National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for full section production

  1. NAABB Full Final Report Section I

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REPORT SECTION I FULL FINAL REPORT SECTION I FULL FINAL REPORT SECTION I Program Overview Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................ iv Synopsis .......................................................................................................... 1 Perspective 1. NAABB was Preceded by the Aquatic Species Program ................ 29 Perspective 2. NAABB and the National Research Council Report on Sustainable

  2. Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Find resources to help you design a production and manufacturing process for a new clean energy technology or product. For full-scale production, other areas to consider include workforce development; R&D funding; and regional, state, and local resources. For more resources, see the Clean Energy

  3. Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production December 8, 2015 - 12:06pm Addthis Photo Courtesy | Doosan Fuel Cell ...

  4. Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2015-09-25

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab, has undergone intense studies in the last 20 years. Currently, CDF and D0 converge on their measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections using the full Tevatron data sample. In these proceedings, the latest results on inclusive and differential measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections at the Tevatron are reported.

  5. Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron You are accessing ...

  6. 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy 3 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2014, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may receive up to 1.8

  7. 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy 5 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2016, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may receive up to 1.8

  8. 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2016, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may receive up to

  9. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure Citation Details ...

  10. 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In 2016, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered ...

  11. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  12. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrts13 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the top quark...

  13. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  14. Top quark pair production cross section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortiana, Giorgio; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.

    2008-04-01

    Top quark pair production cross section has been measured at the Tevatron by CDF and D0 collaborations using different channels and methods, in order to test standard model predictions, and to search for new physics hints affecting the t{bar t} production mechanism or decay. Measurements are carried out with an integrated luminosity of 1.0 to 2.0 fb{sup -1}, and are found to be consistent with standard model expectations.

  15. Surface runoff from full-scale coal combustion product pavements during accelerated loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.M.; Taerakul, P.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing coal combustion products (CCPs) was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under well-controlled conditions. An equivalent of 20 years of highway traffic loading was simulated at the OSU/OU Accelerated Pavement Load Facility (APLF). Three types of portland cement concrete driving surface layers were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (PC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). In general, the concentrations of minor and trace elements were higher in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates than in the leachates obtained from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure and ASTM leaching procedures. Importantly, none of the leachate concentrations exceeded the TCLP limits or primary drinking water standards. Surface runoff monitoring results showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, whereas there were little differences in release rates between PC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for Cr, elements were released as particulates (>0.45 {mu} m) rather than dissolved constituents. The incorporation of fly ash in the PC cement concrete pavements examined in this study resulted in little or no deleterious environmental impact from the leaching of inorganic elements over the lifetime of the pavement system.

  16. Top Quark Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabalina, E.; /Chicago U.

    2006-05-01

    An overview of the preliminary results of the top quark pair production cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV carried out by the CDF and D0 collaborations is presented. The data samples used for the analyses are collected in the current Tevatron run and correspond to an integrated luminosity from 360 pb{sup -1} up to 760 pb{sup -1}.

  17. EERE Success Story-Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production EERE Success Story-Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production December 8, 2015 - 12:06pm Addthis Photo Courtesy | Doosan Fuel Cell America, Inc. Photo Courtesy | Doosan Fuel Cell America, Inc. Doosan Fuel Cell, a Connecticut company which designs, engineers and manufactures clean energy fuel cell systems that produce combined heat and power systems, began operations in July 2014 at its corporate

  18. Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment ...

  19. 2015 Electrical Production: EPACT 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric ...

  20. 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric ...

  1. Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  2. Implementation of Division B, Title I, Section 1101(a)(2) of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 2011-04 provides implementing instructions and guidance for Section 1101(a)(2) of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, Pub. L. 112-10 (hereinafter "Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011). Section 1101(a)(2) of the Act provides that, unless otherwise specified, the authority and conditions provided for projects or activities (including the costs of direct loans and loan guarantees) appropriated, authorized, or funded in the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010, Pub. L. 111-85, still apply.

  3. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of the t-tbar production cross ...

  4. A Multigroup Reaction Cross-Section Collapsing Code and Library of 154-Group Fission-Product Cross Sections.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1983-03-23

    Version 01/02 The code reads multigroup cross sections from a compatible data file and collapses user-selected reaction cross sections to any few-group structure using one of a variety of user neutron flux spectrum options given below: Option Flux description 1 Built-in function including Maxwellian, fission, fusion and slowing-down regions and requiring user-specified parameters and energy-region boundaries. 2 Set of log-log flux-energy interpolation points read from input cross-section data file. 3 Set of log-log flux-energy interpolationmore » points read from user-supplied card input. 4 - 6 Histogram flux values read from user-supplied card input in arbitrary group structure in units of flux-per unit-energy, flux-per-unit lethargy, or integral group flux. LAFPX-E may be used to collapse any set of multigroup reaction cross sections furnished in the required format. However, the code was developed for, and is furnished with, a library of 154-group fission-product cross sections processed from ENDF/B-IV with a typical light water reactor (LWR) flux spectrum and temperature. Four-group radiative capture cross sections produced for LWR calculations are tabulated in the code documentation and are incorporated in the EPRI-CINDER data library, RSIC Code Package CCC-309.« less

  5. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton ... Title: Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV ...

  6. Full PWA Report: An Assessment of Energy, Waste, and Productivity Improvements for North Star Steel Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    North Star Steel's Wilton, Iowa plant (NSSI) was awarded a subcontract through a competitive process to use Department of Energy/OIT funding to examine potential processes and technologies that could save energy, reduce waste, and increase productivity.

  7. Draft Guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005- Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program- July 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains draft guidance for Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the "Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program"

  8. Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections Colin E. Anderson 2011 Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the ef- forts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive sig- nal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understand- ing.

  9. Full Final Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REPOR FULL FINAL REPOR T T SECTION III SECTION III FULL FINAL REPORT SECTION III Individual Project Summaries Table of Contents Algal Biology ..................................................................................................3 Cultivation ...................................................................................................41 Harvesting and Extraction .............................................................................65 Fuel Conversion

  10. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Colin E.

    2011-05-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for νμ → νe oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter θ13, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single π0 (NC 1π0) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1π0 production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1π0 production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical Eν ~ 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data (~ 106 neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1π0 production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1π0 cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the

  11. Heavy quarkonium production at collider energies: Partonic cross section and polarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Jian -Wei; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Ma, Yan -Qing; Sterman, George

    2015-01-27

    We calculate the O(α³s) short-distance, QCD collinear-factorized coefficient functions for all partonic channels that include the production of a heavy quark pair at short distances. Thus, this provides the first power correction to the collinear-factorized inclusive hadronic production of heavy quarkonia at large transverse momentum, pT, including the full leading-order perturbative contributions to the production of heavy quark pairs in all color and spin states employed in NRQCD treatments of this process. We discuss the role of the first power correction in the production rates and the polarizations of heavy quarkonia in high-energy hadronic collisions. The consistency of QCD collinear factorization and nonrelativistic QCD factorization applied to heavy quarkonium production is also discussed.

  12. Heavy quarkonium production at collider energies: Partonic cross section and polarization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiu, Jian -Wei; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Ma, Yan -Qing; Sterman, George

    2015-01-27

    We calculate the O(α³s) short-distance, QCD collinear-factorized coefficient functions for all partonic channels that include the production of a heavy quark pair at short distances. Thus, this provides the first power correction to the collinear-factorized inclusive hadronic production of heavy quarkonia at large transverse momentum, pT, including the full leading-order perturbative contributions to the production of heavy quark pairs in all color and spin states employed in NRQCD treatments of this process. We discuss the role of the first power correction in the production rates and the polarizations of heavy quarkonia in high-energy hadronic collisions. The consistency of QCD collinearmore » factorization and nonrelativistic QCD factorization applied to heavy quarkonium production is also discussed.« less

  13. Measurement of low $p_{T}$ $D^{0}$ meson production cross section at CDF II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mussini, Manuel; /Bologna U.

    2011-05-01

    In this thesis we present a study of the production of D{sup 0} meson in the low transverse momentum region. In particular the inclusive differential production cross section of the D{sup 0} meson (in the two-body decay channel D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) is obtained extending the published CDF II measurement to p{sub T} as low as 1.5 GeV/c. This study is performed at the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab with the CDF II detector.

  14. New Starts, Requests for Proposals, Funding Opportunity Announcements and other Similar Arrangements as Implemented under Division B, Title I, Section 1418 of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 2011-04 implementing instructions and guidance for Section 1101(a)(2) of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, Pub. L. 112-10 (hereinafter Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011), is hereby revised to add Section 1418 on new starts, requests for proposals, requests for quotations, request for information and funding opportunity announcements.

  15. Beauty production cross section measurements at E(cm) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Onofrio, Monica; /Geneva U.

    2005-05-01

    The RunII physics program at the Tevatron started in spring 2001 with protons and antiprotons colliding at an energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and it is carrying on with more than 500 pb{sup -1} of data as collected by both the CDF and D0 experiments. Recent results on beauty production cross section measurements are here reported.

  16. W/Z production cross sections and asymmetries at E(CM) = 2-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellavance, Angela M.; /Nebraska U.

    2005-06-01

    The most recent results for W and Z boson production cross sections and asymmetries are presented from the CDF and D0 collaborations using Run II data taken at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) Tevatron. Data set sizes range from 72 pb{sup -1} to 226 pb{sup -1}, and results range from published to preliminary. Results presented agree with the Standard Model and world averages within errors.

  17. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-19

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton–proton collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider. With an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb-1, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jetmore » observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. As a result, the measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.« less

  18. Assessment of Fission Product Cross-Section Data for Burnup Credit Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Dunn, Michael E; Mueller, Don

    2007-12-01

    Past efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and others have provided sufficient technical information to enable the NRC to issue regulatory guidance for implementation of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup credit; however, consideration of only the reactivity change due to the major actinides is recommended in the guidance. Moreover, DOE, NRC, and EPRI have noted the need for additional scientific and technical data to justify expanding PWR burnup credit to include fission product (FP) nuclides and enable burnup credit implementation for boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The criticality safety assessment needed for burnup credit applications will utilize computational analyses of packages containing SNF with FP nuclides. Over the years, significant efforts have been devoted to the nuclear data evaluation of major isotopes pertinent to reactor applications (i.e., uranium, plutonium, etc.); however, efforts to evaluate FP cross-section data in the resonance region have been less thorough relative to actinide data. In particular, resonance region cross-section measurements with corresponding R-matrix resonance analyses have not been performed for FP nuclides. Therefore, the objective of this work is to assess the status and performance of existing FP cross-section and cross-section uncertainty data in the resonance region for use in burnup credit analyses. Recommendations for new cross-section measurements and/or evaluations are made based on the data assessment. The assessment focuses on seven primary FP isotopes (103Rh, 133Cs, 143Nd, 149Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, and 155Gd) that impact reactivity analyses of transportation packages and two FP isotopes (153Eu and 155Eu) that impact prediction of 155Gd concentrations. Much of the assessment work was completed in 2005, and the assessment focused on the latest FP cross-section evaluations available in the

  19. Characterization of radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of a TRUEX flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Gary S. Groenewold; Rocklan G. McDowell; Richard D. Tillotson; Jack D. Law

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet the FCRD level 2 milestone M3FT-13IN0302053, Identification of TRUEX Strip Degradation. The INL radiolysis test loop has been used to identify radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of the TRUEX flowsheet. These data were used to evaluate impact of the formation of radiolytic degradation products in the strip section upon the efficacy of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. The nominal composition of the TRUEX solvent used in this study is 0.2 M CMPO and 1.4 M TBP dissolved in n-dodecane and the nominal composition of the TRUEX strip solution is 1.5 M lactic acid and 0.050 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Gamma irradiation of a mixture of TRUEX process solvent and stripping solution in the test loop does not adversely impact flowsheet performance as measured by stripping americium ratios. The observed increase in americium stripping distribution ratios with increasing absorbed dose indicates the radiolytic production of organic soluble degradation compounds.

  20. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurwitz, Martina; /Chicago U.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW + WZ) = 16.5{sub -3.0}{sup +3.3} pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 {+-} 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4{sigma}. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  1. Manufacturing Cost Analysis for YSZ-Based FlexCells at Pilot and Full Scale Production Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Robin Kimbrell; Kellie Chenault

    2011-05-01

    Significant reductions in cell costs must be achieved in order to realize the full commercial potential of megawatt-scale SOFC power systems. The FlexCell designed by NexTech Materials is a scalable SOFC technology that offers particular advantages over competitive technologies. In this updated topical report, NexTech analyzes its FlexCell design and fabrication process to establish manufacturing costs at both pilot scale (10 MW/year) and full-scale (250 MW/year) production levels and benchmarks this against estimated anode supported cell costs at the 250 MW scale. This analysis will show that even with conservative assumptions for yield, materials usage, and cell power density, a cost of $35 per kilowatt can be achieved at high volume. Through advancements in cell size and membrane thickness, NexTech has identified paths for achieving cell manufacturing costs as low as $27 per kilowatt for its FlexCell technology. Also in this report, NexTech analyzes the impact of raw material costs on cell cost, showing the significant increases that result if target raw material costs cannot be achieved at this volume.

  2. Process Optimization for Solid Extraction, Flavor Improvement and Fat Removal in the Production of Soymilk From Full Fat Soy Flakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley Prawiradjaja

    2003-05-31

    Traditionally soymilk has been made with whole soybeans; however, there are other alternative raw ingredients for making soymilk, such as soy flour or full-fat soy flakes. US markets prefer soymilk with little or no beany flavor. modifying the process or using lipoxygenase-free soybeans can be used to achieve this. Unlike the dairy industry, fat reduction in soymilk has been done through formula modification instead of by conventional fat removal (skimming). This project reports the process optimization for solids and protein extraction, flavor improvement and fat removal in the production of 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk from full fat soy flakes and whole soybeans using the Takai soymilk machine. Proximate analyses, and color measurement were conducted in 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk. Descriptive analyses with trained panelists (n = 9) were conducted using 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix lipoxygenase-free and high protein blend soy flake soymilks. Rehydration of soy flakes is necessary to prevent agglomeration during processing and increase extractability. As the rehydration temperature increases from 15 to 50 to 85 C, the hexanal concentration was reduced. Enzyme inactivation in soy flakes milk production (measured by hexanal levels) is similar to previous reports with whole soybeans milk production; however, shorter rehydration times can be achieved with soy flakes (5 to 10 minutes) compared to whole beans (8 to 12 hours). Optimum rehydration conditions for a 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk are 50 C for 5 minutes, 85 C for 5 minutes and 85 C for 10 minutes, respectively. In the flavor improvement study of soymilk, the hexanal date showed differences between undeodorized HPSF in contrast to triple null soymilk and no differences between deodorized HPSF in contrast to deodorized triple null. The panelists could not differentiate between the beany, cereal, and painty flavors. However, the panelists responded that the overall aroma of deodorized 8 {sup o}Brix triple null

  3. Gadolinium-148 production cross section measurements for 600-and 800-MEV protons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, K. C.; Devlin, M. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Mashnik, S. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, {sup 148}Gd production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 {mu}m thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 {mu}m thin Al activation foils. Gadolinium spallation yields were determined from these foils using alpha spectroscopy and compared with the LANL codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. When heavy metal targets, such as tungsten, are bombarded with protons greater than a few hundred MeV many different nuclides are produced. These nuclides are both stable and radioactive and are created by spallation, proton activation, or secondary reactions with neutrons and other nuclear particles made in the target. These products are distributed somewhat heterogeneously throughout a thick target because of the energy dependence of the cross sections and energy loss of the proton beam within the target. From this standpoint, it is difficult to measure nuclide production cross sections for a given energy proton in a thick target. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility and 1L target at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. DOE requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on radionuclide inventories in the target as a means of determining the 'nuclear facility' category level. Presently, WNR's Target 4 is a non-nuclear facility while the Lujan 1L target is classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten and other heavy elements. Allowable isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of {sup 148}Gd is generally low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total inhalation dose burden in an accident

  4. Measurements of the $ZZ$ production cross sections in the $$2\\ell2\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-29

    Measurements of the ZZ production cross sections in proton–proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. We found that candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ → 2l2ν, where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)fb-1 at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ(pp → ZZ)=5.1+1.5-1.4(stat)+1.4-1.1(syst)±0.1(lumi)pb at 7 TeV, and 7.2+0.8-0.8(stat)+1.9-1.5(syst)±0.2(lumi)pb at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. Furthermore, the selected data are analyzed to search formore » anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the ZZ final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. As a result, these limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for ZZ in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.« less

  5. Cross section standards for neutron-induced gamma-ray production in the MeV energy range.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R. O. (Ronald O.); Fotiadis, N. (Nikolaos); Devlin, M. J. (Matthew J.); Becker, J. A. (John A.); Garrett, P. E. (Paul E.); Younes, W. (Walid)

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray cross section standards for neutron-induced reactions are important in enabling the accurate determination of absolute cross sections from relative measurements of gamma-ray production. In our work we observed a need for improvement in these standards. In particular there are large discrepancies between evaluations of the {sup nat}Fe(n,n{sub 1}'{gamma}) cross section for the 847-keV gamma ray. We have performed (1) absolute cross section measurements, (2) measurements relative to the {sup nat}Cr(n,n{sub 1}'{gamma}) 1434-keV gamma ray, and (3) comparisons using measured total and elastic scattering cross sections to refine our knowledge of the Fe cross section and the closely linked inelastic channel cross section for Fe. Calculation of integral tests of the cross section libraries may indicate that adjustment of the angular distributions of the neutron elastic and inelastic scattering may be needed.

  6. Measurement of production cross sections for negative pions, kaons, and protons at 10, 18, and 24 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amann, J.F.; Macek, R.J.; Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-10-01

    We report here on a measurement of the 0/sup 0/-production cross sections for low-energy negative secondaries from 10-, 18-, and 24-GeV protons on a variety of targets. Special emphasis is given to determining the dependence of the cross sections on incident proton energy.

  7. Measurements of the $ZZ$ production cross sections in the $2\\ell2\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-29

    Measurements of the ZZ production cross sections in proton–proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. We found that candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ → 2l2ν, where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)fb-1 at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ(pp → ZZ)=5.1+1.5-1.4(stat)+1.4-1.1(syst)±0.1(lumi)pb at 7 TeV, and 7.2+0.8-0.8(stat)+1.9-1.5(syst)±0.2(lumi)pb at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. Furthermore, the selected data are analyzed to search for anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the ZZ final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. As a result, these limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for ZZ in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.

  8. Gamma-ray production cross sections from neutron interactions with iron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R. O.; Laymon, C. M.; Wender, S. A.; Drake, D. M.; Drosg, Manfred; Bobias, S. G.; McGrath, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The initial purpose of this experiment was to provide a consistent data base of neutron-induced gamma-ray production cross sections over a large energy range for use in estimating elemental composition of the martian surface by observing gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions on the planet's surface [Bo02]. However, these data should be useful for other projects such as oil-well logging, accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste, shielding calculations, gamma-ray heating for nuclear reactors and verification of nuclear model calculations and databases. The goal of the measurements was to collect data on the strongest gamma rays from many samples of interest. Because of the available beam time this meant that many of the measurcments were rather short. Despite the short running time the large samples used and the good beam intensity resulted in very satisfactory results. The samples, chosen mainly as common constituents of rock and soil and measured in the same few week period, include: B&, BN, C, Al, Mg, Si, S, Cay Ti, Cr, Mn, and Fe. Be was also used as a neutron scatterer that only produces one gamma ray (478 keV from 7Li) with appreciable intensity. Thus Be can serve as a measure of neutron-induced backgrounds. In this first paper we present results for Fe.

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.1 Hydrogen Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRODUCTION SECTION Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page 3.1 - 1 3.1 Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse energy resources, using a variety of process technologies. Energy resource options include fossil, nuclear, and renewables. Examples of process technologies include thermochemical, biological, electrolytic, and photolytic. 3.1.1 Technical Goal and Objectives Goal Research and develop technologies for low-cost, highly efficient hydrogen production

  10. Measurement of the top pair production cross section at CDF using neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marginean, Radu

    2004-11-01

    In the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab protons and antiprotons are collided at a 1.96 TeV center of mass energy. CDF and D0 are the two experiments currently operating at the Tevatron. At these energies top quark is mostly produced via strong interactions as a top anti-top pair (t{bar t}). The top quark has an extremely short lifetime and according to the Standard Model it decays with {approx} 100% probability into a b quark and a W boson. In the ''lepton+jets'' channel, the signal from top pair production is detected for those events where one of the two W bosons decays hadronically in two quarks which we see as jets in the detector, and the other W decays into an electrically charged lepton and a neutrino. A relatively unambiguous identification in the detector is possible when we require that the charged lepton must be an electron or muon of either charge. The neutrino does not interact in the detector and its presence is inferred from an imbalance in the transverse energy of the event. They present a measurement of the top pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV, from a data sample collected at CDF between March 2002 and September 2003 with an integrated luminosity of 193.5 pb{sup -1}. In order to bring the signal to background ratio at manageable levels, measurements in this channel traditionally use precision tracking information to identify at least one secondary vertex produced in the decay of a long lived b hadron. A different approach is taken here. Because of the large mass of the top quark, t{bar t} events tend to be more spherical and more energetic than most of the background processes which otherwise mimic the t{bar t} signature in the ''lepton+jets'' channel. A number of energy based and event shape variables can be used to statistically discriminate between signal and background events. Monte Carlo simulation is used to model the kinematics of t{bar t} and most of the background processes. A neural network technique is

  11. Measurement of the Inclusive Upsilon production cross section in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-06-01

    The Upsilon production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is measured using a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1 +/- 0.3 inverse picobarns. Integrated over the rapidity range |y|<2, we find the product of the Upsilon(1S) production cross section and branching fraction to dimuons to be sigma(pp to Upsilon(1S) X) B(Upsilon(1S) to mu+ mu-) = 7.37 +/- 0.13^{+0.61}_{-0.42}\\pm 0.81 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is associated with the estimation of the integrated luminosity of the data sample. This cross section is obtained assuming unpolarized Upsilon(1S) production. If the Upsilon(1S) production polarization is fully transverse or fully longitudinal the cross section changes by about 20%. We also report the measurement of the Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(2S), and Upsilon(3S) differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity.

  12. Upsilon production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2011-06-15

    The Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV are measured using a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1±0.3 pb⁻¹. Integrated over the rapidity range |y|<2, we find the product of the Υ(1S) production cross section and branching fraction to dimuons to be σ(pp→Υ(1S)X) · B(Υ(1S)→μ⁺μ⁻)=7.37±0.13+0.61-0.42±0.81 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is associated with the estimation of the integrated luminosity of the data sample. This cross section is obtained assuming unpolarized Υ(1S) production. With themore » assumption of fully transverse or fully longitudinal production polarization, the measured cross section changes by about 20%. We also report the measurement of the Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity.« less

  13. Top quark pair production cross section in the lepton+jets channel using b-tagging at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, H.D.; /Brown U.

    2008-05-01

    The top quark pair production cross section measurement in the lepton+jets channel with b-tagging algorithm is described. About 900 pb{sup -1} data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron are used for this analysis. In this thesis, event selection, background estimation, and cross section calculation are discussed in detail. In addition, calibration of the Luminosity Monitor readout electronics and a new b-tagging algorithm, the SLTNN tagger, are also discussed in this thesis.

  14. Inclusive b-hadron production cross section with muons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the b-hadron production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV is presented. The dataset, corresponding to 85 inverse nanobarns, was recorded with the CMS experiment at the LHC using a low-threshold single-muon trigger. Events are selected by the presence of a muon with transverse momentum greater than 6 GeV with respect to the beam direction and pseudorapidity less than 2.1. The transverse momentum of the muon with respect to the closest jet discriminates events containing b hadrons from background. The inclusive b-hadron production cross section is presented as a function of muon transverse momentum and pseudorapidity. The measured total cross section in the kinematic acceptance is sigma(pp to b+X to mu + X') =1.32 +/- 0.01 (stat) +/- 0.30 (syst) +/- 0.15 (lumi) microbarns.

  15. Measurement of the B⁰ Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-06-20

    Measurements of the differential production cross sections dσ/dpBT and dσ/dyB for B⁰ mesons produced in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV are presented. The data set used was collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 40 pb⁻¹. The production cross section is measured from B⁰ meson decays reconstructed in the exclusive final state J/ψK0S, with the subsequent decays J/ψ→μ⁺μ⁻ and K0S→π⁺π⁻. The total cross section for pBT>5 GeV and |yB|<2.2 is measured to be 33.2±2.5±3.5 μb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  16. HARP targets pion production cross section and yield measurements. Implications for MiniBooNE neutrino flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickremasinghe, Don Athula Abeyarathna

    2015-07-01

    The prediction of the muon neutrino flux from a 71.0 cm long beryllium target for the MiniBooNE experiment is based on a measured pion production cross section which was taken from a short beryllium target (2.0 cm thick - 5% nuclear interaction length) in the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment at CERN. To verify the extrapolation to our longer target, HARP also measured the pion production from 20.0 cm and 40.0 cm beryllium targets. The measured production yields, d2Nπ± (p; θ )=dpd Ω, on targets of 50% and 100% nuclear interaction lengths in the kinematic rage of momentum from 0.75 GeV/c to 6.5 GeV/c and the range of angle from 30 mrad to 210 mrad are presented along with an update of the short target cross sections. The best fitted extended Sanford-Wang (SW) model parameterization for updated short beryllium target π+ production cross section is presented. Yield measurements for all three targets are also compared with that from the Monte Carlo predictions in the MiniBooNE experiment for different SW parameterization. The comparisons of vμ flux predictions for updated SW model is presented.

  17. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; Placakyte, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Schienbein, I.; Starovoitov, P.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  18. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; et al

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by othermore » experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.« less

  19. Status of the top quark: Top production cross section and top properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boisvert, V.; /Rochester U.

    2006-08-01

    This report describes the latest cross section and property measurements associated with the top quark at the Tevatron Run II. The largest data sample used is 760 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Due to its large mass, the top quark might be involved in the process of electroweak symmetry breaking, making it a useful probe for signs of new physics.

  20. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-07-01

    The authors present a new measurement of the production cross section σ(pp = ZZ) at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, obtained from the analysis of the four charged lepton final state ℓ+ℓ-ℓ`+ℓ`-(ℓ, ℓ` = e or μ). They observe ten candidate events with an expected background of 0.37 ± 0.13 events. The measured cross section σ(pp =ZZ) = 1.26-0.37+0.47 (stat) ± 0.14 (syst) pb is in agreement with NLO QCD predictions. This result is combined with a previous result from the ZZ = ℓ+ℓ- νν channel resulting in a combined cross section of σ(pp = ZZ) = 1.40-0.37-0.43more » (stat) ±0.14 (syst) pb.« less

  1. Measurement of the nu(mu) Charged Current pi+ Production to Quasi-elastic Scattering Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Jaroslaw A.; /Louisiana State U.

    2009-09-01

    Using high statistics samples of charged current interactions, MiniBooNE reports a model independent measurement of the single charged pion production to quasi-elastic cross section ratio on mineral oil without corrections for pion re-interactions in the target nucleus [1]. The result is provided as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeV < E < 2.4 GeV with 11% precision in the region of highest statistics.

  2. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-19

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton–proton collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider. With an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb-1, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jet observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. As a result, the measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.

  3. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Koji; /Tsukuba U.

    2009-03-01

    Top quarks are predominantly produced in pairs via the strong interaction in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV . The top quark has a weak isospin 1/2, composing a weak isospin doublet with the bottom quark. This characteristic predicts not only top quark pair production via strong interaction but also single production together with a bottom quark via weak interaction. However, finding single top quark production is challenging since it is rarely produced ({sigma}{sub singletop} = 2.9 pb) against background processes with the same final state like W+jets and t{bar t}. A measurement of electroweak single top production probes the W-t-b vertex, which provides a direct determination of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V{sub tb}|. The sample offers a source of almost 100% polarized top quarks. This thesis describes an optimized search for s-channel single top quark production and a measurement of the single top production cross section using 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CDF detector. We are using events with one high-p{sub T} lepton, large missing E{sub T} and two identified b-quark jets where one jet is identified using a secondary vertex tagger, called SecVtx, and the other jet is identified using SecVtx or a jet probability tagger, called JetProb. In this analysis we have developed a kinematics fitter and a likelihood-based separator between signal and background. As a result, we found that the probability (p-value) that the candidate events originate from a background fluctuation in the absence of single top s-channel production is 0.003, which is equivalent to 2.7 {sigma} deviations in Gaussian statistics, and this excess corresponds to the single top s-channel cross section of 2.38{sub -0.84}{sup +1.01} pb. An observed value of |V{sub tb}| is 1.43{sub -0.26}{sup +0.38}(experimental) {+-} 0.11(theory). We also set the 95% CL. upper limit of {sigma}{sub s} = 4.15 pb for the s-channel production cross section.

  4. Search for production of an ?(1S) meson in association with a W or Z boson using the full 1.96 TeV proton anti-proton collision data set at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; et al

    2015-03-17

    Production of the ?(1S) meson in association with a vector boson is a rare process in the standard model with a cross section predicted to be below the sensitivity of the Tevatron. Observation of this process could signify contributions not described by the standard model or reveal limitations with the current non-relativistic quantum-chromodynamic models used to calculate the cross section. We perform a search for this process using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4/fb?. The search considers the ? ? ?? decay and the decay of themoreW and Z bosons into muons and electrons. In these purely leptonic decay channels, we observe one ?W candidate with an expected background of 1.2 0.5 events, and one ?Z candidate with an expected background of 0.1 0.1 events. Both observations are consistent with the predicted background contributions. The resulting upper limits on the cross section for ?+W/Z production are the most sensitive reported from a single experiment and place restrictions on potential contributions from non-standard-model physics.less

  5. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$1.96~TeV, using the full CDF data sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luca, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=1.96~TeV is presented. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.5~fb$^{-1}$, collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run~II. The measurement is performed as a function of the photon transverse energy ($E_T^{\\gamma}$) covering the range of 30~GeV$< E_T^{\\gamma} <$500~GeV in the pseudorapidity region $|\\eta^{\\gamma}|<$1.0. To reduce the background coming from the decays of $\\pi^0$'s, $\\eta$'s and other hadrons, photons are required to be isolated in the calorimeter. The output distributions of an Artificial Neural Network are exploited to estimate the remaining contamination from jets faking isolated photons. Results are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  6. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from p p? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of ?tt? = 7.64 0.57 (stat + syst) 0.45 (luminosity) pb.

  7. Measurement of the Isolated Prompt Photon Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-02-01

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E_T-gamma in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |eta_gamma|<1.45 and E_T-gamma > 21 GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006 < x_T < 0.086. The measured cross section is found to be in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  8. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from pp¯ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale withmore » integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.« less

  9. Section I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projectile and Target Z-scaling of Target K-vacancy Production Cross Sections at 10A MeV R. L. Watson, V. Horvat and K. E. Zaharakis Molecular Orbital Effects in Near-symmetric ...

  10. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2011-12-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 418 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 185 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions at higher energies for isotopes of F, Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides 235,238U and 239Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on 239Pu; and (9) A new Decay Data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide

  11. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section at $\\sqrt {s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, Mark Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Within the standard model top quarks are predicted to be most often produced in pairs via the strong interaction. However they can also be produced singly through the weak interation. This is a rarer process with many experimental challenges. It is interesting because it provides a new window to search for evidence of physics beyond the standard model picture, such as a fourth generation of quarks or to search for insight into the Higgs Mechanism. Single top production also provides a direct way to calculate the CKM matrix element Vtb. This thesis presents new measurements for single top quark production in the s+t, s and t channels using 5.4 fb-1 of data collected at the DØ detector at Fermilab in Batavia, IL. The analysis was performed using Boosted decision trees to separate signal from background and Bayesian statistcs to calculate all the cross sections.

  12. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section using dilepton events in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. We consider final states with at least two jets and two leptons (ee, e{mu}, {mu}{mu}), and events with one jet for the the e{mu} final state as well. The measured cross section is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.36{sub -0.79}{sup +0.90} (stat + syst) pb. This result combined with the cross section measurement in the lepton + jets final state yields {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.56{sub -0.56}{sup +0.63}(stat + syst) pb, which agrees with the standard model expectation. The relative precision of 8% of this measurement is comparable to the latest theoretical calculations.

  13. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel using lepton+track selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert Emil; /Princeton U.

    2008-09-01

    The production cross section for t{bar t} pairs decaying into two lepton final states was measured using data from the D0 detector at Fermilab. The measurement was made using a lepton+track selection, where one lepton is fully identified and the second lepton is observed as an isolated track. This analysis is designed to complement similar studies using two fully identified leptons [1]. The cross section for the lepton+track selection was found to be {sigma} = 5.2{sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(stat){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst) {+-} 0.3(lumi) pb. The combined cross section using both the lepton+track data and the data from the electron+electron, electron+muon, and muon+muon samples is: {sigma} = 6.4{sub -0.9}{sup +0.9}(stat){sub -0.7}{sup +0.8}(syst) {+-} 0.4(lumi) pb.

  14. Search for production of an $\\Upsilon$(1S) meson in association with a W or Z boson using the full 1.96TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collision data set at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-03-17

    Production of the ?(1S) meson in association with a vector boson is a rare process in the standard model with a cross section predicted to be below the sensitivity of the Tevatron. Observation of this process could signify contributions not described by the standard model or reveal limitations with the current nonrelativistic quantum-chromodynamic models used to calculate the cross section. We perform a search for this process using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1. Our search considers the ???? decay and the decay of the W and Z bosons into muons and electrons. Furthermore, in these purely leptonic decay channels, we observe one ?W candidate with an expected background of 1.20.5 events, and one ?Zcandidate with an expected background of 0.10.1 events. Both observations are consistent with the predicted background contributions. The resulting upper limits on the cross section for ?+W/Zproduction are the most sensitive reported from a single experiment and place restrictions on potential contributions from non-standard-model physics.

  15. Search for production of an $$\\Upsilon$$(1S) meson in association with a W or Z boson using the full 1.96 TeV $$p\\bar{p}$$ collision data set at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-03-17

    Production of the Υ(1S) meson in association with a vector boson is a rare process in the standard model with a cross section predicted to be below the sensitivity of the Tevatron. Observation of this process could signify contributions not described by the standard model or reveal limitations with the current nonrelativistic quantum-chromodynamic models used to calculate the cross section. We perform a search for this process using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1. Our search considers the Υ→μμ decay and the decay of the Wmore » and Z bosons into muons and electrons. Furthermore, in these purely leptonic decay channels, we observe one ΥW candidate with an expected background of 1.2±0.5 events, and one ΥZcandidate with an expected background of 0.1±0.1 events. Both observations are consistent with the predicted background contributions. The resulting upper limits on the cross section for Υ+W/Zproduction are the most sensitive reported from a single experiment and place restrictions on potential contributions from non-standard-model physics.« less

  16. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb{sup -1}. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high x{sub T}. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons require a

  17. Measurement of the WW+WZ Production Cross Section Using the Lepton+Jets Final State at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-11-01

    We report two complementary measurements of the diboson (WW + WZ) cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second method uses more of the kinematic information in the event through matrix-element calculations of the signal and background processes and has a higher sensitivity. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4{sigma} and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results from both methods gives {sigma}{sub WW+WZ} = 16.0 {+-} 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  18. Precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, R.E.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z boson production by e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions has been attained at the Slac Linear Collider with the SLD detector. We describe this measurement for the 1993 data run, emphasizing the significant improvements in polarized beam operation which took place for this run, where the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization averaged 62.6 {plus_minus} 1.2 %. Preliminary 1993 results for A{sub LR} are presented. When combined with the (less precise) 1992 result, the preliminary result for the effective weak mixing angle is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W {sup eff}} = 0.2290 {plus_minus} 0.0010.

  19. Measurement of the single top production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; /Buenos Aires U.

    2010-05-01

    This thesis describes a search for singly produced top quarks via an electroweak vertex in head-on proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analysis uses a total of 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab, corresponding to two different run periods of the Tevatron collider. Two channels contribute to single top quark production at the Tevatron, the s-channel and the t-channel. In the s-channel, a virtual W boson is produced from the aniquilation of a quark and an antiquark and a top and a bottom quarks are produced from the W decay. The top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a bottom quark. Final states are considered in which the W boson decays leptonically into an electron or a muon plus a neutrino. Thus, at the detector level, the final state characterizing the s-channel contains one lepton, missing energy accounting for the neutrino, and two jets from the two bottom quarks. In the t-channel, the final state has an additional jet coming from a light quark. Clearly, a precise reconstruction of the events requires a precise measurement of the energy of the jets. A multivariate technique, Bayesian neural networks, is used to extract the single top signal from the overwhelming background still left after event selection. A Bayesian likelihood probability is then computed to measure the single top cross section. Assuming the observed excess is due to single top events, the measured single top quark production cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.70{sub -0.93}{sup +1.18} pb. The observed excess is associated with a p-value of (3.2 {+-} 2.3) x 10{sup -8}, assuming the background-only hypothesis. This p-value corresponds to an excess over background of 5.4 standard deviations for a Gaussian density. The p-value computed using the standard model signal cross section of 3.46 pb is (22.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -6}, corresponding to an expected significance of 4

  20. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8<|Y*|<10. These measurements use a sample of data recorded using the ATLAS detector in 2011, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4more » and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.« less

  1. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-05-01

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8*|1. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radiusmoreparameters, R = 0.4 and R = 0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.less

  2. Widening the envelope of UK HLW vitrification - Experimental studies with high waste loadings and new product formulations on a full scale non-active vitrification plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, R.; Gribble, N. [Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Riley, A. [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG, UK (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The Vitrification Test Rig is a full scale waste vitrification plant that processes non-radioactive liquid HLW simulants based on the active waste streams produced by the reprocessing plants in the UK. Previous work on the rig has primarily concerned increasing the operational envelopes for the active waste vitrification plants at Sellafield to accommodate higher throughputs of Blended waste streams, higher waste oxide incorporation rates in the vitrified products, and the incorporation of legacy waste streams from early reactor commissioning and reprocessing operations at Sellafield. Recent operations have focussed on four main areas; dilute liquid feeds, very high Magnox waste stream incorporation levels, alternative base glass formulations and providing an operational envelope for 28 %w/w Magnox waste vitrification. This paper details the work performed and the major findings of that work. In summary: The VTR has been successfully used to determine operational envelopes and product quality for several HLW feed variations that will allow WVP to increase overall plant throughput via increased waste loading in canisters, increased HLW feed rates or a combination of both. The VTR has also demonstrated the ability to go to waste incorporations, feed rates and glass compositions that are currently beyond WVP specified limits, but that are feasible for future vitrification regimes. In addition, the VTR has trialled dilute feeds similar to those that are likely to be received by WVP in the future and the data obtained from these experiments will allow WVP to prepare adequately for the high throughput challenge of such feeds. Furthermore, new equipment has been trialled on the VTR in water feed mode to determine its suitability and operational limitations for WVP. Future operations will, in the short term, be concerned with increasing the throughput of WVP and are likely to focus on HLW decommissioning operations waste streams in the longer term. (authors)

  3. A measurement of the top pair production cross-section in the dilepton channel using lepton plus track selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Corrinne Elaine; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-06-01

    Using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron, they measure the t{bar t} production cross section in events with two leptons, significant missing transverse energy, and {ge} 2 jets. As the Run II dataset grows, more stringent tests of Standard Model predictions for the top quark sector are becoming possible. The dilepton channel, where both top quarks decay t {yields} Wb {yields} {ell}{nu}b, is of particular interest due to its high purity even in the absence of a b jet 'tagging' requirement. Use of an isolated track as the second lepton significant increases the dilepton acceptance, at the price of some increase in background, particular from W + jets events where one of the jets is identified as a lepton. With the amount of data available, it has been possible to improve the estimate of the contribution from that background, reflected in a reduced systematic uncertainty. Assuming a branching ratio of BR(W {yields} {ell}{nu}) = 10.8% and a top mass of m{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, the measured cross-section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}) = 8.3 {+-} 1.3(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) {+-} 0.5(lumi.) pb. The result is consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 6.7{sub -0.9}{sup +0.7} pb and represents a significant improvement in precision over previous results using this selection.

  4. Di-photon and photon + b/c production cross sections at Ecm = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajjar, Anant; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of the di-photon cross section have been made in the central region and are found to be in good agreement with NLO QCD predictions. The cross section of events containing a photon and additional heavy flavor jet have also been measured, as well as the ratio of photon + b to photon + c. The statistically limited sample shows good agreement with Leading Order predictions.

  5. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.1 Hydrogen Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.1 - 1 3.1 Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse energy resources, using a variety of process technologies. Energy resource options include fossil, nuclear, and renewables. Examples of process technologies include thermochemical, biological, electrolytic, and photolytic. 3.1.1 Technical Goal and Objectives Goal Research and develop technologies for low-cost, highly efficient hydrogen production from

  6. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section with an in situ Calibration of $b$-jet Identification Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-07-01

    A measurement of the top-quark pair-production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.12 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab is presented. Decays of top-quark pairs into the final states e{nu} + jets and {mu}{nu} + jets are selected, and the cross section and the b-jet identification efficiency are determined using a new measurement technique which requires that the measured cross sections with exactly one and multiple identified b-quarks from the top-quark decays agree. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of 8.5 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) pb is measured.

  7. Measurement of the $$B_c^{\\pm}$$ production cross section in $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=1.96$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2016-03-01

    Here, we describe a measurement of the ratio of the cross sections times branching fractions of the Bc+ meson in the decay mode Bc+ → J/ψμ+ν to the B+ meson in the decay mode B+ → J/ψK+ in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement is based on the complete CDF Run II data set, which comes from an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1. The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions for Bc+ and B+ mesons with momentum transverse to the beam greater than 6 GeV/c and rapidity magnitude smaller than 0.6 ismore » 0.211 ± 0.012(stat)-0.020+0.021(syst). Using the known B+ → J/ψK+ branching fraction, the known B+ production cross section, and a selection of the predicted Bc+ → J/ψμ+ν branching fractions, the range for the total Bc+ production cross section is estimated.« less

  8. Measurement of the production cross-section of a single top quark in association with a W boson at 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-11

    The cross-section for the production of a single top quark in association with a W boson in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 is measured. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Events containing two leptons and one central b-jet are selected. The Wt signal is separated from the backgrounds using boosted decision trees, each of which combines a number of discriminating variables into one classifier. Production of Wt events is observed with a significance of 7.7σ. The cross-section is extracted in amore » profile likelihood fit to the classifier output distributions. The Wt cross-section, inclusive of decay modes, is measured to be 23.0±1.3(stat.)-3.5+3.2(syst.)±1.1(lumi.) pb. The measured cross-section is used to extract a value for the CKM matrix element |Vtb| of 1.01 ± 0.10 and a lower limit of 0.80 at the 95% confidence level. Furthermore, the cross-section for the production of a top quark and a W boson is also measured in a fiducial acceptance requiring two leptons with p T > 25 GeV and |η| < 2.5, one jet with pT > 20 GeV and |η| < 2.5, and ETmiss >20 GeV, including both Wt and top-quark pair events as signal. The measured value of the fiducial cross-section is 0.85 ± 0.01(stat.) -0.07 +0.06 (syst.)±0.03(lumi.) pb.« less

  9. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross-section in dimuon final states in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konrath, Jens Peter; /Freiburg U.

    2008-09-01

    Particle physics deals with the fundamental building blocks of matter and their interactions. The vast number of subatomic particles can be reduced to twelve fundamental fermions, which interact by the exchange of spin-1 particles as described in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The SM provides the best description of the subatomic world to date, despite the fact it does not include gravitation. Following the relation {lambda} = h/p, where h is Planck's constant, for the examination of physics at subatomic scales with size {lambda} probes with high momenta p are necessary. These high energies are accessible through particle colliders. Here, particles are accelerated and brought to collision at interaction points at which detectors are installed to record these particle collisions. Until the anticipated start-up of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron collider at Fermilab near Chicago is the highest energy collider operating in the world, colliding protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Its two interaction points are covered by the multi purpose particle detectors D0 and CDF. During the first data-taking period, known as Run I, the Tevatron operated at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. This run period lasted from 1992 to 1996. During this period, the long-predicted top quark was discovered. From 1996 and 2001, the accelerator was upgraded to deliver higher instantaneous luminosities at its current center-of-mass energy. At the same time, the experiments were upgraded to take full advantage of the upgraded accelerator complex. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator in the world with a sufficient energy to produce top quarks. Studying top quark production, decay and properties is an important part of the D0 and CDF physics programs. Because of its large mass, the top quark is a unique probe of the Standard Model, and an interesting environment to search for new physics. In this thesis, a

  10. Power Full | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Sector: Wind energy Product: China-based investment holding company that owns 100% of Ruifeng Windpower. References: Power Full1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  11. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Heather Lynn

    2004-02-01

    The direct observation of the top quark was first achieved at the Tevatron proton anti-proton collider at Fermilab. This discovery completed the third generation quark sector where the top quark is expected to accompany the bottom quark in the weak isospin doublet. This dissertation discusses the experimental verification of the production cross section as predicted by the Standard Model. A measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using 107.9 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab between March of 2003 and June of 2003 is presented. The measurement focuses on the t{bar t} production in the ''lepton plus jets'' final state in which one of the W bosons from the t{bar t} decay subsequently decays leptonically to an electron or a muon, and the other decays hadronically. The B-tagging technique which utilizes the precision silicon detector tracking is used to enhance the signal for t{bar t} events relative to the background through identification of the bottom quark from its measurable lifetime. The t{bar t} production cross section is measured to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 4.5 {+-} 1.4(stat) {+-} 0.8(sys) pb.

  12. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusivejet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-08-10

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spinasymmetry A_LL and the differential cross section for inclusivemidrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s)=200GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5

  13. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-18

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at √s= 13 TeV by theCMS experiment at the CERN LHC, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 42 pb-1. The measurement is performed by analyzing events with at least one electron and one muon of opposite charge, and at least two jets. We then measured the cross section and found that was 769 ± 60 (stat) ± 55 (syst) ± 92 (lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectation from the standard model.

  14. Measurement of the W+ W- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) =1.96-TeV using dilepton events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Arguin, J.-F.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U.

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the W{sup +}W{sup -} production cross section using 184 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Using the dilepton decay channel W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{sup -}{ovr {nu}}, where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons, we find 17 candidate events compared to an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting W{sup +}W{sup -} production cross section measurement of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.6{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb agrees well with the Standard Model expectation.

  15. First Measurement of the Cross Section for Top-Quark Pair Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-01-01

    The first measurement of the cross section for top-quark pair production in pp collisions at the LHC at center-of-mass energy sqrt(s)= 7 TeV has been performed using 3.1 {\\pm} 0.3 inverse pb of data recorded by the CMS detector. This result utilizes the final state with two isolated, highly energetic charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and two or more jets. Backgrounds from Drell-Yan and non-W/Z boson production are estimated from data. Eleven events are observed in the data with 2.1 {\\pm} 1.0 events expected from background. The measured cross section is 194 {\\pm} 72 (stat.) {\\pm} 24 (syst.) {\\pm} 21 (lumi.) pb, consistent with next-to-leading order predictions.

  16. Measurement of the ttbar production cross section in the all-jets final state in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$=8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-03-08

    The cross section for tt production in the all-jets final state is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector, in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 fb-1. The inclusive cross section is found to be 275.6 ±6.1 (stat) ± 37.8 (syst) ± 7.2 (lumi) pb. The normalized differential cross sections are measured as a function of the top quark transverse momenta, pT, and compared to predictions from quantum chromodynamics. The results are reported at detector, parton, and particle levels. In all cases, the measured top quark pTmore » spectra are significantly softer than theoretical predictions.« less

  17. Measurement of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections using leptonic final states in 8.6 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-06-12

    We study the processes pp̄→WZ→l±νl⁺l⁻ and pp̄→ZZ→l⁺l⁻νν¯, where l=e or μ. Using 8.6 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we measure the WZ production cross section to be 4.50+0.63–0.66 pb which is consistent with, but slightly larger than, the prediction of the standard model. The ZZ cross section is measured to be 1.64±0.46 pb, in agreement with a prediction of the standard model. Combination with an earlier analysis of the ZZ→l⁺l⁻l⁺l⁻ channel yields a ZZ cross section of 1.44+0.35–0.34 pb.

  18. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section in p p̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-07-06

    The authors present a new measurement of the production cross section σ(pp̄ = ZZ) at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, obtained from the analysis of the four charged lepton final state ℓ+ℓ-ℓ`+ℓ`- (ℓ, ℓ` = e or μ). They observe ten candidate events with an expected background of 0.37 ± 0.13 events. The measured cross section σ(pp̄ =ZZ) = 1.26-0.37+0.47 (stat) ± 0.14 (syst) pb is in agreement with NLO QCD predictions. This result is combined with a previous result from the ZZ = ℓ+ℓ- νν̄ channel resulting in a combined cross section of σ(pp̄ = ZZ) =more » 1.40-0.37+0.43 (stat) ±0.14 (syst) pb.« less

  19. Measurement of the ttbar production cross section in the all-jets final state in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-22

    The cross section for tt production in the all-jets final state is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector, in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 fb-1. The inclusive cross section is found to be 275.6 6.1 (stat) 37.8 (syst) 7.2 (lumi) pb. The normalized differential cross sections are measured as a function of the top quark transverse momenta, pT, and compared to predictions from quantum chromodynamics. The results are reported at detector, parton, and particle levels. In all cases, the measured top quark pT spectra are significantly softer than theoretical predictions.

  20. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? and Z?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.

  1. Measurement of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections using leptonic final states in 8.6 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Oteroy y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.

    2012-06-12

    We study the processes pp??WZ?l?l?l? and pp??ZZ?l?l???, where l=e or ?. Using 8.6 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we measure the WZ production cross section to be 4.50+0.630.66 pb which is consistent with, but slightly larger than, the prediction of the standard model. The ZZ cross section is measured to be 1.640.46 pb, in agreement with a prediction of the standard model. Combination with an earlier analysis of the ZZ?l?l?l?l? channel yields a ZZ cross section of 1.44+0.350.34 pb.

  2. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? andmoreZ?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.less

  3. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gaugemore » couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  4. Parton intrinsic motion in inclusive particle production: unpolarized cross sections, single spin asymmetries, and the Sivers effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Alesio, Umberto; Murgia, Francesco

    2004-10-01

    The relevance of intrinsic (or primordial) transverse momentum of partons in the inclusive production of particles at high energy and moderately large p{sub T} has been known for a long time, beginning with Drell-Yan and diphoton processes, and continuing with photon and meson production in hadronic collisions. In view of its renewed interest in the context of polarized processes and single spin asymmetries we perform, in the framework of perturbative QCD with the inclusion of spin and k{sub perpendicular} effects, a detailed analysis of several such processes in different kinematical situations. We show that the inclusion of these effects leads, at the level of accuracy reachable in this approach, to an overall satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental unpolarized data, thus giving support to the study of spin effects and single spin asymmetries within the same scheme. We present results for transverse single spin asymmetries, generated by the so-called Sivers effect, in inclusive pion and photon production in proton-proton collisions. We compare our results with the available experimental data and with previous results obtained using simplified versions of this approach.

  5. Measurement of J/psi meson and b-hadron production cross section at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamashita, Tomohiro

    2006-03-01

    A new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV is presented. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. The integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 is found to be 4.08 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.33}{sup +0.36}(syst) {mu}b. The fraction of J/{psi} events from the decay of the long-lived b-hadrons is separated by using the lifetime distribution in all events with p{sub T}(J/{psi}) > 1.25 GeV/c. The total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is found to be 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum is extracted at sqrts = 1960 GeV. The total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 is found to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

  6. Measurement of the ttbar Production Cross Section in ppbar Collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV using Soft Electron b-Tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-02-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to 1.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We reconstruct t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel, consisting of e{nu}+jets and {mu}{nu}+jets final states. The dominant background is the production of W bosons in association with multiple jets. To suppress this background, we identify electrons from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor jets ('soft electron tags'). From a sample of 2196 candidate events, we obtain 120 tagged events with a background expectation of 51 {+-} 3 events, corresponding to a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.8 {+-} 2.4 (stat) {+-} 1.6 (syst) {+-} 0.5 (lumi) pb. We assume a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of the t{bar t} cross section with soft electron tags in Run II of the Tevatron.

  7. Z-dependence analysis of M x-ray production cross sections for heavy elements with 60≤Z≤90 by protons impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deghfel, B.; Kahoul, A.; Nekkab, M.

    2015-03-30

    Motivated by the large deviation between the experiment and the predictions of the most often used model of ionization process by a charged particle, namely ECPSSR model, a large database of experimental M-shell X-ray production cross-sections by protons energies varying from 0.1 to 4.0 MeV for elements with atomic number 60 ≤ Z ≤ 90, is collected from various sources published from 1980 till 2009 to deduce an empirical M x-ray production cross section. This latter is then deduced from the available experimental data as a function of the scaled velocity parameter by using the whole range of elements (collective analysis) or by introducing the dependence of these cross sections on the atomic number of the target, noted as “Z-dependence analysis” in addition to the collective one. The corresponding results and their deviation from the experimental data are presented for selected elements. Also, a comparison is made for selected elements between our results and other theoretical as well as experimental works.

  8. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore »Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  9. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore » Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  10. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevalier-Thery, Solene; /Paris U., VI-VII /Saclay

    2010-06-01

    The top quark has been discovered by CDF and D0 experiments in 1995 at the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately study the properties of this quark: its mass is now known to better than 1% accuracy. This thesis describes the measurement of the top pair cross section in the electron muon channel with 4, 3 fb{sup -1} recorded data between 2006 and 2009 by the D0 experiment. Since the final state included a muon, improvements of some aspects of its identification have been performed : a study of the contamination of the cosmic muons and a study of the quality of the muon tracks. The cross section measurement is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations and the other experimental measurements. This measurement has been used to extract a value for the top quark mass. This method allows for the extraction of a better defined top mass than direct measurements as it depends less on Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainty on this extracted mass, dominated by the experimental one, is however larger than for direct measurements. In order to decrease this uncertainty, the ratio of the Z boson and the top pair production cross sections has been studied to look for some possible theoretical correlations. At the Tevatron, the two cross sections are not theoretically correlated: no decrease of the uncertainty on the extracted top mass is therefore possible.

  11. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-09-15

    This article reports a measurement of the production cross section of prompt isolated photon pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.36 fb⁻¹. The cross section is presented as a function of kinematic variables sensitive to the reaction mechanisms. The results are compared with three perturbative QCD calculations: (1) a leading-order parton shower Monte Carlo, (2) a fixed next-to-leading-order calculation and (3) a next-to-leading-order/next-to-next-to-leading-log resummed calculation. The comparisons show that, within their known limitations, all calculations predict the main features of the data, but no calculation adequately describes all aspects of the data.

  12. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-09-15

    This article reports a measurement of the production cross section of prompt isolated photon pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.36 fb⁻¹. The cross section is presented as a function of kinematic variables sensitive to the reaction mechanisms. The results are compared with three perturbative QCD calculations: (1) a leading-order parton shower Monte Carlo, (2) a fixed next-to-leading-order calculation and (3) a next-to-leading-order/next-to-next-to-leading-log resummed calculation. The comparisons show that, within their known limitations, all calculations predict the main features of themore » data, but no calculation adequately describes all aspects of the data.« less

  13. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a τ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2012-06-19

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying τ lepton from the decay tt¯→(lνl)(τhντ)bb¯, (l=e,μ). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb⁻¹ for the electron channel and 2.2 fb⁻¹ for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including τ leptons in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV. The measured value σtt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  14. Measurement of the $t \\bar{t}$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-12-29

    The top-antitop quark (t t-bar) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 inverse femtobarns. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239 +/- 2 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) +/- 6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV,morein agreement with the prediction of the standard model.less

  15. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt¯) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/μ +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e–, μ+μ–, and e±μ∓) decay channels. The tt¯ cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt¯ system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic upmore » to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.« less

  16. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  17. Erratum: Measurement of the $$t \\bar{t}$$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-05

    In this study, the top-antitop quark (tt¯) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb–1. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239±2 (stat.)±11 (syst.)±6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV, in agreement with the predictionmore » of the standard model.« less

  18. A measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-02

    In this study, the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is based on the entire 2011 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb–1. Inclusive and differential cross-section ratios for massive vector bosons decaying to electrons and muons are measured in association with jets with transverse momentum pT > 30GeV and jet rapidity |y| < 4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and to predictions from differentmore » Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.« less

  19. A measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-02

    In this study, the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is based on the entire 2011 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb–1. Inclusive and differential cross-section ratios for massive vector bosons decaying to electrons and muons are measured in association with jets with transverse momentum pT > 30GeV and jet rapidity |y| < 4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and to predictions from different Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.

  20. Section C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 Standard 1: Management Products and Controls ... High-Level Waste Product ...... 102 Specification 2: Immobilized Low-Activi...

  1. Measurements of single top quark production cross sections and |Vtb| in pp collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Alverson, George O; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; et al

    2011-12-05

    We present measurements of production cross sections of single top quarks in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We select events with an isolated electron or muon, an imbalance in transverse energy, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of them containing a bottom hadron. We obtain an inclusive cross section of Σ(pp → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.43-0.74+0.73 pb and use it to extract the CKM matrix element 0.79 production rates as predicted by the standard model.« less

  2. Measurement of the tt, WW and Z -> tautau Production Cross Sections in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carron Montero, Sebastian Fernando; /Duke U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis we present a new technique to analyze events containing two highly energetic leptons, as a probe of the Standard Model. The philosophy is to consider the data in a more global way, as opposed to the more traditional process dependent approach of extracting a given signal over the expected backgrounds by using various kinematical requirements. We use our global technique to simultaneously measure the cross sections of the main Standard Model processes; the t{bar t}, WW and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} production from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF detector at Fermilab. We select events by requiring they contain two highly energetic leptons (e{mu}, ee, or {mu}{mu}), and make no other kinematic requirements, except for the ee and {mu}{mu} channels. We then use a likelihood fit of the data in the two-dimensional phase space defined by the missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) and the number of jets in the event (N{sub jet}), to the expected Standard Model distributions, to simultaneously extract the production cross-sections of the main process contributing to our dilepton sample.

  3. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at ?s=7TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at ?s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |?|<2.5, |?|?[1.44,1.57] and with an angular separation ?R>0.45, is 17.20.2(stat)1.9(syst)0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthal angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the CollinsSoper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.

  4. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at ?s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |?|0.45, is 17.20.2(stat)1.9(syst)0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthalmoreangle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the CollinsSoper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.less

  5. Measurement of differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-01-11

    Here, we presented a measurement of differential cross sections for the Higgs boson (H) production in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The analysis exploits the H →γγ decay in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the diphoton system and of the associated jets. Results corrected for detector effects are compared with predictions at next-to-leading order and nextto-next-to-leading order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics, as well as with predictions beyond the standard model. Furthermore, for isolatedmore » photons with pseudorapidities |η| < 2.5, and with the photon of largest and next-to-largest transverse momentum (pγT) divided by the diphoton mass mgg satisfying the respective conditions of pγT/mγγ > 1/3 and >1/4, the total fiducial cross section is 32 ±10 fb.« less

  6. Measurement of the production cross sections for a Z boson and one or more b jets in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-06

    The production of a Z boson, decaying into two leptons and produced in association with one or more b jets, is studied using proton-proton collisions delivered by the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The data were recorded in 2011 with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb-1. The Z(ℓℓ) + b-jets cross sections (where ℓℓ = μμ or ee) are measured separately for a Z boson produced with exactly one b jet and with at least two b jets. In addition, a cross section ratio is extracted for a Z boson producedmore » with at least one b jet, relative to a Z boson produced with at least one jet. The measured cross sections are compared to various theoretical predictions, and the data favour the predictions in the five-flavour scheme, where b quarks are assumed massless. The kinematic properties of the reconstructed particles are compared with the predictions from the MadGraph event generator using the pythia parton shower simulation.« less

  7. Measurement of the tanti-t Production Cross Section in p anti-ptnipbar Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-06-01

    The authors present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 318 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. They select t{bar t} decays into the final states e{nu} + jets and {mu}{nu} + jets, in which at least one b quark from the t-quark decays is identified using a secondary vertex-finding algorithm. Assuming a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c{sup 2}, they measure a cross section of 8.7 {+-} 0.9(stat.){sub -0.9}{sup +1.1}(syst.) pb. They also report the first observation of t{bar t} with significance greater than 5{sigma} in the subsample in which both b quarks are identified, corresponding to a cross section of 10.1{sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(stat.){sub -1.3}{sup +2.0}(syst.) pb.

  8. Measurement of differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-01

    We presented a measurement of differential cross sections for the Higgs boson (H) production in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The analysis exploits the H →γγ decay in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the diphoton system and of the associated jets. Results corrected for detector effects are compared with predictions at next-to-leading order and nextto-next-to-leading order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics, as well as with predictions beyond the standard model. Furthermore, for isolated photons with pseudorapidities |η| < 2.5, and with the photon of largest and next-to-largest transverse momentum (pγT) divided by the diphoton mass mgg satisfying the respective conditions of pγT/mγγ > 1/3 and >1/4, the total fiducial cross section is 32 ±10 fb.

  9. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at √s=7TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in proton–proton collisions at √s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |η|<2.5, |η|ϵ[1.44,1.57] and with an angular separation ΔR>0.45, is 17.2±0.2(stat)±1.9(syst)±0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthalmore » angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the Collins–Soper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.« less

  10. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Contract Section H Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 360 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE ...

  11. SECTION E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. A143 E - i SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE WTP Contract Section E Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru...

  12. Full page photo

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Full Text Glossary Full Text Glossary The full-text glossary includes terms used throughout the website and in Biomass Program publications. Terms are listed alphabetically for easy reference. The term index lists all of the terms defined in the glossary. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A acid: A solution that has an excess of hydrogen ions (H+), with a pH of less than 7. acetic acid: An acid with the structure of C2H4O2.

  13. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/γ*→ττ production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W⁺W⁻, and Z/γ∗ → ττ production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6  fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s = 7  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore » cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/γ∗ → ττ underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be σ(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8⁺⁹̣˙⁷₋₉̣₅ ± 3.3 ± 3.3  pb, σ(W⁺W⁻) = 53.3 ± 2.7⁺⁷˙³₋₈̣₀ ± 1.0 ± 0.5  pb, and σ(Z/γ∗ → ττ) = 1174 ± 24⁺⁷²₋₈₇ ± 21 ± 9  pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W⁺W⁻ measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H → W⁺W⁻.« less

  14. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/γ*→ττ production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W⁺W⁻, and Z/γ∗ → ττ production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6  fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s = 7  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore »cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/γ∗ → ττ underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be σ(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8⁺⁹̣˙⁷₋₉̣₅ ± 3.3 ± 3.3  pb, σ(W⁺W⁻) = 53.3 ± 2.7⁺⁷˙³₋₈̣₀ ± 1.0 ± 0.5  pb, and σ(Z/γ∗ → ττ) = 1174 ± 24⁺⁷²₋₈₇ ± 21 ± 9  pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W⁺W⁻ measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H → W⁺W⁻.« less

  15. MANTA. An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    Neutron cross-sections characterize the way neutrons interact with matter. They are essential to most nuclear engineering projects and, even though theoretical progress has been made as far as the predictability of neutron cross-section models, measurements are still indispensable to meet tight design requirements for reduced uncertainties. Within the field of fission reactor technology, one can identify the following specializations that rely on the availability of accurate neutron cross-sections: (1) fission reactor design, (2) nuclear fuel cycles, (3) nuclear safety, (4) nuclear safeguards, (5) reactor monitoring and neutron fluence determination and (6) waste disposal and transmutation. In particular, the assessment of advanced fuel cycles requires an extensive knowledge of transuranics cross sections. Plutonium isotopes, but also americium, curium and up to californium isotope data are required with a small uncertainty in order to optimize significant features of the fuel cycle that have an impact on feasibility studies (e.g. neutron doses at fuel fabrication, decay heat in a repository, etc.). Different techniques are available to determine neutron cross sections experimentally, with the common denominator that a source of neutrons is necessary. It can either come from an accelerator that produces neutrons as a result of interactions between charged particles and a target, or it can come from a nuclear reactor. When the measurements are performed with an accelerator, they are referred to as differential since the analysis of the data provides the cross-sections for different discrete energies, i.e. σ(Ei), and for the diffusion cross sections for different discrete angles. Another approach is to irradiate a very pure sample in a test reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after

  16. A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

    2011-07-01

    The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

  17. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt¯) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/μ +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e, μ+μ, and e±μ) decay channels. The tt¯ cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt¯ system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic up to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.

  18. Inclusive cross section and double-helicity asymmetry for $$\\pi^{0}$$ production at midrapidity in $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=510$$ GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2016-01-07

    PHENIX measurements are presented for the cross section and double-helicity asymmetry (ALL) in inclusive π⁰ production at midrapidity from p+p collisions at √s = 510 GeV from data taken in 2012 and 2013 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The next-to-leading-order perturbativequantum- chromodynamics theory calculation is in excellent agreement with the presented cross section results. The calculation utilized parton-to-pion fragmentation functions from the recent DSS14 global analysis, which prefer a smaller gluon-to-pion fragmentation function. The π⁰ALL results follow an increasingly positive asymmetry trend with pT and √s with respect to the predictions and are in excellent agreement with the latestmore » global analysis results. This analysis incorporated earlier results on π0 and jet ALL, and suggested a positive contribution of gluon polarization to the spin of the proton ΔG for the gluon momentum fraction range x > 0.05. The data presented here extend to a currently unexplored region, down to x 0.01, and thus provide additional constraints on the value of ΔG.« less

  19. Full Hybrid: Overview

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button OVERVIEW Full hybrids use a gasoline engine as the primary source of power, and an electric motor provides additional power when needed. In addition, full hybrids can use the electric motor as the sole source of propulsion for low-speed, low-acceleration driving, such as in stop-and-go traffic or for backing up. This electric-only driving mode can further increase fuel efficiency under some

  20. Full Circle Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Full Circle Fuels Place: Oberlin, Ohio Zip: 44074 Sector: Biofuels Product: Alternative fuels center dedicated to increasing awareness and use of biofuels in...

  1. WW production cross section measurement and limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings at sqrt(s) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Michael P.; /Rice U.

    2008-04-01

    The cross section for WW production is measured and limits on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ trilinear gauge couplings are set using WW {yields} ee/e{mu}/{mu}{mu} events collected by the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Across the three final states, 108 candidate events are observed with 40.8 {+-} 3.8 total background expected, consistent with {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW) = 11.6 {+-} 1.8(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst) {+-} 0.7(lumi) pb. Using a set of SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(1){sub Y} conserving constraints, the one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits on trilinear gauge couplings are -0.63 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.99, -0.15 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.19, and -0.14 < {Delta}g{sub 1}{sup Z} < 0.34.

  2. SECTION J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    K-1 SECTION J APPENDIX K CONTRACTOR'S TRANSITION PLAN (RESERVED) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-K-2

  3. Section J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L-1 Section J Appendix L MEMORANDUM FROM DAVID R. HILL, GENERAL COUNSEL, DATED NOVEMBER 30, 2006, SUBJECT: ONGOING LICENSING SUPPORT NETWORK ("LSN") OBLIGATIONS Contract No.: ...

  4. H.R. 4751: A Bill to reauthorize appropriations for the weatherization program under section 422 of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, July 13, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The report H.R. 4944 is a bill to reauthorize appropriations for the weatherization program under section 422 of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. The proposed legislative text is included.

  5. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section as a function of jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-08

    Tmore » he tt¯ production cross-section dependence on jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum is reported for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 eV in the single-lepton channel. his data was collected with the ALAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and comprise the full 2011 data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet multiplicity for up to eight jets using jet transverse momentum thresholds of 25, 40, 60, and 80 GeV, and as a function of jet transverse momentum up to the fifth jet. he results are shown after background subtraction and corrections for all known detector effects, within a kinematic range closely matched to the experimental acceptance. Several QCD-based Monte Carlo models are compared with the results. Sensitivity to the parton shower modelling is found at the higher jet multiplicities, at high transverse momentum of the leading jet and in the transverse momentum spectrum of the fifth leading jet. As a result, the MC@NLO+HERWIG MC is found to predict too few events at higher jet multiplicities.« less

  6. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section as a function of jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-08

    The tt¯ production cross-section dependence on jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum is reported for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV in the single-lepton channel. This data was collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and comprise the full 2011 data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet multiplicity for up to eight jets using jet transverse momentum thresholds of 25, 40, 60, and 80 GeV, and as a function of jet transverse momentum up to the fifth jet. The results are shown after background subtraction and corrections for all known detector effects, within a kinematic range closely matched to the experimental acceptance. Several QCD-based Monte Carlo models are compared with the results. Sensitivity to the parton shower modelling is found at the higher jet multiplicities, at high transverse momentum of the leading jet and in the transverse momentum spectrum of the fifth leading jet. As a result, the MC@NLO+HERWIG MC is found to predict too few events at higher jet multiplicities.

  7. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8<|Y*|<10. These measurements use a sample of data recorded using the ATLAS detector in 2011, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4 and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.

  8. SECTION I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section I, Page i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE OF CONTENTS I-1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (NOV 2013) (AS MODIFIED BY DEAR 952.202-1) (REPLACED MODS 020, 029, 0084) ................................................................................................................................ 1 I-2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ................................................................................................. 1 I-3 FAR

  9. Full Hybrid: Starting

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    highlighted Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button STARTING When a full hybrid vehicle is initially started, the battery typically powers all accessories. The gasoline engine only starts if the battery needs to be charged or the accessories require more power than available from the battery. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an

  10. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; et al

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using 89Y, 159Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for 10Be and 26Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of 10Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of 10Be decreased asmore » the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of 26Al, though the absolute values were quite different between 10Be and 26Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.« less

  11. Full containment spray drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, K.

    1999-11-01

    Aspects of safety, environmental protection, and powder quality will continue to influence advances within spray dryer design and operation, and the concept of full containment spray drying offers a means to meet future industrial requirements. Process air recycle and powder containment within the drying chamber leads to no process air discharge to atmosphere, provides a more favorable operator environment around the spray dryer installation, reduces regions within the dryer layout where potential explosive powder/air mixtures can exist, improves yields, reduces powder losses, and provides easier cleaning operations with reduced wash water requirements.

  12. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, hadronic top decays with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegeman, Jeroen Guido; /Twente U. Tech., Enschede

    2009-01-16

    background. It is important to measure the cross section (or branching fraction) in each channel independently to fully verify the standard model. Top quark pair production proceeds through the strong interaction, placing the scene for top quark physics at hadron colliders. This adds an additional challenge: the huge background from multi-jet QCD processes. At the Tevatron, for example, t{bar t} production is completely hidden in light q{bar q} pair production. The light (i.e. not bottom or top) quark pair production cross section is six orders of magnitude larger than that for t{bar t} production. Even including the full signature of hadronic t{bar t} decays, two b-jets and four additional jets, the QCD cross section for processes with similar signature is more than five times larger than for t{bar t} production. The presence of isolated leptons in the (semi)leptonic t{bar t} decay channels provides a clear characteristic to distinguish the t{bar t} signal from QCD background but introduces a multitude of W- and Z-related backgrounds.

  13. SECTION B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phases of the fee determination process consistent with Section B.2 of the subject contract. ... At the end of the rating period, after the determination of the award fee, the CBFO ...

  14. SECTION J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    J-1 SECTION J APPENDIX J PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (TO BE NEGOTIATED AFTER CONTRACT AWARD) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-J-2 Page Blank

  15. 14655 Section I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A099 I-i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES River Corridor Closure Contract Section I Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 649 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2 CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available.

  16. SECTION III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... * Increasing interestparticipation by consumers in Demand Response and conservation * ... * Increasing emphasis and production of coal to liquid fuels * Increased in-migration ...

  17. Section 7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Values in parentheses are (contour interval, maximum value) in g kg . Horizontal scale ... in precipitation efficiency are much less than the changes in cloud water production. ...

  18. Top pair production cross section at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV and a search for v + a current in top quark decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabrera, S.; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2006-09-01

    Possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model have been investigated in top quark decays from a data sample enriched in t{bar t} events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of approximately 700 pb{sup -1} and collected with the CDF II detector. The combined t{bar t} production cross section measurement 7.3 {+-} 0.9 pb agrees with the QCD NLO predictions: 6.7 {+-} 0.8 pb assuming m{sub top} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. The fraction of the V + A current in top quark decay, f{sub V+A}, is determined using the invariant mass of the charged lepton and the bottom quark jet in the decay chain t {yields} Wb {yields} {ell}{nu}b (where {ell} = e or {mu}). The measured value f{sub V+A} = - 0.06 {+-} 0.25 under the assumption m{sub top} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2} is in agreement with the Standard Model. They set an upper limit on f{sub V+A} of 0.29 at the 95% confidence level.

  19. Measurements of normalized differential cross sections for tt¯ production in pp collisions at (s)=7  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2014-10-13

    We present measurements of normalized differential cross sections for top-quark pair production as a function of the top-quark transverse momentum, and of the mass, transverse momentum, and rapidity of the t¯t system, in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √ s=7 TeV. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb₋1, recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected in the lepton + jets channel, requiring exactly one lepton and at least four jets with at least one of the jets tagged as originating from a b-quark. The measuredmore » spectra are corrected for detector efficiency and resolution effects and are compared to several Monte Carlo simulations and theory calculations. The results are in fair agreement with the predictions in a wide kinematic range. Nevertheless, data distributions are softer than predicted for higher values of the mass of the t¯t system and of the top-quark transverse momentum. Lastly, the measurements can also discriminate among different sets of parton distribution functions.« less

  20. Cross Section and Parity-Violating Spin Asymmetries of W{sup {+-}} Boson Production in Polarized p+p Collisions at {radical}(s)=500 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Kinney, E.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Nagle, J. L.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Brooks, M. L.; Butsyk, S.; Guo, L.; Jiang, X.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Lee, D. M.

    2011-02-11

    Large parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetries A{sub L}{sup e+}=-0.86{sub -0.14}{sup +0.30} and A{sub L}{sup e-}=0.88{sub -0.71}{sup +0.12} are observed for inclusive high transverse momentum electrons and positrons in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=500 GeV with the PHENIX detector at RHIC. These e{sup {+-}} come mainly from the decay of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons, and their asymmetries directly demonstrate parity violation in the couplings of the W{sup {+-}} to the light quarks. The observed electron and positron yields were used to estimate W{sup {+-}} boson production cross sections for the e{sup {+-}} channels of {sigma}(pp{yields}W{sup +}X)xBR(W{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e})=144.1{+-}21.2(stat){sub -10.3}{sup +3.4}(syst){+-}21.6(norm) pb, and {sigma}(pp{yields}W{sup -}X)xBR(W{sup -}{yields}e{sup -}{nu}{sub e})=31.7{+-}12.1(stat){sub -8.2}{sup +10.1}(syst){+-}4.8(norm) pb.

  1. Cross Section and Parity-Violating Spin Asymmetries of W± Boston Production in Polarized p + p Collisions at √sNN = 500 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2011-02-11

    Large parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetries A{sub L}{sup e+} = -0.86{sub -0.14}{sup +0.30} and A{sub L}{sup e-} = 0.88{sub -0.71}{sup +0.12} are observed for inclusive high transverse momentum electrons and positrons in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 500 GeV with the PHENIX detector at RHIC. These e{sup {+-}} come mainly from the decay of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons, and their asymmetries directly demonstrate parity violation in the couplings of the W{sup {+-}} to the light quarks. The observed electron and positron yields were used to estimate W{sup {+-}} boson production cross sections for the e{sup {+-}} channels of {sigma}(pp {yields} W{sup +}X) x BR(W{sup +} e{sup +}v{sub e}) 144.1 {+-} 21.2(stat){sub -10.3}{sup +3.4}(syst) {+-} 21.6(norm) pb, and {sigma}(pp {yields} W{sup -}X) x BR(W{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}v{sup -}) = 31.7 {+-} 12.1(stat){sub -8.2}{sup +10.1}(syst) {+-} 4.8(norm) pb.

  2. Full one-loop electroweak corrections to h{sup 0}(H{sup 0},A{sup 0})H{sup {+-}}W{sup {+-}} associated productions at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jing; Ma Wengan; Zhang Renyu; Guo Lei; Jiang Yi; Han Liang

    2007-03-01

    We study the complete one-loop electroweak (EW) corrections to the processes of single charged Higgs boson production associated with a neutral Higgs boson (h{sup 0},H{sup 0},A{sup 0}) and a gauge boson W{sup {+-}} in the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). Numerical results at the SPS1a{sup '} benchmark point as proposed in the SPA project, are presented for demonstration. We find that for the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}h{sup 0}H{sup {+-}}W{sup {+-}} the EW relative correction can be either positive or negative and in the range of -15%{approx}20% in our chosen parameter space. While for the processes e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}H{sup 0}(A{sup 0})H{sup {+-}}W{sup {+-}} the corrections generally reduce the Born cross sections and the EW relative corrections are typically of order -10%{approx}-20%.

  3. SECTION J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING ON HUMAN RESOURCES (TO BE NEGOTIATED DURING CONTRACT TRANSITION) The personnel appendix required by DEAR Subpart 970.31 entitled "Contract Cost Principles and Procedures" as referenced in Section I Clause, DEAR 970.5232-2, "Payments and Advances" will be Appendix A of the contract. The personnel appendix will be negotiated between DOE OCRWM and the selected offeror during the contract transition period. Contract No.: DE-RW0000005

  4. Section 66

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CFCl 3 ) (CF 2 Cl 2 ) (CHFCl 2 ) CF 4 CCl 4 (CFCl 3 ) (CF 2 Cl 2 ) (CHFCl 2 ) SF 6 CF 4 CCl 4 Session Papers 277 Figure 1. Spectral absorption cross-sections of CF 4 between 1281 and 1284 cm . The experimental -1 conditions correspond to the surface, 5-km, and 19-km levels of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere. Figure 2. Spectral absorption cross-sections of CCl 4 between 755 and 810 cm . The experimental conditions -1 correspond to the surface, 5-km, and 19-km levels of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere.

  5. Section CC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 J-12-1 ATTACHMENT J-12 GOVERNMENT FURNISHED SERVICES AND INFORMATION TABLE J-12.1 GFS/I LIST FROM SECTION C (SOW) ID GFS/I GFS/I Due Contract Section GF0001 DOE will administer MOUs with other law enforcement agencies or other Federal agencies (e.g., U.S. Department of Defense [Yakima Training Center]). DOE will provide copies of MOUs and/or contracts to the MSC. As required C.2.1.1.1 GF0002 DOE will provide Federal Commissions for Hanford Patrol personnel. As required C.2.1.1.1 GF0003 DOE

  6. Section CC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 464 J-11-1 ATTACHMENT J-11 CONTRACT DELIVERABLES TABLE J-11.1 DELIVERABLE LIST FROM SECTION C (SOW) ID Deliverable DOE Contract Deliverable Due Contract Section Action Response Time a CD0001 Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix Approve 30 days July 24, 2009; thereafter by request as applicable C.1.3 CD0002 Annual Forecast of Services and Infrastructure Review NA November 21, 2009; annually thereafter by November 31 C.1.3 CD0003

  7. Section I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract Modification No.0200 Section I I-1 PART II SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE OF CONTENTS CLAUSE I.1 - FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (NOV 2013); MODIFIED BY DEAR 952.202-1 9 CLAUSE I.2 - FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) 9 CLAUSE I.3 - FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (MAY 2014) 10 CLAUSE I.4 - FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) 11 CLAUSE I.5 - FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (MAY 2014) 11 CLAUSE I.6 - FAR 52.203-8 CANCELLATION,

  8. Section 117

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation of GOES-7 to a Radiation Budget for April and July 1994 ARMIOP Using ScaRaB... employed for validating a TOA Earth radiation budget product generated from GOES-7 for ...

  9. SECTION I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Aug 2009 952.211-71 Priorities and Allocations (ATOMIC ENERGY) Apr 2008 952.215-70 Key ... The product usually relies upon a cathode-ray tube (CRT), liquid crystal display (LCD), ...

  10. Measurement of the ratios of the Z/gamma* + >= n jet production cross sections to the total inclusive Z/gamma* cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-08-01

    We present a study of events with Z bosons and jets produced at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample consists of nearly 14,000 Z/{gamma}* {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} candidates corresponding to the integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1} collected using the D0 detector. Ratios of the Z/{gamma}* + {ge} n jet cross sections to the total inclusive Z/{gamma}* cross section have been measured for n = 1 to 4 jet events. Our measurements are found to be in good agreement with a next-to-leading order QCD calculation and with a tree-level QCD prediction with parton shower simulation and hadronization.

  11. Measurements of the total and differential Higgs boson production cross sections combining the H ? ?? and H ? ZZ* ? 4? decay channels at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-27

    Measurements of the total and differential cross sections of Higgs boson production are performed using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at a center-of-mass energy of ?s = 8 TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector. Cross sections are obtained from measured H ? ?? and H ? ZZ* ? 4? event yields, which are combined accounting for detector efficiencies, fiducial acceptances, and branching fractions. Differential cross sections are reported as a function of Higgs boson transverse momentum, Higgs boson rapidity, number of jets in the event, and transverse momentum of the leading jet. Themoretotal production cross section is determined to be ?pp?H = 33.0 5.3 (stat) 1.6 (syst) pb. The measurements are compared to state-of-the-art predictions.less

  12. Section J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M-1 Section J Appendix M Key Design, Licensing and Site Management M&O Milestone Chart Activity Planned Date Develop and Submit CD-2 (25%-30%) 08/2009 Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Balance of Plant Support Facilities (OCRWM Start of Construction 3/2012) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Initial Handling Facility (IHF) (OCRWM Start of Construction for IHF: 9/2013) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Wet Handling

  13. Section L

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Section L - Attachment F - Past Performance Cover Letter and Questionnaire Date: ________________ Dear _________________: Our firm is submitting a proposal for a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Contract for the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site with an estimated value of approximately $550M per year. Our firm is seeking your assistance. We are asking you to complete the attached questionnaire evaluating our performance on

  14. SECTION J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D-1 SECTION J APPENDIX D KEY PERSONNEL Name Position Doug Cooper General Manager John Donnell Repository Licensing Lead Al Ebner, PE, PhD Repository Design Lead Steve Piccolo Deputy General Manager Steve White Quality & Performance Assurance Lead George Clare Project Management & Integration Lead Mike Hitchler Preclosure Safety Analysis Lead Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-D-2 POSITION DESCRIPTIONS OCRWM SPECIFIED KEY PERSONNEL 1. General Manager: Requires 10 years experience as a

  15. SECTION J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H-1 SECTION J APPENDIX H CONTRACT GUIDANCE FOR PREPARATION OF DIVERSITY PLAN This Guidance is to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the Diversity elements and where these issues may already be addressed in the contract. To the extent these issues are already addressed in the contract, the Contractor need only cross reference the location. Contractor's Workforce The Department's contracts contain clauses on Equal Employment

  16. Section 89

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensitivity Tests on the Microphysical Parameters of a 2-Dimensional Cirrus Model R.-F. Lin Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Radiatively induced convection may serve a key role in the evolution of cirrus. A 2-dimensional cirrus model with a spatial resolution of 100 m is developed to investigate dynam- ical-radiative-microphysical interactions. It is assumed that the model domain represents part of a cross-section of cirrus

  17. Section 64

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Do Clouds Mitigate the Biological Effects of Ozone Depletion in the Antarctic? P. Ricchiazzi, C. Gautier, and S. Yang Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California, Santa Barbara Introduction Method Recent studies have shown that biological production in the To distinguish the cloud effect from the strong modulating maritime Antarctic is affected by the ratio of irradiance in the effects of the total ozone, we developed a retrieval technique UVB band to that in the

  18. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the delta m**2 about equals 1-eV**2 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, David W.; /Columbia U.

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  19. Measurement of νμ-induced charged-current neutral pion production cross sections on mineral oil at Evϵ0.5–2.0 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Bazarko, A. O.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Cox, D. C.; et al

    2011-03-23

    Using a custom 3-Cerenkov ring fitter, we report cross sections for νμ-induced charged-current single π⁰ production on mineral oil (CH₂) from a sample of 5810 candidate events with 57% signal purity over an energy range of 0.5–2.0 GeV. This includes measurements of the absolute total cross section as a function of neutrino energy, and flux-averaged differential cross sections measured in terms of Q², μ⁻ kinematics, and π⁰ kinematics. The sample yields a flux-averaged total cross section of (9.2±0.3stat±1.5syst)×10⁻³⁹ cm²/CH² at mean neutrino energy of 0.965 GeV.

  20. Measurement of νμ-induced charged-current neutral pion production cross sections on mineral oil at Evϵ0.5–2.0 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Bazarko, A. O.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Cox, D. C.; Curioni, A.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D. A.; Fleming, B. T.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Garvey, G. T.; Grange, J.; Green, C.; Green, J. A.; Hart, T. L.; Hawker, E.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R. A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kasper, P.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kourbanis, I.; Koutsoliotas, S.; Laird, E. M.; Linden, S. K.; Link, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Louis, W. C.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Marsh, W.; Mauger, C.; McGary, V. T.; McGregor, G.; Metcalf, W.; Meyers, P. D.; Mills, F.; Mills, G. B.; Monroe, J.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Nelson, R. H.; Nienaber, P.; Nowak, J. A.; Osmanov, B.; Ouedraogo, S.; Patterson, R. B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C. C.; Prebys, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Ray, H.; Roe, B. P.; Russell, A. D.; Sandberg, V.; Schirato, R.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Smith, D.; Soderberg, M.; Sorel, M.; Spentzouris, P.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R. J.; Sung, M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Tzanov, M.; Van de Water, R. G.; Wascko, M. O.; White, D. H.; Wilking, M. J.; Yang, H. J.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2011-03-23

    Using a custom 3-Cerenkov ring fitter, we report cross sections for νμ-induced charged-current single π⁰ production on mineral oil (CH₂) from a sample of 5810 candidate events with 57% signal purity over an energy range of 0.5–2.0 GeV. This includes measurements of the absolute total cross section as a function of neutrino energy, and flux-averaged differential cross sections measured in terms of Q², μ⁻ kinematics, and π⁰ kinematics. The sample yields a flux-averaged total cross section of (9.2±0.3stat±1.5syst)×10⁻³⁹ cm²/CH² at mean neutrino energy of 0.965 GeV.

  1. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  2. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $$ s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $ is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 $\\,\\text {fb}^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25 $\\,\\text {GeV}$ respectively, in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta |<2.5$ , $|\\eta |\

  3. Measurement of the $$\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$$ production cross section in the $$\\mathrm{ e \\mu }$$ channel in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-08-03

    The inclusive cross section for top quark pair production is measured in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV, corresponding to 5.0 and 19.7 fb–1, respectively, with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The cross sections are measured in the electron-muon channel using a binned likelihood fit to multi-differential final state distributions related to identified b quark jets and other jets in the event. The measured cross section values are 173.6 ± 2.1 (stat)+4.5-4.0 (syst) ± 3.8 (lumi) pb at √s = 7 TeV, and 244.9 ± 1.4 (stat)+6.3-5.5 (syst) ± 6.4 (lumi) pb at √s = 8more » TeV, in good agreement with QCD calculations at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy. The ratio of the cross sections measured at 7 and 8 TeV is determined, as well as cross sections in the fiducial regions defined by the acceptance requirements on the two charged leptons in the final state. The cross section results are used to determine the top quark pole mass via the dependence of the theoretically predicted cross section on the mass, giving a best result of 173.8+1.7-1.8 GeV. Furthermore, the data at √s = 8 TeV are also used to set limits, for two neutralino mass values, on the pair production of supersymmetric top squarks with masses close to the top quark mass.« less

  4. Measurement of the B+ production cross-section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1960-GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a new measurement of the B{sup +} meson differential cross section d{sigma}/dP{sub T} at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 739 pb{sup -1} collected with the upgraded CDF detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. B{sup +} candidates are reconstructed through the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi} K{sup +}, with J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The integrated cross section for producing B{sup +} mesons with p{sub T} {ge} 6 GeV/c and |y| {le} 1 is measured to be 2.78 {+-} 0.24 {mu}b.

  5. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  6. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  7. Measurement of the differential cross-sections of prompt and non-prompt production of J / ψ and ψ (2S) in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-05-20

    The production rates of prompt and non-prompt J/ψ and ψ(2S) mesons in their dimuon decay modes are measured using 2.1 and 11.4 fb-1 of data collected with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, in proton–proton collisions at √s=7 and 8 respectively. Production cross-sections for prompt as well as non-prompt sources, ratios of ψ(2S) to J/ψ production, and the fractions of non-prompt production for J/ψ and ψ(2S) are measured as a function of meson transverse momentum and rapidity. Lastly, the measurements are compared to theoretical predictions.

  8. Full hoop casing for midframe of industrial gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Gerald A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2015-12-01

    A can annular industrial gas turbine engine, including: a single-piece rotor shaft spanning a compressor section (82), a combustion section (84), a turbine section (86); and a combustion section casing (10) having a section (28) configured as a full hoop. When the combustion section casing is detached from the engine and moved to a maintenance position to allow access to an interior of the engine, a positioning jig (98) is used to support the compressor section casing (83) and turbine section casing (87).

  9. Measurement of the tt? production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV using events with large Missing ET and jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-08-09

    In this paper we report a measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron accelerator. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and high jet multiplicity. This measurement vetoes the presence of explicitly identified electrons and muons, thus enhancing the tau contribution of ttMs; decays. Signal events are discriminated from the background using a neural network and heavy flavor jets are identified by a secondary-vertex tagging algorithm. We measure a tt? production cross section of 7.99 0.55(stat) 0.76(syst) 0.46(lumi) pb, assuming a top mass mtop = 172.5 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous measurements and standard model predictions.

  10. Top physics: measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev using lepton + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-07

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. In these events, heavy flavor quarks from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, a total of 48 candidate events are selected, where 13.5 {+-} 1.8 events are expected from background contributions. We measure a t{bar t} production cross section of 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup _1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb.

  11. Monte Carlo Study of the Measurement of the top - anti-top Production Cross-Section in the Muon + Jets Channel with the D0-Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Jorg Manfred; /Bonn U.

    2004-03-01

    A measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 detector using simulated events is performed. The final state containing a muon and jets is examined including all methods of measuring signal efficiencies and the estimation of the background contributions. Especially, the identification efficiency and properties of muons are studied.

  12. Measurement of the production and differential cross sections of W⁺W⁻ bosons in association with jets in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; et al

    2015-06-23

    We present a measurement of the W-boson-pair production cross section in pp¯ collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy and the first measurement of the differential cross section as a function of jet multiplicity and leading-jet energy. The W⁺W⁻ cross section is measured in the final state comprising two charged leptons and neutrinos, where either charged lepton can be an electron or a muon. Using data collected by the CDF experiment corresponding to 9.7 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity, a total of 3027 collision events consistent with W⁺W⁻ production are observed with an estimated background contribution of 1790 ± 190 events. Themore » measured total cross section is σ(pp¯→ W⁺W⁻) = 14.0 ± 0.6(stat)⁺1.2⁻1.0(syst) ± 0.8(lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction.« less

  13. Measurement of the t anti-t Production Cross Section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using Lepton + Jets Events with Jet Probability b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-07-01

    The authors present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. A b-tagging algorithm based on the probability of displaced tracks coming from the event interaction vertex is applied to identify b quarks from top decay. Using 318 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector, they measure the t{bar t} production cross section in events with at least one restrictive (tight) b-tagged jet and obtain 8.9{sub -1.0}{sup +1.0}(stat.){sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(syst.) pb. The cross section value assumes a top quark mass of m{sub t} is presented in the paper. This result is consistent with other CDF measurements of the t{bar t} cross section using different samples and analysis techniques, and has similar systematic uncertainties. They have also performed consistency checks by using the b-tagging probability function to vary the signal to background ratio and also using events that have at least two b-tagged jets.

  14. American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Bar Association Section on Environment Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60610 Product: The Section of...

  15. Measurement of differential production cross-sections for a Z boson in association with b-jets in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-10-24

    We report measurements of differential production cross-sections of a Z boson in association with b-jets in pp collisions at √ s = 7 TeV. The data analysed correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1 recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Particle-level cross-sections are determined for events with a Z boson decaying into an electron or muon pair, and containing b-jets. For events with at least one b-jet, the cross-section is presented as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum and rapidity, together with the inclusive b-jet cross-section as a function of b-jet transverse momentum,more » rapidity and angular separations between the b-jet and the Z boson. For events with at least two b-jets, the cross-section is determined as a function of the invariant mass and angular separation of the two highest transverse momentum b-jets, and as a function of the Z boson transverse momentum and rapidity. Lastly, results are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.« less

  16. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-24

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section, $ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |?| 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements aremorecompared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. The predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.less

  17. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-06-03

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section, $ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |?| 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements aremorecompared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. Lastly, the predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.less

  18. Measurement of the t-tbar production cross section in p-pbar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV using lepton+jets events in the CDF detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palencia, Enrique; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Cantabria U., Santander

    2006-12-01

    The top quark is the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the standard model (SM). In particular, the measurement of the top quark pair production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} is of interest as a test of QCD predictions. Recent QCD calculations done with perturbation theory to next-to-leading order predict {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} with an uncertainty of less than 15%, which motivate measurements of comparable precision. In this thesis, the author reports a measurement of the cross section for pair production of top quarks in the lepton+jets channel in 318 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were recorded between March 2002 and September 2004, during Run II of the Tevatron, by the CDF II detector, a general purpose detector which combines charged particle trackers, sampling calorimeters, and muon detectors. processes in which a W boson is produced in association with several jets with large transverse momentum can be misidentified at t{bar t}, since they have the same signature. In order to separate the t{bar t} events from this background, they develop a method to tag b-jets based on tracking information from the silicon detector. The main event selection requires at least one tight (more restrictive) b tag in the event. As a cross check, they also measure the cross section using events with a loose (less restrictive) b tag and events which have at least two tight or at least two loose b tags. Background contributions from heavy flavor production processes, such as Wb{bar b}, Wc{bar c} or Wc, misidentified W bosons, electroweak processes, single top production, and mistagged jets are estimated using a combination of Monte Carlo calculations and independent measurements in control data samples. An excess over background in the number of

  19. B physics: measurement of the j/psi meson and b-hadron production cross sections in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1960 gev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2004-12-23

    The authors present a new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. They find the integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 4.08 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.33}{sup +0.36}(syst) {mu}b. They separate the fraction of J/{psi} events from the decay of the long-lived b-hadrons using the lifetime distribution in all events with p{sub T}(J/{psi}) > 1.25 GeV/c. They find the total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, they extract the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. They find the total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

  20. Measurement of the J/psi meson and b-hadron production cross sections in p anti-p collisions at s(NN)**(1/2) = 1960-GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Arguin, J.-F.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U. /Duke U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Helsinki U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /SungKyunKwan U.

    2004-12-01

    We present a new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. We find the integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 4.08 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.33}{sup +0.36}(syst) {mu}b. We separate the fraction of J/{psi} events from the decay of the long-lived b-hadrons using the lifetime distribution in all events with p{sub T} (J/{psi}) > 1.25 GeV/c. We find the total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, we extract the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. We find the total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

  1. Guidelines to assist rural electric cooperatives to fulfill the requirements of Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA for cogeneration and small power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    These guidelines were designed to assist National Rural Electric Cooperative Association staff and consultants involved in the implementation of Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The guidelines were structured to meet anticipated use as: a self-contained legal, technical and economic reference manual helpful in dealing with small power producers and cogenerators; a roadmap through some of the less obvious obstacles encountered by utilities interacting with small power producers and cogenerators; a starting point for those utilities who have not yet formulated specific policies and procedures, nor developed rates for purchasing power from small power producers and cogenerators; a discussion vehicle to highlight key issues and increase understanding in workshop presentations to rural electric cooperatives; and an evolutionary tool which can be updated to reflect changes in the law as they occur. The chapters in these Guidelines contain both summary information, such as compliance checklists, and detailed information, such as cost rate calculations, on regulatory requirements, operational considerations, and rate considerations. The appendices contain more specific material, e.g. rural electric cooperative sample policy statements. (LCL)

  2. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-06-03

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section,more » $$ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $$ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s} $$ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$$^{-1}$$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |η| < 2.5, and are required to have transverse momenta in the range 40 < $$ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $$ < 300 GeV and $$ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $$ > 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. Lastly, the predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.« less

  3. Measurement of differential and integrated fiducial cross sections for Higgs boson production in the four-lepton decay channel in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-01

    Integrated fiducial cross sections for the production of four leptons via the H → 4ℓ decays (ℓ = e, μ) are measured in pp collisions atmore » $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8TeV. Measurements are performed with data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb$$^{–1}$$ at 7TeV, and 19.7 fb$$^{–1}$$ at 8 TeV, collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Differential cross sections are measured using the 8 TeV data, and are determined as functions of the transverse momentum and rapidity of the four-lepton system, accompanying jet multiplicity, transverse momentum of the leading jet, and difference in rapidity between the Higgs boson candidate and the leading jet. A measurement of the Z → 4ℓ cross section, and its ratio to the H → 4ℓ cross section is also performed. All cross sections are measured within a fiducial phase space defined by the requirements on lepton kinematics and event topology. Here, the integrated H → 4ℓ fiducial cross section is measured to be 0.56$$_{–0.44}^{+0.67}$$ (stat)$$_{–0.06}^{+0.21}$$ (syst) fb at 7 TeV, and 1.11$$_{–0.35}^{+0.41}$$ (stat)$$_{–0.10}^{+0.14}$$ (syst) fb at 8 TeV. The measurements are found to be compatible with theoretical calculations based on the standard model.« less

  4. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯Wmore » nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.« less

  5. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. 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M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O’Brien, B. J.; O’grady, F.; O’Neil, D. C.; O’Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯W nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.

  6. Measurement of the Top-antitop Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using the Kinematic Properties of Events with Leptons and Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-09-01

    A measurement of the top-antitop production cross section in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been performed at the LHC with the CMS detector. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns and is based on the reconstruction of the final state with one isolated, high transverse-momentum electron or muon and three or more hadronic jets. The kinematic properties of the events are used to separate the top-antitop signal from W+jets and QCD multijet background events. The measured cross section is 173 + 39 - 32 (stat. + syst.) pb, consistent with standard model expectations.

  7. Measurement of the p anti-p --> t anti-t production cross section at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV in the fully hadronic decay channel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2006-12-01

    A measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton anti-proton collisions at an interaction energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. This analysis uses 405 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Fully hadronic t{bar t} decays with final states of six or more jets are separated from the multijet background using secondary vertex tagging and a neural network. The t{bar t} cross section is measured as {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 4.5{sub -1.9}{sup +2.0}(stat){sub -1.1}{sup +1.4}(syst) {+-} 0.3(lumi) pb for a top quark mass of m{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. A Measurement of the production cross section of top-antitop pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass of 1.96 TeV using secondary vertex b-tagging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachacou, Henri

    2004-12-01

    A measurement of the t{bar t} pair production cross section is presented using 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment during Run II at the Tevatron. t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel are isolated by identifying electrons and muons, reconstructing jets and transverse missing energy, and identifying b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. The efficiency of the algorithm is measured in a control sample using a novel technique that is less dependent on the simulation. For a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup +1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb is measured.

  9. Measurement of the t anti-t Production Cross Section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV in the All Hadronic Decay Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-07-01

    The authors report a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The analysis is performed using 311 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data consist of events selected with six or more hadronic jets with additional kinematic requirements. At least one of these jets must be identified as a b-quark jet by the reconstruction of a secondary vertex. The cross section is measured to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.5 {+-} 2.1(stat.){sub -2.2}{sup +3.3}(syst.){sub -0.4}{sup +0.5}(lumi.) pb, which is consistent with the standard model prediction.

  10. Mesure de la section efficace de production de paires de quarks top dans l'etat final di-electron avec les donnees collectees par l'experience D0 au RunIIa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Dit Latour, Bertrand; /LPSC, Grenoble

    2008-09-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 by CDF and D0 collaborations in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately measure the properties of this very massive quark. This thesis is devoted to the measurement of the top pair production cross-section via the strong interaction, in a final state composed of two electrons, two particle jets and missing transverse energy. It is based on a 1 fb{sup -1} data set collected by the D0 experiment between 2002 and 2006. The reconstruction and identification of electrons and jets is of major importance in this analysis, and have been studied in events where a Z boson is produced together with one or more jets. The Z+jets process is indeed the dominant physics background to top pair production in the dielectron final state. The primary goal of this cross-section measurement is to verify Standard Model predictions. In this document, this result is also interpreted to indirectly extract the top quark mass. Moreover, the cross-section measurement is sensitive to new physics such as the existence of a charged Higgs boson. The selection established for the cross-section analysis has been used to search for a H{sup +} boson lighter than the top quark, where the latter can decay into a W{sup +} or H{sup +} boson and a b quark. The model that has been studied makes the assumption that the H{sup +} boson can only decay into a tau lepton and a neutrino.

  11. Measurements of fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b-jets in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-07

    Fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b -jets are reported, using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, collected with the ATLAS detector. The cross-section times branching ratio for tt¯ events with at least one additional b-jet is measured to be 950 ± 70 (stat.) +240-190 (syst.) fb in the lepton-plus-jets channel and 50 ± 10 (stat.) +15-10 (syst.) fb in the eμ channel. The cross-section times branching ratio for events with at least two additional b -jets is measured to bemore » 19.3 ± 3.5 (stat.) ± 5.7 (syst.) fb in the dilepton channel ( eμ , μμ , and ee ) using a method based on tight selection criteria, and 13.5 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 3.6 (syst.) fb using a looser selection that allows the background normalisation to be extracted from data. The latter method also measures a value of 1.30 ± 0.33 (stat.) ± 0.28 (syst.)% for the ratio of tt¯ production with two additional b-jets to tt¯ production with any two additional jets. As a result, all measurements are in good agreement with recent theory predictions.« less

  12. Measurement and simulation of the cross sections for the production of {sup 148}Gd in thin {sup nat}W and {sup 181}Ta targets irradiated with 0.4- to 2.6-GeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titarenko, Yu. E. Batyaev, V. F.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Butko, M. A.; Pavlov, K. V.; Florya, S. N.; Tikhonov, R. S.; Zhivun, V. M.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Mashnik, S. G.; Leray, S.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; Mancusi, D.; Yariv, Y.; Nishihara, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kumawat, H.; Mank, G.; Gudowski, W.

    2011-04-15

    The cross sections for the production of {sup 148}Gd in {sup nat}W and {sup 181}Ta targets irradiated by 0.4-, 0.6-, 0.8-, 1.2-, 1.6-, and 2.6-GeV protons at the ITEP accelerator complex have been measured by direct {alpha} spectrometry without chemical separation. The experimental data have been compared with the data obtained at other laboratories and with the theoretical simulations of the yields on the basis of the BERTINI, ISABEL, CEM03.02, INCL4.2, INCL4.5, CASCADE07, and PHITS codes.

  13. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'γ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 20Ne(p, pαγ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1975RO08 20Ne(p, γ): S-factors 0.37 - 2.10 Direct Capture (DC) → 332-keV state, DC → 2425-keV state, tail of 2425-keV state X4 04/19/2011 20Ne(p, γ): differential σ at θγ = 90° DC → 332-keV state, 332-keV state →

  14. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1973MC12 16O(p, α): σ threshold - 7.7 X4 10/17/2012 1981DY03 16O(p, pα): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 4.44-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 16O(p, p'): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1997MO27 16O(p, p), (p, γ): elastic, capture σ Ecm = 200 - 3750 keV X4 03/28/2013 1973RO34 16O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 3.1 S-Factor X4 05/10/2011 16O(p, γ): differential σ for the DC → ground

  15. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $$\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$= 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) =more » 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.« less

  16. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the |Vtb| CKM matrix element in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2014-06-01

    Measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb? recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop $ \\left(\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}\\right) $ , in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is ?t-ch. = 83.6 2.3 (stat.) 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and $ \\overline{\\mathrm{t}} $ cross sections are measured to be ?t-ch.(t) = 53.8 1.5 (stat.) 4.4 (syst.) pb and ?$_{t-ch.}$ $ \\left(\\overline{t}\\right) $ = 27.6 1.3 (stat.) 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is Rt-ch. = ?t-ch.(t)/?t-ch. $ \\left(\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}\\right) $ = 1.95 0.10 (stat.) 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. The modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element Vtb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at ?s = 7 TeV, a value |Vtb| = 0.998 0.038 (exp.) 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.

  17. Measurements of single top quark production cross sections and |Vtb| in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Alverson, George O; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Aoki, Masato

    2011-12-05

    We present measurements of production cross sections of single top quarks in pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We select events with an isolated electron or muon, an imbalance in transverse energy, and two, three, or four jets, with one or two of them containing a bottom hadron. We obtain an inclusive cross section of Σ(pp̄ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.43-0.74+0.73 pb and use it to extract the CKM matrix element 0.79 < |Vtb| {le} 1 at the 95% C.L. We also measure Σ(pp̄ → tb + X) = 0.68-0.35+0.38pb and Σ(pp̄ → tqb + X) = 2.86-0.63+0.69pb when assuming, respectively, tqb and tb production rates as predicted by the standard model.

  18. Measurement of $Z/\\gamma^* + b$-jet Production Cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 1.96$ TeV with the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortolan, Lorenzo

    2012-07-01

    Processes at hadron colliders, such as the production of jets, are described by the Quantum Chromodynamics theory (QCD). Precise descriptions of processes involving jets in association with a vector boson have nowadays large relevance as they represent irreducible background to other Standard Model (SM) processes and searches for new physics. The experimental study and understanding of the b-jet production in association with a Z boson are crucial for many reasons. For one side, it is the most important background for a light Higgs boson decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair and produced in the ZH mode.This is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs search at Tevatron in particular since the latest results have excluded the high mass region (MH > 127 GeV/c2 ). For another side the signature of b-jets and a Z boson is also background to new physics searches, such as supersymmetry, where a large coupling of the Higgs boson to bottom quarks is allowed. The produ ction cross section measurement of b-jets in events with a Z boson has already been performed at hadron colliders, at the Tevatron by CDF and D0 experiments and are now pursued at the LHC by ATLAS and CMS. In particular the CDF measurement was performed with only 2 fb-1 and was limited by the statistical uncertainty. This PhD thesis presents a new measurement of the $Z/\\gamma^* + b$-jet production cross section using the complete dataset collected by CDF during the Run II. $Z/\\gamma^*$ bosons are selected in the electron and muon decay modes and are required to have 66 < MZ < 116 GeV/c2 while jets, reconstructed with the MidPoint algorithm, have to be central (|Y| < 1.5) with pT > 20 GeV/c . The per jet cross section is measured with respect to the $Z/\\gamma^*$ inclusive and the $Z/\\gamma^* +$ jets cross sections. Results are compared to leading order (LO) event generator plus parton shower and next-to-leading order (NLO) predictions corrected for non

  19. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $$ s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in protonproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $ is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 $\\,\\text {fb}^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25 $\\,\\text {GeV}$ respectively, in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta | 0.45$ , is $17.2 \\pm 0.2\\,\\text {(stat)} \\pm 1.9\\,\\text {(syst)}more\\pm 0.4\\,\\text {(lumi)} $ $\\text {\\,pb}$ . Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthal angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the CollinsSoper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.less

  20. FULL SITE NAME Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    comprehensive descriptions of key activities that took place throughout the cleanup process at the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. Fact Sheet This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site Page 1 of 6 Timeline 1940s April 1941 - The Department of the Army, under a state of emergency, acquired 17,232 acres of land in St. Charles County, Missouri, for the production of explosives to use in World War II. November 1941 through January

  1. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 10/28/2014 1993CH02 12C(p, X): σ for η production ≤ 0.9 GeV X4 03/07/2012 1974RO29 12C(p, γ): σ 150 - 3000 keV X4 08/27/2013 1951GO1B 12C(p, p): yield curve of elastic scattering 0.2 - 4.0 θ = 164° 11/05/2014 1976ME22 12C(p, p): absolute σ 0.3 - 2.0 X4 08/07/2013 2008BU19 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors. 354, 390, 460, 463, 565,

  2. Measurement and simulation of the cross sections for nuclide production in {sup 93}Nb and {sup nat}Ni targets irradiated with 0.04- to 2.6-GeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titarenko, Yu. E. Batyaev, V. F.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Butko, M. A.; Pavlov, K. V.; Florya, S. N.; Tikhonov, R. S.; Zhivun, V. M.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Mashnik, S. G.; Leray, S.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; Mancusi, D.; Yariv, Y.; Nishihara, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kumawat, H.; Mank, G.; Gudowski, W.

    2011-04-15

    The cross sections for nuclide production in thin {sup 93}Nb and {sup nat}Ni targets irradiated by 0.04- to 2.6-GeV protons have been measured by direct {gamma} spectrometry using two {gamma} spectrometers with the resolutions of 1.8 and 1.7 keV in the {sup 60}Co 1332-keV {gamma} line. As a result, 1112 yields of radioactive residual nuclei have been obtained. The {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 22}Na reaction has been used as a monitor reaction. The experimental data have been compared with the MCNPX (BERTINI, ISABEL), CEM03.02, INCL4.2, INCL4.5, PHITS, and CASCADE07 calculations.

  3. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jet from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.

  4. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jetmore » from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.« less

  5. Effect of pH treatment on K-shell x-ray intensity ratios and K-shell x-ray-production cross sections in ZnCo alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kup Aylikci, N.; Aylikci, V.; Tirasoglu, E.; Cengiz, E.; Kahoul, A.; Karahan, I. H.

    2011-10-15

    In this study, empirical and semiempirical K-shell fluorescence yields ({omega}{sub K}) and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios from the available experimental data for elements with 23{<=}Z{<=}30 were calculated to compare them with elements in different alloys. The experimental data are fitted using the quantity [{omega}{sub K}/(1-{omega}{sub K})]{sup 1/4} vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios. The empirical and semiempirical K-shell fluorescence yield values were used to calculate the K x-ray-production cross-section values for pure Co and Zn elements. Also, {sigma}{sub K{alpha}}, {sigma}{sub K{beta}} production cross sections and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios of Co and Zn have been measured in pure metals and in different alloy compositions which have different pH values. The samples were excited by 59.5-keV {gamma} rays from a {sup 241}Am annular radioactive source. K x rays emitted by samples were counted by an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The effect of pH values on alloy compositions and the effect of alloying on the fluorescence parameters of Co and Zn were investigated. The x-ray fluorescence parameters of Co and Zn in the alloying system indicate significant differences with respect to the pure metals. These differences are attributed to the reorganization of valence shell electrons and/or charge transfer phenomena.

  6. Measurement of the inclusive production cross sections for forward jets and for dijet events with one forward and one central jet in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2012-06-01

    The inclusive production cross sections for forward jets, as well for jets in dijet events with at least one jet emitted at central and the other at forward pseudorapidities, are measured in the range of transverse momenta pt = 35-150 GeV/c in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Forward jets are measured within pseudorapidities 3.2<|eta|<4.7, and central jets within the |eta|<2.8 range. The double differential cross sections with respect to pt and eta are compared to predictions from three approaches in perturbative quantum chromodynamics: (i) next-to-leading-order calculations obtained with and without matching to parton-shower Monte Carlo simulations, (ii) PYTHIA and HERWIG parton-shower event generators with different tunes of parameters, and (iii) CASCADE and HEJ models, including different non-collinear corrections to standard single-parton radiation. The single-jet inclusive forward jet spectrum is well described by all models, but not all predictions are consistent with the spectra observed for the forward-central dijet events.

  7. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD atmorenext-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).less

  8. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  9. Measurement of the tt̄ production cross section in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using events with large Missing ET and jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-09

    In this paper we report a measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section in pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron accelerator. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and high jet multiplicity. This measurement vetoes the presence of explicitly identified electrons and muons, thus enhancing the tau contribution of ttMs; decays. Signal events are discriminated from the background using a neural network and heavy flavor jets are identified by a secondary-vertex tagging algorithm. We measure a tt̄ productionmore » cross section of 7.99 ± 0.55(stat) ± 0.76(syst) ± 0.46(lumi) pb, assuming a top mass mtop = 172.5 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous measurements and standard model predictions.« less

  10. Measurement of the B0s. Production Cross Section withB0s→J/ψΦ Decays in pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-09-20

    The B0s differential production cross section is measured as functions of the transverse momentum and rapidity in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV, using the B0s→J/ψΦ decay, and compared with predictions based on perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order. The data sample, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 40 pb⁻¹. The B0s is reconstructed from the decays J/ψ→μ⁺μ⁻ and Φ→K⁺K⁻. The integrated B0s cross section times B0s→J/ψΦ branching fraction in the range 8BT <50 GeV/c and |yB|<2.4 is measured to be 6.9±0.6±0.6 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second ismore » systematic.« less

  11. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).

  12. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leadingmore » order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).« less

  13. Measurements of the B Production Cross Section in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV using semileptonic decays of b hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, James Alexander; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2006-07-01

    The authors present a measurement of the cross section of b hadron (H{sub b}) production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They use 83 pb{sup -1} of data taken between october 2002 and May 2003 that was collected with a trigger sensitive to high momentum muons and displaced tracks. They use partially reconstructed decays in the following modes: H{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}D{sup 0}X, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and H{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}D*{sup +} X, D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, and their charge conjugates. They correct for the backgrounds from c{bar c} and b{bar b} decays, for trigger and reconstruction efficiencies, and for detector acceptance. They report the total cross section above a minimum transverse momentum (p{sub T}) of 9 GeV/c for the rapidity range |y| {le} 0.6.

  14. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).

  15. Updated Section H Greening Clauses | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Updated Section H Greening Clauses We are updating the Section H Green clauses. The intent ... Sample Contract Language for Construction Using Energy-Efficient Products Updated ...

  16. Determination of the top-quark pole mass and strong coupling constant from the t t-bar production cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-08-21

    The inclusive cross section for top-quark pair production measured by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is compared to the QCD prediction at next-to-next-to-leading order with various parton distribution functions to determine the top-quark pole mass,more » $$m_t^{pole}$$, or the strong coupling constant, $$\\alpha_S$$. With the parton distribution function set NNPDF2.3, a pole mass of 176.7$$^{+3.0}_{-2.8}$$ GeV is obtained when constraining $$\\alpha_S$$ at the scale of the Z boson mass, $m_Z$, to the current world average. Alternatively, by constraining $$m_t^{pole}$$ to the latest average from direct mass measurements, a value of $$\\alpha_S(m_Z)$$ = 0.1151$$^{+0.0028}_{-0.0027}$$ is extracted. This is the first determination of $$\\alpha_S$$ using events from top-quark production.« less

  17. RFP Section H and Section L Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 26, 2011, two draft RFP Section H templates "Performance Requirements" and "Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan" and one draft RFP Section L template "Proposal Preparation Instructions – Cover Letter and Volume I, Offer and Other Documents" were distributed for Procurement Director (PD), Head of Contracting Activity (HCA), General Counsel and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate. The final version of the three aforementioned RFP Section H and L templates are available in STRIPES.

  18. SECTION L… ATTACHMENT H

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    III-SECTION J APPENDIX K TRANSITION PLAN To be Added at a Later Date

  19. A Meaurement of the W+- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at sqroot(s)=1.96 TeV in the DiLepton channel and limits on anomalous WWZ/gamma couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGivern, Dustin; /University Coll. London

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of the production cross section of W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV and limits on trilinear gauge boson coupling (TGC) parameters are presented. The data were recorded with the CDF experiment at Tevatron during the 2001 and 2002 data taking periods in which a total integrated luminosity of 184 pb{sup -1} was collected. The data sample was filtered for events with two leptonic w boson decays where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons. 17 events are observed against an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting cross-section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.5{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb and agrees well with the Standard Model expectation. Limits on the TGC parameters {Delta}{kappa} and {lambda} are set under both the equal coupling scheme, that assumes the W boson couples identically to the Z and {gamma}, and the HISZ coupling scheme, that requires the couplings to respect SU(2){sub L} x &(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry. In both cases this is achieved by using a likelihood fit to the lepton-P{sub T} distribution of the 17 candidate events. The resulting limits are found to be: -0.4 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.6({lambda} = 0); -0.3 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the EQUAL couplings and -0.7 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.9 ({lambda} = 0); -0.4 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the HISZ couplings.

  20. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  1. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8O(p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008LA06 18O(p, α): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0 - 1.5 θα = 46° 12/03/2012 1990CH32 18O(p, α): σ < 2 X4 10/04/2012 1990VO06 18O(p, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.22 X4 02/13/2012 2008LA13 18O(p, α): deduced σ 0 - 250 keV X4 10/20/2014 1973BA31 18O(p, n): total neutron-production σ < 5 1 X4 05/10/2011 1990WA10 18O(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1979LO01 18O(p, α): σ 72 - 935 keV X4

  2. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc ? J/??and B ? J/? K and B(Bc? J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc ? J/? ?) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc) B(Bc ? J/??))/(?(B) B(B ? J/?K) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c and Bmesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| -1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/????-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomoremeasure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ???-/+)/B(Bc is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.less

  3. Cross Section and Parity Violating Spin Asymmetries of W plus or minus Boson Production in Polarized p+p Collisions at s=500 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Large parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetries A{sub L}{sup e+} = -0.86{sub -0.14}{sup +0.30} and A{sub L}{sup e-} = 0.88{sub -0.71}{sup +0.12} are observed for inclusive high transverse momentum electrons and positrons in polarized p+p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 500 GeV with the PHENIX detector at RHIC. These e{sup {+-}} come mainly from the decay of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons, and their asymmetries directly demonstrate parity violation in the couplings of the W{sup {+-}} to the light quarks. The observed electron and positron yields were used to estimate W{sup {+-}} boson production cross sections for the e{sup {+-}} channels of {sigma}(pp {yields} W{sup +}X) x BR(W{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}) = 144.1 {+-} 21.2(stat){sub -10.3}{sup +3.4}(syst) {+-} 21.6(norm) pb, and {sigma}(pp {yields} W{sup -}X) x BR(W{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub e}) = 31.7 {+-} 12.1(stat){sub -8.2}{sup +10.1}(syst) {+-} 4.8(norm) pb.

  4. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    E SECTION J APPENDIX E PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT(S) [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to contract award. For Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) template, see Section L, Attachment A.]

  5. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I SECTION J APPENDIX I SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to

  6. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I SECTION J APPENDIX I SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to...

  7. Section 106 Archaeology Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation's Section 106 guidance is designed to assist federal agencies in making effective management decisions about archaeological resources in completing the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). This guidance highlights the decision-making role of the federal agency in the Section 106 process. It is also designed for use by State and Tribal Historic Preservation Officers, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and cultural resource management professionals when assisting federal agencies to meet their responsibilities under Section 106.

  8. 14655 Section D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING......

  9. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX B AWARD FEE PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....

  10. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX M CONTRACTOR COMMITMENTS, AGREEMENTS, AND UNDERSTANDINGS Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....