z. Chen, L. Qin, M. Barbui,...

  13. SECTION IV. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IV. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE Cross Sections for Cu K-Vacancy Production in Fast Heavy Ion Collisions R.L. Watson, J.M. Blackadar and V. Horvat Enhancement of the Cu Kα x-ray Diagram Lines in Fast Heavy Ion Collisions R.L. Watson, V. Horvat and J.M. Blackadar K-shell Ionization by Secondary Electrons V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar Target-atom Inner-shell Vacancy Distributions Created in Collisions with Heavy Ion Projectiles V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar Systematics of

  14. RFP Section L Attachment Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 29,2010, six draft RFP Section L Attachment templates (Past Performance Information Questionnaire, Past Performance Questionnaire Cover Letter, Letter of Commitment, Past Performance Reference Information Form, ESH&Q Past Performance Information Form, and Resume Format) were distributed for Procurement Director (PD) and Head of Contracting Activity (HCA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate. The final versions of the six aforementioned RFP Section L Attachment templates will be e-mailed directly to the Procurement Directors and made available in the STRIPES Library. For RFP's generated in STRIPES, the Section L Attachments should be identified in clause DOE-L-1033 and the file with each Attachment should be attached to the RFP.

  15. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N u F a c t 0 9 11th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, Superbeams and Beta Beams July 20-25, 2009 - Illinois Institute of Technology - Chicago David Schmitz, Fermilab Outline  Quick Audience Survey  Introduction  Relevant Energies and Targets  Current Cross-Section Experiments  Recent Results and Mysteries  Future Cross-Section Experiments NuFact09 - IIT, Chicago - 07/24/2009 D. Schmitz, Fermilab White Sox Survey D. Schmitz, Fermilab NuFact09 - IIT, Chicago -

  16. Microsoft Word - WTP Contract Section I - Conformed Thru 363.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section I Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. 363 I - i SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES WTP Contract Section I Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. 363 I - ii SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES FULL TEXT OF REFERENCED CLAUSES Clause No. Clause Title Page No. I.1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (OCT 1995); DEAR 952.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 1997) ............................... 1 I.2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)

  17. Section CIR: CASE IDENTIFICATION RECORD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... A-20 NumFullBaths NCOMBATH A full bathroom is one that has a sink with running water, a ... B-13c IceThruDoor1 ICE Does this refrigerator have through-the-door ice and water service? ...

  18. SECTION J, APPENDIX A - SOW

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029; Modified Mod 0049) Honeywell FM&T, LLC Contract No. DE-NA0000622 SECTION J APPENDIX A STATEMENT OF WORK 09/19/12 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. OBJECTIVES, SCOPE, AND REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................... 1 1.0 OBJECTIVE .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND

  19. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD.............................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA...........................................3 M-4 COST CRITERION.................................................................................5 Section M, Page 2 M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS (a) This acquisition will be conducted using the policies and procedures in Federal

  20. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS......................................................................176 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD...................................................................177 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA..........................................177 M-4 COST CRITERION.............................................................................................179 Section M, Page 176 M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS (a) This acquisition will be

  1. Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 - Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program - July 2014 Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of ...

  2. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  3. POLICY FLASH 2014-10 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION_ FULL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION FULL IMPLEMENTATION OF ANA SYSTEM POLICY FLASH 2014-10 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION FULL IMPLEMENTATION OF ANA SYSTEM An updated ...

  4. Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM Instruments for Simultaneous Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ...

  5. Full fuel-cycle comparison of forklift propulsion systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L. L.; Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-11-05

    Hydrogen has received considerable attention as an alternative to fossil fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigates the technical and economic feasibility of promising new technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells. A recent report for DOE identified three near-term markets for fuel cells: (1) Emergency power for state and local emergency response agencies, (2) Forklifts in warehousing and distribution centers, and (3) Airport ground support equipment markets. This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell propulsion for existing technologies based on batteries and fossil fuels. Industry data and the Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model are used to estimate full fuel-cycle emissions and use of primary energy sources, back to the primary feedstocks for fuel production. Also considered are other environmental concerns at work locations. The benefits derived from using fuel-cell propulsion are determined by the sources of electricity and hydrogen. In particular, fuel-cell forklifts using hydrogen made from the reforming of natural gas had lower impacts than those using hydrogen from electrolysis.

  6. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  7. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    18 Section J Appendix F List of Applicable Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the Contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the CRD in whole or in part. For those Directives whereby the Contractor has been granted an

  8. Mission Support Contract Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 298 1 ATTACHMENT J-4-d Mission Support Contract FY 2013 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan The Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) details the administration of performance incentives and allocation of total available fee as defined in Section B, Supplies or Services and Prices/Costs. 1. PERFORMANCE INCENTIVES This PEMP contains both objective and subjective performance incentives in order to maximize the efficacy of the

  9. Dosimetry and cross section measurements at RTNS II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Kneff, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous measurements have been conducted at TRNS-II in order to map the neutron field for materials irradiations, to measure activation cross sections, and to measure helium production cross sections. Experiments of up to two weeks duration irradiated large numbers of activation dosimetry and helium samples both close to the source and throughout the target room. Many other samples have been irradiated in piggy-back positions over periods lasting many months. All of these experiments fall into four main classes, namely, fluence-mapping, activation dosimetry, the production of long-lived isotopes, and helium generation measurements. Radiometric dosimetry and activation cross section measurements were performed at Argonne National Laboratory; helium production was measured at Rockwell International Corporation. This paper briefly summarizes the principal results of our measurements at RTNS-II; references are given for more detailed publications. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structures (Conference) | SciTech Connect modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in

  11. Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections. × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science

  12. Full Service Leased Space Data Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Service Leased Space Data Report Full Service Leased Space Data Report The Full Service Leased Space Data Report is to be used for voluntary reporting of scope 3 emissions from fully serviced leased space where the agency does not purchase energy directly. File Download the Full Service Leased Space Data Report.

  13. Turbine airfoil having outboard and inboard sections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazzola, Stefan; Marra, John J

    2015-03-17

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and formed from at least an outboard section and an inboard section such that an inner end of the outboard section is attached to an outer end of the inboard section. The outboard section may be configured to provide a tip having adequate thickness and may extend radially inward from the tip with a generally constant cross-sectional area. The inboard section may be configured with a tapered cross-sectional area to support the outboard section.

  14. Template:PrintFullVersionButton | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PrintFullVersionButton Jump to: navigation, search This is the PrintFullVersionButton template. It is intended for inclusion on any page where the printing of a superset of pages...

  15. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel ... with Ultralow-Sulfur Fuel Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission ...

  16. Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Energy Systems Division About ... UChicago Argonne, LLC. ANLESD08-3 Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion ...

  17. Part IV: Section D - Packaging and Marking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section D - Page ii PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging 1 D.2 Marking ...

  18. SECTION II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS Dynamic Evolution and the Caloric Curve for Medium Mass Nuclei J. Cibor, R. Wada, K. Hagel, M. Lunardon, N. Marie, R. Alfaro, W. Shen, B. Xiao, Y. Zhao, J. Li, M. Murray, J.B. Natowitz, Z. Majka and P. Staszel Search for 5He Emission from Hot Compound Nuclei R. Charity and L.G. Sobotka for the Washington University, NSCL, Legnaro, Padova, TAMU Collaboration IMF Production in 64Zn + 58Ni at 35A-79A MeV R. Wada, K. Hagel, J. Cibor, J. Li, M. Murray, J.B. Natowitz, A. Ono

  19. Vermont Section 401 Water Quality Certification Application ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Application required for Section 401 water quality certification under the Clean Water Act. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Section 401 Water Quality...

  20. OpenEI Community - Section 7

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Wed, 05 Sep...

  1. Beijing Full Three Dimension Power Engineering Co Ltd FTD | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Engineering Co Ltd (FTD) Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100080 Product: A steam turbine design and refurbishment service provider. Focus on technical...

  2. Supercomputers Help a Catalyst Reach its Full Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical reactions facilitated by catalysts are crucial to many industrial processes. In fertilizer production, chemical companies combine copious amounts of molecular hydrogen ...

  3. DE-FE0004001 Full text of Clauses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Transportation: NETL has a pool of GSA vehicles, to which ... of products other than fuel for producing heat or power ... and economic analysis, scheduling, performance measurement, ...

  4. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  5. Analysis of Soluble Re Concentrations in Refractory from Bulk Vitrification Full-Scale Test 38B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Scott K.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2006-06-30

    The capacity of the waste treatment plant (WTP) being built at the Hanford Site is not sufficient to process all of the tank waste accumulated from more than 40 years of nuclear materials production. Bulk vitrification can accelerate tank waste treatment by providing some supplemental low-activity waste (LAW) treatment capacity. Bulk vitrification combines LAW and glass-forming chemicals in a large metal container and melts the contents using electrical resistance heating. A castable refractory block (CRB) is used along with sand to insulate the container from the heat generated while melting the contents into a glass waste form. This report describes engineering-scale (ES) and full-scale (FS) tests that have been conducted. Several ES tests showed that a small fraction of soluble Tc moves in the CRB and results in a groundwater peak different than WTP glass. The total soluble Tc-99 fraction in the FS CRB is expected to be different than that determined in the ES tests, but until FS test results are available, the best-estimate soluble Tc-99 fraction from the ES tests has been used as a conservative estimate. The first FS test results are from cold simulant tests that have been spiked with Re. An estimated scale-up factor extrapolates the Tc-99 data collected at the ES to the FS bulk vitrification waste package. Test FS-38A tested the refractory design and did not have a Re spike. Samples were taken and analyzed to help determine Re CRB background concentrations using a Re-spiked, six-tank composite simulant mixed with soil and glass formers to produce the waste feed. Although this feed is not physically the same as the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System feed , the chemical make-up is the same. Extensive sampling of the CRB was planned, but difficulties with the test prevented completion of a full box. An abbreviated plan is described that looks at duplicate samples taken from refractory archive sections, a lower wall sample, and two base samples to gain early information about Re and projected Tc-99 levels in the FS box.

  6. Coal production 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-07

    Coal Production 1985 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. All data presented in this report, except the total production table presented in the Highlights section, and the demonstrated reserve base data presented in Appendix A, were obtained from form EIA-7A, ''Coal Production Report,'' from companies owning mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1985. The data cover 4105 of the 5477 US coal mining operations active in 1985. These mining operations accounted for 99.4% of total US coal production and represented 74.9% of all US coal mining operations in 1985. This report also includes data for the demonstrated reserve vase of coal in the US on January 1, 1985.

  7. 2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Full Presentations | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Full Presentations 2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Full Presentations The Transmission Reliability R&D Reliability & Markets Peer Review included 11 presentations over 2 days on August 7 - 8, 2012 at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. The full presentations are available below. Presentation summaries are also available. PDF icon 2012 R&M Peer Review - Transmission Investment Assessment Under Uncertainty - Ben Hobbs PDF icon 2012 R&M Peer Review - Renewable

  8. Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on Full Diameter

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SNF Interim Storage Canister Mockup | Department of Energy Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on Full Diameter SNF Interim Storage Canister Mockup Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on Full Diameter SNF Interim Storage Canister Mockup The goal of work described in this document is to assess the effects of the manufacturing process on canister performance by evaluating the properties of a full-diameter cylindrical mockup of an interim storage

  9. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service Access Road over Lena Gulch | Department of Energy Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch from South Golden Road to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, Golden, Colorado. PDF

  10. ARM: Portable Radiation Package: Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer full

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    resolution 6-s sampling (Dataset) | Data Explorer Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer full resolution 6-s sampling Title: ARM: Portable Radiation Package: Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer full resolution 6-s sampling Portable Radiation Package: Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer full resolution 6-s sampling Authors: Annette Koontz ; R. Reynolds Publication Date: 2012-11-02 OSTI Identifier: 1095577 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data

  11. Enterprise Assessments Review, Pantex Plant 2014 Full Participation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exercise - April 2015 | Department of Energy Review, Pantex Plant 2014 Full Participation Exercise - April 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review, Pantex Plant 2014 Full Participation Exercise - April 2015 April 2015 Review of the Pantex Plant 2014 Full Participation Exercise The Office of Emergency Management Assessments, within the U.S. Department of Energy's independent Office of Enterprise Assessments, Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, conducted an independent oversight

  12. BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity - Full Applications Webinar (Text Version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 6 Funding Opportunity - Full Applications Webinar (Text Version) BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity - Full Applications Webinar (Text Version) Here is the text version of the webinar BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity - Full Applications, presented in March 2016. Watch the presentation. Karma Sawyer: Presentation cover slide: Good afternoon, everyone. Welcome to our webinar. Thank-you for your interest in the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts on renewable energy and

  13. Elastic scattering and total cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1990-03-01

    This report discusses concepts of elastic scattering and cross sections of proton-proton interactions. (LSP)

  14. Savannah River Site Contractor Resumes Full Operations Following...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River Site Contractor Resumes Full Operations Following Pause April 27, 2016 - 12:25pm Addthis AIKEN, S.C. - Savannah River Site management and operations contractor ...

  15. Validation of the SASSI2010 Subtraction Method Using Full Scale...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the SASSI2010 Subtraction Method Using Full Scale Independent Verification Lisa Anderson Farhang Ostadan Bechtel National, Inc. USDOE NPH Workshop October 2014 Validation of the...

  16. Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects Below are the project presentations and respective peer ...

  17. New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New culturing tool reveals New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells A new technique for genetic analysis, "gel microdroplets," helps scientists generate complete...

  18. Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plasma material interaction in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment divertor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma ...

  19. CASL - VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated in a Full Core

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated in a Full Core Simulation In December, CASL reported on the latest results from its Watts Bar reactor progression problem modeling. The most recent simulation includes quarter-core representation with coupled neutronics (including embedded cross section generation and neutron transport) and thermal - hydraulics. Last July, the team completed a demonstration of physics coupling that included heat generation and thermal-hydraulic

  20. Full Text of the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2006

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Full Text Glossary Full Text Glossary The full-text glossary includes terms used throughout the website and in Biomass Program publications. Terms are listed alphabetically for easy reference. The term index lists all of the terms defined in the glossary. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A acid: A solution that has an excess of hydrogen ions (H+), with a pH of less than 7. acetic acid: An acid with the structure of C2H4O2.

  1. Coherence time effects on J/{psi} production and suppression...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurements and a nuclear absorption cross section extracted from pA charmonium production experiments, we study Jpsi production and absorption in nucleus-nucleus collisions. ...

  2. Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    eXperiment divertor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment ...

  3. Apparatus and method for detecting full-capture radiation events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, Daniel M. C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling the output signal of a radiation detector and distinguishing full-capture radiation events from Compton scattering events. The output signal of a radiation detector is continuously sampled. The samples are converted to digital values and input to a discriminator where samples that are representative of events are identified. The discriminator transfers only event samples, that is, samples representing full-capture events and Compton events, to a signal processor where the samples are saved in a three-dimensional count matrix with time (from the time of onset of the pulse) on the first axis, sample pulse current amplitude on the second axis, and number of samples on the third axis. The stored data are analyzed to separate the Compton events from full-capture events, and the energy of the full-capture events is determined without having determined the energies of any of the individual radiation detector events.

  4. Apparatus and method for detecting full-capture radiation events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-10-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for sampling the output signal of a radiation detector and distinguishing full-capture radiation events from Compton scattering events. The output signal of a radiation detector is continuously sampled. The samples are converted to digital values and input to a discriminator where samples that are representative of events are identified. The discriminator transfers only event samples, that is, samples representing full-capture events and Compton events, to a signal processor where the samples are saved in a three-dimensional count matrix with time (from the time of onset of the pulse) on the first axis, sample pulse current amplitude on the second axis, and number of samples on the third axis. The stored data are analyzed to separate the Compton events from full-capture events, and the energy of the full-capture events is determined without having determined the energies of any of the individual radiation detector events. 4 figs.

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on AddThis.com... More in this section...

  6. Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resiliency | Department of Energy Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and Resiliency Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and Resiliency May 2, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis Inside Florida Power & Light's Transmission Performance Diagnostic Center. | Photo courtesy of Florida Power & Light. Inside Florida Power & Light's Transmission Performance Diagnostic Center. | Photo courtesy of Florida Power & Light. In 2009, at the

  7. IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu Citation Details In-Document Search Title: IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu The solid-state properties of most elements are now well understood on the basis of quantum physics - with few exceptions, notably the element number 94, plutonium. Plutonium has six

  8. AVTA: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures AVTA: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures PDF icon EV America Test Specifications PDF icon ETA-TP001 Implementation of SAE Standard J1263, February 1996 - Road Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques PDF icon ETA-TP002 Implementation of SAE Standard J1666, May 1993 - Electric Vehicle Acceleration, Gradeability, and Deceleration Test Procedure PDF icon

  9. Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Sector Manufacturing Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing The U.S. Manufacturing Sector Static Sankey diagram shows how total primary energy is used by U.S. manufacturing plants. Click on the Onsite Generation, Process Energy or Nonprocess Energy thumbnails below the diagram to see further detail on energy flows in manufacturing. Also, see the Dynamic Manufacturing Energy Sankey Tool to pan, zoom, and customize the manufacturing Sankey data and compare energy consumption across

  10. Supercomputers Help a Catalyst Reach its Full Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Help a Catalyst Reach its Full Potential Supercomputers Help a Catalyst Reach its Full Potential Placing Protons Prevents Wasteful Profligate Reactions April 23, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov +1 510 495 2402 protondeliverystory.jpg While one configuration (endo/endo) of a popular nickel catalyst can produce thousands of hydrogen molecules a second, the other forms that place the proton farther from the center are slower and less efficient. Chemical reactions facilitated by catalysts are

  11. 'What is Space?': Full of Possibilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    'What is Space?': Full of Possibilities 'What is Space?': Full of Possibilities November 2, 2011 - 10:21am Addthis Host Brian Greene explores the possibilities of space in tonight's premiere episode of PBS NOVA's "The Fabric of the Cosmos." Host Brian Greene explores the possibilities of space in tonight's premiere episode of PBS NOVA's "The Fabric of the Cosmos." Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Communications Specialist (detailee) How can I watch? Check your local

  12. Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective February 24, 2012 - 4:45pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaking at the 2011 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. | Energy Department file photo. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaking at the 2011 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. | Energy Department file photo. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Former Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of

  13. High-voltage compatible, full-depleted CCD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2007-09-18

    A charge coupled device for detecting electromagnetic and particle radiation is described. The device includes a high-resistivity semiconductor substrate, buried channel regions, gate electrode circuitry, and amplifier circuitry. For good spatial resolution and high performance, especially when operated at high voltages with full or nearly full depletion of the substrate, the device can also include a guard ring positioned near channel regions, a biased channel stop, and a biased polysilicon electrode over the channel stop.

  14. 2014 Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PROGRAM | Department of Energy ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM 2014 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM In 2015, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may receive up to 1.8

  15. OpenEI Community - Section 12

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Wed, 05 Sep 2012 04:36:43 +0000 Kyoung 488...

  16. Spontaneous Potential (book section) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Spontaneous Potential (book section) Author NA Published NA, The date "NA" was not understood.The date "NA" was not understood....

  17. SRS FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. In accordance with NDAA Section 3116, certain waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is not high...

  18. Regulatory Review Comment Section | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment » Regulatory Review Comment Section Regulatory Review Comment Section DOE Comments on Radiation Protection (Atomic Energy Act) DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste

  19. Part V: Section H: Special Contract Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M801 Section H - Page 2 of 50 PART I SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 No Third Party Beneficiaries...

  20. Section 12 | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  1. Section 7 | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  2. Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS Request for Proposal DE-RP36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service Being ...

  3. Section 1703 Loan Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 1703 Loan Program Section 1703 Loan Program About the Section 1703 Loan Program Section 1703 of Title XVII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorizes the U.S. Department of Energy to support innovative clean energy technologies that are typically unable to obtain conventional private financing due to high technology risks. In addition, the technologies must avoid, reduce, or sequester air pollutants or anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Technologies we will consider include:

  4. Covered Product Category: Residential Refrigerators | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This calculator allows the user to input different product types, capacities and local utility costs. The output section automatically displays results based on the user's inputs. ...

  5. Covered Product Category: Residential Freezers | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This calculator allows users to input different product types, capacities, and local utility costs. The output section automatically displays results based on the user's inputs. ...

  6. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  7. DE-FE0004001 Full text of Clauses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PART I SECTION A - SOLICITATION/CONTRACT FORM OMB Approval No. 9000-0008 SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD 1. RATING PAGE OF 1 246 PAGES 2. CONTRACT NO. DE-FE0004001 3. SOLICITATION NO. DE-SO26-08000664 4. TYPE OF SOLICITATION SEALED BID (IFB) X NEGOTIATED (RFP) 5. DATE ISSUED January 30, 2009 6. REQUISITION/PURCHASE NO. 26-08NT007047 7. ISSUED BY CODE 8. ADDRESS OFFER TO (If other than Item 7) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory PO Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road

  8. Full Core Multiphysics Simulation with Offline Mesh Deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merzari, E.; Shemon, E. R.; Yu, Y.; Thomas, J. W.; Obabko, A.; Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay; Solberg, Jerome; Ferencz, R.; Whitesides, R.

    2015-12-21

    In this report, building on previous reports issued in FY13 we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core. The focus of the present report is a full core simulation with off-line mesh deformation.

  9. Optical caustics of Kerr spacetime: The full structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozza, V.

    2008-09-15

    I present an exhaustive numerical investigation of the optical caustics in gravitational lensing by a spinning black hole for an observer at infinity. Besides the primary caustic, I examine higher order caustics, formed by photons performing one or several loops around the black hole. My investigation covers the whole parameter space, including the black hole spin, its inclination with respect to the line of sight, the source distance, and the caustic order. By comparing my results with the available analytical approximations, I find perfect agreement in their respective domains of validity. I then prove that all caustics maintain their shape (a tube with astroidal cross section) in the entire parameter space without suffering any transitions to different caustic shapes. For nearly extremal spin, however, higher order caustics grow so large that their cross sections at fixed radii wind several times around the black hole. As a consequence, for each caustic order, the number of images ranges from 2 to 2(n+1), where n is the number of loops spanned by the caustic. As for the critical curves, I note that for high values of the spin they develop a small dip on the side corresponding to prograde orbits.

  10. Full-Column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10 Full-Column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 Final Campaign Report ML Fischer January 2016 CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

  11. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

  12. Cross-Sectional Transport Imaging in a Multijunction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haegel, Nancy M.; Ke, Chi-Wen; Taha, Hesham; Guthrey, Harvey; Fetzer, C. M.; King, Richard

    2015-06-14

    Combining highly localized electron-beam excitation at a point with the spatial resolution capability of optical near-field imaging, we have imaged carrier transport in a cross-sectioned multijunction (GaInP/GaInAs/Ge) solar cell. We image energy transport associated with carrier diffusion throughout the full width of the middle (GaInAs) cell and luminescent coupling from point excitation in the top cell GaInP to the middle cell. Supporting cathodoluminescence and near-field photoluminescence measurements demonstrate excitation-dependent Fermi level splitting effects that influence cross-sectioned spectroscopy results as well as transport limitations on the spatial resolution of cross-sectional measurements.

  13. From ZZ to ZH : How Low Can These Cross Sections Go or Everybody, Let's Cross Section Limbo!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, Emanuel Alexandre; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-08-01

    We report on two searches performed at the D0 detector at the Fermi National Laboratory. The first is a search for Z di-boson production with a theoretical cross section of 1.4 pb. The search was performed on 2.6 fb{sup -1} of data and contributed to the first observation of ZZ production at a hadron collider. The second is a search for a low mass Standard Model Higgs in 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data. The Higgs boson is produced in association with a Z boson where the Higgs decays hadronically and the Z decays to two leptons. The ZZ search was performed in both the di-electron and di-muon channels. For the ZH search, we will focus on the muonic decays where we expanded the traditional coverage by considering events in which one of the two muons fails the selection requirement, and is instead reconstructed as an isolated track. We consider Higgs masses between 100 and 150 GeV, with theoretical cross sections ranging from 0.17 to 0.042 pb, and set upper limits on the ZH production cross-section at 95% confidence level.

  14. Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Arthur L. (Kenyon, MN); Krawza, Kenneth I. (Lakeville, MN)

    1997-01-01

    In a hydraulically powered pump for excavating and transporting slurries in hich it is immersed, the improvement of a gravel and cobble eductor including an expandable mixing section, comprising: a primary flow conduit that terminates in a nozzle that creates a water jet internal to a tubular mixing section of the pump when water pressure is applied from a primary supply flow; a tubular mixing section having a center line in alignment with the nozzle that creates a water jet; a mixing section/exit diffuser column that envelopes the flexible liner; and a secondary inlet conduit that forms an opening at a bas portion of the column and adjacent to the nozzle and water jet to receive water saturated gravel as a secondary flow that mixes with the primary flow inside of the mixing section to form a combined total flow that exits the mixing section and decelerates in the exit diffuser.

  15. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  16. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  17. LED Watch: Unlocking the Full Potential of Indoor Systems

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LD+A June 2015 www.ies.org Lighting control has long held the potential to deliver significant energy sav- ings by adjusting the amount of light to the real-time needs of a particular space and its occupants. But while myriad prod- ucts for controlling light have been com- mercially available for quite some time, their deployment and resulting energy savings have been limited. SSL products are poised to be the catalyst that unlocks that potential. SSL technology offers an unprecedented ability

  18. Section 106 Archaeology Guidance (ACHP, 2009)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation's Section 106 guidance is designed to assist federal agencies in making effective management decisions about archaeological resources in completing the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). This guidance highlights the decision-making role of the federal agency in the Section 106 process. It is also designed for use by State and Tribal Historic Preservation Officers, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and cultural resource management professionals when assisting federal agencies to meet their responsibilities under Section 106.

  19. RPM Sections - RPM-2 RPM-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clock History Browse Pages Blog Labels Attachments Index Recent updates RSS feed builder Home RPM Sections Asset Management Information Technology (Assets) Lifecycle Management...

  20. Montana Watershed Protection Section Contacts Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    contact information for the Watershed Protection Section of the Water Quality Planning Bureau. Author Montana Water Quality Planning Bureau Published State of Montana, Date Not...

  1. Cal. PRC Section 21065 - Environmental Quality Definitions |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Cal. PRC Section 21065 - Environmental Quality DefinitionsLegal Abstract Contains...

  2. Microsoft Word - SECTION D.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Medical Services at Hanford D-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING ......

  3. ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Explanatory Material Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material Abstract This...

  4. ACTIV87: Fast Neutron Activation Cross Section File

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-08-01

    4. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND AND INFORMATION ACTIV87 is a compilation of fast neutron induced activation reaction cross-sections. The compilation covers energies from threshold to 20 MeV and is based on evaluated data taken from other evaluated data libraries and individual evaluations. The majority of these evaluations were performed by using available experimental data. The aforementioned available experimental data were used in the selection of needed parameters for theoretical computations and for normalizing the results of suchmore » computations. Theoretical calculations were also used for interpolation and extrapolation of experimental cross-section data. All of the evaluated data curves were compared with experimental data that had been reported over the four year period preceding 1987. Only those cross-sections not in contradiction with experimental data that was current in 1987 were retained in the activation file, ACTIV87. In cases of several conflicting evaluations, that evaluation was chosen which best corresponded to the experimental data. A few evaluated curves were renormalized in accordance with the results of the latest precision measurements. 5. APPLICATION OF THE DATA 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA The following libraries and individual files of evaluated neutron cross-section data were used for the selection of the activation cross-sections: the BOSPOR Library, the Activation File of the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, the Evaluated Neutron Data File (ENDF/B-V) Activation File, the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82), and individual evaluations carried out under various IAEA research contracts. The file of selected reactions contains 206 evaluated cross-section curves of the (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,a) reactions which lead to radioactive products and may be used in many practical applications of neutron activation analysis. Some competing activation reactions, usually with low cross-section values, are given for completeness.« less

  5. Development of Thin Section Zinc Die Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, Frank

    2013-10-31

    A new high fluidity zinc high pressure die casting alloy, termed the HF alloy, was developed during laboratory trials and proven in industrial production. The HF alloy permits castings to be achieved with section thicknesses of 0.3 mm or less. Technology transfer activities were conducted to develop usage of the HF high fluidity alloy. These included production of a brochure and a one-hour webinar on the HF alloy. The brochure was then sent to 1,184 product designers in the Interzinc database. There was excellent reception to this mailing, and from this initial contact 5 technology transfer seminars were conducted for 81 participants from 30 companies across a wide range of business sectors. Many of the successful applications to date involve high quality surface finishes. Design and manufacturing assistance was given for development of selected applications.

  6. Smart Energy Management of Multiple Full Cell Powered Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOhammad S. Alam

    2007-04-23

    In this research project the University of South Alabama research team has been investigating smart energy management and control of multiple fuel cell power sources when subjected to varying demands of electrical and thermal loads together with demands of hydrogen production. This research has focused on finding the optimal schedule of the multiple fuel cell power plants in terms of electric, thermal and hydrogen energy. The optimal schedule is expected to yield the lowest operating cost. Our team is also investigating the possibility of generating hydrogen using photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells through finding materials for efficient light harvesting photoanodes. The goal is to develop an efficient and cost effective PEC solar cell system for direct electrolysis of water. In addition, models for hydrogen production, purification, and storage will be developed. The results obtained and the data collected will be then used to develop a smart energy management algorithm whose function is to maximize energy conservation within a managed set of appliances, thereby lowering O/M costs of the Fuel Cell power plant (FCPP), and allowing more hydrogen generation opportunities. The Smart Energy Management and Control (SEMaC) software, developed earlier, controls electrical loads in an individual home to achieve load management objectives such that the total power consumption of a typical residential home remains below the available power generated from a fuel cell. In this project, the research team will leverage the SEMaC algorithm developed earlier to create a neighborhood level control system.

  7. Modeling the efficient access of full-text information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, M.; Kero, R.; Korp, P.; McCusker-Whiting, M.; Tsur, S.; Dunlap, K.; Johnson, L.

    1996-05-01

    The title of this paper describes a research goal set by many offices within US DOE. This paper reviews efficient full-text searching techniques being developed to better understand and meet this goal. Classical computer human interaction (CHI) approaches provided by commercial information retrieval (IR) engines fail to contextualize information in ways that facilitate timely decision making. Use of advanced CHI techniques (eg, visualization) in combination with deductive database technology augment the weaknesses found in presentation capabilities of IR engines and are discussed. Various techniques employed in a Web-based prototype system currently under development are presented.

  8. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - renewable section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on renewable energy production and consumption and overviews of fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

  9. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - renewable section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on renewable energy production and consumption and overviews of fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

  10. MiniBooNE Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sections Group e-mail: BOONE-CROSSSECTIONS(AT)fnal.gov convenors: Alessandro Curioni (alessandro.curioni(AT)yale.edu) and Sam Zeller (gzeller(AT)fnal.gov) Cross Sections at MiniBooNE, Meetings, Reference Articles, Conferences, Useful Links Last updated on 07/19/07

  11. Public Comment re Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of 2007 | Department of Energy Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Public Comment re Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Public Comment by the Uranium Producers of America (UPA) re Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The UPA urges DOE to clarify the definition of nuclear supplier to not include uranium production or conversion services as a covered person under EISA. In the alternative, uranium

  12. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  13. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  14. Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

  15. SECTION V. SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H SECTION J APPENDIX H KEY PERSONNEL [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after

    B, Page 1 SECTION L ATTACHMENT B LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL TITLE NAME [Note: Add/remove extra rows if needed]

    A, Page 1 SECTION L ATTACHMENT A PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT For value received, and in consideration of, and in order to induce the United States (the Government) to enter into Contract [insert Contract number] for the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site

  16. ANALYTIC EXPRESSIONS FOR THE LIGHT-SCATTERING CROSS SECTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Information 1 Web Services Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version OSTI's Announcement Notice 241.1 Web Service for STI One option available for DOE sites to submit AN 241.1 metadata for STI products is the AN 241.1 Web Service. The STI product will be a full text document, such as a technical report, thesis/dissertation, book, journal literature, conference literature, or a program document. It could also be multimedia. OSTI's Web Service allows a submitting site to send

  17. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  18. Use of fine gridding in full field simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greaser, G.R.; Doerr, T.C.; Chea, C.; Parvez, N.

    1995-10-01

    A full field 3D simulation study was completed for a large Saudi Arabian oilfield located in the Arabian Gulf. The subject field produced from a highly layered Arab D carbonate reservoir which exhibited a strong water drive. The objective of the study was to determine future platform locations and timing with respect to water encroachment. The large areal extent (13{times}23 km) and highly layered nature of this reservoir necessitated use of coarse grids in order to obtain a reasonable model size. The coarse grid model was constructed with 86,000 grid cells. Using the coarse model, prediction studies showed an advantage to future platform development with horizontal wells. However, these results were suspect since it was thought that the coarse cell model may not properly model water coning and encroachment around the horizontal wellbores. To improve the modeling of water movement, fine grid numerical simulation techniques were investigated. This paper discusses the use of sector and local grid refinement modeling techniques with commercially available software. Fine grid simulation studies were conducted for a proposed new platform. The fine grid simulation studies showed significantly different results compared with the coarse model predictions. The fine grid simulation results will be discussed, the two fine grid simulation techniques will be compared, and reasons presented why performance differences exist. Performance of the fine grid models on an Unix RISC based workstation is included.

  19. Reduction of Islands in Full-pressure Stellarator Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.R. Hudson; D.A. Monticello; A.H. Reiman

    2001-04-30

    The control of magnetic islands is a crucial issue in designing Stellarators. Islands are associated with resonant radial magnetic fields at rational rotational-transform surfaces and can lead to chaos and poor plasma confinement. In this article, we show that variations in the resonant fields of a full-pressure stellarator equilibrium can be related to variations in the boundary via a coupling matrix, and inversion of this matrix determines a boundary modification for which the island content is significantly reduced. The numerical procedure is described and the results of island optimization are presented. Equilibria with islands are computed using the Princeton Iterative Equilibrium Solver, and resonant radial fields are calculated via construction of quadratic-flux-minimizing surfaces. A design candidate for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment [Phys. Plasmas 8, 2001], which has a large island, is used to illustrate the technique. Small variations in the boundary shape are used to reduce island size and to reverse the phase of a major island chain.

  20. Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program I. Purpose In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005; Public Law 109-58) Congress established a new program to support the expansion ...

  1. Section 311 Revised Template January 4 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01.

  2. MODELING AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS FOR AMERICIUM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROCHMAN, D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2005-05-01

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on the modeling and fission cross section for americium isotopes (May 2004-June 2005). The purpose of the contract was to provide fission cross sections for americium isotopes with the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE 2.19. The following work was performed: (1) Fission calculations capability suitable for americium was implemented to the EMPIRE-2.19 code. (2) Calculations of neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 239}Am to {sup 244g}Am were performed with EMPIRE-2.19 for energies up to 20 MeV. For the neutron-induced reaction of {sup 240}Am, fission cross sections were predicted and uncertainties were assessed. (3) Set of fission barrier heights for each americium isotopes was chosen so that the new calculations fit the experimental data and follow the systematics found in the literature.

  3. Section 311 Revised Template August 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01.

  4. Microsoft Word - Section F (Mod 616).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on or before September 30, 2016. The period of performance for the Recovery Act work specified in Section C and Table J-1 shall be for the period of performance beginning...

  5. EPAct Section 242 Comments and DOE Responses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 2, 2014 in the Federal Register, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published and requested comment on draft guidance for implementing Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct...

  6. Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01.

  7. Section 999: Annual Plans | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 999: Annual Plans Section 999: Annual Plans October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 Federal Register Notice for October 8, 2013 UDAC Meeting The 24th Meeting of the Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee (UDAC), previously scheduled for October 8, 2013, is postponed until further notice due to a lapse in Federal funding. October 2, 2013 URTAC Meeting - October 2013 Federal Register Notice for October 10, 2013 URTAC Meeting The 24th Meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology

  8. Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program I. Purpose In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005; Public Law 109-58) Congress established a new program to support the expansion of hydropower energy development at existing dams and impoundments through an incentive payment procedure. Under section 242 of EPAct 2005, the Secretary of Energy is directed to provide incentive payments to the owner or authorized operator of qualified hydroelectric facilities for electric energy generated and sold

  9. QuickSite Cross Section Processing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-05-27

    This AGEM-developed system produces cross sections by inputting data in both standard and custom file formats and outputting a graphic file that can be printed or further modified in a commercial graphic program. The system has evolved over several years in order to combine and visualize a changing set of field data more rapidly than was possible with commercially available cross section software packages. It uses some commercial packages to produce the input and tomore » modify the output files. Flexibility is provided by a dynamic set of programs that are customized to accept varying input and accomodate varying output requirements. There are two basic types of routines: conversion routines and cross section generation routines. The conversion routines convery various data files to logger file format which is compatible with a standard file format for LogPlot 98, a commonly used commercial log plotting program. The cross section routines generate cross sections and apply topography to these cross sections. All of the generation routines produce a standard graphic DXF file, which is the format used in AutoCAD and can then be modified in a number of available graphics programs.« less

  10. Detailed photonuclear cross-section calculations and astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Hoff, R.W.

    1989-06-15

    We have investigated the role of an isomeric state and its coupling to the ground state (g.s.) via photons and neutron inelastic scattering in a stellar environment by making detailed photonuclear and neutron cross-section calculations for /sup 176/Lu and /sup 210/Bi. In the case of /sup 176/Lu, the g.s. would function as an excellent galactic slow- (s-) process chronometer were it not for the 3.7-h isomer at 123 keV. Our calculations predicted much larger photon cross sections for production of the isomer, as well as a lower threshold, than had been assumed based on earlier measurements. These two factors combine to indicate that an enormous correction, a factor of 10/sup 7/, must be applied to shorten the current estimate of the half-life against photoexcitation of /sup 176/Lu as a function of temperature. This severely limits the use of /sup 176/Lu as a stellar chronometer and indicates a significantly lower temperature at which the two states reach thermal equilibrium. For /sup 210/Bi, our preliminary calculations of the production and destruction of the 3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ y isomeric state by neutrons and photons suggest that the /sup 210/Bi isomer may not be destroyed by photons as rapidly as assumed in certain stellar environments. This leads to an alternate production path of /sup 207/Pb and significantly affects presently interpreted lead isotopic abundances. We have been able to make such detailed nuclear cross-section calculations using: modern statistical-model codes of the Hauser-Feshbach type, with complete conservation of angular momentum and parity; reliable systematics of the input parameters required by these codes, including knowledge of the absolute gamma-ray strength-functions for E1, M1, and E2 transitions; and codes developed to compute large, discrete, nuclear level sets, their associated gamma-ray branchings, and the presence and location of isomeric states. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Annual Energy Review - financial indicators section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Annual statistics on consumer energy prices and expenditures, fossil fuel production prices and value, and value of fossil fuel imports and exports back to 1949.

  12. Section C: Description, Specifications and Work Statements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... is accountable for the planning, execution, completion, assessment, and delivery of all work products. ... NREL encourages and supports a creative environment in which RDD&D ...

  13. Full Focus Needed on Finishing Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant - 12196

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, Suzanne; Biyani, Rabindra; Holmes, Erika

    2012-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) Hanford Nuclear Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks located 19 to 24 km (12 to 15 miles) from the Columbia River in south-central Washington State. Hanford's tanks now hold about 212,000 cu m (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive and chemically hazardous waste. Sixty-seven tanks have leaked an estimated 3,785 cu m (1 million gallons) of this waste into the surrounding soil. Further releases to soil, groundwater, and the Columbia River are the inevitable result of the tanks continuing to age. The risk from this waste is recognized as a threat to the Northwest by both State and Federal governments. US DOE and Bechtel National, Inc., are building the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat and vitrify (immobilize in glass) the waste from Hanford's tanks. As is usual for any groundbreaking project, problems have arisen that must be resolved as they occur if treatment is to take place as specified in the court-enforceable Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) and the Consent Decree, entered into by US DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). At times, US DOE's approach to solving these critical issues seems to have caused undue wastes of time, energy, and, ultimately, public funds. Upon reviewing the history of Hanford's tank waste treatment project, Ecology hopes that constructive criticism of past failures and praise of successes will inspire US DOE to consider changing practices, be more transparent with regulatory agencies and the public, and take a 'lean production' approach to successfully completing this project. All three Tri-Party Agreement agencies share the goal of completing WTP on time, ensuring it is operational and in compliance with safety standards. To do this, Ecology believes US DOE should: - Maintain focus on the primary goal of completing the five major facilities of WTP. - Construct a supplemental low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification facility for the two-thirds balance of LAW that will not be treated by the vitrification facility under construction. - Prepare infrastructure for waste feed from the tanks and facilities to handle the WTP waste streams. To support this project track, Ecology expedites dangerous waste permitting by using a design-build approach to integrate WTP into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permit for Hanford. (authors)

  14. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore »extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  15. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore » extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  16. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  17. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of $$B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}$$ and $$B^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi K^{\\pm}$$ and $$\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp})/\\mathcal{B}(B_{c}^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\pi^{\\pm})$$ in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (σ(B±c)B(B±c→J/ψπ±))/(σ(B±)B(B±→J/ψK±)) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires B c ± and B± mesons with transverse momentum p T > 15 GeV and rapidity |y|< 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48±0.05(stat)± 0.03(syst)±0.05 (τBc)]%. The B c ± → J/ψπ ± π ± π ∓ decay is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomore » measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions B(B±c→J/ψπ±π±π∓)/B(B±c→J/ψπ±) is measured to be 2.55±0.80(stat)±0.33(syst)+0.04-0.01(τBc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.« less

  18. MiniBooNE Charged Current Charged Pion Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muon Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Charged Pion Production Cross Sections on Mineral Oil at Enu~1 GeV", arXiv:1011.3572 [hep-ex], submitted to Phys. Rev. D. The following MiniBooNE information for the 2010 CC π+ cross section paper is made available to the public. Tables A root file containing histograms of all of the cross section results in the paper can be found here. A text file of the cross section results can be found here. The MiniBooNE muon neutrino flux distribution can be

  19. In situ oil shale retort with a generally T-shaped vertical cross section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1981-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale and has a production level drift in communication with a lower portion of the fragmented mass for withdrawing liquid and gaseous products of retorting during retorting of oil shale in the fragmented mass. The principal portion of the fragmented mass is spaced vertically above a lower production level portion having a generally T-shaped vertical cross section. The lower portion of the fragmented mass has a horizontal cross sectional area smaller than the horizontal cross sectional area of the upper principal portion of the fragmented mass above the production level.

  20. SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 The Energy Policy Act of 2005 added section ...

  1. NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Section ...

  2. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  3. SECTION J, APPENDIX L - DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L [Note: The Diversity Plan shall be submitted to the Contracting Officer in accordance with DEAR 970.5226-1] DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE 12/1/10 In accordance with the Contract's Section I Clause entitled "DEAR 970.5226-1, Diversity Plan," this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) for each of the clause's Diversity

  4. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  5. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2011-09-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B3 or B1 zero-dimensional approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constants may be output in any of several standard formats including INL format, ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional (1-D) discrete-ordinate transport code, is incorporated into COMBINE7.1. As an option, the 167 fine-group constants generated by zero-dimensional COMBINE portion in the program can be used to calculate regionwise spectra in the 1-D ANISN portion, all internally to reflect the 1-D transport correction. The regionwise spectra are then used to generate mutigroup regionwise neutron constants. The 1-D neutron transport can be performed up to three stages, e.g., from a TRISO fuel to PEBBLE to 1-D full core wedge. In addition, COMBINE7.1 has now the capability of adjoint flux calculation through the 1-D ANISN transport. Photon transport capability is also added. For this, a photon production and photo-atomic cross section library, MATNG.LIB, was generated in MATXS format through NJOY code. The photon production cross section matrix is of 167 neutron - 18 photon groups. Photo-atomic cross sections, including heating, are in 18 energy groups.

  6. DOE Technical Targets for Photobiological Hydrogen Production | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Photobiological Hydrogen Production DOE Technical Targets for Photobiological Hydrogen Production These tables list the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) technical targets for photobiological hydrogen production. The tables are organized into separate sections for photolytic biological and photosynthetic bacterial hydrogen production systems. More information about targets can be found in the Hydrogen Production section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Multi-Year Research,

  7. Optimization of Preprocessing and Densification of Sorghum Stover at Full-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal A. Yancey; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Craig C. Conner; Christopher T. Wright

    2011-08-01

    Transportation costs can be a prohibitive step in bringing biomass to a preprocessing location or biofuel refinery. One alternative to transporting biomass in baled or loose format to a preprocessing location, is to utilize a mobile preprocessing system that can be relocated to various locations where biomass is stored, preprocess and densify the biomass, then ship it to the refinery as needed. The Idaho National Laboratory has a full scale 'Process Demonstration Unit' PDU which includes a stage 1 grinder, hammer mill, drier, pellet mill, and cooler with the associated conveyance system components. Testing at bench and pilot scale has been conducted to determine effects of moisture on preprocessing, crop varieties on preprocessing efficiency and product quality. The INLs PDU provides an opportunity to test the conclusions made at the bench and pilot scale on full industrial scale systems. Each component of the PDU is operated from a central operating station where data is collected to determine power consumption rates for each step in the process. The power for each electrical motor in the system is monitored from the control station to monitor for problems and determine optimal conditions for the system performance. The data can then be viewed to observe how changes in biomass input parameters (moisture and crop type for example), mechanical changes (screen size, biomass drying, pellet size, grinding speed, etc.,), or other variations effect the power consumption of the system. Sorgum in four foot round bales was tested in the system using a series of 6 different screen sizes including: 3/16 in., 1 in., 2 in., 3 in., 4 in., and 6 in. The effect on power consumption, product quality, and production rate were measured to determine optimal conditions.

  8. This Week In Petroleum Distillate Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... total distillate stocks Four-week average U.S. distillate fuel oil demand Distillate production and imports (million barrels per day) Total U.S. 15 ppm sulfur and under > 15 ...

  9. 20010-2011 Section III: Nuclear Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The initial state of high energy nuclear collisions R. J. Fries and G. Chen Charmonium production in heavy-ion collisions at the large hadron collider X. Zhao and R. Rapp Scaling ...

  10. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  11. Navy's Section 2922a Legislation Success Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—features U.S. Department of Navy success stories in relation to Section 2922a legislation, which involves contracts for energy or fuel for military installations.

  12. Isotopes Products

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotopes Products Isotopes Products Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Products stress and rest Stress and rest Rb-82 PET images in a patient with dipyridamole stress-inducible lateral wall and apical ischemia. (http://www.fac.org.ar/scvc/llave/image/machac/machaci.htm#f2,3,4) Strontium-82 is supplied to our customers for use in Sr-82/Rb-82 generator technologies. The generators in turn are supplied to

  13. IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Knowledge on Oscillation Knowledge on Oscillation Measurements Measurements M. Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and U. of Valencia) IDS-NF, RAL, Jan 16-17 2008 M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 2 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 3 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA Beta

  14. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

  15. Isotopes Products

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Products stress and rest Stress and rest Rb-82 PET images in a patient with dipyridamole...

  16. Hydrogen Production

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

  17. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  18. Briefing Memo: Petroleum Product Transmission & Distribution...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF of the briefing memo. Briefing Memo More Documents & Publications Briefing Memo: Petroleum Product Transmission & Distribution The Quadrennial Energy Review (Full Report)...

  19. Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - Journal Papers 1. An overview of biogas production and utilization at full-scale ... review) 2. Producing pipeline-quality biomethane via anaerobic digestion of sludge ...

  20. Full Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... locations - Increase options for web-based data sharing and analysis Pretty much Yes. ... on-demand connections and crappy latency in fundamental operations such as MPIAlltoall. ...

  1. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. Major developments in section 404-permitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, M.; Orr, S.

    2009-06-15

    Mountain coal mining in the Central Appalachians faces increased challenge under the Clean Water Act (CWA). These challenges have included the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) increased involvement in permitting under Section 404 of the CWA; active opposition by environmental groups to Section 404 permits; and proposed federal legislation to reduce the availability of these permits. These recent challenges culminated in a June 11, 2009, Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the PEA, the Department of Interior (DoI) and the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) that will limit the use of general permits for mountaintop coal mining and increase the scrutiny applied to individual permits, while also providing a coordinated approach for reviewing the backlog of pending permit application. By entering into the MoU, the federal agencies aim to reduce the environmental impacts of mountaintop coal mining while increasing certainty and transparency for permit applications. Challenges to Section 404 permitting for mountaintop coal mining are dynamic and new developments occur almost daily. This article provides a snapshot of the current climate.

  3. Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor (Patent) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Patent: Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is

  4. Measurement Of Differential Cross Sections Of p(e,e'{pi}{sup +})n For High-Lying Resonances At Q{sup 2} < 5 GeV{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Kijun

    2014-01-01

    The exclusive electro-production process ep -> e'n{pi}{sup +} was measured in the range of the invariant mass for n{pi}{sup +} system 1.6 GeV <= W <= 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV{sup 2} <= Q{sup 2} <= 4.0 GeV{sup 2} using CLAS. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in exclusive {pi}{sup +} production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the n{pi}{sup +} center-of-mass system. In this experiment, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points were measured. In this proceeding, preliminary results of our latest analysis work are presented on differential cross sections and structure functions as well as Legendre Moments.

  5. Farmstead production of fuel alcohol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badger, P.C.; Pile, R.S.; Waddell, E.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority Agricultural Energy Applications Section (Muscle Shoals, AL) has designed and constructed a small-scale fuel alcohol production facility which can produce 10 gph of 190-proof alcohol. Information presented includes some factors relative to facility design, layout, and construction, plus operation and performance experiences.

  6. DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Production from Thermochemical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Production section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. Technical Targets: Solar-Driven High-Temperature ...

  7. Active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe with full collision terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y.

    2015-08-11

    Sterile neutrinos are thermalised in the early Universe via oscillations with the active neutrinos for certain mixing parameters. The most detailed calculation of this thermalisation process involves the solution of the momentum-dependent quantum kinetic equations, which track the evolution of the neutrino phase space distributions. Until now the collision terms in the quantum kinetic equations have always been approximated using equilibrium distributions, but this approximation has never been checked numerically. In this work we revisit the sterile neutrino thermalisation calculation using the full collision term, and compare the results with various existing approximations in the literature. We find a better agreement than would naively be expected, but also identify some issues with these approximations that have not been appreciated previously. These include an unphysical production of neutrinos via scattering and the importance of redistributing momentum through scattering, as well as details of Pauli blocking. Finally, we devise a new approximation scheme, which improves upon some of the shortcomings of previous schemes.

  8. Closed-cycle textile dyeing: full-scale hyperfiltration demonstration (design)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Hyperfiltration (HF) is a membrane separation technique that has been used successfully in desalination of natural water. Because energy, process chemicals and water are discharged from industrial processes in large quantities, the application of various types of membranes to recover through recycle has been studied in a series of government sponsored research projects. The results of the research led to the current project of joining a full scale dynamic membrane HF system with an operating dye range into an integrated production unit. The dye range is a multi-purpose unit having a variety of effluents from preparation and dyeing of textile fabric. This report describes the design and construction of the hyperfiltration equipment; presents and evaluates data from one year of operation; gives costs for equipment, installation and operation, and credits for savings due to recycle; and describes the primary objectives of an 18 month project continuation.

  9. Bottom production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baines, J.; Baranov, S.P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bouhova, E.; Cacciari, M.; Caner, A.; Coadou, Y.; Corti, G.; Damet, J.; Dell-Orso, R.; De Mello Neto, J.R.T.; Domenech, J.L.; Drollinger, V.; Eerola, P.; Ellis, N.; Epp, B.; Frixione, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gavrilenko, I.; Gennai, S.; George, S.; Ghete, V.M.; Guy, L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iengo, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jones, R.; Kharchilava, A.; Kneringer, E.; Koppenburg, P.; Korsmo, H.; Kramer, M.; Labanca, N.; Lehto, M.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Mele, S.; Nairz, A.M.; Nakada, T.; Nikitin, N.; Nisati, A.; Norrbin, E.; Palla, F.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robins, S.; Rousseau, D.; Sanchis-Lozano, M.A.; Shapiro, M.; Sherwood, P.; Smirnova, L.; Smizanska, M.; Starodumov, A.; Stepanov, N.; Vogt, R.

    2000-03-15

    In the context of the LHC experiments, the physics of bottom flavoured hadrons enters in different contexts. It can be used for QCD tests, it affects the possibilities of B decays studies, and it is an important source of background for several processes of interest. The physics of b production at hadron colliders has a rather long story, dating back to its first observation in the UA1 experiment. Subsequently, b production has been studied at the Tevatron. Besides the transverse momentum spectrum of a single b, it has also become possible, in recent time, to study correlations in the production characteristics of the b and the b. At the LHC new opportunities will be offered by the high statistics and the high energy reach. One expects to be able to study the transverse momentum spectrum at higher transverse momenta, and also to exploit the large statistics to perform more accurate studies of correlations.

  10. RFP Section L Technical Proposal Preparation Instruction and Section M Evaluation Criteria Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 29, 2010, and April 1, 2010, fourteen draft RFP Section L Technical Proposal Preparation Instruction and Section M Evaluation Criteria templates (Past Performance, Transition, Organization Structure and Approach, Key Personnel (written proposal and oral presentation), Key Personnel (written proposal), Relevant Experience, and Environment Safety and Health) were distributed for Procurement Director (PD) and Head of Contracting Activity (HCA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate. The final version of the fourteen aforementioned RFP Section L and M templates are available in STRIPES as part of the series of DOE-L-1024 or DOE-M-1005 clauses.

  11. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  12. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2013-00054 Revision 1 August 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 7,845 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location (including cell

  13. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2014-00039 Revision 1 August 28, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 8,770 kgals Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit location

  14. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2014-00076 Revision 1 Posted Date: December 2, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,066 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal

  15. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2014-00113 Revision 1 Posted Date: March 2, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,894 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit

  16. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 SRR-ESH-2015-00014 Revision 1 Posted Date: May 29, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,894 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit

  17. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00110 Revision 1 Post Date: February 29, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 722 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cells 5A and 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and

  18. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2016-00025 Revision 0 Post Date: February 29, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 744 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and

  19. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00052 Revision 1 Post Date: August 28, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 9,948 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cell 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault/disposal unit

  20. Cross Sections for Nuclei A = 3 - 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Sections with Proton and Alpha Induced Reactions for Nuclei A = 3 - 20 I. Introduction: We have scanned the NSR from 1910-present for various articles with proton and alpha induced reactions. We have used the program Plot Digitizer 2.5.0 to extract the excitation functions from figures in the articles. In some cases the uncertainties are provided in the figures, we have noted this in comments, but we have made no attempt to extract the uncertainties. In cases where the data are given in

  1. Fusion Blanket Coolant Section Criteria, Methodology, and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMuth, J. A.; Meier, W. R.; Jolodosky, A.; Frantoni, M.; Reyes, S.

    2015-10-02

    The focus of this LDRD was to explore potential Li alloys that would meet the tritium breeding and blanket cooling requirements but with reduced chemical reactivity, while maintaining the other attractive features of pure Li breeder/coolant. In other fusion approaches (magnetic fusion energy or MFE), 17Li- 83Pb alloy is used leveraging Pb’s ability to maintain high TBR while lowering the levels of lithium in the system. Unfortunately this alloy has a number of potential draw-backs. Due to the high Pb content, this alloy suffers from very high average density, low tritium solubility, low system energy, and produces undesirable activation products in particular polonium. The criteria considered in the selection of a tritium breeding alloy are described in the following section.

  2. Coal production, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-05

    Coal Production 1987 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. The data presented in this report were collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-275) as amended. The 1987 coal production and related data presented in this report were obtained from Form EIA-7A, ''Coal Production Report,'' from companies owning mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1987. This survey originated at the Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior. In 1977, the responsibility for taking the survey was transferred to the EIA under the Department of Energy Organization Act (P.L. 95-91). The data cover 3667 of the 4770 US coal mining operations active in 1987. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 77 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1987. This issue is the 12th annual report published by EIA and continues the series formerly included as a chapter in the Minerals Yearbook published by the Bureau of Mines. This report also includes data for the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1988. This is the eighth annual summary on minable coal, pursuant to Section 801 of Public Law 95-620. 18 figs., 105 tabs.

  3. LANL PDMLink Product Structure Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Christopher J.

    2012-08-29

    Over the past 2 and a half years LANL has done both functionality exploration as well as production implementations of PDMLink Product Structure to control the configuration of many of the LANL Design Agency Products. Based on this experience LANL has been recommending for over a year that future product structure implementation in PDMLink do not use the two digit suffix in the number field of enterprise parts (or WTParts). The suffix will be part of one of the attributes for Part Number. Per the TBP's the two digit suffix represents a change in form, fit, or function in a part or a change in the production agency or a number of other conditions. It also denotes backward compatibility with earlier suffixed parts (see TBP 402 section 3.1).

  4. APPARATUS FOR MEASURING NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cranberg, L.

    1959-07-14

    An apparatus is described for analyzing the nuclear reaction products resulting from impingement of nuclear particles against a selected target material and automatically recording the number of reaction prcducts in selected energy levels. The target is bombarded by ions from a particle accelerator and the target potential is cyclicly varied over a particular energy range by a modulator. A nuclear reaction detector is lccated adjacent the target to produce pulses for each reaction product. The output from the detector and the modulator are coupled to a function sampler, for generating a pulse in respcnse to each detected event having an amplitude proportional to the amplitude of the instantaneous target potential. The later pulses are coupled to a multichannel analyzer, whereby nuclear reactions are recorded in appropriate channels of the analyzer in correspcndence with the magnitude of the energy of the impinging ions.

  5. SECTION IV: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND MATERIALS SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND MATERIALS SCIENCE A semiempirical scaling law for target K x-ray production in heavy ion collisions............ IV-1 R. L. Watson, Y. Peng, V. Horvat, and A. N. Perumal Systematics of L x-ray satellite spectra .................................................................................. IV-4 V. Horvat, R.L. Watson, Y. Peng and J. M. Blackadar Single and multiple L-shell ionization by fast heavy ions...................................................... IV-7 V. Horvat ,

  6. Actinide Targets for Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Baker; Christopher A. McGrath

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and the Generation IV Reactor Initiative have demonstrated a lack of detailed neutron cross-sections for certain "minor" actinides, those other than the most common (235U, 238U, and 239Pu). For some closed-fuel-cycle reactor designs more than 50% of reactivity will, at some point, be derived from "minor" actinides that currently have poorly known or in some cases not measured (n,?) and (n,f) cross sections. A program of measurements under AFCI has begun to correct this. One of the initial hurdles has been to produce well-characterized, highly isotopically enriched, and chemically pure actinide targets on thin backings. Using a combination of resurrected techniques and new developments, we have made a series of targets including highly enriched 239Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu. Thus far, we have electrodeposited these actinide targets. In the future, we plan to study reductive distillation to achieve homogeneous, adherent targets on thin metal foils and polymer backings. As we move forward, separated isotopes become scarcer, and safety concerns become greater. The chemical purification and electodeposition techniques will be described.

  7. Method for producing through extrusion an anisotropic magnet with high energy product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandhok, Vijay K.

    2004-09-07

    A method for producing an anisotropic magnet with high energy product through extrusion and, more specifically, by placing a particle charge of a composition from the which magnet is to be produced in a noncircular container, heating the container and particle charge and extruding the container and particle charge through a noncircular extrusion die in such a manner that one of the cross-sectional axes or dimension of the container and particle charge is held substantially constant during the extrusion to compact the particle charge to substantially full density by mechanical deformation produced during the extrusion to achieve a magnet with anisotropic magnetic properties along the axes or dimension thereof and, more specifically, a high energy product along the transverse of the smallest cross-sectional dimension of the extruded magnet.

  8. Oil Production

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-07-01

    A horizontal and slanted well model was developed and incorporated into BOAST, a black oil simulator, to predict the potential production rates for such wells. The HORIZONTAL/SLANTED WELL MODEL can be used to calculate the productivity index, based on the length and location of the wellbore within the block, for each reservoir grid block penetrated by the horizontal/slanted wellbore. The well model can be run under either pressure or rate constraints in which wellbore pressuresmore » can be calculated as an option of infinite-conductivity. The model can simulate the performance of multiple horizontal/slanted wells in any geometric combination within reservoirs.« less

  9. Microsoft Word - Contract Sections I-J.DOC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section J Page J-1 Section J Part III -- List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments Table of Contents Section Page J.1 Hanford Site Map J-2 J.2 Government Furnished...

  10. Recommendations: Draft 2008 Section 999 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2008 Section 999 Annual Plan PDF icon UDAC Recommendations on Draft 2008 Section 999 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications UDAC Meeting - October 15, 2008 UDAC Meeting - July 2007 UDAC Meeting - February 2011

  11. Recommendations: Draft 2011 Section 999 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2011 Section 999 Annual Plan PDF icon UDAC Recommendations on Draft 2011 Section 999 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications Recommendations: Draft 2012 Annual Plan UDAC Next Steps UDAC Meeting - February 2011

  12. Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 PDF icon Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 More Documents & Publications Financial ...

  13. Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Hurricane Ike, September 2008...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Hurricane Rita, September 2005 Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Cross-Sound Cable Company, August 2003 Federal Power Act section 202(c) - ...

  14. Product separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welsh, Robert A.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.

    1976-01-20

    A secondary light sensitive photoelectric product separator for use with a primary product separator that concentrates a material so that it is visually distinguishable from adjacent materials. The concentrate separation is accomplished first by feeding the material onto a vibratory inclined surface with a liquid flow, such as a wet concentrating table. Vibrations generally perpendicular to the stream direction of flow cause the concentrate to separate from its mixture according to its color. When the concentrate and its surrounding stream reach the recovery end of the table, a detecting device notes the line of color demarcation and triggers a signal if it differs from a normal condition. If no difference is noted nothing moves on the second separator. However, if a difference is detected in the constant monitoring of the color line's location, a product splitter and recovery unit normally positioned near the color line at the recovery end, moves to a new position. In this manner the selected separated concentrate is recovered at a maximum rate regardless of variations in the flow stream or other conditions present.

  15. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.; Wolf, Abraham

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample prior to introduction of a molding medium in the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  16. Absolute photoneutron cross sections of Sm isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Filipescu, D.; Nyhus, H.-T.; Renstrom, T.; Tesileanu, O.; Shima, T.; Takahisa, K.; Miyamoto, S.

    2015-02-24

    Photoneutron cross sections for seven samarium isotopes, {sup 144}Sm, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 148}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 152}Sm and {sup 154}Sm, have been investigated near neutron emission threshold using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ-rays produced at the synchrotron radiation facility NewSUBARU. The results are important for nuclear astrophysics calculations and also for probing γ-ray strength functions in the vicinity of neutron threshold. Here we describe the neutron detection system and we discuss the related data analysis and the necessary method improvements for adapting the current experimental method to the working parameters of the future Gamma Beam System of Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility.

  17. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.; Wolf, A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  18. Research on Fast-Doppler-Broadening of neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.; Wang, K.; Yu, G.

    2012-07-01

    A Fast-Doppler-Broadening method is developed in this work to broaden Continuous Energy neutron cross-sections for Monte Carlo calculations. Gauss integration algorithm and parallel computing are implemented in this method, which is unprecedented in the history of cross section processing. Compared to the traditional code (NJOY, SIGMA1, etc.), the new Fast-Doppler-Broadening method shows a remarkable speedup with keeping accuracy. The purpose of using Gauss integration is to avoid complex derivation of traditional broadening formula and heavy load of computing complementary error function that slows down the Doppler broadening process. The OpenMP environment is utilized in parallel computing which can take full advantage of modern multi-processor computers. Combination of the two can reduce processing time of main actinides (such as {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U) to an order of magnitude of 1{approx}2 seconds. This new method is fast enough to be applied to Online Doppler broadening. It can be combined or coupled with Monte Carlo transport code to solve temperature dependent problems and neutronics-thermal hydraulics coupled scheme which is a big challenge for the conventional NJOY-MCNP system. Examples are shown to determine the efficiency and relative errors compared with the NJOY results. A Godiva Benchmark is also used in order to test the ACE libraries produced by the new method. (authors)

  19. Hot Zero and Full Power Validation of PHISICS RELAP-5 Coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Lodi; C. Rabiti; A. Alfonsi; A. Epiney; M. Sumini

    2013-06-01

    PHISICS is a reactor analysis toolkit developed in the last 3 years at the Idaho National Laboratory that has been also coupled with the thermo-hydraulic plant simulator RELAP5-3D. PHISICS is aimed to provide an optimal trade off between needed computational resources and accuracy in the range of 10~100 cores. In fact this range has been identified as the next 5 to 10 years average computational capability available to nuclear engineer designing and optimizing nuclear reactor cores. Different publication has been already presented [1] showing test of the single modules composing the PHISICS package. Lately the Idaho National Laboratory had the opportunity to access to plant data for the first cycle of a PWR including Hot Zero Power (HZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP). This data provided the opportunity to validate the transport solver, the interpolation capability for mixed macro and micro cross section and the criticality search option of the PHISICS package. In the following we will firstly recall briefly the structure of the different PHISICS modules and then we will illustrate the modeling process and some preliminary results.

  20. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Section...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Section 1605 Text Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Section 1605 Text Energy ... national aggregate emissions of each greenhouse gas for each calendar year of the ...