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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Measurement of the ZZ production cross section using the full CDF II data set  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the ZZ-boson pair-production cross section in 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy pp¯ collisions. We reconstruct final states incorporating four charged leptons or two charged leptons and two neutrinos from the full data set collected by the Collider Detector experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponding to 9.7??fb?1 of integrated luminosity. Combining the results obtained from each final state, we measure a cross section of 1.04?0.25+0.32??pb, in good agreement with the standard model prediction at next-to-leading order in the strong-interaction coupling.

T. Aaltonen et al. (CDF Collaboration)

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

2

Measurement of the ZZ production cross section using the full CDF II data set  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a measurement of the ZZ boson-pair production cross section in 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy ppbar collisions. We reconstruct final states incorporating four charged leptons or two charged leptons and two neutrinos from the full data set collected by the Collider Detector experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Combining the results obtained from each final state, we measure a cross section of 1.04(+0.32)(-0.25) pb, in good agreement with the standard model prediction at next-to-leading order in the strong-interaction coupling.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Lack of iron | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lack of iron Lack of iron Iron-bearing minerals in sediments naturally reduce contaminant levels The Science The release of wastes associated with nuclear reprocessing from storage...

4

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

5

Iron Absorption  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Absorption Iron Absorption Name: Mary Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I wrote before to Steve and got a answer back. I would like more information. The cirmcustances were that I first had anaemia and then I went for a gastroscopy. The results of which were I had insufficient acid been produced in the stomach. I was told that acid was nessary for the absorbion of iron and it was because of this that I became anaemic. I was told to eat plently of red meat not too many vegetables. Is there any other information you can give me? Replies: It is very difficult to say for sure without seeing you chart and I am not your doctor. But it sounds to me like you are deficient in the vitamin B12. In your stomach you have 3 basic types of cells. One is called chief cells which secrete the precursor of the enzyme pepsin which begins the breakdown of protein. Another is called the parietal cells which secrete your stomach acid and a substance called intrinsic factor. Now-switch to your bone marrow which is where your red blood cells are made. In order for your red blood cells to mature in the bone marrow, vitamin B12 is necessary. B12 can only be obtained from animal food sources such as meat, milk and eggs. Unfortunately, B12 cannot be absorbed in the stomach without intrinsic factor. If there is sufficient B12 present in the diet, it can be stored in the liver. If you aren't eating enough animal sources your B12 will be taken from your liver until you run out. You could also be deficient in intrinsic factor. So while the outcome is anemia (not enough red blood cells) the problem could be from a few different things. Follow your doctor's recommendations and eat more sources of B12

6

Full documents available at: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/climate/regulations.htm EPA's section of the Preamble for the Light-Duty GHG Rule (see pp. 388-396)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Preamble for the Light-Duty GHG Rule (see pp. 388-396) III.H. What are the Estimated Cost, Economic, and Other Impacts of the Program? In this section, EPA presents the costs and impacts of EPA's GHG program. It is important to note that NHTSA's CAFE standards and EPA's GHG standards will both be in effect, and each

Edwards, Paul N.

7

Orchestration of Iron Homeostasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...act simultaneously, and some are interrelated. Intestinal iron absorption increases with decreased iron stores, increased erythropoietic activity, anemia, or hypoxemia. Conversely, intestinal iron absorption decreases in the presence of inflammation — a process that contributes to the anemia of inflammation... The characterization of newly identified genes has led investigators to challenge previous models of the regulation of iron homeostasis in health and its dysregulation in disease. Drs. Robert Fleming and Bruce Bacon describe hepcidin and iron homeostasis.

Fleming R.E.; Bacon B.R.

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Download Full-text PDF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristic depressions in apparent photosynthetic energy conversion efficiencies in iron-limited ..... A number of factors could potentially explain contrasts.

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

9

Download Full-text PDF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

resin column) to elucidate the bioavailable forms of iron present in Lake Superior ... Model ligand additions, iron bioaccumulation, and photo-oxidation of ... and use of ligand exchange theory to assess iron .... 15 mL of a mild ion-pairing agent (ammonium acetate ...... from sediment trap data, demonstrating that cross-

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

10

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising. ...

1982-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising. ...

1984-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

12

Section J  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

M-1 Section J Appendix M Key Design, Licensing and Site Management M&O Milestone Chart Activity Planned Date Develop and Submit CD-2 (25%-30%) 082009 Submission of Construction...

13

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... ACS MEMBER RATES "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the member. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 1599 Post Road East, P.O. ...

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 25 Sylvan Rd. ...

1985-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 25 Sylvan Rd. ...

1985-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 25 Sylvan Rd. ...

1986-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 500 Post Road East, P.O. ...

1987-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 500 Post Road East, P.O. ...

1992-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 25 Sylvan Rd. ...

1983-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 1599 Post Road East, P.O. ...

1992-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 500 Post Road East, P.O. ...

1989-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 1599 Post Road East, P.O. ...

1992-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

23

SECTION J  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

J-1 SECTION J APPENDIX J PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (TO BE NEGOTIATED AFTER CONTRACT AWARD) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-J-2 Page Blank...

24

Section I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Projectile and Target Z-scaling of Target K-vacancy Production Cross Sections at 10A MeV R. L. Watson, V. Horvat and K. E. Zaharakis Molecular Orbital Effects in Near-symmetric...

25

SECTION E  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Attachment P Completion Definition Sheets for Incentive Fee C.1 Activity Milestone Completion Incentive WTP Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed...

26

Section J  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

L-1 L-1 Section J Appendix L MEMORANDUM FROM DAVID R. HILL, GENERAL COUNSEL, DATED NOVEMBER 30, 2006, SUBJECT: ONGOING LICENSING SUPPORT NETWORK ("LSN") OBLIGATIONS Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-2 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-3 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005

27

Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements placed by employed ACS members and student affiliates are accepted at 50 cents per word per insertion, no minimum charge. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to CHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING NEWS, Classified Advertising, 25 Sylvan Rd. ...

1980-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

BlackboardSectioningTool Course Sectioning The Sectioning Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sectioning tool: Consult the online help provided within the sectioning tool Call the OIT Help Desk at (609 by those preferences, select Enable/Configure Student Preference Tool. Need help using the BlackboardBlackboardSectioningTool Course Sectioning 1 The Sectioning Tool The Sectioning Tool is a course

Bou-Zeid, Elie

29

Section 66  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CFCl CFCl 3 ) (CF 2 Cl 2 ) (CHFCl 2 ) CF 4 CCl 4 (CFCl 3 ) (CF 2 Cl 2 ) (CHFCl 2 ) SF 6 CF 4 CCl 4 Session Papers 277 Figure 1. Spectral absorption cross-sections of CF 4 between 1281 and 1284 cm . The experimental -1 conditions correspond to the surface, 5-km, and 19-km levels of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere. Figure 2. Spectral absorption cross-sections of CCl 4 between 755 and 810 cm . The experimental conditions -1 correspond to the surface, 5-km, and 19-km levels of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere. Laboratory Spectroscopy in Support of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program P. Varanasi Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres The University at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York There is considerable world-wide interest in the remote sensing of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), especially CFC-11

30

The Rusting of Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... glass tubes instead of flasks, and the surface of the metal was in some cases roughened with a coarse file. After the admission of the iron, the tubes were drawn ...

J. NEWTON FRIEND

1906-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

FULL-COST ACCOUNTING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FULL-COST ACCOUNTING ... Environmental costs would be built into a product's cost, and consumers would be able to make informed purchases. ...

1993-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

SECTION J  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

J-F-1 SECTION J APPENDIX F CRITICAL STAFF Subject Matter Expert Subject Matter Canister Transfer Machine Engineering Waste Package Transfer Trolley Engineering Transport and Emplacement Vehicle Engineering Cask Transfer Trolley Engineering Criticality and Nuclear Engineering Subsurface Thermal Management Engineering Pre-closure Safety Analysis Specialist Waste Package and Drip Shields Engineering Waste Package Closure System Engineering NOG-1 Cranes Engineering Subsurface Design Engineering Structural Seismic Design Engineering Transport, Aging, and Disposal (TAD) interface with repository systems Note: The Contractor shall identify names of at least one individual which shall function in each of the subject matter areas identified above. Qualification requirements for these individuals are

33

SECTION J  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D-1 D-1 SECTION J APPENDIX D KEY PERSONNEL Name Position Doug Cooper General Manager John Donnell Repository Licensing Lead Al Ebner, PE, PhD Repository Design Lead Steve Piccolo Deputy General Manager Steve White Quality & Performance Assurance Lead George Clare Project Management & Integration Lead Mike Hitchler Preclosure Safety Analysis Lead Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-D-2 POSITION DESCRIPTIONS OCRWM SPECIFIED KEY PERSONNEL 1. General Manager: Requires 10 years experience as a Senior Manager, responsible for the licensing and/or design and/or operation of a large complex nuclear facility. Must have experience as a

34

Download Full-text PDF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

iron was measured on an inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometer (J&N ... the DOC, we focus on A250 rather than DOC in the following. Table 1. Formation

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Full bridge converter Transformers and isolated converters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parts of the B-H curve are used. Include: push-pull, half-bridge, full-bridge (explained belowFull bridge converter Transformers and isolated converters Most DC power supplies have) cross section of a transformer. (b) Ideal B-H characteristics of the core. (c) B-H characteristics

Knobloch,Jürgen

36

Full Text Glossary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The full-text glossary includes terms used throughout the website and in Biomass Program publications. Terms are listed alphabetically for easy reference. The term index lists all of the terms defined in the glossary.

37

Section 19  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observations and Applications of Data Taken with the Observations and Applications of Data Taken with the Cloud Profiling Radar System J. M. Firda, S. M. Sekelsky, S. P. Lohmeier, R. E. McIntosh Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts Introduction During the past year, the University of Massachusetts' Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) team has been active in collecting and processing data. Participation in several field campaigns has produced new and interesting data sets. A classification software was also developed using rule-based techniques and neural networks to identify cloud particles. This paper describes the activities of CPRS from March of 1995 to March of 1996. In the first section, involvement in field experiments is briefly described. This is followed by a

38

Section Number:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives," the following list of directives is applicable to this contract. List A Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives," the Contractor shall comply with the requirements of applicable Federal, State, and local laws and regulations, unless relief has been granted in writing by the appropriate regulatory agency. Omission of any applicable law or regulation from this list does not affect the obligation of the contractor to comply with such law or regulation. Laws & Regulations Title 10 CFR Part 2 Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing Proceedings and Issuance of Orders

39

SECTION J  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

H-1 H-1 SECTION J APPENDIX H CONTRACT GUIDANCE FOR PREPARATION OF DIVERSITY PLAN This Guidance is to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the Diversity elements and where these issues may already be addressed in the contract. To the extent these issues are already addressed in the contract, the Contractor need only cross reference the location. Contractor's Workforce The Department's contracts contain clauses on Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Affirmative Action (AA). The Plan may discuss how the contractor has or plans to establish and maintain result-oriented EEO and AA programs in accordance with the requirements of these clauses, and how the contractor's organization includes

40

Section J  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M-1 M-1 Section J Appendix M Key Design, Licensing and Site Management M&O Milestone Chart Activity Planned Date Develop and Submit CD-2 (25%-30%) 08/2009 Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Balance of Plant Support Facilities (OCRWM Start of Construction 3/2012) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Initial Handling Facility (IHF) (OCRWM Start of Construction for IHF: 9/2013) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Wet Handling Facility (WHF) (OCRWM Start of Construction for WHF: 12/2012) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Canister Receipt and Closure Facility (CRCF) (OCRWM Start of Construction for CRCF-1: 10/2011) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Panel 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Iron Pots and Kettles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Pots and Kettles Iron Pots and Kettles Nature Bulletin No. 544-A November 16, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation IRON POTS AND KETTLES At Possum Trot Hill, on US 150 west of Danville, a huge iron kettle squats as a monument to what was once an important industry in Illinois. It is one of 80 used from 1824 to 1831 for boiling down brine from salt springs in that vicinity. Salt was a luxury then. About a bushel was produced from one kettleful (100 gallons) of brine and that was worth more than 100 bushels of oats. Those 80 monsters came from Kentucky where iron works had been established to make the utensils and implements desperately needed by pioneer families. About half of them had come up through the Cumberland Gap, on horseback, with only a rifle, an ax, a pot for cooking, some bedding and the clothes on their backs. Every family, in addition to a skillet or spider, and a Dutch oven, coveted a big kettle for making salt, soap, candles and maple syrup, butchering hogs, rendering lard, boiling clothes on wash day, and dyeing homespun material for garments.

42

It's Elemental - The Element Iron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manganese Manganese Previous Element (Manganese) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Cobalt) Cobalt The Element Iron [Click for Isotope Data] 26 Fe Iron 55.845 Atomic Number: 26 Atomic Weight: 55.845 Melting Point: 1811 K (1538°C or 2800°F) Boiling Point: 3134 K (2861°C or 5182°F) Density: 7.874 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word iron. Iron's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for iron, ferrum. Say what? Iron is pronounced as EYE-ern. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using iron for at least 5000 years. Iron is the cheapest and one of the most abundant of all metals, comprising nearly 5.6% of the earth's crust and nearly all of the

43

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Buildings - Full Report Office Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS2003/PBA%20report/office%20report/office_pdf.html[9/24/2010 3:33:25 PM] Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a

44

Full Hybrid: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

highlighted Stop/Start button banner graphic: blue bar highlighted Stop/Start button banner graphic: blue bar subbanner graphic: gray bar Overview Button highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button OVERVIEW Full hybrids use a gasoline engine as the primary source of power, and an electric motor provides additional power when needed. In addition, full hybrids can use the electric motor as the sole source of propulsion for low-speed, low-acceleration driving, such as in stop-and-go traffic or for backing up. This electric-only driving mode can further increase fuel efficiency under some driving conditions. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

45

Full Hybrid: Overview  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button highlighted Starting button Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button OVERVIEW Full hybrids use a gasoline engine as the primary source of power, and an electric motor provides additional power when needed. In addition, full hybrids can use the electric motor as the sole source of propulsion for low-speed, low-acceleration driving, such as in stop-and-go traffic or for backing up. This electric-only driving mode can further increase fuel efficiency under some driving conditions. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

46

Section 36  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Cloud and Aerosol Height Distribution Retrieval and Analysis Employing Continuous Operation Lidar Data J. D. Spinhirne, D. L. Hlavka and V. S. Scott NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland A. E. Galbraith and J. A. Reagan University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona Introduction Instrument New technology now permits ground-based lidar to operate The basis of the MPL design is the use of lasers with high full time and profile all significant aerosol and cloud structure pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) and low pulse energies. of the atmosphere up to the limit of signal attenuation. Such When highly efficient optics, filters, and detectors are used, it systems are in operation at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is possible to obtain profiling of all significant cloud and aero-

47

Availability of iron from iron-storage proteins to marine phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genes coding for iron-storage proteins are common in DNA samples from seawater. In iron-deprived marine ecosystems, iron-storage proteins may be important ...

48

Magnetism of iron. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A previously developed theory of the magnetism of iron, based upon the notion of a randomized exchange field, is modified and extended. It is shown that Coulomb fields arise in association with the randomized exchange field; the modification allows one to take into account these fields, which are found to change the details of the previous results without affecting the main conclusions. The theory has been extended to calculate the properties of the model at finite temperatures: the Curie temperature (1840 K), the magnetization curve, the paramagnetic susceptibility (a Curie-Weiss law), and the effective interatomic exchange coupling are calculated for iron. The magnitudes of the atomic spin moments were found to vary little up to 1.5 times the Curie temperature.

J. Hubbard

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The magnetism of iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A type of theory capable of reconciling the localized- and itinerant-electron models of a ferromagnetic metal is discussed. This kind of theory contemplates a distribution of "exchange field" configurations which correspond very roughly to the spin configurations of the localized model. Computations involve thermal averages over these configurations, each configuration V having an effective energy E(V). Starting from the band structure for ferromagnetic iron, the E(V) have been estimated for certain configurations V. The results are reasonably consistent with the observed Curie temperature of iron, in spite of the presence of exchange fields ?1-2 eV, and give some suggestion of behavior characteristic of the Heisenberg model.

J. Hubbard

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Full Hybrid: Starting  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

highlighted Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button highlighted Low Speed button Cruising button Passing button Braking button Stopped button STARTING When a full hybrid vehicle is initially started, the battery typically powers all accessories. The gasoline engine only starts if the battery needs to be charged or the accessories require more power than available from the battery. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Battery (highlighted): The battery stores energy generated from the gasoline engine or, during regenerative braking, from the electric motor. Since the battery powers the vehicle at low speeds, it is larger and holds much more energy than batteries used to start conventional vehicles. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, generator, power split device, and electric motor visible. the car is stopped at an intersection.

51

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

MECS 2006- Iron and Steel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

54

Iron and Steel (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

55

Download Full-text PDF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variation in cross- sectional area A with tide is ignored (thereby neglecting ... neap variations in tidal energy and atmospheric forcing None- theless, over a time ...

56

System and method for making metallic iron with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for making metallic iron nodules with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions is disclosed. The method includes: assembling a linear hearth furnace having entry and exit portions, at least a conversion zone and a fusion zone, and a moving hearth adapted to move reducible iron bearing material through the furnace on contiguous hearth sections; assembling a shrouded return substantially free of air ingress extending adjacent at least the conversion and fusion zones of the furnace through which hearth sections can move from adjacent the exit portion to adjacent the entry portion of the furnace; transferring the hearth sections from the furnace to the shrouded return adjacent the exit portion; reducing reducible material in the linear hearth furnace to metallic iron nodules; and transporting gases from at least the fusion zone to the shrouded return to heat the hearth sections while in the shrouded return.

Kiesel, Richard F; Englund, David J; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

57

Transcriptional and translational regulatory responses to iron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. MethodologyPrincipal Findings:...

58

Kumba Iron Ore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kumba Iron Ore Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kumba Iron Ore Place: Pretoria, South Africa Zip: 175 Sector: Solar Product: South Africa based mining company. The firm is...

59

Electrochemical behavior of reactively sputtered iron-doped nickel oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-doped nickel oxide films were deposited by reactive sputtering from elemental and alloy targets in a 20% oxygen/argon atmosphere and were characterized for use as oxygen evolution catalysts. The incorporation of iron reduced the overpotential required for oxygen evolution by as much as 300 mV at a current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} compared to undoped nickel oxide deposited under similar conditions. Tafel slopes were reduced from 95 mV/dec in undoped NiO{sub x} films to less than 40 mV/dec for films containing 1.6 to 5.6 mole percent (m/o) iron, indicating a change in the rate-limiting step from the primary discharge of OH{sup {minus}} ions to the recombination of oxygen radicals. Resistivity, structural, and compositional measurements indicate that high oxygen content is necessary to gain the full benefit of the iron dopant. Initial tests in KOH indicate excellent long-term stability. A film deposited from the FeNi alloy target, which exhibited low oxygen overpotentials and a Tafel slope of 35 mV/dec, had not degraded appreciably following more than 7,000 h of operation at an anodic current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}. Taken together, the low oxygen evolution reaction overpotentials, the excellent stability in KOH, and the relative insensitivity to iron content indicative that reactively sputtered iron-doped nickel oxide is promising as an oxygen catalyst.

Miller, E.L.; Rocheleau, R.E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

Sarma, Balu (Airmont, NY); Downing, Kenneth B. (Greenville, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

62

Iron Edison Battery Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iron Edison Battery Company Iron Edison Battery Company Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Iron Edison Battery Company Name Iron Edison Battery Company Place Lakewood, Colorado Sector Bioenergy, Carbon, Efficiency, Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Nickel Iron (Ni-Fe) battery systems Year founded 2011 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 202-681-4766 Website http://ironedison.com Region Rockies Area References Iron Edison Battery Company[1] Nickel Iron Battery Specifications[2] About the company and the owners[3] Nickel Iron Battery Association[4] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Iron Edison Battery Company is a company based in Lakewood, Colorado. Iron Edison is redefining off-grid energy storage using advanced

63

Fabrication and processing of iron aluminides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been shown to exhibit room-temperature ductility values of 15 to 19% by the control of composition and thermomechanical processing steps. The scale-up of one of the compositions to 2270-kg (5000-lb) electroslag-remelted (ESR) round ingot and 3272-kg (7200-lb) vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) slab ingot is described. Microstructural and mechanical property data are presented on small pieces sectioned from these ingots. The effects of final rolling temperature and the final annealing treatment on room-temperature ductility were investigated for the ESR ingot. A study of iron-aluminide binary alloys revealed that the environmental effects on room-temperature ductility values were absent for {le}8.5 wt % Al. The increasing aluminum content and the development of ordered structure resulted in increased environmental effects. Applications and a brief description of their status are described. Based on the combined property and cost advantage, continued development of iron aluminide is recommended.

Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fabrication and processing of iron aluminides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been shown to exhibit room-temperature ductility values of 15 to 19% by the control of composition and thermomechanical processing steps. The scale-up of one of the compositions to 2270-kg (5000-lb) electroslag-remelted (ESR) round ingot and 3272-kg (7200-lb) vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) slab ingot is described. Microstructural and mechanical property data are presented on small pieces sectioned from these ingots. The effects of final rolling temperature and the final annealing treatment on room-temperature ductility were investigated for the ESR ingot. A study of iron-aluminide binary alloys revealed that the environmental effects on room-temperature ductility values were absent for {le}8.5 wt % Al. The increasing aluminum content and the development of ordered structure resulted in increased environmental effects. Applications and a brief description of their status are described. Based on the combined property and cost advantage, continued development of iron aluminide is recommended.

Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Process for the synthesis of iron powder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

Welbon, W.W.

1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Process for the synthesis of iron powder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

Not Available

1982-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

67

Absorption of Iron from Ferritin Is Independent of Heme Iron and Ferrous Salts in Women and Rat Intestinal Segments .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ferritin iron from food is readily bioavailable to humans and has the potential for treating iron deficiency. Whether ferritin iron absorption is mechanistically different from… (more)

Theil, Elizabeth C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Contract Mapper Full Symbology List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Mapper Full Symbology List Colour symbology Operational Support Unit 15th October 2007 Main Road Management Area Other Fell Thin Compartments Sub-Compartments Contract Buffer Order

69

Contract Mapper Full Symbology List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Mapper Full Symbology List Black & White symbology Operational Support Unit 15th October Compartments Sub-Compartments # # ## Management Area Fell Thin Contract Buffer Other #12;

70

Iron supported clay as catalysts for oxidation of cyclooctane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron supported bentonite clay catalysts have been prepared by the ion exchange of bentonite with iron2+ and iron3+ solution and immobilization with iron compounds using ligands: acetylacetonate, picolinate, pyraz...

W. Trakarnpruk; P. Dumrongpong

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Microsoft Word - IronCore  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November/December 2013 November/December 2013 Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but

72

Ligand effects on bioinspired iron complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE HYDROPHILIC PHOSPHATRIAZAADAMANTANE LIGAND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF H2-PRODUCTION ELECTROCATALYSTS: IRON HYDROGENASE MODEL COMPLEXES ............................................................................................. 44 Results... THE HYDROPHILIC PHOSPHATRIAZAADAMANTANE LIGAND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF H2-PRODUCTION ELECTROCATALYSTS: IRON HYDROGENASE MODEL COMPLEXES ............................................................................................. 44 Results...

Mejia Rodriguez, Ma. del Rosario

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery Print Friday, 26 September 2014 14:37 Jian ware (or Tenmoku) ceramic bowls, famous for their...

74

Synthesis of monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals by thermal decomposition of iron carboxylate salts{  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's group12 recently published a study of c-Fe2O3 nanocrystals with different shapes. Iron acetylacetonateSynthesis of monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals by thermal decomposition of iron carboxylate September 2004 Iron oxide (Fe3O4, magnetite) nanocrystals of 6 to 30 nm with narrow size distributions (s

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

75

Full Rank Rational Demand Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a nominal income full rank QES. R EFERENCES (A.84)S. G. Donald. “Inferring the Rank of a Matrix. ” Journal of97-102. . “A Demand System Rank Theorem. ” Econometrica 57 (

LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Section 42: Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

using techniques that do not jeopardize the containment of waste in the disposal system. Ten monitoring parameters were identified in an analysis performed to fulfill the section...

77

Wastewater Ozonation Catalyzed by Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another attempt to improve ozonation removal efficiency is the use of metals or their oxides to catalyze ozonation. ... The waveforms were generated by a potentiostat BAS model Epsilon-2. ... Sreethawong, T.; Chavadej, S.Color removal of distillery wastewater by ozonation in the absence and presence of immobilized iron oxide catalyst J. Hazard. ...

Anaid Cano Quiroz; Carlos Barrera-Di?az; Gabriela Roa-Morales; Patricia Balderas Herna?ndez; Rubi? Romero; Reyna Natividad

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential as protective corrosion claddings in sul- fidizing environments were investigated. As-solidified castings of Fe-Al alloys characterization of the corrosion scales consisted of sur- face and cross-sectional microscopy in combination

DuPont, John N.

79

14655 Section I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be...

80

Section I: Contract Clause  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

17O Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010SE11 17O(p, ): nuclear excitation function 0 - 0.7 1 06222011 1973RO03...

82

EMPLOYMENT Advertising Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EMPLOYMENT Advertising Section ... "Situations wanted" advertisements will be classified by type of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, etc.). ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 25 Sylvan Rd. ...

1981-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

11B Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, ): deduced , S-factor Ecm 0 - 1 X4 11072012...

84

18O Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003DA19 18O(, ): deduced resonance strengths 470 - 770 keV X4 02132012...

85

12C Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2009MA70 12C(, 0): 0 - 2.27 X4 05012012 1997KU18 12C(, ): analyzed...

86

7Li Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004GY02 7Li(, ): deduced absolute resonance strengths 810 - 820 keV X4 02...

87

7Li Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997GO13 7Li(pol. p, ): total , S-factor for capture to third-excited state 0 -...

88

4He Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4He(, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1978HI04 4He(, ): elastic scattering excitation function 32.6 - 35.4 ...

89

15N Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2002WI18 15N( ): 461 - 2642 keV X4 09122011 1997WI12 15N( ): 0.65...

90

6Li Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 01212015) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(, ): thick target yield resonance X4 02152012 1966FO05...

91

19F Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 01212015) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008UG01 19F(, p): yield curves, 792 - 1993 keV X4 09142011 2005UG04...

92

9Be Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 01212015) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1994WR01 9Be(, n): , thick target yield, deduced S-factor Ecm 0.16 - 1.87...

93

11B Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 01212015) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1991WA02 11B(, n): thick-target yield of E 411, 605 and 606 keV resonance...

94

20Ne Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 01212015) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(, ): deduced S-factor of capture 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09152011...

95

10B Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 01212015) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1992MC03 10B(, ): relative to Rutherford scattering 1 - 3.3 X4 05022012...

96

3He Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1982KR05 3He(, ): Ecm 107 - 1266 keV X4 01052012 1969NA24 3He(, ):...

97

14N Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4N(, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971CO27 14N(, ): thick target yield 0.5 - 1.2 1 08042011 2000GO43...

98

Cross-Section Measurement  

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Cross-Section Measurement of 2 H(n,np)n at 16 MeV in Symmetric Constant Relative Energy Configurations Alexander Hoff Couture A dissertation submitted to the faculty of the...

99

Cross-section  

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Cross-section Cross-section formulae for specific processes 1 39. CROSS-SECTION FORMULAE FOR SPECIFIC PROCESSES Revised September 2005 by R.N. Cahn (LBNL). Setting aside leptoproduction (for which, see Sec. 16), the cross sections of primary interest are those with light incident particles, e + e - , γγ, qq, gq , gg, etc., where g and q represent gluons and light quarks. The produced particles include both light particles and heavy ones - t, W , Z, and the Higgs boson H. We provide the production cross sections calculated within the Standard Model for several such processes. 39.1. Resonance Formation Resonant cross sections are generally described by the Breit-Wigner formula (Sec. 16 of this Review). σ(E) = 2J + 1 (2S 1 + 1)(2S 2 + 1) 4π k 2 Γ 2 /4 (E - E 0 ) 2 + Γ 2 /4 B in B out , (39.1) where E is the c.m. energy, J is the spin of the resonance, and the number of polarization states of the two incident particles

100

Multilayer route to iron nanoparticle formation in an insulating matrix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Well-protected isolated bcc-iron nanoparticles embedded in silicon dioxide were prepared by e-beam evaporation and postannealing of multilayers in an ultrahigh vacuum system. The spherical shape and isolation of the particles were confirmed by plan-view and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy.Oxidation was evaluated from the electron energy-loss near edge structure. In this technique a postedge peak of 40 eV above the iron L 3 threshold originating from backscattering of oxygen atoms provides a clear indication of iron oxide. The white-line ratio (WLR) measuring the 3 d -orbital occupancy is used to estimate the oxidation-layer thickness. In the samples of large ironnanoparticles (with average diameter larger than 10 nm ) a very thin surface layer appears to be the oxide maghemite approximately one atomic layer according to the WLR evaluations. The evolution of the coercivity with particle size as measured by the magneto-optical Kerr effect shows that the reversal process is dominated by the surfaceanisotropy and is also affected by the dipole interaction particularly in samples with large volume-filling factor.

Feng Wang; Marek Malac; Ray F. Egerton; Alkiviathes Meldrum; Xiaobin Zhu; Zhigang Liu; Nicole Macdonald; Peng Li; Mark R. Freeman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOI: 10.1002/ejic.200600960 Synthesis and Sublimation Kinetics of a Highly Volatile Asymmetric Iron(II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL PAPER DOI: 10.1002/ejic.200600960 Synthesis and Sublimation Kinetics of a Highly Volatile: Asymmetric iron(II) amidinate / Bridging ligands / Metathesis / Sublimation kinetics / Thermochemistry properties have been the subject of intense investigations in chemistry, electronics, optics, energy

102

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

103

Characterization and Reactivity of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as solute within the iron core of the HRCO particles. Kinetic batch experiments of carbon tetrachloride (CT) degradation were performed to quantitatively compare the redox...

104

POLICY SECTIONS POLICY OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY SECTIONS POLICY OFFICE POLICIES FORMS PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY POLICY #12;guide to WRITING POLICIES Administrative policies align opera- tions, set behavior expectations across the University system and communicate policy roles and responsibilities. You, as the policy owner or writer, have the important task

Minnesota, University of

105

16O Cross Section  

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6O(, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971TO06 16O(, ): 0.85 - 1.8 X4 09152011 1953CA44 16O(, ): 0.94...

106

14C Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4C(p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1969SI04 14C(p, ): -rays yield for 230 - 690 keV E 2.8 MeV 08152013 1990GO25 14C(p,...

107

6Li Cross Section  

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6Li(p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004TU02 6Li(p, ): coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low 1, S-factors from...

108

9Be Cross Section  

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p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997ZA06 9Be(p, ), (p, d): S-factor 16 - 390 keV X4 01232013 1973SI27 9Be(p,...

109

16O Cross Section  

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p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1973MC12 16O(p, ): threshold - 7.7 X4 10172012 1981DY03 16O(p, p): for production of...

110

18O Cross Section  

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p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008LA06 18O(p, ): deduced S-factor Ecm 0 - 1.5 46 12032012 1990CH32...

111

20Ne Cross Section  

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p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'): for production of -rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV -rays...

112

15N Cross Section  

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p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 15N(p, n): < 30 X4 04262012 1982RE06 15N(p, ): 78 - 810 keV X4...

113

11C Cross Section  

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C(p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003LI51 11C(p, ): deduced S-factor low X4 09122011 2003TA02 11C(p, ):...

114

19F Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 19F(p, n): < 30 X4 04262012 2008CO03 19F(p, ): Ecm 200 - 700 keV X4 0514...

115

4He Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1974KR07 4He(p, p): 0.5 - 3 X4 10232014 2004PU02 4He(p, p): ( 128.7) 1.2 - 5.2 X4 10...

116

3He Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1980BE06 3He(pol. p, p): 0.3 - 1.0 X4 10302014 1964IM03 3He(p, ): deduced ...

117

17O Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1973BA10 17O(, n): neutron yields with target thickness 0.9 - 5.3 2.5 keV, 6...

118

3H Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

H(, X) (Current as of 05142012) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001TO07 3H(, ): deduced S-factor Ecm 0.05 - 0.8 X4 01092012 1994BR25...

119

14N Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003MU12 14N(p, ): deduced astrophysical S-factors < 600 keV X4 05062013 1990WA10 14N(p, n):...

120

12C Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 12C(p, ): , deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 10282014 1993CH02 12C(p,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

10B Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010LA11 10B(p, ): deduced S(E) E(cm) 0 - 0.15 1 11302011 1993AN06 10B(p, ):...

122

10Be Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Be(p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1970GO04 10Be(p, 0): 0.6 - 6.3 0, 90 06052012 1987ERZY...

123

13C Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 13C(p, ): , deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 09122011 1994KI02 13C(p,...

124

13C Cross Section  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3C(, X) (Current as of 01212015) NSR Reaction E (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2006JO11 13C(, n): deduced S(E) 0 - 1 from (1993BR17), from (1993DR08) X4...

125

Precise measurement of neutrino and antineutrino differential cross sections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The NuTeV experiment at Fermilab has obtained a unique high-statistics sample of neutrino and antineutrino interactions using its high-energy sign-selected beam. We present a measurement of the differential cross section for charged-current neutrino and antineutrino scattering from iron. We determine the relative ?¯ to ? cross section, r=??¯/??, at high energy with errors a factor of 2 smaller than the previous world average. Structure functions, F2(x,Q2) and xF3(x,Q2), are determined by fitting the inelasticity, y, dependence of the cross sections. This measurement has significantly improved systematic precision as a consequence of more precise understanding of hadron and muon energy scales.

M. Tzanov et al.

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common...

127

Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium...

128

Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based...

129

Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and oxidation...

130

Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent...

131

Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical...

132

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

133

Neutron Spin Resonance in Iron-based Superconductors | The Ames...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neutron Spin Resonance in Iron-based Superconductors The propagation of a novel magnetic excitation in the superconducting state, called a spin resonance, has been observed in iron...

134

Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the iron associated with fossil tissues, which occurred primarily as the mineral goethite. They then employed experiments to show that iron, derived from hemoglobin lysate,...

135

Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions:...

136

Production of iron from metallurgical waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of recovering metallic iron from iron-bearing metallurgical waste in steelmaking comprising steps of providing an iron-bearing metallurgical waste containing more than 55% by weight FeO and FeO equivalent and a particle size of at least 80% less than 10 mesh, mixing the iron-bearing metallurgical waste with a carbonaceous material to form a reducible mixture where the carbonaceous material is between 80 and 110% of the stoichiometric amount needed to reduce the iron-bearing waste to metallic iron, and as needed additions to provide a silica content between 0.8 and 8% by weight and a ratio of CaO/SiO.sub.2 between 1.4 and 1.8, forming agglomerates of the reducible mixture over a hearth material layer to protect the hearth, heating the agglomerates to a higher temperature above the melting point of iron to form nodules of metallic iron and slag material from the agglomerates by melting.

Hendrickson, David W; Iwasaki, Iwao

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iron and manganese can give water an unpleasant taste, odor and color. In this publication you'll learn how to know whether your water contains iron or manganese and how to eliminate these contaminants with various treatment methods such as aeration...

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Magnetism in iron and nickel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fluctuating local band theory of itinerant electron ferromagnetism in nickel and iron is investigated with the use of first-principles numerical calculations. In this theory the excitations predominantly responsible for the phase transition are fluctuations in the direction of local magnetization. The free energy in the presence of a fluctuation is evaluated numerically in the approximation that this direction changes in time and space slowly enough to justify the use of the static approximation and second-order perturbation theory. The energies and wave functions used to incorporate the band and wavevector dependence of the relevant interaction matrix elements were obtained by Slater-Koster fits to earlier ab initio self-consistent energy bands. Results for nickel and iron are obtained in terms of an effective classical Heisenberg exchange. This is compared with other theoretical calculations and available experimental data. From the numerical results, it is concluded that both quantum effects (the time dependence of the exchange field) and local-field effects are important to account for the transition temperature TC.

C. S. Wang; R. E. Prange; V. Korenman

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Section 49 - Business  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The category entitled Business includes milestones involving companies and other business organizations with energy-related activities, and also business ventures in energy by individual entrepreneurs. This subject area is closely related to the preceding section Economics. The first significant energy business involved the mining, transportation, and sale of coal. The coal industry originated in Great Britain, especially in the Newcastle area of northern England. (This became the source of the expression “carrying coals to Newcastle” to describe a needless activity, since coal already could be found there in such abundance.) The U.S. coal business began in the mid 1700s, and was located mainly in the Appalachian region, where it still exists as a major industry today. The next major energy business to emerge in the U.S. was water power, in New Jersey in the late 1700s. This was followed by the gas lighting industry, which had begun in Britain in 1812 and then developed in the U.S. shortly afterward. Another notable energy business of this time was the whale oil industry, in which whales were hunted for use of their oil as a lighting fuel. This had a remarkable career arc as a business. It came of age in New England in the 1820s, peaked in the 1840s, and was virtually defunct by the end of the 1860s. Other fuel sources had replaced whale oil, chiefly kerosene, a cheaper and more easily obtainable product. The oil business had its formal beginnings in the 1850s in the U.S. and Romania. The year 1870 then saw a significant milestone in the business with the creation of the Standard Oil Company by John D. Rockefeller and colleagues. Three years later, the brothers Robert and Ludwig Nobel (siblings of the inventor Alfred) set up a company to exploit the oil riches of Baku, Azerbaijan. Baku’s oil industry would become the largest in the world in the late nineteenth century. Also in the 1850s, the first commercial natural gas company was formed in Fredonia, New York. The 1870s marked the beginning of another huge energy business, the commercial supply of electric power. The founding of Thomas Edison’s Edison Electric Light Company (1879) was the seminal event in this respect. Thus by the end of the 1870s, the four large energy supply industries of the U.S.—coal, oil, gas, and electricity—were all in full operation. The general availability of energy supply from oil and electricity led to the development of a huge energy-related business, the automobile industry. This began in the 1890s, with the founding of Daimler Motors in Germany being the most significant event. Electric car companies would enjoy success from this early period of the 1890s up until the early 1920s, when gasoline-powered cars eclipsed their sale. The first step in the demise of electric streetcar companies also came in the early 1920s when the General Motors Company began a campaign to replace street cars with gasoline-powered vehicles. A major development in the energy business in the 20th century was the effort to produce and market oil from Middle Eastern sources. This began in earnest in the 1930s when Western oil companies were granted concessions to begin oil prospecting in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. Eventually, these two nations would take over their oil industry and control its revenue themselves, as would various other oil-exporting nations (e.g., Venezuela, Nigeria). The influence of Western oil companies was at its peak in the mid 1970s when the popular media referred to the “Seven Sisters” that then dominated the business: Exxon, Mobil, Socal (Chevron), Texaco, Gulf, British Petroleum, and Royal Dutch/Shell. These companies controlled about 85 percent of the world’s oil reserves. Their influence on the global market would soon diminish due to the importance of OPEC and the existence of various state-owned oil companies as noted above. Nevertheless, a contemporary list of the ten largest global companies still includes all of the Seven Sisters, either as independent companies or as part of a merger with another of this group. The

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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141

KINETIC CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION OF METALLIC IRON AND IMPLICATIONS FOR METALLIC IRON DUST FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic iron is one of the most abundant condensing materials in systems of solar abundance. Because metallic iron is responsible for the continuum opacity of dust particles, it has a large contribution to the thermal structure of circumstellar environments and hence to dust evolution itself. In order to understand the formation processes of metallic iron in circumstellar environments, condensation and evaporation kinetics of metallic iron were studied experimentally. Metallic iron condenses at the maximum rate with the condensation coefficient (a parameter ranging from 0 to 1 to represent kinetic hindrance for surface reaction) of unity under high supersaturation conditions, and evaporates nearly ideally (evaporation coefficient of unity) in vacuum. On the other hand, evaporation of metallic iron takes place with more kinetic hindrance in the presence of metallic iron vapor. It is also found that metallic iron atoms nucleate heterogeneously on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Metallic iron does not necessarily condense homogeneously in circumstellar environments, but might condense through heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing dust. Metallic iron formation proceeds with little kinetic hindrance for highly unequilibrated conditions, but the effects of kinetic hindrance may appear for evaporation and condensation occurring near equilibrium with a timescale of months to years in protoplanetary disks.

Tachibana, Shogo; Nagahara, Hiroko; Ozawa, Kazuhito; Ikeda, Youhei; Nomura, Ryuichi; Tatsumi, Keisuke; Joh, Yui, E-mail: tachi@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

143

Part III - Section J  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

H H DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE To Be Updated during Transition With regard to the Contract Section I Clause entitled "Diversity Plan", this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the clause's Diversity elements. If the Contractor's current policy or procedure already addresses the following elements, the Contractor need only provide a copy of the policy or procedure to the Contracting Officer and identify the applicable policy or procedure and applicable page number(s). Work Force This Contract includes clauses on Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Affirmative Action (AA). The Contractor's Diversity Plan should describe the means by which the

144

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 2, Sections 6 and 7: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from an experimental investigation of the mechanisms governing the ash aerosol size segregated composition resulting from the combustion of pulverized coal in a laboratory scale down-flow combustor are described. The results of modeling activities used to interpret the results of the experiments conducted under his subtask are also described in this section. Although results from the entire program are included, Phase II studies which emphasized: (1) alkali behavior, including a study of the interrelationship between potassium vaporization and sodium vaporization; and (2) iron behavior, including an examination of the extent of iron-aluminosilicate interactions, are highlighted. Idealized combustion determination of ash particle formation and surface stickiness are also described.

Helble, J.J. [ed.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

LLNL Section I Clauses/Prescriptions  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AC52-06NA27344 LLNL AC52-06NA27344 LLNL Section I, Page 56 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I I-1 CONTRACT CLAUSES Unless conditionally "Noted", all contract clauses are hereby incorporated by full text. The references cited herein are from the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) (48 CFR Chapter 1) and the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) (48 CFR Chapter 9). Note: The titles and page locations of the clauses are as follows: CLAUSE TITLE PAGE I001 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JUL 2004) (DEVIATION) ..............................62 I002 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUTIES (APR 1984) ..........................................................63

146

Section A Introduction to Review Section A Introduction to Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Review. Separate user guides for e-Recruitment Plan and Recruit are available on the AP On-Line UserSection A Introduction to Review A-1 Section A ­ Introduction to Review This section includes: · About AP On-Line (this page) · Accessing Review (this page) · Assignment of roles in Review (page A-2

Tsien, Roger Y.

147

Full list of Portfolio Manager custom reporting metrics | ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Full list of Portfolio Manager custom reporting metrics Full list of Portfolio Manager custom reporting metrics Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

148

Why Sequence Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? The goal of this project is to obtain complete genome sequences for six different freshwater iron (Fe)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). Four of these are oxygen-dependent iron-oxidizing β-proteobacteria, and three of these, Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, Gallionella capsiferriformans, and strain TW-2, are capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth (that is, obtaining energy by the oxidation of inorganic compounds) using Fe(II) as sole energy source under microaerobic (low-oxygen) conditions. The fourth organism, Leptothrix cholodnii, is a sheath-forming heterotrophic (i.e., using complex organic compounds for nutrition) organism that oxidizes both Fe(II) and Mn(II) and deposits a ferromanganic coating on its sheath. In addition,

149

Iron-air battery development program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress and status of the research and development program on the iron-air advanced technology battery system at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation during the period June 1978-December 1979 are described. This advanced battery system is being developed for electric vehicle propulsion applications. Testing and evaluation of 100 cm/sup 2/ size cells was undertaken while individual iron and air electrode programs continued. Progress is reported in a number of these study areas. Results of the improvements made in the utilization of the iron electrode active material coupled with manufacturing and processing studies related to improved air electrodes continue to indicate that a fully developed iron-air battery system will be capable of fulfilling the performance requirements for commuter electric vehicles.

Buzzelli, E.S.; Liu, C.T.; Bryant, W.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

System and method for producing metallic iron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

Iron and the ecology of marine microbes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iron is a cofactor of a number biochemical reactions that are essential for life. In the marine environment, this micronutrient is a scarce resource that limits processes of global importance such as photosynthesis and ...

Ventouras, Laure-Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Section 180(c)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

: : Questions for Discussion * Funding Allocation Method: - Formula or needs-based? Does either choice impact a set-aside? * Eligibility: - What happens if a Tribe has no emergency response or law enforcement capability? Can they be eligible for Section 180(c) funds? Funding Allocation Method * What we've heard: - Population is not an appropriate measure for funds - Funding should protect all aboriginal lands - Don't use the ½ mile of a route measure used in the EIS - Consider a set-aside of funds for Tribes, higher than the 3% used by DOT's HMEP assistance program. Funding Allocation Method * Formula Approach - Factors in a formula should measure risk and need - What factors might be appropriate? - How can a formula account for varying levels of tribal authority over a route? For example,

153

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Contaminant Specific\Iron\Eco-SSL for Iron.wpd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Iron Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-69 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR IRON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES - 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1 2.0 IRON GEOCHEMISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 2.1 Weathering Processes Affect on Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 3 2.2 Soil Conditions Affect on Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 4 3.0 EFFECTS OF IRON ON PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.1 Essentiality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.2 General Effects

154

Elastic moduli of nickel and iron aluminides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELASTIC MODULI OF NICKEL AND IRON ALUMINIDES A Thesis by SREEDHAR MAN JIGANI Submitted to the Oifice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993... Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ELASTIC MODULI OF NICKEL AND IRON ALUMINIDES A Thesis by SREEDHAR MAN JIGANI Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Manjigani, Sreedhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Muon trapping at monovacancies in iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Positive-muon—spin-rotation experiments were performed on electron irradiated iron. A new defect-associated frequency is observed which is assigned to muons trapped at monovacancies. The hyperfine field at the vacancy site is -0.956 T at 140 K. The diffusion constant for ?+ in iron deduced from the trapping rate follows an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 38±3 meV between 90 and 190 K.

A. Möslang; H. Graf; G. Balzer; E. Recknagel; A. Weidinger; Th. Wichert; R. I. Grynszpan

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

SECTION A: STUDENT INFORMATION ______________________________________________________________________ 93#____________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION A: STUDENT INFORMATION # __________________@_________________________ (______)______________ ________/________/_________ Email Address Phone # Effective Date of this Request SECTION B: ADDITIONAL INFORMATION The items listed below are designated as "Directory Information" and may be released for any purpose at the discretion

Swaddle, John

157

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions (MMTCO2) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2007. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2007" data, energy-related CO2 emissions projected for the Iron and Steel industry were 133.5 MMTCO2 in 2006. The AEO Supplementary Tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2005-2030. The AEO2007 reflects data and information available as of September 15, 2006. Source: Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (PDF 38.44 KB) with

158

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch University, Princeton University, and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) suggests that it is not just a lack of iron, but a lack of iron in an easy-to-use form, that is affecting the ecosystems. The researchers sampled two north-south corridors across the Southern Ocean, traveling an easterly transect between the base of the South African National Antarctic Expeditions (SANAE IV) in Queen Maud Land and Cape Town, and a westerly transect between SANAE IV and South Georgia Island. Along the way they collected particles containing solid iron from a series of ocean systems with different characteristics.

159

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch University, Princeton University, and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) suggests that it is not just a lack of iron, but a lack of iron in an easy-to-use form, that is affecting the ecosystems. The researchers sampled two north-south corridors across the Southern Ocean, traveling an easterly transect between the base of the South African National Antarctic Expeditions (SANAE IV) in Queen Maud Land and Cape Town, and a westerly transect between SANAE IV and South Georgia Island. Along the way they collected particles containing solid iron from a series of ocean systems with different characteristics.

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly cellular iron Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , iron storage function and cellular regulation. Biochim. Biophys. Acta Bioenerg. 1275: 161-203. HOFMANN... Availability of iron from iron-storage proteins to marine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensityof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China andof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Section 4 - Wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exploitation of wind power for useful energy is both a practice dating back to ancient times and a key component of today’s effort to substitute renewable energy sources for fossil fuels. Use of wind energy has progressed historically through three stages. First came the use of wind for propulsion of water craft via sails. Then the windmill came into use in agriculture, originally to grind grain and then later to drain water from fields or raise it from a well. Finally (much later) came the use of wind to power turbines to generate electricity. The two historic uses of wind power, sailing ships and windmills, are both still in existence today, though on a lesser scale than in the past. The earliest use of the sail is thought to have occurred more than 5,000 years ago on the Nile River and in the Mediterranean Sea. A major advance in sailing came in the era of the Roman Empire, as early as the 2nd century A.D., with the appearance on the Mediterranean of the lateen (triangular) sail, which was capable of taking the wind on either side and thus could sail into the wind, as opposed to the earlier square sail which could only sail with the wind. This technology is believed to have originated with Arab sailors on the Red Sea about 200 years earlier. The use of multiple triangular sails, in combination with square sails, led to the Age of Sail, during which sailing vessels were employed for global exploration, international trade, and naval warfare. The ultimate in wind-powered ships were the clipper ships of the mid 19th century, famous for their high speed, elegant design, and graceful appearance. Ironically, the finest clipper ships appeared just as the Age of Sail was in its twilight years, having been overtaken by the development of the steam-powered ship. The classic European windmill first appeared in the Middle Ages, probably in the 12th century. A written record of one in England dates from the 1180s. The common type was the tower mill, which was developed shortly afterward. It became known as the Dutch windmill because it was ubiquitous in that country, and even today it is a popular symbol of the Dutch nation. The windmill influenced the topography of the Netherlands in that it was widely used to provide the power to reclaim submerged land. The windmill also was reported in China at about the same time it emerged in Europe, though it may have developed even earlier. In the United States the so-called American farm or American-style windmill became a familiar sight from the middle of the 19th century onward, especially in the developing Western region. It was used to provide power to raise well water and to run farm machinery. New technology enabled it to turn its wheel to adjust to changing wind direction, and also to restrict the wheel speed so that the blades would not be destroyed during storms. The use of steel rather than wood as the blade material was a later refinement. This type of windmill eventually spread far beyond the U.S. borders to be used globally. The beginnings of the use of wind power to generate electricity came in the late 1880s and early 1890s, through the work of Charles Brush in the U.S. and Poul la Cour in Denmark. Brush modified a windmill to operate a DC generator, creating what is considered to be the first wind power plant. The experiments of la Cour with wind turbines laid the foundation for modern wind energy technology. In the 1920s the U.S. wind pioneer Marcellus Jacobs developed the first commercial propeller-type rotor for a wind turbine. Companies such as his Jacobs Wind continued on the path established by Brush of modifying existing windmills to provide power to drive DC generators, especially for use by farms that were not on the electrical grid prior to the coming of widespread rural electrification. Another major development of the 1920s was the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), which was patented by the French engineer Georges J. M. Darrieus. This new type of wind turbine had a distinctive “eggbeater”or “skipping rope” design, in contrast with the horizontal a

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting iron ore to metallic iron nodules. Various types of coals including a bio-coal produced though torrefaction can result in production of NRI at reduced GHG levels. The process results coupled with earlier already reported developments indicate that this process technique should be evaluated at the next level in order to develop parameter information for full scale process design. Implementation of the process to full commercialization will require a full cost production analysis and comparison to other reduction technologies and iron production alternatives. The technical results verify that high quality NRI can be produced under various operating conditions at the pilot level.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

165

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

166

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

167

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

168

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

169

Full Permit Application Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full Permit Application Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Full Permit Application HandbookLegal Abstract...

170

Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor Classification Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

400060 Working Title Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor Advertised Employing Department Statistics of Months Employed Per Year 9 Summary of Duties and Responsibilities The Department of Statistics at Iowa Appointment Type Faculty - Tenure-Eligible Base of Employment B - Faculty (9 Months) Full or Part Time Full

Carriquiry, Alicia

171

SECTION J - TABLE OF CONTENTS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Arrangement Appendix Q Minimum Standards for Contractors' COI Plans (Replaced Mod 002) Appendix R RESERVED Appendix S Contracting Officer's Representative(s) Section J Page i...

172

Advances in Fe(VI) charge storage: Part II. Reversible alkaline super-iron batteries and nonaqueous super-iron batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reversible thin film Fe(VI/III) cathodic charge/discharge storage in alkaline batteries is presented. Whereas ultra-thin (e.g., 3 nm) Fe(VI/III) films exhibit a high degree of reversibility, thicker films are increasingly passive toward the Fe(VI) charge transfer. An extended conductive matrix facilitates a 100-fold enhancement in charge storage for reversible Fe(VI/III) super-iron thin films. The thicker (100s of nanometers) films deposited on extended conductive matrixes composed of high-surface-area Pt, Ti, and Au can sustain high reversibility, which provides the possibility of using Fe(VI) salts as the cathode materials for rechargeable Fe(VI)/metal hydride batteries. Super-iron cathodes can also be discharged in conjunction with a Li anode in nonaqueous media. Optimization of the nonaqueous primary super-iron/Li batteries is summarized. Fe(VI) cathodes are also reversible in nonaqueous electrolyte systems. The charge/discharge process of super-iron cathodes in nonaqueous media involves both the lithiation/delithiation of the active mass and the reduction/oxidation of the Fe(VI/III), while only the thin film Fe(VI/III) electrodes can sustain high reversibility involving the full theoretical capacity in the nonaqueous batteries.

Xingwen Yu; Stuart Licht

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

174

Patterns of Iron Use in Societal Evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The iron stock needed to sustain people’s lives tends to saturate in industrialized countries around 8?12 tons per capita, indicating a long-term potential for the steel industry to dramatically shift resource use from primary (ore) to secondary (scrap) raw materials and thereby significantly save energy and greenhouse gas emissions. ... Figure 3. Per capita iron stocks in use versus per capita GDP PPP (1990 international dollars). ... Speculations about an absolute decoupling in steel demand, however, cannot be supported by this study: none of the analyzed countries shows a shrinking per-capita iron stock in use, which would be needed for long-term absolute decoupling of steel demand. ...

Daniel B. Müller; Tao Wang; Benjamin Duval

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in Ferritin Almost all organisms require iron as a co-factor in numerous metalloproteins and enzymes. In particular, phytoplankton, which are aquatic, free-drifting, single-celled organisms that can harvest energy from the sun, have an elevated demand for iron due to the large role it plays in their photosynthetic machinery. In 30-40% of the world's oceans iron concentrations are low enough to limit the growth of phytoplankton (Martin and Fitzwater 1988; Moore et al. 2002). New sources of iron to these regions are sporadic and typically include atmospheric dust deposition or weak upwelling of deep waters. figure 1 Figure 1: A light micrograph of the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Shown are one whole cell and two partial cells connected at the cell tips in a chain. The brown components of the cells are the chloroplasts. Scale bar = 5 mm. (Image courtesy of K. Holtermann)

176

TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SECTION B: HOUSING TYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SECTION C: HOME HEATING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 SECTION D: AIR CONDITIONING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 SECTION E: WATER HEATING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 SECTION F: LIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 SECTION G: APPLIANCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Refrigerators and Freezers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

177

Section 44 - Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The category entitled Environment refers to the impact on the natural world of energy use in all forms. This section is complemented by two others, Ecology and Health and Safety, both of which focus on effects on organismal life rather than the physical environment. Ecology deals with energy effects on nonhuman organisms and Health and Safety covers effects on humans. Energy use did affect the environment to some extent in the preindustrial era through the clearing of forests for wood fuel, and through the urban air pollution resulting from burning of this fuel for processes such as ironmaking and brewing. However, it was not until the Industrial Revolution created an intensive demand for fuel to power engines and machines that the natural world was greatly impacted by energy use. This realization of human impact on the environment was associated with the Industrial Revolution because prior to that the concept of “Nature” as an entity distinct from civilization was not fully developed. When the landscape of Europe and North America began to be transformed on a large scale by industry in the 1800s, this created public awareness that the natural world was being degraded and diminished. The English novelist Charles Dickens wrote in 1840 that in the London of a half century earlier, “Nature was not so far removed, or hard to get at, as in these days.” In addition to the fundamental idea of Nature as an entity in itself, the 19th century saw the establishment of various other concepts of modern environmental science, such as the heat island effect, the phenomenon of acid rain, the fact of anthropomorphic influence on the physical landscape, and the role of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas. Also occurring during this period were the first study of environmental problems, the first formal pollution control measures, the beginnings of the practice of recycling, and the founding of the first environmental advocacy organization (Sierra Club). The development of motor vehicle transportation in the twentieth century brought with it major environmental impacts through air pollution from engine exhaust. This came to a crisis point in the postwar era with major smog events in urban areas such as London and Los Angeles. Disposal of nuclear wastes also became an issue during this time, and remains so today. The 1960s saw the first major commercial oil spill, one of numerous such events to occur since the industry began to use huge supertankers to transport oil from distant sites. Coal mining, always associated with environmental impact since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, became even more significant in this respect in the late twentieth century, through the controversial practice of mountaintop removal mining. In today’s world fossil fuel sources that involve relatively little intrusion on the environment have been depleted, and the energy industry has been required to turn to other resources that are more difficult to extract and thus require more intrusive techniques; e.g., the use of fracking (hydraulic fracturing) to remove natural gas from rock formations far below the Earth’s surface. Increased use of alternative energy sources will reduce the environmental impact associated with fossil fuels, but the challenge is how to maintain a balance between supplying society’s vast energy needs and maintaining the quality of the natural environment.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Transmission of fast neutrons through an iron sphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integral Experiments have been performed using a homogeneous iron spherical shell to test neutron cross-section data. Neutron leakage spectra from the shell were measured using /sup 252/Cf-fission and (deuterium-tritium) D-T-fusion neutron sources and an Ne-213 spectrometry system. An associated particle detector was used to monitor the absolute D-T neutron source strength as well as any accompanying deuterium-deuterium neutron contamination. The leakage spectra were calculated using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code VIM and the discrete ordinates S/sub n/ code ANISN employing ENDF/B-IV. For neutron energies between 1 and 5 MeV, the calculations underpredicted the leakage spectrum by factors of 1.4 to 2 for the Californium neutron source and 2 to 3 for the D-T neutron source. The large discrepancies are attributed to inadequate representation of cross-section resonance structure (namely, minima); inadequate representation of the angular and secondary energy distributions for continuum inelastic scattering and (n,2n) reactions also contribute to these discrepancies.

Hertel N.E.; Johnson, R.H.; Wehring, B.W.; Dorning, J.J.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurements and analyses of neutron transport through iron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integral experiments have been performed using a thick homogeneous spherical shell of iron to test existing neutron cross section data. Neutron leakage spectra were measured for Cf-252-fission and DT-fusion neutron sources using an NE-213 spectrometry system. An associated particle detector monitored the absolute DT neutron source strength and the amount of DD neutron contamination in the DT source spectrum. The leakage spectra were calculated using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code VIM and the discrete-S/sub n/ code ANISN. For neutron energies between 1 and 5 MeV, the calculations underpredicted the leakage spectrum by factors of 2 to 1.4 for the Cf neutron source and of 3 to 2 for the DT neutron source. The large discrepancies are attributed to inadequate representation of cross-section resonance structure (viz., minima); inadequate representation of the angular and secondary energy distributions for continuum inelastic scattering and (n, 2n) reactions may also contribute to these discrepancies.

Hertel, N.E.; Johnson, R.H.; Dorning, J.J.; Wehring, B.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of Aerosol Source on Ocean Photosynthesis figure 1 Figure 1. Dust storm blowing glacial dusts from the Copper River Basin of southeast Alaska into the North Pacific Ocean, which depends on this and other external iron sources to support its biological communities. (Image: NASA MODIS satellite image, Nov. 1, 2006. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=7094) Iron is one of the most important elements to life. Despite its paramount importance and relative abundance, dissolved iron concentrations are often very low, in part due to the formation of very stable iron minerals in most oxidizing environments. Since soluble iron is available to living organisms, iron deficiencies are widespread, and the factors that influence

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Decoupling of Iron and Phosphate in the Global Payal Parekh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with weaker wind stresses leads to a decrease in surface [PO4] and [Fe] in the Southern Ocean due (reviewed by Karl et al., 2002; Mills et al., 2004) have a greater iron requirement and iron availability

Follows, Mick

182

Iron oxide nanoparticles as a contrast agent for thermoacoustic tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation. The addition of an exogenous contrast agent improves image quality by more effectively converting microwave energy to heat. The use of iron oxide nanoparticles in MRI applications has been explored but super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles...

Keho, Aaron Lopez

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

183

Steam reforming utilizing iron oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High activity steam reforming iron oxide catalysts are described. Such catalysts can be unsupported utilizing at least 90% by weight iron oxide and various modifiers (Ai/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, CaO, SiO/sub 2/) or unmodified and supported on such things as alumina, CaO impregnated alumina, and lanthanum stabilized alumina. When used in steam reformers such as autothermal and tubular steam reformers, these catalysts demonstrate much improved resistance to carbon plugging.

Setzer, H. T.; Bett, J. A. S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries | Argonne...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries Technology available for licensing: Inexpensive, electrochemically active phosphate compounds with high functionality for...

185

Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Iron phosphate vanadate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses have been investigated for use as cathodes in lithium ion batteries. MP glass cathodes are similar in composition to theoretically promising crystalline polyanionic (CP) cathodes (e.g., lithium cobalt phosphate, lithium manganese silicate), but with proper polyanion substitution, they can be designed to overcome the key shortcomings of CP cathodes, such as poor electrical conductivity and irreversible phase changes. Iron phosphate/vanadate glasses were chosen as a first demonstration of the MP glass concept. Polyanion substitution with vanadate was shown to improve the intercalation capacity of an iron phosphate glass from almost zero to full theoretical capacity. In addition, the MP glass cathodes also exhibited an unexpected second high-capacity electrochemical reaction. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of cathodes from cells having different states of charge suggested that this second electrochemical reaction is a glass-state conversion reaction. With a first demonstration established, MP glass materials utilizing an intercalation and/or glass-state conversion reaction are promising candidates for future high-energy cathode research.

Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Carroll, Kyler J [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

,"Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" ,"Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",, "Item","Investor Owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-Utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of...

187

,"Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" ,"Full Service Providers",,,,,"Other Providers",, "Item","Investor Owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-Utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of...

188

Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ? Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ? The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ? The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

Oropeza, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Corea, M., E-mail: mcoreat@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Gómez-Yáñez, C. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Rivera, J.J. [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potosí, C.P. 78210 (Mexico)] [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potosí, C.P. 78210 (Mexico); Navarro-Clemente, M.E., E-mail: mnavarroc@ipn.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

2, 537549, 2005 Dissolved iron input  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured masses beyond the mixing zone, a process known as the "marine biological carbon pump". This export5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

Synthesis and consolidation of iron nanopowders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microwave plasma processing technique was used to synthesize iron nanopowders. The average particle size of these powders was ~10 nm and the surface area was measured to be 42m2/g. Powder production rates as high as 50 gm/hour were achieved. Magnetic property measurements on iron nanopowders yielded coercivities as high as 60 kA/m at 4 K, which decreased to ~0 A/m (a superparamagnetic transition) at room temperature. In this paper, the microwave plasma processing technique has been compared with other nanopowder synthesis techniques. Since the successful application of nanomaterials depends highly on the processing technology, results from consolidation studies on iron nanopowders are also presented. Iron nanopowders were consolidated to study performance parameters such as density, grain growth and other morphological changes. The nanopowder was consolidated using Plasma Pressure Consolidation (P2C) technique to 95% density, at a temperature and pressure of 850 °C and 63 \\{MPa\\} respectively. Microwave plasma synthesis is capable of producing metallic and ceramic nanopowders, which will sustain interest in research areas including magnetic storage, nano-fabrication of electronic materials and nanoglass, besides the field of catalysis.

R. Kalyanaraman; Sang Yoo; M.S. Krupashankara; T.S. Sudarshan; R.J. Dowding

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Iron oxide red wastewater treatment and recycling of iron-containing sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a wastewater treatment process and recycling of iron sludge from wastewater treatment for iron oxide red production. Results show that: (1) Sludge from wastewater treatment process under the operating parameters: 1.84 g/L of NaOH dosage, 10 mins of aeration with flow rate of 1 L/min and 150 mins of sediment time is potential for seed crystal preparation and excellent iron oxide red product can be obtained in the secondary oxidation under condition of 85 °C, 68 h of reaction time and 150 mL/min of airflow rate, (2) In practical engineering, the average removal rate of Fe2+ and SS and chroma of effluent is 99.75%, 86.7% and less than 40 times, respectively, and all items of product satisfy demands of industrial standards, (3) Compared with the original wastewater treatment, the new process can save the cost of wastewater treatment and earn extra 20.0 dollars for a ton of iron oxide red product and then both economic benefit and environmental protection can be realized by this process. It is proved that the novel method is reliable, economical and promising in iron oxide red industry and cleaner production of iron oxide red is feasible.

Zhenguo Chen; Xiaojun Wang; Qilong Ge; Guanchao Guo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Cross section for nuclear fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... gamma rays. In recent years there have been many studies of the cross section for nuclear fusion, and some features of the process are now understood (Nature, 256, 261; ... velocities fusion cannot take place at all.

P. E. Hodgson

1976-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

Section 25: Future State Assumptions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Compliance Certification Application (CCA), Chapter 6.0, Section 6.2 and Appendices SCR and MASS (U.S. DOE 1996). Many of these future state assumptions were derived from the...

194

SBIR Full Application Preparation and Submission Information  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

An LOI is required and must be submitted by the small business concern. Only those applicants that submit an LOI by the due date are eligible to submit a full application.

195

Full Circle Developments Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full Circle Developments Inc Full Circle Developments Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Full Circle Developments Inc Place Plymouth, Michigan Zip 48170 Sector Renewable Energy Product Private Michigan-based clean energy project developer, with focus on brownfield site biofuel projects that are powered by renewable energy. Coordinates 43.75681°, -87.984809° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.75681,"lon":-87.984809,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

196

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) ●

197

Iron-57 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of hindered iron porphyrins. Ruffling as a possible mechanism for d-orbital energy level inversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron-57 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of hindered iron porphyrins. ... Ruffling as a possible mechanism for d-orbital energy level inversion ...

Lars Baltzer; Marie Landergren

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Magnetism in Iron at High Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetism in iron at high temperature is investigated by calculating the total electronic band-structure energy for four types of spin arrangements. A slow smooth spatial variation of spin direction costs relatively little energy and the atomic moment m is reduced only ? 10%. More rapid variations have considerably higher energy, which may explain the high degree of short-range order and small ?m observed at T?TC. Other aspects are also discussed.

M. V. You; V. Heine; A. J. Holden; P. J. Lin-Chung

1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron Pnictides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has resulted in surprising new insights into high temperature superconductivity and its relationship with magnetism. Here we provide an overview of some of what is known about these materials and in particular about the interplay of magnetism and superconductivity in them. Similarities and contrasts with cuprate superconductors are emphasized and the superconducting pairing is discussed within the framework of spin fluctuation induced pairing.

Singh, David J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The iron abundance of the Magellanic Bridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution HST ultra-violet spectra for five B-type stars in the Magellanic Bridge and in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have been analysed to estimate their iron abundances. Those for the Clouds are lower than estimates obtained from late-type stars or the optical lines in B-type stars by approximately 0.5 dex. This may be due to systematic errors possibly arising from non-LTE effects or from errors in the atomic data as similar low Fe abundances having previously been reported from the analysis of the ultra-violet spectra of Galactic early-type stars. The iron abundance estimates for all three Bridge targets appear to be significantly lower than those found for the SMC and LMC by approximately -0.5 dex and -0.8 dex respectively and these differential results should not be affected by any systematic errors present in the absolute abundance estimates. These differential iron abundance estimates are consistent with the underabundances for C, N, O, Mg and Si of approximately -1.1 dex relative to our Galaxy previously found in our Bridge targets. The implications of these very low metal abundances for the Magellanic Bridge are discussed in terms of metal deficient material being stripped from the SMC.

P. L. Dufton; R. S. I. Ryans; H. M. A. Thompson; R. A. Street

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Correlation effects in the iron pnictides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here we address this issue through the phenomenology of the charge transport and dynamics, single-electron excitation spectrum, and magnetic ordering and dynamics. We outline the evidence that the parent compounds, while metallic, have electron interactions that are sufficiently strong to produce incipient Mott physics. In other words, in terms of the strength of electron correlations compared to the kinetic energy, the iron pnictides are closer to intermediately-coupled systems lying at the boundary between itinerancy and localization, such as V{sub 2}O{sub 3} a or Se-doped NiS{sub 2} , rather than to simple antiferromagnetic metals like Cr. This level of electronic correlations produces a new small parameter for controlled theoretical analyses, namely the fraction of the single-electron spectral weight that lies in the coherent part. Using this expansion parameter, we construct the effective low-energy Hamiltonian and discuss its implications for the magnetic order and magnetic quantum criticality. Finally, this approach sharpens the notion of magnetic frustration for such a metallic system, and brings about a multi band matrix t-J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model for the carrier-doped iron pnictides.

Zhu, Jian-xin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Si, Qimiao [RICE UNIV; Abrahams, Elihu [RUTGERS UNIV; Dai, Jianhui [ZHEJIANG UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Connected obstructions to full graph homomorphisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Minimal obstructions to full homomorphisms to a graph B have been proved to be of size at most |B|+1. This turns out to require that disconnected obstructions be allowed. In this paper we prove that the size of minimal connected obstructions is at most ...

Pavol Hell, Aleš Pultr

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Friction in full view A. P. Merklea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction in full view A. P. Merklea and L. D. Marksb Materials Science and Engineering proposed friction mechanisms explaining the unique tribological properties of graphite. Wear of graphite chemical or struc- tural information from the interface during a friction experi- ment. Examples

Marks, Laurence D.

205

The Colorado Section Welcomes You  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Colorado Section Welcomes You ... Among those at present affiliated with the section who have become nationally famous are John B. Ekeley, head of the Department of Chemistry of the University of Colorado, Boulder; W. D. Engle, president of Denver University and head of the Department of Chemistry, a member of the SOCIETY since 1898; Sidney J. Osborn, chief chemist of the Great Western Sugar Co., first chairman of the Division of Sugar Chemistry; M. F. Coolbaugh, president of Colorado State School of Mines; and R. G. Gustavson, noted for his contributions to the knowledge of the sex hormones. ...

1932-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

An Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Based on a Graphene Anode and a Lithium Iron Phosphate Cathode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Based on a Graphene Anode and a Lithium Iron Phosphate Cathode ... To the best of our knowledge, complete, graphene-based, lithium ion batteries having performances comparable with those offered by the present technology are rarely reported; hence, we believe that the results disclosed in this work may open up new opportunities for exploiting graphene in the lithium-ion battery science and development. ... A full Li-ion battery (Figure 4a) is obtained by coupling the Cu-supported graphene nanoflake anode with a lithium iron phosphate, LiFePO4, that is, a cathode commonly used in commercial batteries. ...

Jusef Hassoun; Francesco Bonaccorso; Marco Agostini; Marco Angelucci; Maria Grazia Betti; Roberto Cingolani; Mauro Gemmi; Carlo Mariani; Stefania Panero; Vittorio Pellegrini; Bruno Scrosati

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

1 INTRODUCTION The full characterization of the vulnerability of criti-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the network are of- ten highly variable quantities both in space and time. Functional models are, then, often in Section 2; in Section 3, the physical characterization of interde- pendencies is introduced; in Section 4, the functional model for interdependent CIs is detailed; in Section 5, the proposed model is applied to three

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, H{sub c2}(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was #12;tted with a power-law function {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T) = AT{sup n}. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s{sub {+-}}#6; scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s{sub {+-}}#6; gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at {lambda}#21;(T), in optimally - doped, SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (T{sub c} ~ #25;25 K) and annealed (T{sub c} ~ #25;35 K) single crystals of SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from #21;{lambda}(0) = 300 {+-}#6; 10 nm in as-grown samples to {lambda}#21;(0) = 275{+-}#6;10 nm. At low temperatures, {lambda}#21;(T) #24;~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from the charge-doped materials. In-plane resistivity measurements as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and its orientation with respect to the crystallographic ab-plane were used to study the upper critical field, H{sub c2}, of two overdoped compositions of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}, x=0.054 and x=0.072. Measurements were performed using precise alignment (with accuracy less than 0.1{degree}) of the magnetic field with respect to the Fe-As plane. The dependence of the H{sub c2} on angle {theta}#18; between the field and the ab- plane was measured in isothermal conditions in a broad temperature range. We found that the shape of the H{sub c2} vs. {theta}#18; curve clearly deviates from the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

Murphy, Jason [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

e00053-12.full.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10.1128/mBio.00053-12. 10.1128/mBio.00053-12. 3(2): . mBio . Temperature-Dependent Product Formation Engineering a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon for 2012. Mirko Basen, Junsong Sun and Michael W. W. Adams Product Formation Archaeon for Temperature-Dependent Engineering a Hyperthermophilic http://mbio.asm.org/content/3/2/e00053-12.full.html Updated information and services can be found at: REFERENCES http://mbio.asm.org/content/3/2/e00053-12.full.html#ref-list-1 This article cites 28 articles, 13 of which can be accessed free at: CONTENT ALERTS more>> article), Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new articles cite this http://journals.asm.org/subscriptions/ To subscribe to another ASM Journal go to: http://mbio.asm.org/misc/contentdelivery.xhtml Information about Print on Demand and other content delivery options:

210

Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Decorrelating the topology in full QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the performance of the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm in updating non-trivial global topological structures. We find that the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm has serious problems decorrelating the global topological charge. This represents a warning which must be seriously considered when simulating full QCD, regardless of the number and type of fermions, with this or any similar algorithm. Simulated tempering is examined as a means of accelerating the decorrelation.

G. Boyd; B. Allés; M. D'Elia; A. Di Giacomo; E. Vicari

1996-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

212

COLLOQUIUM: How Trenton Iron and Steel Innovations Reshaped America...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mr. Clifford Zink Independent Historian Iron and steel innovations in Trenton helped transform modern life with new methods of transportation, construction, and communications....

213

Iron-based Superconductor Simulations Spin Out New Possibilities...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron-based Superconductor Simulations Spin Out New Possibilities on Titan Rutgers team develops computational model for predicting superconductivity The 15 boxes in this image show...

214

Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I use compilations of phosphorous and iron data in ironused upwelling dissolved phosphorous and ammonium as well asand adsorption of dissolved phosphorous onto microbial Fe

Planavsky, Noah John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Iron(III)-doped, silica : biodegradable, self-targeting nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of calcium and phosphorous, which can be attributed toamount of calcium and phosphorous increase. The iron(III)-composed of calcium and phosphorous were in the recovered

Mitchell, Kristina Kalani Pohaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Iron Oxide Waste Form for Stabilizing 99Tc. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stabilizing 99Tc. Iron Oxide Waste Form for Stabilizing 99Tc. Abstract: Crystals of goethite were synthesized with reduced technetium 99Tc(IV) incorporated within the solid...

217

Zero Valent Iron: Impact of Anions Present during Synthesis on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iron nanoparticles was quantified by monitoring the kinetics as well as products of carbon tetrachloride reduction, and significant differences in reactivity and chloroform...

218

Ferredoxin and flavodoxin as biochemical indicators of iron ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

search Agreement RP8021-05 from the Electric Power Research. Institute ... equatorial Pacific Ocean was enriched with iron and moni- ..... The first identifi-.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Interagency ADR Workplace Section Education Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interagency Alternative Dispute Resolution Working Group (IADRWG) Workplace Conflict Management Section (“Workplace Section”) provides guidance on “best practices” in ADR program development,...

220

Section 999 Program Library | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Science & Innovation Oil & Gas Offshore Drilling Section 999 Program Library Section 999 Program Library Cost-Shared Program Publications October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIG: E 263 09 ^TITLE: Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron ^SIGNUSE: Refer to Guide E 844 for guidance on the selection, irradiation, and quality control of neutron dosimeters. Refer to Practice E 261 for a general discussion of the determination of fast-neutron fluence rate with threshold detectors. Pure iron in the form of foil or wire is readily available and easily handled. Fig. 1 shows a plot of cross section as a function of neutron energy for the fast-neutron reaction 54Fe(n,p)54Mn (1). This figure is for illustrative purposes only to indicate the range of response of the 54Fe(n,p)54Mn reaction. Refer to Guide E 1018 for descriptions of recommended tabulated dosimetry cross sections. 54Mn has a half-life of 312.13 days (3) (2) and emits a gamma ray with an energy of 834.845 keV (5). (2) Interfering activities generated by neutron activation arising from thermal or fast neutron interactions are 2.57878 (46)-h 56Mn, 44.95-d (8) 59Fe, and 5.27...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Comparison of gleptoferron iron compound to two commonly used iron supplements for the prevention of baby pig anemia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ig"5 Thesis H763 c. Z J COMPARISON OF GLEPTOFERRON IRON COMPOUND TO TWO COMMONLY USED IRON SUPPLEMENTS FOR THE PREVENTION OF BABY PIG ANEMIA A Professional Paper Ervin R. Homann Submitted as Partial Fulfillment of the Professional... OF LITERATURE EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE RESULTS AND DISCUSSION SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED VITA TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 12 13 15 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. EFFECT OF IRON SOURCE AND TIME OF ADMINISTRATION ON PIG SURVIVAL AND PIG HEIGHTS...

Homann, Ervin R.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Integrated powerhead demonstration full flow cycle development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Integrated Powerhead Demonstration (IPD) is a 1 112 000 N (250 000? lb f ) thrust (at sea level) LOX/LH2 demonstration of a full flow cycle in an integrated system configuration. Aerojet and Rocketdyne are on contract to the Air Force Research Laboratory to design develop and deliver the required components and to provide test support to accomplish the demonstration. Rocketdyne is on contract to provide a fuel and oxygen turbopump a gas-gas injector and system engineering and integration. Aerojet is on contract to provide a fuel and oxygen preburner a main combustion chamber and a nozzle. The IPD components are being designed with Military Spaceplane (MSP) performance and operability requirements in mind. These requirements include: lifetime ?200 missions mean time between overhauls ?100 cycles and a capability to throttle from 20% to 100% of full power. These requirements bring new challenges both in designing and testing the components. This paper will provide some insight into these issues. Lessons learned from operating and supporting the space shuttle main engine (SSME) have been reviewed and incorporated where applicable. The IPD program will demonstrate phase I goals of the Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program while demonstrating key propulsion technologies that will be available for MSP concepts. The demonstration will take place on Test Stand 2A at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards AFB. The component tests will begin in 1999 and the integrated system tests will be completed in 2002.

J. Mathew Jones; James T. Nichols; William F. Sack; William D. Boyce; William A. Hayes

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Full Counting Statistics of Stationary Particle Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general scheme for treating particle beams as many particle systems. This includes the full counting statistics and the requirements of Bose/Fermi symmetry. In the stationary limit, i.e., for longer and longer beams, the total particle number diverges, and a description in Fock space is no longer possible. We therefore extend the formalism to include stationary beams. These beams exhibit a well-defined "local" counting statistics, by which we mean the full counting statistics of all clicks falling into any given finite interval. We treat in detail a model of a source, creating particles in a fixed state, which then evolve under the free time evolution, and we determine the resulting stationary beam in the far field. In comparison to the one-particle picture we obtain a correction due to Bose/Fermi statistics, which depends on the emission rate. We also consider plane waves as stationary many particle states, and determine the distribution of intervals between successive clicks in such a beam.

J. Kiukas; A. Ruschhaupt; R. F. Werner

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Unconventional temperature enhanced magnetism in iron telluride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discoveries of copper and iron-based high-temperature superconductors (HTSC)1-2 have challenged our views of superconductivity and magnetism. Contrary to the pre-existing view that magnetism, which typically involves localized electrons, and superconductivity, which requires freely-propagating itinerant electrons, are mutually exclusive, antiferromagnetic phases were found in all HTSC parent materials3,4. Moreover, highly energetic magnetic fluctuations, discovered in HTSC by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) 5,6, are now widely believed to be vital for the superconductivity 7-10. In two competing scenarios, they either originate from local atomic spins11, or are a property of cooperative spin-density-wave (SDW) behavior of conduction electrons 12,13. Both assume clear partition into localized electrons, giving rise to local spins, and itinerant ones, occupying well-defined, rigid conduction bands. Here, by performing an INS study of spin dynamics in iron telluride, a parent material of one of the iron-based HTSC families, we have discovered that this very assumption fails, and that conduction and localized electrons are fundamentally entangled. In the temperature range relevant for the superconductivity we observe a remarkable redistribution of magnetism between the two groups of electrons. The effective spin per Fe at T 10 K, in the2 antiferromagnetic phase, corresponds to S 1, consistent with the recent analyses that emphasize importance of Hund s intra-atomic exchange15-16. However, it grows to S 3/2 in the disordered phase, a result that profoundly challenges the picture of rigid bands, broadly accepted for HTSC.

Zalinznyak, I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Xu, Zhijun [ORNL; Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Tsvelik, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pdf Association for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST). 2010a.American BOF Roundup. Iron & Steel Technology. November.for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST). 2010b. 2010 EAF

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. Abstract: The combination of zero-valent iron and a clay-type...

228

Public good dynamics drive evolution of iron acquisition strategies in natural bacterioplankton populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A common strategy among microbes living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. Such siderophore–iron ...

Cordero, Otto X.

229

Tricking Iron into Acting like a Rare-earth Element | The Ames...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tricking Iron into Acting like a Rare-earth Element By slipping iron between two nitrogen atoms in a lithium matrix, researchers are able to trick iron into having magnetic...

230

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Symmetric Long Straight Section Lattices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Symmetric Symmetric Long Straight Section Lattices for 2, 4, and 8 Sectors formerly AOP-TN-2009-007, Rev. 2 Michael Borland March 23, 2009 Accelerator Systems Division, Advanced Photon Source 1 Introduction Long straight sections [1] (LSS) are anticipated to be one of the significant changes to the accel- erator as part of the APS Renewal. Previously [2], we developed a lattice with eight LSS that, while workable, would have presented some operational challenges. In the present note, we show improved results for 8LSS, along with new solutions for 4LSS and 2LSS. As before, these lattices are developed by removing the Q2 quadrupoles and moving the Q1 back into its place, permitting a 7.7-m-long insertion device (as judged by the increase in face-to-face distance for the innermost powered quadrupoles). Further increases in length (perhaps 10%) might be possible by removing corrector magnets,

232

A&G Volume 54 Issue 1, Full Issue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......lithoautotrophic means of both energy genera- tion and carbon...render it an available energy source (Weiss et al...subsurface. Finally, an alternative inorganic electron acceptor...some iron reducers is car- bon monoxide (CO...made available as an energy source through downward......

A&G Volume 54 Issue 1; Full Issue

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SECTION J, APPENDIX A - SOW  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Replaced Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029; Modified Mod 0049) Honeywell FM&T, LLC Contract No. DE-NA0000622 SECTION J APPENDIX A STATEMENT OF WORK 09/19/12 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. OBJECTIVES, SCOPE, AND REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................... 1 1.0 OBJECTIVE .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2.1 The NNSA Mission ...................................................................................................................................... 1

234

Full Circle Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Full Circle Fuels Place Oberlin, Ohio Zip 44074 Sector Biofuels Product Alternative fuels center dedicated to increasing awareness and use of biofuels in northeast Ohio. Coordinates 41.292925°, -82.217354° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.292925,"lon":-82.217354,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally anoxic, redox transition zone sediments from the Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic iron cycles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iron cycle control atmospheric CO ? 12;The Global Carbon Cycle 70 times more carbon in ocean than... on ocean biological activity Iron cycle processes Modeling ... Source:...

237

Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iron media using Tafel analysis and Electrochemicalzerovalent iron using tafel analysis and electrochemicalAt the micro-scale, Tafel scan and electrochemical impedance

Wu, Yuxin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Trophic status of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii influences the impact of iron deficiency on photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of iron de?ciency on photosynthesis Aimee M. Terauchi •rates by suppress- ing photosynthesis but increasing insteadal. 2007). In oxygenic photosynthesis, iron is a cofactor in

Terauchi, Aimee M.; Peers, Graham; Kobayashi, Marilyn C.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Neutron Scattering Studies of Cuprates and Iron Pnictides.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Presented within are neutron scattering studies of several different high temperature superconducting materials: BaFe1.9Ni0.1As2 [Barium Iron Nickel Arsenic], BaFe1.85Ni0.15As2 [Barium Iron Nickel Arsenic], Ba0.67K0.33Fe2As2 [Barium… (more)

Liu, Mengshu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Enhanced Superconducting Properties of Iron Chalcogenide Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among the newly discovered iron-based superconductor, FeSe with the simplest structure and a transition temperature (T_c) around 8 K arouses much research interest. Although its Tc is much lower than that of the cuprates, iron chalcogenide has low...

Chen, Li

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to investigate reducing processing temperature, controlling the gas temperature and gas atmosphere over metalized iron nodules, and effectively using sub-bituminous coal as a reductant for producing high quality metalized iron nodules at low cost.

242

The iron powder test for naphthenic acid corrosion studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the course of an ongoing investigation into the phenomenon of naphthenic acid corrosion, a new test method has evolved and is currently being further developed to substitute the total acid number (TAN or neutralization number) as an indicator for naphthenic acid corrosion potential. It can also be used to complement conventional autoclave corrosion tests in high temperature environments, which are based on weight loss of steel coupons. In this new method an oil sample reacts with pure iron powder within an autoclave heated to the testing temperature. The result is based on the amount of dissolved iron found in the oil sample. The oil sample can dissolve an amount of iron for a given time at a given temperature, depending on the naphthenic acid corrosion, since these acids react with iron to produce oil soluble iron naphthenates. This paper describes the method, compares it with conventional crude corrosiveness testing, and proposes it as a new way of measuring naphthenic acid corrosion potential.

Hau, J.L.; Yepez, O.; Specht, M.I.; Lorenzo, R. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe. The fitting is now being placed into manufacture. Task 8--System Integration and Laboratory Validation continued developing the robot module inter-connects and development of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 4: Iron  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 Iron The chemical element iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the second most abundant metal. About five percent of the Earth's crust is composed of iron. The metal is chemically active and is found in nature combined with other elements in rocks and soils. In its natural state, iron is chemically bonded with oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, or sulfur in a variety of minerals. Forms of Iron Minerals, Ores, and Rocks Iron occurs mainly in iron-oxide ores. Some ores are a mixture of minerals rich in iron. Other iron ores are less rich and have a large number of impurities. The most important iron ore- forming minerals are: * Magnetite - Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) forms magnetic black iron ore. There are large deposits of

245

SECTION THIRTY SEVEN Consultants Section Thirty Seven Consultants, Inc.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

THIRTY SEVEN THIRTY SEVEN Consultants Section Thirty Seven Consultants, Inc. A California Corporation 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001] Rapid Response Team for Transmission AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Department of Energy, DoE. ACTION: Request for information. (1) The development timelines for generation and attendant transmission are often not coordinated or run concurrently. Because of the lengthy time to obtain regulatory reviews, permits and approvals (collectively ''Regulatory Permits''), major new transmission lines can take significantly longer to develop than some types of generation to which the transmission would connect. This Request for Information will refer to the difference in development times between generation and transmission as

246

Estimation of simultaneous systems of spatially interrelated cross sectional equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we consider a simultaneous system of spatially interrelated cross sectional equations. Our specification incorporates spatial lags in the endogenous and exogenous variables. In modelling the disturbance process we allow for both spatial correlation as well as correlation across equations. The data set is taken to be a single cross section of observations. The model may be viewed as an extension of the widely used single equation Cliff-Ord model. We suggest computationally simple limited and full information instrumental variable estimators for the parameters of the system and give formal large sample results.

Harry H. Kelejian; Ingmar R. Prucha

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

System and method for producing metallic iron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hearth furnace for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing having a drying/preheat zone, a conversion zone, a fusion zone, and optionally a cooling zone, the conversion zone is between the drying/preheat zone and the fusion zone. A moving hearth is positioned within the furnace housing. A hood or separation barrier within at least a portion of the conversion zone, fusion zone or both separates the fusion zone into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

THE AMIERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. NEW YORK SECTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...detect any impurity. The average of seven analyses on the acetylacetonate and of nine on the basic acetate gave the result: Atomic...new substance, was a mixture of the sulphides of zinc and iron. The Dissociation of Lead Nitrate: J. Liv-INGSTON R...

H. C. SHERMAN

1904-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Iron and steel industry process model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The iron and steel industry process model depicts expected energy-consumption characteristics of the iron and steel industry and ancillary industries for the next 25 years by means of a process model of the major steps in steelmaking, from ore mining and scrap recycling to the final finishing of carbon, alloy, and stainless steel into steel products such as structural steel, slabs, plates, tubes, and bars. Two plant types are modeled: fully integrated mills and mini-mills. User-determined inputs into the model are as follows: projected energy and materials prices; projected costs of capacity expansion and replacement; energy-conserving options, both operating modes and investments; the internal rate of return required on investment; and projected demand for finished steel. Nominal input choices in the model for the inputs listed above are as follows: National Academy of Sciences Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems Demand Panel nominal energy-price projections for oil, gas, distillates, residuals, and electricity and 1975 actual prices for materials; actual 1975 costs; new technologies added; 15% after taxes; and 1975 actual demand with 1.5%/y growth. The model reproduces the base-year (1975) actual performance of the industry; then, given the above nominal input choices, it projects modes of operation and capacity expansion that minimize the cost of meeting the given final demands for each of 5 years, each year being the midpoint of a 5-year interval. The output of the model includes the following: total energy use and intensity (Btu/ton) by type, by process, and by time period; energy conservation options chosen; utilization rates for existing capacity; capital-investment decisions for capacity expansion.

Sparrow, F.T.; Pilati, D.; Dougherty, T.; McBreen, E.; Juang, L.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Clean Air Act, Section 309  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CLEAN AIR ACT § 309* CLEAN AIR ACT § 309* §7609. Policy review (a) The Administrator shall review and comment in writing on the environmental impact of any matter relating to duties and responsibilities granted pursuant to this chapter or other provisions of the authority of Administrator, contained in any (1) legislation proposed by any Federal department or agency, (2) newly authorized Federal projects for construction and any major Federal agency action (other than a project for construction) to which section 4332(2)(C) of this title applies, and (3) proposed regulations published by any department or agency of the Federal Government. Such written comment shall be made public at the conclusion of any such review. (b) In the event the Administrator determines that any such legislation, action, or regulation

252

Performance of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter prototype  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype hadron calorimeter, of similar design to the Warm Iron Calorimeter (WIC) planned for the SLD experiment, has been built and its performance has been studied in a test beam. The WIC is an iron sampling calorimeter whose active elements are plastic streamer tubes similar to those used for the Mont-Blanc proton decay experiment. The construction and operation of the tubes will be briefly described together with their use in an iron calorimeter - muon tracker. Efficiency, resolution and linearity have been measured in a hadron/muon beam up to 11 GeV. The measured values correspond to the SLD design goals.

Callegari, G.; Piemontese, L.; De Sangro, R.; Peruzzi, I., Piccolo, M.; Busza, W.; Friedman, J.; Johnson, A.; Kendall, H.; Kistiakowsky, V.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The effects of copper and iron deficiencies in the chick  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Copper and iron content of all four diets were determined and the results reported in Table 2, III. Experiment 2. This experiment was carried out to determine the effects of adding cupric oxide to the diet in place of cupric sulfate as the copper... of Copper and Iron Deficiencies on Blood, Mortality and Weights of Four Week Old Chicks Analysis of Copper and Iron Content of Purified Diet" Experiment 3 Effects of Cupric Sulfate, Cupric Oxide, Ferrous Sul- fate and Ferric Oxide on Blood, Mortality...

McGhee, Flin Cameron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Iron-carbon compacts and process for making them  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes iron-carbon compacts and a process for making them. The process includes preparing a slurry comprising iron powder, furfuryl alcohol, and a polymerization catalyst for initiating the polymerization of the furfuryl alcohol into a resin, and heating the slurry to convert the alcohol into the resin. The resulting mixture is pressed into a green body and heated to form the iron-carbon compact. The compact can be used as, or machined into, a magnetic flux concentrator for an induction heating apparatus.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Santa Fe, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Section 12 | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

256

Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS Request for Proposal DE-RP36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service Being...

257

Section 7 | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 22:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

258

Computers & Graphics 28 (2004) 907918 Technical section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For the straight homogeneous generalized cylinder (SHGC) [6,7], their cross-sections have the same shape but may) a constant axis direction (SHGC), (ii) a constant size of cross-section (PRCGC), or (iii) a fixed shape

Ahuja, Narendra

259

SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems 26 4, the following should be considered when designa ng bicycle routes on roadways: Vehicular speed limits; SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems 27 4.2 BIKE LANES Bike lanes

Duchowski, Andrew T.

260

Intro to Least Squares Problems (LSQ) Full rank, m = n Full rank, m>n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 19, 2014 ... doesn't have an exact solution – maybe A isn't full rank, or m > n, or for whatever reason b isn't in the column-space of A, i.e. b /? col(A).

2014-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nickel and iron EXAFS of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum strain DSM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nickel and iron EXAFS of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum strain DSM ...

Neil R. Bastian; Gabriele. Diekert; Eric C. Niederhoffer; Boon Keng. Teo; Christopher T. Walsh; William H. Orme-Johnson

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008

263

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah

264

An Application of the Electric Resistance Furnace to the Determination of Oxygen in Iron and Steel.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Application of the Electric Resistance Furnace to the Determination of Oxygen in Iron and Steel. ...

R. H. McMillen

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Absorption cross section in Lifshitz black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the absorption cross section of a minimally coupled scalar in the Lifshitz black hole obtained from the new massive gravity. The absorption cross section reduces to the horizon area in the low energy and massless limit of s-wave mode propagation, indicating that the Lifshitz black hole also satisfies the universality of low energy absorption cross section for black holes.

Taeyoon Moon; Yun Soo Myung

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | Local iron displacements and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Local iron displacements and magnetoelastic coupling in a spin-ladder Local iron displacements and magnetoelastic coupling in a spin-ladder compound Hypothesis: Is magnetoelastic coupling in [FeX4]-based materials, an important ingredient in the emergence of superconductivity? Lujan Center: Combined Total Scattering and magnetic structure determination (HIPD-NPDF) The study of local, average and magnetic structure shows the existenceof highly correlated local iron (Fe) displacements in the spin-ladder iron chalcogenide BaFe2Se3. Built of ferromagnetic [Fe4] plaquettes, the magnetic ground state correlates with local displacements of the Fe atoms. Knowledge of these local displacements is essential for properly understanding the electronic structure of these systems. As with the copper oxide superconductors two decades ago, these

268

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Wednesday, November 27, 2013 The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but until now experimental

269

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov December 2012 This patent-pending technology, "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process," provides a metal-oxide oxygen carrier for application in fuel combustion processes that use oxygen. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Patent Details U.S. Non-Provisional Patent Application No. 13/159,553; titled "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid

270

Open Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration K. Coale coale@mlml.calstate.edu (831) 632-4400 Moss Landing Marine Laboratories 8272 Moss Landing Road Moss Landing, California 95039 USA Abstract The trace element iron has been recently shown to play a critical role in nutrient utilization, phytoplankton growth and therefore the uptake of carbon dioxide from the surface waters of the global ocean. Carbon fixation in the surface waters, via phytoplankton growth, shifts the ocean/atmosphere exchange equilibrium for carbon dioxide. As a result, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and iron flux to the oceans have been linked to climate change (glacial to interglacial transitions). These recent findings have led some to suggest that large scale

271

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Knoxville Iron Co - TN 07  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Knoxville Iron Co - TN 07 Knoxville Iron Co - TN 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: KNOXVILLE IRON CO. (TN.07 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Knoxville , Tennessee TN.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 TN.07-2 TN.07-3 Site Operations: Melted uranium contaminated scrap metal in order to test industrial hygiene procedures in the mid-1950s. TN.07-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC license TN.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Limited Quantities of Uranium Contained in Slag Material TN.07-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only TN.07-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to KNOXVILLE IRON CO.

272

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Iron Spin Transition in the The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print Wednesday, 30 April 2008 00:00 It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. The new results suggest that the effect of the spin-pairing transition on magnesiowüstite can be large enough to require a partial revision of the most accepted model of the lower mantle composition.

273

Decoupling of iron and phosphate in the global ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M increase in dissolved iron in deep waters. Forcing the model with weaker wind stresses leads to a decrease CO2. Additionally, nitrogen fixing organisms (reviewed by Karl et al. [2002] and Mills et al. [2004

Follows, Mick

274

Chapter 1.2 - The Direct Reduction of Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the past 100 years, the dominant technology to produce iron from iron ores has been the blast furnace, which utilizes carbothermic reduction at elevated temperatures to make a molten iron product and a liquid slag. However, economic ironmaking in this fashion requires massive facilities for economy of scale, and is environmentally problematic with its sinter plants, coke ovens, and large production of carbon dioxide. Direct reduction (DR) is an alternate form of ironmaking that is economic at much smaller scales, generally uses natural gas as reductant instead of coke, and costs considerably less than a blast furnace facility. Worldwide production of Direct Reduced Iron has increased from less than one million tonnes per year in 1971 to over 70 million tonnes forty years later. DRI production is expected to continue this rapid increase for years to come.

Thomas Battle; Urvashi Srivastava; John Kopfle; Robert Hunter; James McClelland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Iron and DHA in Relation to Early Cognitive Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(SF), and body iron (BI); DHA by median split. Bayley Scales of Infant Development Index II (BSID-II) Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) at 18 months (n=191) were assessed. A priori comparisons observed MDI...

Park, Loran Marie

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles for biological applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iron oxides magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) of high crystallinity, high magnetization, and size-monodispersity were synthesized with oleic acid as their native ligands. These hydrophobic and non-functionalized MPs have magnetic ...

Insin, Numpon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mechanism of iron catalysis of carbon monoxide decomposition in refractories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors discuss the catalytic effects of selected iron phases (metals, oxides, sulfides, and carbides) on the Boudouard reaction studied in an effort to more fully understand the disintegration of refractories when exposed to CO for long periods of time. It was found that active Fe atoms generated from the reduction of the iron oxides, especially {alpha}-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, are the actual catalysts for the Boudouard reaction. The catalytic process confirmed by thermodynamic calculations, kinetic data, and X-ray diffraction data, consists of adsorption and decomposition of CO simultaneously forming carbides of iron. The chemisorption and subsequent decomposition of the iron carbides, rather than diffusion, constitute the rate-controlling process for carbon deposition.

Xu, M.W.P.; Brown, J.J. Jr. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Simulation of iron impurity gettering in crystalline silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work discusses the Impurity-to-Efficiency (12E) simulation tool and applet. The 12E simulator models the physics of iron impurity gettering in silicon solar cells during high temperature processing. The tool also ...

Powell, Douglas M. (Douglas Michael)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons....

282

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2008 00:00 It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons....

283

Brain Iron as an Early Predictor of Alzheimer's Disease | Advanced...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Brain Iron as an Early Predictor of Alzheimer's Disease JUNE 15, 2011 Bookmark and Share (A)...

284

Momentum Distribution of Electrons in Chromium, Iron, and Nickel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Compton profiles of the electron momentum distribution in chromium, iron, and nickel are calculated using the wave functions obtained from self-consistent linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals energy-band calculations. The results are compared with experiment.

J. Rath, C. S. Wang, R. A. Tawil, and J. Callaway

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HTSC Figure 1 Fig. 1. Measured electronic structure of underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 in...

287

Laboratory and field studies of colloidal iron oxide dissolution as ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mechanisms that mediate the conversion of iron from the refractory pool to the ... lated to the extent of dissolution of the ferrihydrite carrier phase, even for .... totals was determined on a Canberra low-energy germanium detector. Replicate ...

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids."Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 31(1):50-58. Authors: MJ Truex VR Vermeul DP Mendoza BG...

289

Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier."Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 28(3):56-64. doi:10.1111j.1745-6592.2008.00203.x Authors:...

290

Hepcidin Is Involved in Iron Regulation in the Ischemic Brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxidative stress plays an important role in neuronal injuries caused by cerebral ischemia. It is well established that free iron increases significantly during ischemia and is responsible for oxidative damage in the brain. ...

Ding, Hui; Yan, Cai-Zhen; Shi, Honglian; Zhao, Ya-Shuo; Chang, Shi-Yang; Yu, Peng; Wu, Wen_Shuang; Zhao, Chen-Yang; Chang, Yan-Zhong; Duan, Xiang-Lin

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

291

The industrial ecology of the iron casting industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal casting is an energy and materials intensive manufacturing process, which is an important U.S. industry. This study analyzes iron casting, in particular, for possible improvements that will result in greater efficiencies ...

Jones, Alissa J. (Alissa Jean)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Mixed valence of iron in minerals with cation clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The valence and distribution of iron in vivianite, lazulite, babingtonite, rockbridgeite, acmite, aegirine-augite, hedenbergite,...2+ and Fe3+ in neighboring sites through common edges or faces is observed in all...

Georg Amthauer; George R. Rossman

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Verification of Steelmaking Slags Iron Content Final Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steel industry in the United States generates about 30 million tons of by-products each year, including 6 million tons of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slag. The recycling of BF (blast furnace) slag has made significant progress in past years with much of the material being utilized as construction aggregate and in cementitious applications. However, the recycling of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slags still faces many technical, economic, and environmental challenges. Previous efforts have focused on in-plant recycling of the by-products, achieving only limited success. As a result, large amounts of by-products of various qualities have been stockpiled at steel mills or disposed into landfills. After more than 50 years of stockpiling and landfilling, available mill site space has diminished and environmental constraints have increased. The prospect of conventionally landfilling of the material is a high cost option, a waste of true national resources, and an eternal material liability issue. The research effort has demonstrated that major inroads have been made in establishing the viability of recycling and reuse of the steelmaking slags. The research identified key components in the slags, developed technologies to separate the iron units and produce marketable products from the separation processes. Three products are generated from the technology developed in this research, including a high grade iron product containing about 90%Fe, a medium grade iron product containing about 60% Fe, and a low grade iron product containing less than 10% Fe. The high grade iron product contains primarily metallic iron and can be marketed as a replacement of pig iron or DRI (Direct Reduced Iron) for steel mills. The medium grade iron product contains both iron oxide and metallic iron and can be utilized as a substitute for the iron ore in the blast furnace. The low grade iron product is rich in calcium, magnesium and iron oxides and silicates. It has a sufficient lime value and can be utilized for acid mine drainage treatment. Economic analysis from this research demonstrates that the results are favorable. The strong demand and the increase of price of the DRI and pig iron in recent years are particularly beneficial to the economics. The favorable economics has brought commercial interests. ICAN Global has obtained license agreement on the technology from Michigan Tech. This right was later transferred to the Westwood Land, Inc. A demonstration pilot plant is under construction to evaluate the technology. Steel industry will benefit from the new supply of the iron units once the commercial plants are constructed. Environmental benefits to the public and the steel industry will be tremendous. Not only the old piles of the slag will be removed, but also the federal responsible abandoned mines from the old mining activities can be remediated with the favorable product generated from the process. Cost can be reduced and there will be no lime required, which can avoid the release of carbon dioxide from lime production process.

J.Y. Hwang

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Title Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6221E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Amrose, Susan, Ashok J. Gadgil, Venkat Srinivasan, Kristin Kowolik, Marc Muller, Jessica Huang, and Robert Kostecki Journal Joournal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering Volume 48 Issue 9 Pagination 1019-1030 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords arsenic, bangladesh, Cambodia, dosage rate, electrocoagulation, india, water treatment Abstract We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 μg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance

296

Neutron scattering study of the iron based superconductors.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In most iron-based and copper-oxide superconductors, the Tc [superconducting critical temperature] gradually increases upon charge carrier doping or isovalent doping. In the under-doped regime of… (more)

Wang, Miaoyin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Sound speed and thermophysical properties of liquid iron and nickel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An electrical-pulse-heating technique has been used to heat iron and nickel to high temperatures to measure thermophysical properties in the liquid state. A dynamic technique was used because static techniques, which are capable of greater precision, fail at a relatively low temperature. Measurements have been made, and results are shown for enthalpy, temperature, density, electrical resistivity, and sound speed up to 3950 K in iron and 4250 K in nickel.

R. S. Hixson; M. A. Winkler; M. L. Hodgdon

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

300

Polymorphous Transformations of Nanometric Iron(III) Oxide: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of its polymorphism, iron(III) oxide (ferric oxide, Fe2O3) is one of the most interesting and potentially useful phases of the iron oxides. ... Structural and magnetic properties, methods of synthesis, and applications of seven Fe(III) oxide polymorphs, including rare beta, epsilon, amorphous, and high-pressure forms, are reviewed. ... Films of ?-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by oxidizing Fe films rapidly in air. ...

Libor Machala; Ji?í Tu?ek; Radek Zbo?il

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High-temperature fabricable nickel-iron aluminides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nickel-iron aluminides are described that are based on Ni.sub.3 Al, and have significant iron content, to which additions of hafnium, boron, carbon and cerium are made resulting in Ni.sub.3 Al base alloys that can be fabricated at higher temperatures than similar alloys previously developed. Further addition of molybdenum improves oxidation and cracking resistance. These alloys possess the advantages of ductility, hot fabricability, strength, and oxidation resistance.

Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

302

Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics.

Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Jerebtsova, Marina [Children's National Medical Center, CRI Center for Cancer and Immunology, 111 Michigan Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph [Department of Biophysics and Physiology, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Richardson, Des R. [Iron Metabolism and Chelation Program, Department of Pathology, Blackburn Building (D06), University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, 2006 Australia (Australia); Ray, Patricio E. [Children's National Medical Center, CRI Center for Cancer and Immunology, 111 Michigan Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Gordeuk, Victor R. [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Nekhai, Sergei [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States)], E-mail: snekhai@howard.edu

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Iron Dominated Electromagnets: Design, Fabrication, Assembly and Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medium energy electron synchrotrons used for the production of high energy photons from synchrotron radiation is an accelerator growth industry. Many of these accelerators have been built or are under construction to satisfy the needs of synchrotron light users throughout the world. Because of the long beam lifetimes required for these synchrotrons, these medium energy accelerators require the highest quality magnets of various types. Other accelerators, for instance low and medium energy boosters for high energy physics machines and electron/positron colliders, require the same types of magnets. Because of these needs, magnet design lectures, were organized and presented periodically at biennual classes organized under the auspices of the US Particle Accelerator School (USPAS). These classes were divided among areas of magnet design from fundamental theoretical considerations, the design approaches and algorithms for permanent magnet wigglers and undulators and the design and engineering of conventional accelerator magnets. The conventional magnet lectures were later expanded for the internal training of magnet designers at LLNL at the request of Lou Bertolini. Because of the broad nature of magnet design, Dr. S. Y. Lee, the former Director of the Particle Accelerator School, saw the need for a specialized course covering the various aspects of the design, engineering and fabrication of conventional magnets. This section of the class was isolated and augmented using the LLNL developed material resulting in the class on conventional magnet design. Conventional magnets are defined (for the purposes of this publication) as magnets whose field shape is dominated by the shape of the iron magnet yoke and are excited by coils, usually wound from solid or hollow water-cooled copper or aluminum conductors. This publication collects the lecture notes, written for the first course in the USPAS conventional magnet design course and evolved over subsequent presentations of this same course, and organizes the material roughly divided among two parts. One part is theoretical and computational and attempts to provide a foundation for later chapters which exploit the expressions and algorithms for the engineering and design calculations required to specify magnet conceptual designs. A chapter is devoted to the description and use of one of many magnet codes used to characterize the two dimensional field resulting from various magnet cross-sections. A chapter is included which exploits the two-dimensional theory and applies the mathematics to techniques and systems for magnet measurement. The second part of this publication ranges to practical issues associated with the fabrication of components, assembly, installation and alignment of magnets. This section also includes fabrication practices which respond to personnel and equipment protection needs. Required design calculations are supplemented by examples and problems. A CD is included with tools provided to simplify the computation of some of the more tedious relationships. This CD also includes useful photographs and pictures describing the high volume production of typical magnet types, which if included in the publication will add too many pages and increase the cost of publication. Styles among those facing similar problems will result in a wide variation of individual magnet designs. Designs and technologies will evolve and improve. This publication provides a snapshot of the present technology and presents as examples the magnet designs developed in response to the needs of several projects, the Advanced Light Source at LBNL, PEPII Low Energy Ring and SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC and the Australian Light Source, currently under construction in Melbourne. In each example, the reasons for fabrication design decisions are itemized and rationalized as much as is reasonable. The examples presented in this publication are provided as starting points which can be used as a design basis for magnets required for future projects. It is hoped that the listing of some design choi

Tanabe, Jack; /SLAC, SSRL

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

304

Synthesis of iron oxides and the influence of organic acids on the resolubilization of iron minerals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Organ1c Acids on the Resolubi1 izat1on of Iron M1neral s. (May 1984) Er1c Thacher Clarke, B. A. , Southwestern University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Equilibrium Fe concentrat1ons of calcareous soil are readily... and reducing agents, buffered in 1. 0 N NH4 acetate at pH 3. 5 and 4. 75, Dissolution rate in oxalic acid decreased in the following order: ferrihydrite, lep1docroc1te, and goeth1te. Rate of Fe ox1de dissolution 1n the presence of com- plexing and reducing...

Clarke, Eric Thacher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe. The fitting is now being manufactured. The 12-inch ball valve for allowing no-blow access was also procured. Task 8 (System Integration and Laboratory Validation) continued with the development of the robot module inter-connects and of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to the design, fabrication and testing of a entry fitting in a 4-inch prototype and is now being used to complete drawings for use in 12-inch diameter pipe. Task 8--System Integration and Laboratory Validation continued developing the robot module inter-connects and development of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M. Kothari, Gerard T. Pittard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Overview Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Trends to 2030 In preparing projections for the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets between today and 2030. This overview focuses on one case, the reference case, which is presented and compared with the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) reference case (see Table 1). Readers are encouraged to review the full range of alternative cases included in other sections of AEO2008. As in previous editions of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), the reference case assumes that current policies affecting the energy sector remain unchanged throughout the projection period. The reference case provides a clear basis against which alternative cases and policies can be compared. Although current laws and regulations may change over the next 25 years, and new ones may be created, it is not possible to predict what they will be or how they will be implemented [1].

308

Iron aluminide knife and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy cutting edge. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800.degree. C. for a period of time followed by rolling at 650.degree. C., cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Backscattering cross section of a roughened sphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The backscattering cross section of a perfectly conducting, roughened sphere is presented. It is derived from the calculation of the electric-field cross correlation at two temporal...

Schertler, Donald J; George, Nicholas

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Section 10 (cont.): More Risk Management Concepts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 4, 2014 ... Section 10 (cont.) .... next ten years is Poisson distributed with mean 4. Each ... due to hurricanes hitting the house in the next ten years. Lesson ...

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

Vibration assisted filling of thin section castings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Understanding of the mechanism of the vibration needed to fill thin section or one with sharp edges in profile shapes and clarifying the dominant control… (more)

Abdul Karem, Waleed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Explanatory Material Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material Abstract This...

314

Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential of Domestic Natural Gas Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential of Domestic...

315

POLICY FLASH 2014-10 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION_ FULL...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION FULL IMPLEMENTATION OF ANA SYSTEM POLICY FLASH 2014-10 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION FULL IMPLEMENTATION OF ANA SYSTEM An updated...

316

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses...

317

GRR/Section 11-FD-a - NHPA Section 106 - Resource Survey | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

11-FD-a - NHPA Section 106 - Resource Survey 11-FD-a - NHPA Section 106 - Resource Survey < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-FD-a - NHPA Section 106 - Resource Survey 11-FD-a NHPA Section 106 Consultation.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Advisory Council on Historic Preservation National Park Service Bureau of Indian Affairs Regulations & Policies National Historic Preservation Act 36 CFR Part 800 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11-FD-a NHPA Section 106 Consultation.pdf 11-FD-a NHPA Section 106 Consultation.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Section 106 applies when two thresholds are met:

318

GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) 17FDAWildScenicRiversSection7AProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies National Park Service Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service United States Forest Service Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations & Policies Wild and Scenic Rivers Act 36 CFR 297 Wild and Scenic Rivers Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17FDAWildScenicRiversSection7AProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

319

GRR/Section 14-NV-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-NV-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-NV-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-NV-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14NVDSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Regulations & Policies Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1341) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14NVDSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1341) requires activities in

320

GRR/Section 14-WA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-WA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-WA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-WA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14-WA-d - 401 Water Quality Certification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies U S Army Corps of Engineers Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Statute of Washington Chapter 90.48 Washington Administrative Code Chapter 173-201A Washington Administrative Code 173-225-030 Triggers None specified Developers requiring a Section 404 Dredge and Fill Permit from the U S Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) are required to obtain a Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the state of Washington. The Washington State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

GRR/Section 14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14CADSection401WaterQualityCertification (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California State Water Resources Control Board Regulations & Policies Section 401 Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.) Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act Code of Regulations Title 23, Section 3855 et. seq. Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14CADSection401WaterQualityCertification (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

322

GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires a Water Quality Certification for any federal license or permit that is issued to construct or operate a facility, which may result in any fill or discharge into the navigable waters of the United States. The Utah Division of Water Quality oversees the 401 Water Quality Certification process in the state of Utah. The director of the Utah Division of Water Quality ("director") handles

323

Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F. [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Möller, C. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany) [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); TU Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Lauer, K. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)] [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Millihertz QPOs and broad iron line from LMC X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the temporal and energy spectral characteristics of the persistent black hole X-ray binary LMC X-1 using two XMM-Newton and a Suzaku observation. We report the discovery of low frequency (~ 26-29 mHz) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We also report the variablity of the broad iron K-alpha line studied earlier with Suzaku. The QPOs are found to be weak with fractional rms amplitude in the ~ 1-2 % range and quality factor Q~2-10 . They are accompanied by weak red noise or zero-centered Lorentzian components with rms variability at the ~ 1-3 % level. The energy spectra consists of three varying components - multicolour disk blackbody (kT_{in} ~ 0.7-0.9 keV), high energy power-law tail (Gamma ~ 2.4 - 3.3) and a broad iron line at 6.4-6.9 keV. The broad iron line, the QPO and the strong power-law component are not always present. The QPOs and the broad iron line appear to be clearly detected in the presence of a strong power-law component. The broad iron line is found to be weaker when the disk is like...

Alam, Md Shah; Belloni, T; Mukherjee, D; Jhingan, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Magnetosome-like ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanocubes for highly sensitive MRI of single cells and transplanted pancreatic islets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Contrast Agent. Ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanocubes were synthesized via thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in a mixture composed of oleic...PEG-phospholipid-encapsulated ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanocubes, designated as...

Nohyun Lee; Hyoungsu Kim; Seung Hong Choi; Mihyun Park; Dokyoon Kim; Hyo-Cheol Kim; Yoonseok Choi; Shunmei Lin; Byung Hyo Kim; Hye Seung Jung; Hyeonjin Kim; Kyong Soo Park; Woo Kyung Moon; Taeghwan Hyeon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 5. Comparison of Energy Intensity of Iron and Steelthe U.S. . 27 5.1. Energy Intensity of Iron and27 5.2. Energy Intensity of Iron and Steel Production in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Section 4 -Financial Information A. General Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Section 4 - Financial Information A. General Information 1. All University Housing and Dining fees. The security deposit, less any charges for damages, will be returned approximately ten weeks after the end according to Section 5 ­ Termination of Occupancy, will result in the forfeiture of the security deposit

Pantaleone, Jim

328

Section 999: Annual Plans | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Section 999: Annual Plans Section 999: Annual Plans Section 999: Annual Plans October 2, 2013 URTAC Meeting - October 2013 Federal Register Notice for October 10, 2013 URTAC Meeting The 24th Meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee (URTAC), previously scheduled for October 10, 2013, is postponed until further notice due to a lapse in Federal funding. October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 Federal Register Notice for October 8, 2013 UDAC Meeting The 24th Meeting of the Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee (UDAC), previously scheduled for October 8, 2013, is postponed until further notice due to a lapse in Federal funding. September 10, 2013 Draft 2014 Annual Plan Section 999: Draft 2014 Annual Plan July 8, 2013 2013 Annual Plan Section 999: 2013 Annual Plan

329

Collision Cross Sections for D — D Neutrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclear collision cross sections of 22 elements for the neutrons from a deuteron-deuteron source have been measured. The geometrical arrangement of the experiment was such that only small corrections to the measured transmission were necessary. The neutron energy was 2.88±0.04 Mev. The cross sections are found to vary irregularly with the atomic weight. The proton cross section determined for both paraffin and water scatterers is found to be 2.36×10-24 cm2, which is smaller than the value predicted by theory. In addition, the cross sections of a number of elements for neutrons of 2.46 Mev energy have been measured. For some elements the cross section is found to increase with an increase in neutron energy, for others it decreases.

W. H. Zinn; S. Seely; V. W. Cohen

1939-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Response of zinc, iron and copper status parameters to supplementation with zinc or zinc and iron in women  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supplementation with zinc at levels available over-the-counter may compromise iron or copper status. This study examined the effects of zinc(50mg/day) or zinc and iron(50 mg each/day) on 18 women aged 25-40. Subjects were matched on initial levels of serum ferritin(SF) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase(ESOD) and randomly assigned to Group Z (zinc) or F-Z (iron and zinc). The following were measured pretreatment and after 6 and 10 weeks treatment: serum zinc (BZ), salivary sediment zinc (SSZ), hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), SF, serum ceruloplasmin (Cp) and ESOD. Effects of treatment and weeks of treatment on changes from initial blood and saliva levels were analyzed using AOV. BZ increased (P=0.0144) and ESOD decreased (P=0.0001) with weeks of treatment. Differences due to treatment are presented. No effects were noted on Hgb, Hct or Cp. Intakes of zinc supplements at about 4X RDA appear to decrease copper(ESOD) and iron(SF) status. Use of iron w/zinc may be protective for FE but not Cu, and may compromise zinc (SSZ) status.

Yadrick, K.; Kenney, M.A.; Winterfeldt, E.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. The new results suggest that the effect of the spin-pairing transition on magnesiowüstite can be large enough to require a partial revision of the most accepted model of the lower mantle composition.

332

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. The new results suggest that the effect of the spin-pairing transition on magnesiowüstite can be large enough to require a partial revision of the most accepted model of the lower mantle composition.

333

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. The new results suggest that the effect of the spin-pairing transition on magnesiowüstite can be large enough to require a partial revision of the most accepted model of the lower mantle composition.

334

Fissile sample worths in the Uranium/Iron Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the long-standing problems from LMFBR critical experiments is the central worth discrepancy, the consistent overprediction of the reactivity associated with introducing a small material sample near the center of an assembly. Reactivity (sample worth) experiments in ZPR-9, assembly 34, the Uranium/Iron Benchmark (U/Fe), were aimed at investigating this discrepancy. U/Fe had a large, single-region core whose neutronics was governed almost entirely by /sup 235/U and iron. The essentially one-dimensional plate unit cell had one 1.6 mm-wide column of 93% enriched uranium (U(93)) near the center, imbedded in about 50 mm of iron and stainless steel. The neutron spectrum was roughly comparable to that of an LMFBR, but the adjoint spectrum was much flatter than an LMFBR's. The worths of four different fissile materials were measured and the worth of U(93) was measured using several different experimental techniques.

Schaefer, R.W.; Bucher, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH SECTION The Physics Education Research Section PERS publishes articles describing important results from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH SECTION The Physics Education Research Section PERS publishes articles because students of- ten confuse electric and magnetic fields.9,10 It has been shown that when a particle

Heckler, Andrew F.

336

GRR/Section 14-HI-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HI-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification HI-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-HI-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14HID - Section401WaterQualityCertification (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1251) Section 401 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 54 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14HID - Section401WaterQualityCertification (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

337

High-Energy Cross Sections. II. Nucleon-Nucleon Cross Section at Cosmic-Ray Energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cosmic-ray measurements are capable of yielding reliable results for the cross section of a nucleus for proton or neutron collisions involving a not too small energy transfer. This cross section should therefore be less than, or at most equal to, the true nonelastic cross section (reaction cross section). Results of recent cosmic-ray work are assembled and compared with the reaction cross sections measured at 1.4 Bev with the Brookhaven Cosmotron; it is found that the cosmic-ray cross sections are significantly larger, even for Pb. Assuming a nonuniform distribution of the density of nuclear matter, one can explain this surprising effect as the result of an increase in the elementary nucleon-nucleon cross section with energy. It is shown that the elementary cross section (the average of ?pp and ?np) must be (120-20+30)×10-27 cm2 in the neighborhood of 30 Bev.

Robert W. Williams

1955-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Measurement of the nucleon structure function in iron using 215- and 93-GeV muons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93- and 215-GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the multimuon spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. Using the known form of the radiatively corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F2(x,Q2) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5sections at the two beam energies, we measure R=-0.06±0.06(stat)±0.11(syst). Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others.

P. D. Meyers; A. R. Clark; K. J. Johnson; L. T. Kerth; S. C. Loken; T. W. Markiewicz; W. H. Smith; M. Strovink; W. A. Wenzel; R. P. Johnson; C. Moore; M. Mugge; R. E. Shafer; G. D. Gollin; F. C. Shoemaker; P. Surko

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enercon Services, Inc. (ENERCON) was requested under Task Order No.2 to identify scientific and technical data needed to benchmark and justify Full Burnup Credit, which adds 16 fission products and 4 minor actinides1 to Actinide-Only burnup credit. The historical perspective for Full Burnup Credit is discussed, and interviews of organizations participating in burnup credit activities are summarized as a basis for identifying additional data needs and making recommendation. Input from burnup credit participants representing two segments of the commercial nuclear industry is provided. First, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been very active in the development of Full Burnup Credit, representing the interests of nuclear utilities in achieving capacity gains for storage and transport casks. EPRI and its utility customers are interested in a swift resolution of the validation issues that are delaying the implementation of Full Burnup Credit [EPRI 2010b]. Second, used nuclear fuel storage and transportation Cask Vendors favor improving burnup credit beyond Actinide-Only burnup credit, although their discussion of specific burnup credit achievements and data needs was limited citing business sensitive and technical proprietary concerns. While Cask Vendor proprietary items are not specifically identified in this report, the needs of all nuclear industry participants are reflected in the conclusions and recommendations of this report. In addition, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were interviewed for their input into additional data needs to achieve Full Burnup Credit. ORNL was very open to discussions of Full Burnup Credit, with several telecoms and a visit by ENERCON to ORNL. For many years, ORNL has provided extensive support to the NRC regarding burnup credit in all of its forms. Discussions with ORNL focused on potential resolutions to the validation issues for the use of fission products. SNL was helpful in ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost compared to the acquisition of equivalent experimental data. ENERCON concludes that even with the cos

Enercon Services, Inc.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

340

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat to smelt the iron. Coal gasification is the result of anew processes such as gasification, slow pyrolysis, and fastreaction ? Carbon gasification and iron ore reduction

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensityof Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensitycomparisons of steel production energy efficiency and CO 2

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

How Godzilla Ate Pittsburgh: The Long Rise of the Japanese Iron and Steel Industry, 1900–1973  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

poorly endowed as Japan in coking coal and iron ore (WarrenYawata of iron ore for coking coal and the progressive in-

Bernard Elbaum

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of 4 nm ... obtained through high-temperature solution phase reaction of iron (III) acetylacetonate with 1, 2-hexadecanediol in the presence ... oleic acid and oleylami...

L. A. Cano; M. V. Cagnoli; S. J. Stewart; E. D. Cabanillas; E. L. Romero…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of 4 nm ... obtained through high-temperature solution phase reaction of iron (III) acetylacetonate with 1, 2-hexadecanediol in the presence ... oleic acid and oleylami...

L. A. Cano; M. V. Cagnoli; S. J. Stewart; E. D. Cabanillas…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Thermal Reactions of Fullerene C60 with Iron(III) Acetylacetonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal reaction of solid mixtures of fullerene C60 with iron(III) acetylacetonate proceeds in the combustion mode; the composition...60...ratio in the initial mixture. The magnetization of iron-fullerene complex...

V. G. Isakova; E. A. Petrakovskaya; A. D. Balaev…

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The nonlinear optical, magnetic, and Mössbauer spectral properties of some iron(III) doped silica xerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron(III) species dispersed in silica have been ... synthesized with a sol-gel process. The iron(III) was introduced as the acetylacetonate complex into a solution of tetraethoxysilane to...Z-scan experimental st...

L. Rebbouh; V. Rosso; Y. Renotte; Y. Lion; F. Grandjean…

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. Abstract: Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a...

348

Characterization of the FNR Protein of Escherichid coli, an Iron-Binding Transcriptional Regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coli, an Iron-Binding Transcriptional Regulator Jeffrey Green Martin Trageser Stephan...John R. Guest FNR is a transcriptional regulator mediating the activation or repression...coli, an iron-binding transcriptional regulator. | FNR is a transcriptional regulator...

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the tropi- cal Pacific Ocean II. Iron biogeochemistry,in the Northeast Pacific Ocean Gyre: Aerosols, iron, and theF. M. M. : The equatorial Pacific Ocean: Grazer-controlled

Moore, J. K; Braucher, O.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Direct production of light olefins from syngas over a carbon nanotube confined iron catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron particles confined in carbon nanotube (CNT) channels have been used as a catalyst for the direct conversion of syngas to light olefins. Compared with iron catalysts supported on other materials such as Si...

ChuanFu Wang; XiuLian Pan; XinHe Bao

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction. A Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for...

352

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Cisco IronPort Web Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple...

353

Characterization of temperature profile in furnace and solubility of iron in silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A better understanding of the behavior of impurities, such as iron, in silicon can lead to increases in solar cell efficiency. The purpose of this thesis was to study the behavior of iron in silicon via three sub-tasks: ...

Modi, Vrajesh Y

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium subsurface mobility is primarily controlled by its oxidation state, which in turn is loosely coupled to the oxidation state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and oxidation state. A pH 6.3 vadose zone sediment containing iron oxides and iron-containing phyllosilicates was treated with various complexants (ammonium oxalate) and reductants (dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate) to selectively leach and/or reduce iron oxide and phyllosilicate phases. Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to identify initial iron mineral composition of the sediment and monitor dissolution and reduction of iron oxides. Sorption of Pu(V) was monitored over one week for each of six treated sediment fractions. Plutonium oxidation state speciation in the aqueous and solid phases was monitored using solvent extraction, coprecipitation, and XANES. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the sediment contained 25-30% hematite, 60-65% Al-goethite, and <10%Fe(III) in phyllosilicate; there was no detectable Fe(II). Upon reduction with a strong chemical reductant (dithionite-citrate buffer, DCB), much of the hematite and goethite disappeared and the Fe in the phyllosilicate reduced to Fe(II). The rate of sorption was found to correlate with the 1 fraction of Fe(II) remaining within each treated sediment phase. Pu(V) was the only oxidation state measured in the aqueous phase, irrespective of treatment, whereas Pu(IV) and much smaller amounts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) were measured in the solid phase. Surface-mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) occurred in treated and untreated sediment samples; Pu(V) remained on untreated sediment surface for two days before reducing to Pu(IV). Similar to the sorption kinetics, the reduction rate was correlated with sediment Fe(II) concentration. The correlation between Fe(II) concentrations and Pu(V) reduction demonstrates the potential impact of changing iron mineralogy on plutonium subsurface transport through redox transition areas. These findings should influence the conceptual models of long-term stewardship of Pu contaminated sites that have fluctuating redox conditions, such as vadose zones or riparian zones.

Hixon, Amy E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Nitsche, Heino; Qafoku, Odeta; Powell, Brian A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Promising tools in cancer theranostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Iron-oxide nanoparticles of small dimensions that have superparamagnetic properties show immense potential to revolutionize the future of cancer theranostics, the combinatorial diagnosis and therapeutic approach towards cancer. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have unique magnetic properties, due to which they show excellent tumor-targeting efficiency, and this paves the way for effective personalized cancer treatment. The aim of this review is to focus on the ability of \\{SPIONs\\} to perform multiple roles in the field of cancer biology, such as in diagnosis, monitoring, targeting and therapy. Also, other topics are discussed, including the synthesis of SPIONs, the challenges and recent advances.

Poornima Budime Santhosh; Nataša Poklar Ulrih

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Summary: Section 4.1, Part 1 Summary: Section 4.1, Part 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all ten vector space axioms hold, we can conclude that S is a vector space. Summary: Section 4.1, PartSummary: Section 4.1, Part 1 Summary: Section 4.1, Part 1 #12;A vector space is a nonempty set V of objects, called vectors, on which are defined addition and scalar multiplication, subject to the ten

Myers, Amy

360

Total and Partial Fragmentation Cross-Section of 500 MeV/nucleon Carbon Ions on Different Target Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By using an experimental setup based on thin and thick double-sided microstrip silicon detectors, it has been possible to identify the fragmentation products due to the interaction of very high energy primary ions on different targets. Here we report total and partial cross-sections measured at GSI (Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung), Darmstadt, for 500 MeV/n energy $^{12}C$ beam incident on water (in flasks), polyethylene, lucite, silicon carbide, graphite, aluminium, copper, iron, tin, tantalum and lead targets. The results are compared to the predictions of GEANT4 (v4.9.4) and FLUKA (v11.2) Monte Carlo simulation programs.

Behcet Alpat; Ercan Pilicer; Sandor Blasko; Diego Caraffini; Francesco Di Capua; Vasile Postolache; Giorgio Saltanocchi; Mauro Menichelli; Laurent Desorgher; Marco Durante; Radek Pleskac; Chiara La Tessa

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Film-forming capacity of alcoholic solutions of iron(III) chloride with acetylacetone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Processes in which film-forming solutions based on acetylacetonate and iron(III) chloride are produced were subjected to...

S. A. Kuznetsova; I. A. Senokosova

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint- Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input

363

Consequence of total lepton number violation in strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of a neutrinoless electron to positron conversion on a cooling of strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs is studied.

Belyaev, V. B. [Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ricci, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Šimkovic, F. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F1, SK-842 15, Bratislava, Slovakia and Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Adam, J. Jr.; Tater, M.; Truhlík, E. [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 ?ež (Czech Republic)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Neutron Total Cross Sections at 20 Mev  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the T(d, n)He4 reaction as a monoenergetic source of neutrons of about 20 Mev, the total cross sections of 13 elements have been measured by a transmission experiment. These cross sections vary approximately as A23 as is to be expected from the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. The cross section for hydrogen at 19.93 Mev is 0.504±0.01 barn. This result, together with other results at lower energies, seems to require a Yukawa potential in both the singlet and triplet n-p states and a singlet effective range that is lower than that obtained from p-p scattering data.

Robert B. Day and Richard L. Henkel

1953-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

SECTION 205 FCA 48, AS AMENDED MODEL PROJECT PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features for Section 205 non- structural flood risk management, Section 206 aquatic ecosystem restoration. Section 205 Structural Flood Risk Management and Section 206 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration ­ Use only structural flood risk management and to Section 206 aquatic ecosystem restoration. Section 205 Structural

US Army Corps of Engineers

366

SECTION 205 FCA 48, AS AMENDED MODEL PROJECT PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allocable to Section 205 structural flood risk management and to Section 206 aquatic ecosystem restoration. Section 205 Structural Flood Risk Management, Section 206 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration, and Recreation to Section 205 structural flood risk management, to Section 206 aquatic ecosystem restoration

US Army Corps of Engineers

367

Part VI: Section I: Contract Clause  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be...

368

Interfacial Effects in Iron-Nickel Hydroxide–Platinum Nanoparticles Enhance Catalytic Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coordinatively unsaturated iron sites for activating O 2...the catalyst. To create the iron (hydr)oxide interface...acac) 2 (where acac is acetylacetonate) in the presence of CO...showed that this layer contained iron (fig. S3). Although the...

Guangxu Chen; Yun Zhao; Gang Fu; Paul N. Duchesne; Lin Gu; Yanping Zheng; Xuefei Weng; Mingshu Chen; Peng Zhang; Chih-Wen Pao; Jyh-Fu Lee; Nanfeng Zheng

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reduction of Sintering during Annealing of FePt Nanoparticles Coated with Iron Oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are first obtained by reduction of iron(III) acetylacetonate and platinum(II) acetylacetonateReduction of Sintering during Annealing of FePt Nanoparticles Coated with Iron Oxide Chao LiuVised Manuscript ReceiVed October 12, 2004 FePt/iron oxide core/shell nanoparticles are synthesized by a two step

Laughlin, David E.

370

Iron Species in Argonne Premium Coal Samples:? An Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron Species in Argonne Premium Coal Samples:? An Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 ... Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the iron species that are present within the Argonne Premium Coal Samples. ...

Stephen R. Wasserman; Randall E. Winans; Robert McBeth

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

Highpressure behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highpressure behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions Mainak Mookherjee,1 Yoichi at high pressures have demonstrated that Fe7C3 iron carbide is a likely candidate for the Earth's inner behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions, J. Geophys. Res., 116, B04201, doi:10

Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

372

Mineralogical and Microbial Controls on Iron Reduction in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terminal electron accepting processes, iron reduction has the added complexity that its oxidized form (ferric iron) exists primarily as one of several solid phases in environments with pH greater than 3. Thus, the distribution and form of ferric iron...

Howson, Andrea Melissa

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

373

Author's personal copy Hematite and iron carbonate precipitation-coexistence at the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide The hydrothermal reactivity of swelling clays has relevant implications on the geological that the carbon dioxide increased the hydrothermal reactivity of montmorillonite because the hematite and ironAuthor's personal copy Hematite and iron carbonate precipitation-coexistence at the iron

Montes-Hernandez, German

374

The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

375

Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum K. G precipitation; sorption; isotherms; X-ray diffraction; hydrous iron oxide; hydrous aluminum oxide; copper. INTRODUCTION Hydrous oxides of iron (HFO) and aluminum (HAO) are important mineral components of natural

Chorover, Jon

376

HIGH TEMPERATURE SULFIDATION BEHAVIOR OF LOW Al IRON-ALUMINUM COMPOSITIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH TEMPERATURE SULFIDATION BEHAVIOR OF LOW Al IRON-ALUMINUM COMPOSITIONS S.W. Banovic, J.N. Du (Received January 5, 1998) (Accepted March 23, 1998) Introduction Iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings, the application of iron-aluminum alloys is currently limited due to hydrogen cracking susceptibility subsequent

DuPont, John N.

377

Rhizosphere Microbial Community Structure in Relation to Root Location and Plant Iron Nutritional Status  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plant iron nutritional status were compared by performing...plant iron nutritional status during the iron-sufficient...only 24 samples, allowed us to compare root locations...BARD) program grant US-2668-95 and by a grant...U.S. Department of Energy. REFERENCES B. Assmus...

Ching-Hong Yang; David E. Crowley

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

EOC Title: Logistics Section Chief General Description The Logistics Section Chief is responsible for providing facilities, services, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOGISTICS EOC Title: Logistics Section Chief General Description The Logistics Section Chief EOC operating requirements. Key Role & Responsibilities � Ensure the logistics function is carried out Staff for Complex Incidents Training for Section Chiefs � Logistics Section Chief Training #12;

Walker, Matthew P.

379

St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but has a high tolerance for shade-season grass. It does best in full sun and high temperatures. Goes dormant and turns brown in winter. Very

Ishida, Yuko

380

GRR/Section 14-OR-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-OR-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14ORDSection410WaterQualityCertification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality U S Army Corps of Engineers Regulations & Policies OAR 340-048: Certification of Compliance with Water Quality Requirements Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14ORDSection410WaterQualityCertification.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency U S Army Corps of Engineers Regulations & Policies Idaho Environmental Protection and Health Act Idaho Administrative Procedure Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf 14IDDSection401WaterQualityCertificationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

382

GRR/Section 14-AK-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-AK-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-AK-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-AK-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14AKDSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation United States Environmental Protection Agency U S Army Corps of Engineers Regulations & Policies Alaska Water Quality Standards Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14AKDSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf 14AKDSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

383

GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14MTD401WaterQualityCertification (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Federal Clean Water Act (33 USC § 1251 et seq.) Montana Codes Annotated 75-5-401 Aministrative Rules of Montana Chapter 30 Administrative Rules of Montana 17.30.101 through 109 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTD401WaterQualityCertification (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

384

GRR/Section 12-FD-f - ESA Section 7 Formal Consultation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f - ESA Section 7 Formal Consultation f - ESA Section 7 Formal Consultation < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-FD-f - ESA Section 7 Formal Consultation 12FDF - ESA Section 7 Formal Consultation.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Fish and Wildlife Service Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Bureau of Reclamation Regulations & Policies Endangered Species Act ESA Sec. 3 ESA Sec. 7 ESA Sec. 9 ESA Sec. 10 50 CFR 17.11-17.12 50 CFR 226 50 CFR 402.02 50 CFR 402.14 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12FDF - ESA Section 7 Formal Consultation.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

385

West Virginia University 1 In this section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia University 1 Minors In this section: � General Statement � Rationale � Requirements to assure that completion of a minor is appropriately recognized and posted to the student's transcript: 1

Mohaghegh, Shahab

386

West Virginia University 1 In this section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia University 1 FERPA In this section: � Notice to Students Regarding FERPA not contractually affiliated with the University. Use and disclosure of this information shall be limited to (1

Mohaghegh, Shahab

387

SECTION J, APPENDIX L - DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L Note: The Diversity Plan shall be submitted to the Contracting Officer in accordance with DEAR 970.5226-1 DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE 12110 In...

388

Part IV: Section G: Contract Administration  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

G - Page ii PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 Contracting Officer's Representative(s) 1 G.2 Contract Administration 1 G.3 Modification...

389

MODELING AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS FOR AMERICIUM.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on the modeling and fission cross section for americium isotopes (May 2004-June 2005). The purpose of the contract was to provide fission cross sections for americium isotopes with the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE 2.19. The following work was performed: (1) Fission calculations capability suitable for americium was implemented to the EMPIRE-2.19 code. (2) Calculations of neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 239}Am to {sup 244g}Am were performed with EMPIRE-2.19 for energies up to 20 MeV. For the neutron-induced reaction of {sup 240}Am, fission cross sections were predicted and uncertainties were assessed. (3) Set of fission barrier heights for each americium isotopes was chosen so that the new calculations fit the experimental data and follow the systematics found in the literature.

ROCHMAN, D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

GRR/Sections | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Sections GRR/Sections < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Roadmap Coverage The roadmapping initiative covers the states show in green on the map below, including California, Nevada, Hawai'i, Alaska, Idaho, Utah, Oregon, and Montana. The roadmap is being developed at the federal and state levels, allowing for future expansion to the local (county) level. Development of the roadmap for two additional states (Colorado and Texas) is underway for Fiscal Year 2013. Click on a state to view Regulatory Roadmap information specific to that state. List of Roadmap Sections Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for

391

Cross-Section Measurement near 50 Bev  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experiment to measure the cross section for high-energy cosmic-ray protons and neutrons to interact with the Fe nucleus has been carried out at 3250 m elevation. The detector had a relatively good energy resolution, and was designed to select nucleons in the vicinity of 50 Bev. The purpose was to obtain a single interaction cross section with good accuracy in order to compare it with results obtained with accelerators in the 1- to 5-Bev region. This comparison yields a value for the elementary meson-production cross section [the average of ?(pp) and ?(np)] near 50 Bev. The Fe results are: neutrons, ?Fe=0.61±0.03 barn; protons, ?Fe=0.61±0.04 barn. The corresponding average nucleon-nucleon "inelastic" (presumably meson production) cross section is ?nucleon=21±4 millibarns.

A. E. Brenner and Robert W. Williams

1957-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Full-rank Tilings of F 2 Do Not Exist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Full-rank Tilings of F 8 2 Do Not Exist #3; Ari Trachtenberg y Alexander Vardy z February 3, 2003 Abstract We show that there are no full-rank tilings of F 8 2 , using a carefully designed exhaustive search. This solves an open problem posed in [5] and implies that a full-rank perfect binary code

Goldberg, Bennett

393

Ultra Low Power Full Adder Topologies Farshad Moradi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the sense energy recovery full adder (SERF) design and the GDI (Gate diffusion input) technique designs. In this paper, 65nm standard models are used for simulations. Keywords: GDI, SERF, Full adder topologies for full adder based on GDI technique are presented. Moreover, several circuit topologies based

Mahmoodi, Hamid

394

Absorption cross section of RN black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behavior of a charged scalar field in the RN black hole space time is studied using WKB approximation. In the present work it is assumed that matter waves can get reflected from the event horizon. Using this effect, the Hawking temperature and the absorption cross section for RN black hole placed in a charged scalar field are calculated. The absorption cross section $\\sigma _{abs}$ is found to be inversely proportional to square of the Hawking temperature of the black hole.

Sini R.; V. C. Kuriakose

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Oxidation State of Iron at High Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fig. 3. In K vs. In P-Acetylacetonate and basic acetate. kilobars...for the basic acetate and acetylacetonate (4). Both of these ligands...molecule attaching to the iron through two oxygens. The...KFeCI4 * 323 393 0.07 Fe acetylacetonate 60 325 0.15 Fe acetylacetonate...

H. G. Drickamer; G. K. Lewis Jr.; S. C. Fung

1969-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

High Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Iron Aluminide Alloys and Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-year effort has been focused on optimizing the long-term oxidation performance of ingot-processed (IP) and oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe{sub 3}Al and iron aluminide-based coatings. Based on results from several composition iterations, a Hf-doped alloy (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05at.%Hf) has been developed with significantly better high temperature oxidation resistance than other iron aluminides. The scale adhesion is not significantly better; however, the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale grows at a slower rate, approximately a factor of 10 less than undoped iron aluminide. The benefit of Hf is greatest at 1100-1200 C. Long-term oxidation resistance of commercially fabricated ODS Fe{sub 3}Al has been determined and compared to commercially available ODS FeCrAl. Scale spallation rates for ODS Fe{sub 3}Al are higher than for ODS FeCrAl. To complement studies of iron-aluminide weld-overlay coatings, carbon steel was coated with Fe-Al-Cr by thermal spraying. These specimens were then exposed in air at 900 and 1000 C and in air-1%SO{sub 2} at 800 C. Most likely due to an inadequate aluminum concentration in the coatings, continuous protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} could not be maintained and, consequently, the corrosion performance was significantly worse than what is normally observed for Fe{sub 3}Al.

Pint, B.A.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nanocrystalline Iron Oxide Aerogels as Mesoporous Magnetic Architectures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed crystalline nanoarchitectures of iron oxide that exhibit superparamagnetic behavior while still retaining the desirable bicontinuous pore?solid networks and monolithic nature of an aerogel. ... The laser power was controlled using a series of optical density filters and kept below ?1 mW to avoid sample degradation. ...

Jeffrey W. Long; Michael S. Logan; Christopher P. Rhodes; Everett E. Carpenter; Rhonda M. Stroud; Debra R. Rolison

2004-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

398

Extracellular iron-sulfur precipitates from growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have examined extracellular iron-bearing precipitates resulting from the growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in a basal medium with lactate as the carbon source and ferrous sulfate. Black precipitates were obtained when D. desulfuricans was grown with an excess of FeSO{sub 4}. When D. desulfuricans was grown under conditions with low amounts of FeSO{sub 4}, brown precipitates were obtained. The precipitates were characterized by iron K-edge XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer-effect spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. Both were noncrystalline and nonmagnetic (at room temperature) solids containing high-spin Fe(III). The spectroscopic data for the black precipitates indicate the formation of an iron-sulfur phase with 6 nearest S neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 2.24(1) {angstrom}, whereas the brown precipitates are an iron-oxygen-sulfur phase with 6 nearest O neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 1.95(1) {angstrom}.

Antonio, M. R.; Tischler, M. L.; Witzcak, D.

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

399

Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles W. Brullot a in revised form 20 December 2011 Available online 3 February 2012 Keywords: Ferrofluid Polyethylene glycol Magneto-optics Magnetite Rheology a b s t r a c t Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol

400

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-rhodium alloy catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the nature of iron-rhodium alloy catalysts during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a combination of experimental techniques were applied. Infrared spectroscopy was mainly used to extract direct information on the surface of catalysts under the reaction conditions. In addition, Mossbauer spectroscopy was employed to study the iron alloy catalysts. Further characterization of the catalysts was performed by chemisorption measurements. Hydrocarbon products of the CO + H/sub 2/ synthesis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography. The working surface of a silica-supported rhodium catalyst was found to be saturated with molecular carbon monoxide. The intensity of the linear carbonyl absorption band remained constant compared to that for room temperature CO adsorption, while that of the bridge-bonded carbonyl absorption band was drastically reduced during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The bridge-bonded adsorption sites are assumed to be the active sites for dissociating carbon monoxide. The hydrogenation rate of the linearly adsorbed carbon monoxide was much slower than the steady state reaction rate. The alloy catalyst did not form a bulk carbide, but the presence of surface carbon was suggested by the large shift of the linear carbonyl absorption band. On the other hand, infrared spectra on an iron catalyst showed only weak bands, indicating a high degree of CO dissociation. On a silica-supported iron-rhodium alloy catalyst, surface analysis by infrared spectroscopy presents evidence of well-mixed alloy formation. Three models of carbon monoxide adsorption were identified.

Choi, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Iron Phosphate Glasses for Vitrifying DOE High Priority Nuclear Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron phosphate glasses have been studied as an alternative glass for vitrifying Department of Energy (DOE) high priority wastes. The high priority wastes were the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and the High Level Waste (HLW) with high chrome content stored at Hanford, WA, and the Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These wastes were recommended by Tanks Focus Area since they were expected to require special attention when vitrified in borosilicate glasses. All three of these wastes have been successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses at waste loadings ranging from a low of 32 wt% for the high sulfate LAW to 40 wt% for the SBW to a high of 75 wt% for the high chrome HLW. In addition to these desirable high waste loadings, the iron phosphate glasses were easily melted, typically between 950 and 1200 C, in less than 4 hours in commercial refractory oxide containers. It is noteworthy that the chemical durability of both glassy and deliberately crystallized iron phosphate wasteforms not only met, but significantly exceeded, all current DOE chemical durability requirements as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). The high waste loading, low melting temperature, rapid furnace throughput (short melting time) and their outstanding chemical durability could significantly accelerate the clean up effort and reduce the time and cost of vitrifying these high priority wastes.

Kim, C.W.; Day, D.E.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

Carbonylation of (+)-2-carene induced by iron-pentacarbonyl.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(+)-2-carene heated neat with iron pentacarbonyl leads to ?-phellandrene-Fe(CO)3 complex ( ?15 % ), p. cymene ( ?15 % ), (-)-(1S)-3,8,8-trimethylbicyclo (4.1.1) oct-3-ene-7-one ( ?50 % ) and (+)-(1S,7S)-3,8,8-trimethylbicyclo (4.1.1.) oct-3-ene-7-ol ( ?20 % ).

Christiane Santelli-Rouvier; Maurice Santelli; Jean-Pierre Zahra

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The iron man phenomenon, participatory culture, & future augmented reality technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Iron Man media franchise glorifies futuristic interfaces and devices like holographic screens, powerful mobile devices, and heads-up displays. Consequently, a mainstream audience has come to know about and discursively relate to Augmented Reality ... Keywords: augmented reality, human-centric design, social media

Isabel Pedersen; Luke Simcoe

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residence time for contaminated ground- water to degrade VC to below its maximum contamination levelReduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems B A O L I N D E N G * Department). Remediation of groundwater contaminated with chlori- nated ethylenes, including vinyl chloride, has been chal

Deng, Baolin

405

Sulfur Versus Iron Oxidation in an Iron-Thiolate Model Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the absence of base, the reaction of [Fe{sup II}(TMCS)]PF{sub 6} (1, TMCS = 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)-4,8,11-trimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) with peracid in methanol at -20 C did not yield the oxoiron(IV) complex (2, [Fe{sup IV}(O)(TMCS)]PF{sub 6}), as previously observed in the presence of strong base (KO{sup t}Bu). Instead, the addition of 1 equiv of peracid resulted in 50% consumption of 1. The addition of a second equivalent of peracid resulted in the complete consumption of 1 and the formation of a new species 3, as monitored by UV-vis, ESI-MS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies. ESI-MS showed 3 to be formulated as [Fe{sup II}(TMCS) + 2O]{sup +}, while EXAFS analysis suggested that 3 was an O-bound iron(II)-sulfinate complex (Fe-O = 1.95 {angstrom}, Fe-S = 3.26 {angstrom}). The addition of a third equivalent of peracid resulted in the formation of yet another compound, 4, which showed electronic absorption properties typical of an oxoiron(IV) species. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed 4 to be a novel iron(IV) compound, different from 2, and EXAFS (Fe{double_bond}O = 1.64 {angstrom}) and resonance Raman ({nu}{sub Fe{double_bond}O} = 831 cm{sup -1}) showed that indeed an oxoiron(IV) unit had been generated in 4. Furthermore, both infrared and Raman spectroscopy gave indications that 4 contains a metal-bound sulfinate moiety ({nu}{sub s}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1000 cm{sup -1}, {nu}{sub as}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1150 cm{sup -1}). Investigations into the reactivity of 1 and 2 toward H{sup +} and oxygen atom transfer reagents have led to a mechanism for sulfur oxidation in which 2 could form even in the absence of base but is rapidly protonated to yield an oxoiron(IV) species with an uncoordinated thiol moiety that acts as both oxidant and substrate in the conversion of 2 to 3.

A McDonald; M Bukowski; E Farquhar; T Jackson; K Koehntop; M Seo; R De Hont; A Stubna; J Halfen; E Munck

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Widget:PrintFullVersionButton | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PrintFullVersionButton PrintFullVersionButton Jump to: navigation, search This widget creates a button, which create a button matching the PrintPDF button style, which will direct the user to the assembled page. This template assumes the existence of the PrintPDFButton widget and template. Parameters page - The wiki address of the assembled page, or full version to be printed. cover - The name of a wiki page to use as a cover page (optional) Dependencies Template:PrintFullVersionButton Template:PrintPDFButton Widget:PrintPDFButton Usage This Widget assumes the existence of HTML elements created by the PrintFullVersionButton template, and is called via that template. {{PrintFullVersionButton}} Example {{PrintFullVersionButton}} (displays in the upper right corner of the page) Retrieved from

407

Feasibility Study --Project Full Breeze By the Wind Energy Projects in Action (WEPA) Full Breeze Project team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feasibility Study -- Project Full Breeze By the Wind Energy Projects in Action (WEPA) Full Breeze Department of Facilities approached the wind energy sub-community in the spring of 2009 to assist in a study

408

Fracture toughness studies of gray and ductile cast irons using a J-integral approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and silicon in which more carbon is present than can be retained in solid solution in austenite at the eutectic temperature. In gray cast iron, the iron and carbon solidify as a eutectic structure whose two phases are graphite and iron. Gray iron usually... contains from 1. 7 to 4. 5% carbon and 1 to 3% silicon. 27 The normal microstructure of gray iron is a matrix of pearlite (ferrite and cementite) with the graphite flakes dispersed throughout. Among the properties that the flake graphite 28 in gray...

Floyd, Donna Lynne Woodall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

File:Section106examplereport.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Section106examplereport.pdf Section106examplereport.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Section106examplereport.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,272 × 1,645 pixels, file size: 2.23 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 8 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 10:35, 20 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:35, 20 November 2012 1,272 × 1,645, 8 pages (2.23 MB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

410

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos 21: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities November 12, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Cisco IronPort Email Security Appliances (C-Series and X-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. Cisco IronPort Web Security Appliances (S-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. ABSTRACT: Cisco Ironport Appliances Sophos Anti-Virus Vulnerabilities. REFERENCE LINKS: Cisco Security Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20121108-sophos Secunia Advisory SA51197 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Cisco has acknowledged some vulnerabilities in Cisco IronPort Web Security

411

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos 1: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities November 12, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Cisco IronPort Email Security Appliances (C-Series and X-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. Cisco IronPort Web Security Appliances (S-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. ABSTRACT: Cisco Ironport Appliances Sophos Anti-Virus Vulnerabilities. REFERENCE LINKS: Cisco Security Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20121108-sophos Secunia Advisory SA51197 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Cisco has acknowledged some vulnerabilities in Cisco IronPort Web Security

412

Use of bimodal carbon distribution in compacts for producing metallic iron nodules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for use in production of metallic iron nodules comprising providing a reducible mixture into a hearth furnace for the production of metallic iron nodules, where the reducible mixture comprises a quantity of reducible iron bearing material, a quantity of first carbonaceous reducing material of a size less than about 28 mesh of an amount between about 65 percent and about 95 percent of a stoichiometric amount necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material, and a quantity of second carbonaceous reducing material with an average particle size greater than average particle size of the first carbonaceous reducing material and a size between about 3 mesh and about 48 mesh of an amount between about 20 percent and about 60 percent of a stoichiometric amount of necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material.

Iwasaki, Iwao

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

GRR/Section 14-CO-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-CO-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 4-CO-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14CODSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies 5 CCR 1002-82 Colorado Water Quality Control Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14CODSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires a Water Quality

414

GRR/Section 14-TX-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-TX-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 4-TX-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14TXDSection401WaterQualityCertification (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas Regulations & Policies 16 TAC 3.93 - RRC Water Quality Certification 16 TAC 3.30 - MOU between the RRC and the TCEQ Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14TXDSection401WaterQualityCertification (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires a Water Quality

415

Kinetics of the steam reforming of methane with iron, nickel, and iron-nickel alloys as catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steam reforming of methane on iron or nickel, CH/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/O ..-->.. CO + 3H/sub 2/, can be regarded as a sequence of two reactions with adsorbed carbon as an intermediate species: CH/sub 4/ ..-->.. C(ads) + 2H/sub 2/, C(ads) + H/sub 2/O ..-->.. CO + H/sub 2/. As the first reaction is rate limiting, the following rate law can be applied to methane reforming catalysed by iron: v = k/sub 2//sup Fe/ a/sub 0//sup -n/ p/sub CH/sub 4///P/sub H/sub 2///sup 1/2/, 0.6 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 1.0. The oxygen activity a/sub 0/ on the catalyst surface is virtually determined by the ratio P/sub H/sub 2/O//P/sub H/sub 2// in the gas atmosphere. The above rate equation was confirmed by measurements in a flow apparatus for the temperature range 700 to 900/sup 0/C. In agreement with the reaction model the steady-state carbon activity on the iron surface and the steady-state carbon concentration in the iron catalyst are very low. With nickel as catalyst the reaction rate is much higher and independent of the oxygen activity on the catalyst surface. The rate equation reads: v = k/sub 2//sup Ni/ P/sub CH/sub 4//. Different partial reaction steps of the methane decomposition are rate determining on iron and nickel.

Muenster, P.; Grabke, H.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Effect of thermal treatment on coke reactivity and catalytic iron mineralogy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron minerals in coke can catalyze its gasification and may affect coke behavior in the blast furnace. The catalytic behavior of iron depends largely upon the nature of the iron-bearing minerals. To determine the mineralogical changes that iron could undergo in the blast furnace, cokes made from three coals containing iron present in different mineral forms (clays, carbonates, and pyrite) were examined. All coke samples were heat-treated in a horizontal furnace at 1373, 1573, and 1773 K and then gasified with CO{sub 2} at 1173 K in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Coke mineralogy was characterized using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of coke mineral matter prepared by low-temperature ashing (LTA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FESEM/EDS). The mineralogy of the three cokes was most notably distinguished by differing proportions of iron-bearing phases. During heat treatment and subsequent gasification, iron-containing minerals transformed to a range of minerals but predominantly iron-silicides and iron oxides, the relative amounts of which varied with heat treatment temperature and gasification conditions. The relationship between initial apparent reaction rate and the amount of catalytic iron minerals - pyrrhotite, metallic iron, and iron oxides - was linear and independent of heat treatment temperature at total catalyst levels below 1 wt %. The study showed that the coke reactivity decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment due to decreased levels of catalytic iron minerals (largely due to formation of iron silicides) as well as increased ordering of the carbon structure. The study also showed that the importance of catalytic mineral matter in determining reactivity declines as gasification proceeds. 37 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Byong-chul Kim; Sushil Gupta; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Category:Regulatory Roadmap Federal Sections | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Regulatory Roadmap Federal Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap? Click here for a user-friendly list of Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap pages. This is the Regulatory Roadmap Federal Sections category. Add.png Add an Section Pages in category "Regulatory Roadmap Federal Sections" The following 48 pages are in this category, out of 48 total. G GRR/Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process GRR/Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process GRR/Section 11-FD-a - NHPA Section 106 - Resource Survey GRR/Section 11-FD-b - Tribal Consultation GRR/Section 11-FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment GRR/Section 11-FD-d - NHPA Section 106 - Consultation

418

Property:GRR/SectionNumber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SectionNumber SectionNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GRR/SectionNumber Property Type Number Description The section number of a section in the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap. The value of this property is derived automatically by the section template and is used in sorting sections on the GRR Home page. Subproperties This property has the following 2 subproperties: G GRR/Section 6-HI-d - Oversize and/or Overweight Vehicles and Loads Permit GRR/Section 7 - Power Plant Siting/Construction Overview Pages using the property "GRR/SectionNumber" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) G GRR/Section 1 - Land Use Overview + 1 + GRR/Section 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations + 1 + GRR/Section 1-CA-a - State Land Use Planning + 1 +

419

Category:Regulatory Roadmap Overview Sections | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sections Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap? Click here for a user-friendly list of Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap pages. This is the Regulatory Roadmap Overview Sections category. Add.png Add an Section Pages in category "Regulatory Roadmap Overview Sections" The following 22 pages are in this category, out of 22 total. G GRR/Section 1 - Land Use Overview GRR/Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process GRR/Section 11 - Cultural Resource Assessment GRR/Section 12 - Flora & Fauna Resource Assessment Process GRR/Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process GRR/Section 14 - Water Resource Assessment GRR/Section 15 - Air Quality Assessment Process GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process G cont.

420

Category:Regulatory Roadmap State Sections | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap? Click here for a user-friendly list of Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap pages. This is the Regulatory Roadmap State Sections category. Add.png Add an Section Pages in category "Regulatory Roadmap State Sections" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 339 total. (previous 200) (next 200) G GRR/Section 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-CA-a - State Land Use Planning GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning GRR/Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 11-AK-a - State Cultural Considerations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Sectional Model Flume Facilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sectional Model Flume Facilities Sectional Model Flume Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sectional Model Flume Facilities Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 21.3 Beam(m) 1.4 Depth(m) 2.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

422

Section 999 Program Library | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science & Innovation » Oil & Gas » Offshore Drilling » Section Science & Innovation » Oil & Gas » Offshore Drilling » Section 999 Program Library Section 999 Program Library Cost-Shared Program Publications October 2, 2013 URTAC Meeting - October 2013 October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 September 10, 2013 Draft 2014 Annual Plan More Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee (UDAC) Activities and Products November 27, 2013 UDAC Meeting - December 2013 November 20, 2013 UDAC Meeting - December 2013 November 18, 2013 UDAC Meeting - September 2013 More Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee (URTAC) Activities and Products November 27, 2013 URTAC Meeting - December 2013 November 18, 2013 URTAC Meeting - December 2013 November 18, 2013 URTAC Meeting - December 2013 More Stay Connected Fossil Energy on Facebook Fossil Energy on Twitter Sign up for NewsAlerts Fossil Energy RSS Feeds

423

Utah Antiquities Section | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Antiquities Section Antiquities Section Jump to: navigation, search Name Utah Antiquities Section Address 300 S. Rio Grande Street Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84101 Coordinates 40.7623958°, -111.9047846° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7623958,"lon":-111.9047846,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

424

Temperature Dependent Neutron Scattering Sections for Polyethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This note presents neutron scattering cross sections for polyethylene at 296 K, 77 K and 4 K derived from a new scattering kernel for neutron scattering off of hydrogen in polyethylene. The kernel was developed in ENDF-6 format as a set of S(alpha,beta) tables using the LEAPR module of the NJOY94 code package. The polyethylene density of states (from 0 to sub eV) adopted to derive the new kernel is presented. We compare our calculated room temperature total scattering cross sections and double differential cross sections at 232 meV at various angles with the available experimental data (at room temperature), and then extrapolate the calculations to lower temperatures (77K and 4K). The new temperature dependent scattering kernel gives a good quantitative fit to the available room temperature data and has a temperature dependence that is qualitatively consistent with thermodynamics.

Roger E. Hill; C. -Y. Liu

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solid-solid phase transition measurements in iron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previously, dynamic experiments on iron have observed a non-zero transition time and width in the solid-solid {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition. Using Proton Radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, we have performed plate impact experiments on iron to further study the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition which occurs at 13GPa. A 40mm bore powder gun was coupled to a proton radiography beam line and imaging system and synchronized to the impact of the projectile on the target sample with the proton beam pattern. A typical experimental configuration for the iron study, as shown below in 3 color-enhanced radiographs, is a 40mm diameter aluminum sabot impacting a 40mm diameter of polycrystalline ARMCO iron. The iron is backed by a sapphire optical window for velocimetry measurements. The aluminum flyer on the left of the iron is barely visible for visual display purposes. Direct density jumps were measured which corresponded to calculations to within 1% using a Wondy mUlti-phase equation of state model. In addition, shock velocities were measured using an edge fitting technique and followed that edge movement from radiograph to radiograph, where radiographs are separated in time by 500 ns. Preliminary measurements give a shock velocity (P1 wave) of 5.251 km/s. The projectile velocity was 0.725 km/s which translate to a peak stress of 17.5 GPa. Assuming the P1 wave is instantaneous, we are able to calibrate the chromatic, motion, object and camera blur by measuring the width of the P1 wave. This approximation works in this case since each of the two density jumps are small compared to the density of the object. Subtracting the measured width of the P1 wave in quadrature from the width of the P2 wave gives a preliminary measurement of the transition length of 265 {mu}m. Therefore, a preliminary measured phase transition relaxation time {tau} = transition length/u{sub s} = 265 {mu}m/5.251 km/s = 50 ns. Both Boettger and Jensen conclude that the transition rate and likely the transition mechanisms depend on the impact stress and the sample thickness. Since Proton Radiography can measure directly the transition length as well as the shock velocity, a transition time can be directly calculated. With higher higher energy protons we have better resolution of the measured width and edge locations. This will allow a more precise measurement of phase transition relaxation time. We propose to perform a series of experiments to measure the phase transition relaxation time, {tau}, as a function of drive and sample size.

Schwartz, Cynthia Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

SECTION 205 FCA 48, AS AMENDED MODEL PROJECT PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Section 205 non- structural flood risk management, Section 206 aquatic ecosystem restoration 205 Structural Flood Risk Management and Section 206 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration ­ Use only structural flood risk management and to Section 206 aquatic ecosystem restoration. Section 205 Structural

US Army Corps of Engineers

427

Appendix - Neutron Scattering Lengths and Cross Sections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this appendix, we present an updated table of neutron scattering lengths and cross sections for most of the known nuclides, based on preexisting works. We include the coherent and incoherent scattering lengths, as well as the spin-dependent scattering lengths b+ and b?, in cases where this information is available. Also presented are the scattering coherent, incoherent, total, and absorption cross sections. We present an overview of the fundamental theory of the magnitudes to which the table is referred, and also a summary of the main experimental techniques used in determining these magnitudes.

Javier Dawidowski; José Rolando Granada; Javier Roberto Santisteban; Florencia Cantargi; Luis Alberto Rodríguez Palomino

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

Negret, Alexandru [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of neutron total cross-sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross-sections for neutron scattering from $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca are calculated as a function of energy from $50-700$~MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are already in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment.

C. R. Chinn; Ch. Elster; R. M. Thaler; S. P. Weppner

1994-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

430

Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS, EMISSIONS, AND WATER IMPACTS Prepared For be divided into two parts: · Well-to-Tank (WTT) Feedstock extraction, transport, storage, processing, distribution, transport, and storage · Tank-to-Wheels (TTW) Refueling, consumption and evaporation The full

432

Towards Topic Driven Access to Full Text Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Topic Driven Access to Full Text Documents Caterina Caracciolo, Willem van Hage access to full text documents. The methodology we propose is a combination of topic segmentation and coherent documents that can be used in two ways: as a basis for automatically generating hypertext links

de Rijke, Maarten

433

New orthogonal space-time block codes with full diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been shown from the Hurwitz-Radon theorem that square complex orthogonal space-time code designs cannot achieve full diversity and full rate simul-taneously, except in the two transmit antenna case. However, this result does not consider non...

Dalton, Lori Anne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Full-Scale Production Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Find resources to help you design a production and manufacturing process for a new clean energy technology or product. For full-scale production, other areas to consider include workforce development; R&D funding; and regional, state, and local resources. For more resources, see the Clean Energy Manufacturing Federal Resource Guide. Design Production and Manufacturing Process Advanced Research Projects Agency: Tech-to-Market Resources - general tech-to-market (T2M) resources. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office: Manufacturing Demonstration Facility - a collaborative manufacturing community that works to provide real data to

435

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed previously. Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in test cast-iron pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to be focused on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported previously.) Several design issues were identified which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair robots for cast-iron pipe to assure their commercial success. For Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train), previous problems with bladder design and elastomeric material expansion in the large mains were addressed. A new bladder based on a commercially available design was obtained and tested with success. Minor improvements were highlighted during patch-setting tests and are now being pursued. For Task 5 (Design and Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera), the previous field tests showed clearly that, in mains with low gas velocities, it will be necessary to improve the system's capacity to remove debris from the immediate vicinity of the bell and spigot joints. Otherwise, material removed by the cleaning flails (the flails were found to be very effective in cleaning bell and spigot joints) falls directly to the low side of the pipe and accumulates in a pile. This accumulation can prevent the sleeve from achieving a leak-free repair. Similarly, it is also deemed necessary to design an assembly to capture existing servicetap coupons and allow their removal from the inside of the pipe. Task 6 (Design and Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) was previously completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabVIEW. However, this must now be revisited to add control routines for the coupon catcher that will be added. This will most likely include a lift-off/place-on magnet translation function. Task 7 (Design and Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design for a bolt-on entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast-iron pipe in the current quarter. The drilling assembly for cutting an access hole through the wall of the gas main was also designed, along with a plug assembly to allow removing all tools from the live main and setting a blind flange on the entry fitting prior to burial. These designs are described in detail in the report. Task 8 (System Integration and Laboratory Validation) continued with the development of the robot module i

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast-iron test pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported last quarter.) These tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair robots for cast-iron pipe to assure their commercial success. For Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train), work has been directed on increasing the nitrogen bladder reservoir volume to allow at least two complete patch inflation/patch setting cycles in the event the sleeve does not set all ratchets in the same row on the first attempt. This problem was observed on a few of the repair sleeves that were recently installed during field tests with the small-diameter robotic system. For Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera), the recent field tests showed clearly that, in mains with low gas velocities, it will be necessary to improve the system's capacity to remove debris from the immediate vicinity of the bell and spigot joints. Otherwise, material removed by the cleaning flails (the flails were found to be very effective in cleaning bell and spigot joints) falls directly to the low side of the pipe and accumulates in a pile. This accumulation can prevent the sleeve from achieving a leak-free repair. Similarly, it is also deemed necessary to design an assembly to capture existing service-tap coupons and allow their removal from the inside of the pipe. These coupons were found to cause difficulty in launching and retrieving the small pipe repair robot; for example, one coupon lodged beneath the end of the guide shoe. Designs for new features to accomplish these goals for the large robotic system were pursued and are presented in this report. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) was previously completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabVIEW. However, this must now be revisited to add control routines for the coupon catcher to be added. This will most likely include a lift-off/place-on magnet translation function. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe in the previous quarter. Field tests with the 4-inch

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NETL: News Release - Clean Coal Technology Report Showcases Advanced Iron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 6, 2000 April 6, 2000 Clean Coal Technology Report Showcases Advanced Iron Making Process, Benefits for the Environment Topical Report Profiles Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System; Now Available on DOE's Fossil Energy Web Site An advanced iron making technology demonstrated in the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program stands out for its potential to provide major environmental and financial benefits to the United States steel industry. Bethlehem Steel Topical Report The Energy Department has profiled the project in a topical report entitled Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System Demonstration Project. The report describes the federal government's partnership demonstration project with Bethlehem Steel Corporation, which tested a new method for reducing

438

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron and Heterogeneous Photocatalysis with TiO2 Speaker(s): Marta Litter Date: November 19, 2010 - 11:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Arsenic in groundwater is a dramatic global problem due to the high incidence of arsenicosis or HACRE (Chronic Endemic Regional Hydro-arsenicism, Hidroarsenicismo Crónico Regional Endémico in Spanish), a severe illness causing skin lesions and cancer in extended regions of the world. For this reason, research on low-cost technologies for As removal to be applied in isolated, poor, rural locations is mandatory. This seminar will present a brief overview of arsenic pollution issues and mitigation needs in Latin America. It will also present results on As(V) removal using

439

Parkers-Iron Springs, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parkers-Iron Springs, Arkansas: Energy Resources Parkers-Iron Springs, Arkansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.6081427°, -92.3320235° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.6081427,"lon":-92.3320235,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

440

What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Experiments on Cement Yield Concrete Results Novel Experiments on Cement Yield Concrete Results Watching a Glycine Riboswitch "Switch" Polyamorphism in a Metallic Glass Under Pressure, Vanadium Won't Turn Down the Volume New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials MARCH 29, 2007 Bookmark and Share Crystal structure of EuFe4Sb12 showing the cage confined Eu atoms (red) and Fe atoms (brown) surrounded by Sb tilted octahedral (Sb atoms are not shown). Thermoelectric materials such as iron antimonide have drawn intense interest because they offer a pollution-free source of electricity and a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

IRON-PHOSPHATE GLASS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium-99 (Tc-99) can bring a serious environmental threat because of its high fission yield, long half-life, and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The present work investigated the immobilization of Tc-99 (surrogated by Re) by heat-treating mixtures of an iron-phosphate glass with 1.5 to 6 wt.% KReO{sub 4} at {approx}1000 C. The Re retention in the glass was as high as {approx}1.2 wt. % while the loss of Re by evaporation during melting was {approx}50%. Re was uniformly distributed within the glass. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was {approx}0.39 g/m{sup 2}, comparable with that in phosphate-bonded ceramics and borosilicate glasses. These results suggest that iron-phosphate glass can provide a good matrix for immobilizing Tc-99.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; XU K; CHOI J; UM W; HEO J

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

Iron beam acceleration using direct plasma injection scheme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new set of vanes of radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator was commissioned using highly charged iron beam. To supply high intensity heavy ion beams to the RFQ, direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) with a confinement solenoid was adopted. One of the difficulties to utilize the combination of DPIS and a solenoid field is a complexity of electro magnetic field at the beam extraction region, since biasing high static electric field for ion extraction, RFQ focusing field, and the solenoid magnetic field fill the same space simultaneously. To mitigate the complexity, a newly designed magnetic field clamps were used. The intense iron beam was observed with bunched structure and the total accelerated current reached 2.5 nC.

Okamura, M., E-mail: okamura@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)] [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan) [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Section I. Summary of Project Activities Section I-A. 2008-2009 Project Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Section I. Summary of Project Activities Section I-A. 2008-2009 Project Summary University year, we accomplished the following: · Established a dual career opportunity procedure vetted to address, communicate procedures for the new daycare facility, and to explore the potential

Farritor, Shane

446

SECTION 2 -HOSPITAL SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the hospital) SECTION 1 -PERSONAL DETAILS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION 2 - HOSPITAL SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the hospital) SECTION 1 - PERSONAL to Advertise via eRecruitment in conjunction with this document. Position Title Appointment Term Hospital - HOSPITAL SUPERANNUATION A base hospital salary amount (including a supplementary clinical loading) plus

Tobar, Michael

447

SECTION 2 -HOSPITAL SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the hospital) SECTION 1 -PERSONAL DETAILS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION 2 - HOSPITAL SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the hospital) SECTION 1 - PERSONAL with this document. Funding % Base Salary UWA % HOSPITAL % $ Private Practice Allowance $ Head of Department % Salary Level UWA % HOSPITAL % Base Salary $ Clinical Loading $ Head of School Allowance $ Other

Tobar, Michael

448

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

Watson, Craig A.

449

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

450

Chapter 12 - Coal use in iron and steel metallurgy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter discusses the role of coal in iron and steel metallurgy. The chapter first gives information about routes for steel manufacture, current levels of steel production and forecasts for the future. It then discusses the use of coal in different metallurgical processes with emphasis on various ironmaking technologies as the most energy consuming step of the process chain. Alternatives to coal like biomass, hydrogen or waste plastics are discussed from the point of view of CO2 reduction.

A. Babich; D. Senk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Zinc sorption by iron oxides and soil samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Head of Department) May 1989 ABSTRACT Zinc Sorption by Iron Oxides and Soil Samples. (May 1989) Markku Juhani Yli-Halla, M. S. University of Helsinki, Finland Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Zn sorption by synthetic Fe oxide... and soil samples was studied. The purpose was to examine the effect of crystallinity and adsorbed silica on Zn adsorption by synthetic Fe oxide using goethite and ferrihydrite as test materials. Zn sorption by acid soil samples from Finland and a...

Yli-Halla, Markku Juhani

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Low resistivity contact to iron-pnictide superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method of making a low resistivity electrical connection between an electrical conductor and an iron pnictide superconductor involves connecting the electrical conductor and superconductor using a tin or tin-based material therebetween, such as using a tin or tin-based solder. The superconductor can be based on doped AFe.sub.2As.sub.2, where A can be Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu or combinations thereof for purposes of illustration only.

Tanatar, Makariy; Prozorov, Ruslan; Ni, Ni; Bud'ko, Sergey; Canfield, Paul

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fouling of carbon steel heat exchanger caused by iron bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carbon steel heat exchanger installed in a reverse osmosis unit failed after 1 1/2 years from start-up as a result of tubes, lids, tube sheets, and connection pipes clogging from rust deposits. Chemical analysis of cooling water and scraped precipitates, as well laboratory screening of the deposits for bacteria, revealed that activity of iron-oxidizing bacteria present in cooling water could lead to heat exchanger blockage.

Starosvetsky, J.; Armon, R.; Starosvetsky, D. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech. (Israel)); Groysman, A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY Psychology 405, Section 001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY Psychology 405, Section 001 Department of Psychology Michigan State University Fall, 2012 Class meeting times: Tuesday, Thursday, 12:40-2:00 p.m. Place: 120 Psychology Building Instructor: L.J. Harris Office: 217 Psychology Building Office Hours: Mondays, 3:00 - 5 p.m.; other times

Liu, Taosheng

456

SECTION 1 -CERTIFICATION BY AUTHORISED DEPARTMENTAL OFFICER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION 1 - CERTIFICATION BY AUTHORISED DEPARTMENTAL OFFICER Earnings Code Description Rate No Ext. Employee ID Surname Given Names Title Date of Birth (dd/mm/yy) Sex (tick one) male female Home Phone No. Postal Address (for group certificates, etc) Postcode Is an Employment Declaration Form

Tobar, Michael

457

electronic reprint Acta Crystallographica Section D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electronic reprint Acta Crystallographica Section D Biological Crystallography ISSN 0907 is retained. Republication of this article or its storage in electronic databases or the like is not permitted of hidden Markov models electronic reprint #12;research papers 1898 Gough SUPERFAMILY database Acta Cryst

Gough, Julian

458

Navy's Section 2922a Legislation Success Stories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—features U.S. Department of Navy success stories in relation to Section 2922a legislation, which involves contracts for energy or fuel for military installations.

459

Section XI -- 25 years of development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original concept of nuclear power plant designers was that the higher standards of design and fabrication would make inservice inspections unnecessary, and little attention was given to provisions for access. By 1966 the Atomic Energy Commission recognized that a planned program of periodic inservice inspections would be needed. They began development of criteria, and encouraged industry code-writing organizations to do likewise. These groups joined forces in 1968, and their product was published by ASME in 1970 as part of the Boiler and Pressure Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Coolant Systems. Section XI, 24 pages in 1970, is now 723 pages. While it originally covered only light water reactor Class 1 components and piping, it now includes Class 2, 3, and containment, and liquid metal cooled reactor plants. Along the way, rules have been developed for gas-cooled and low pressure heavy water reactor plants. The growth in size of Section XI from its modest beginning has been largely because of recognition that the rules governing plant inspection/operation need to be considerably different from the rules provided for the component designer/manufacturer. Rules have been developed in the areas of repair/replacement technology, NDE methodology, NDE acceptance standards, and analytical evaluation methods in the absence of appropriate rules in Section III.

Hedden, O.F. [ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations, Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Student's Department: Course/Section Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student's Department: Course/Section Number: Course Title: Instructor: Explanation of why coursework has not yet been completed: Description of coursework remaining to be completed: Graduate Student is Requested: Arts & Sciences Students: Shriver Hall 28 (Graduate Affairs and Admissions Office) Engineering

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Finance 400 Section 001 (10591) Investment Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Finance 400 Section 001 (10591) Investment Analysis Fall 2013 Instructor Mark Pyles Class 9 covers basic investment theory with emphasis given to the analysis of securities, portfolio management will entail the student has a working knowledge in: types of financial investments financial market

Young, Paul Thomas

462

Employee Handbook & Policy Manual Section Heading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employee Handbook & Policy Manual Section Heading: 2.00 ­ Administrative & Personnel Policies in this document: · Person With Disabilities: a person having a physical or mental impairment which substantially. A "common wheelchair" does not exceed 30 inches in width and 48 inches in length measured two inches from

463

Energy and Society Week 4 Section Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. What is the main flaw of GDP per capita as the development metric? ANS: Open end question. Main flaw1 9/17/2014 Energy and Society Week 4 Section Solution TOPIC 1: Energy & Development: [iClicker]-1. Influence = B. Energy consumption = (/$) C. Carbon = 2 (/) ANS: [C] Note carbon

Kammen, Daniel M.

464

Energy and Society Section Handout Week 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power loss Loss of electrical power to heat in a resistor = 2 Key components of a power grid1 Energy and Society Section Handout ­ Week 9 Topics 1. Grid 2. Q&A on midterm 1. Grid Key Concepts 10 = 12 Total current = 10 = 100 b) The power is delivered to the distribution grid by a 240. k

Kammen, Daniel M.

465

and Cross-Sections at the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Measurements of the Z ? ? ? and W ? ? ? ? cross-sections at the LHC with data taken at s = 7 TeV are reported for the ATLAS, CMS, and \\{LHCb\\} experiments. All results are found to agree with the Standard Model.

Philip Ilten

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Double-differential light-ion production cross sections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......deuteron breakup production cross sections...alpha fragmentation production cross sections, with hydrogen as the target, is...neutron and proton production cross sections...semi-classical geometric methods to describe the fragmentation......

T. M. Miller; L. W. Townsend

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 Microsoft Word - Section 311 AL FAL Feb 17 2010 More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word -...

468

GRR/Section 12-FD-d - ESA Section 10 Take Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 12-FD-d - ESA Section 10 Take Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-FD-d - ESA Section 10 Take Permit 12FDDESASection10TakePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Fish and Wildlife Service National Marine Fisheries Service Regulations & Policies Endangered Species Act National Environmental Policy Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12FDDESASection10TakePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

469

GRR/Section 11-FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-FD-c - NHPA Section 106 - Effects Assessment 11FDCNHPASection106EffectsAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Regulations & Policies National Historic Preservation Act 36 CFR 800 - Protection of Historic Properties Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11FDCNHPASection106EffectsAssessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Federal agency must proceed to the assessment of adverse effects when

470

GRR/Section 11-FD-d - NHPA Section 106 - Consultation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 11-FD-d - NHPA Section 106 - Consultation < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-FD-d - NHPA Section 106 - Consultation 11FDDNHPASection106Consultation.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Regulations & Policies National Historic Preservation Act 36 CFR 800 - Protection of Historic Properties Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11FDDNHPASection106Consultation.pdf

471

GRR/Section 12-FD-e -ESA Section 7 Informal Consultation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e -ESA Section 7 Informal Consultation e -ESA Section 7 Informal Consultation < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-FD-e -ESA Section 7 Informal Consultation 12FDE - ESASection7InformalConsultation.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Fish and Wildlife Service Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Bureau of Reclamation Regulations & Policies Endangered Species Act 50 CFR 17.11-17.12 50 CFR 402.02 50 CFR 402.13 50 CFR 402.14 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12FDE - ESASection7InformalConsultation.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

472

Performance and cycling of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance and cycling of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with Performance and cycling of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with various catholyte salts Title Performance and cycling of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with various catholyte salts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Tucker, Michael C., Venkat Srinivasan, Philip N. Ross, and Adam Z. Weber Journal Journal of Applied Electrochemistry Volume 43 Issue 7 Pagination 637 - 644 Date Published 7/2013 ISSN 0021-891X Keywords battery, Flow battery, iron hydrogen cell, progress, redox flow cell Abstract A redox flow cell utilizing the Fe2+/Fe3+ and H-2/H+ couples is investigated as an energy storage device. A conventional polymer electrolyte fuel cell anode and membrane design is employed, with a cathode chamber containing a carbon felt flooded with aqueous acidic solution of iron salt. The maximum power densities achieved for iron sulfate, iron chloride, and iron nitrate are 148, 207, and 234 mW cm(-2), respectively. It is found that the capacity of the iron nitrate solution decreases rapidly during cycling. Stable cycling is observed for more than 100 h with iron chloride and iron sulfate solutions. Both iron sulfate and iron chloride solutions display moderate discharge polarization and poor charge polarization; therefore, voltage efficiency decreases dramatically with increasing current density. A small self-discharge current occurs when catholyte is circulating through the cathode chamber. As a result, a current density above 100 mA cm(-2) is required to achieve high Coulombic efficiency (> 0.9).

473

An Atomistic study of Helium Resolution in bcc Iron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of gas-stabilized bubbles in irradiated materials can be a significant factor in the microstructural processes that lead to mechanical property and dimensional changes in structural materials exposed to high-energy neutrons. Helium generation and accumulation is particularly important under DT fusion irradiation conditions. Although the process of ballistic resolutioning of gas from bubbles has been long-discussed in the literature, there have been few computational studies of this mechanism. Resolutioning could limit bubble growth by ejecting gas atoms back into the metal matrix. A detailed atomistic study of ballistic He resolutioning from bubbles in bcc iron has been carried out using molecular dynamics. A newly-developed Fe-He interatomic potential was employed, with the iron matrix described by the potential of Ackland and co-workers from 1997. The primary variables examined were: irradiation temperature (100 and 600K), iron knock-on atom energy (5 and 20 keV), bubble radius (~0.5 and 1.0 nm), and He-to-vacancy ratio in the bubble (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0) in order to obtain an assessment of this dynamic resolutioning mechanism. The results presented here focus on the 5 keV cascades which indicate a modest, but potentially significant level of He removal by this process.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Stewart, David M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Corrosion of iron in acid solutions with hydrogen sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of pH and the concentration of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on corrosion of iron in acid solutions was studied using a potentiostatic polarization method. The alternating current (AC) impedance technique also was used to characterize the active dissolution process of iron. Results showed the dissolution process was accelerated by H{sub 2}S. The anodic dissolution current (i{sub a}) increased with pH and H{sub 2}S concentration with reaction orders of about n{sub pH} = n{sub H{sub 2}s} = 0.25 when the ratio of H{sub 2}S concentration and hydrogen ion (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) concentration was <10{sup 1.5} i{sub a} reached a maximum and became independent of pH and [H{sub 2}S] when [H{sub 2}S]/H{sub 3}O{sup +} > 10{sup 1.5}. The Nyquist diagram corresponding to the active dissolution process in the Tafel range exhibited two capacitive loops in addition to the well-known, high-frequency capacitive loop. A mechanism was proposed to explain the results in which H{sub 2}S chemisorbed first on the electrode surface and then catalyzed the anodic dissolution of iron in two discharging steps.

Cheng, X.L.; Ma, H.Y.; Zhang, J.P.; Chen, X.; Chen, S.H. [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). Dept. of Chemistry; Yang, H.Q. [Peking Univ. (China). Dept. of Chemistry

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Iron phosphate glass for immobilization of 99Tc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium-99 (99Tc) can bring serious environmental threats because of its long half-life (t1/2 = ~2.1 x 105 years), high fission yield (~6%), and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The high volatility makes it difficult to immobilize 99Tc in continuous melters vitrifying 99Tc-containing nuclear wastes in borosilicate glasses. This work explores a possibility of incorporating a high concentration of 99Tc, surrogated by the non-radioactive Re, in an iron phosphate glass by melting mixtures of iron phosphate glass frits with 1.5-6 mass% KReO4 at ~1000 C. The retention of Re achieved was ~1.1 mass%. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was <10*2 g/m2. Surprisingly, the Re escaped from the melt within a short time of heating, especially when the temperature was increased. Therefore, 99Tc volatilization would still be a challenging task for its immobilization in iron phosphate glasses.

Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel R.; Um, Wooyong; Heo, Jong

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Economic analysis of transportation directly reduced iron (DRI) through ship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directly reduced iron (DRI) is a major source of iron units in cases of low scrap availability and/or hot metal. Its main advantage is it is low content of phosphorus and sulphur. Removal of phosphorus and sulphur demands high energy consumption in steel making process. With fast depleting sources of cooking coal, the availability of hot metal will decrease in the coming years. Also, scrap availability is already on the declining trend. Hence, DRI is going to be the main source of iron units in the future, especially in electric arc furnace (EAF steel making). The disadvantage of DRI usages lies in it is high reactivity. Freshly produced DRI possesses high susceptibility to oxidation whenever it comes in contact with air. The generated heat in the oxidation reaction increases the tendency to oxidation, thereby, starting a short of chain reaction and ultimately leading to the burning of DRI. This phenomenon makes storage and handling of DRI a concern. The problem caused loss of one cargo in Delta steel company, Nigeria. The authors of this dissertation were given the responsibility to work out the solution in the minimum possible time for implementing it to the next shipments. It is heartening that the problem could be successfully solved and implemented in the next shipments in November '06. Hence, after above work implementation of the recommendations for a $45 risk/ton of DRI, only $1 is to be spent for protection against the risk.

Manikant K. Paswan; Chinmoy Mukherjee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by ferrous iron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium is a primary inorganic contaminant of concern at the Pantex Plant. Chromium concentrations have been found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the drinking water standards, particularly in certain wells in the perched aquifer below Zone 12. In situ reduction of a mobile form of chromium, Cr(VI) to an immobile form, Cr(III), was examined as a viable option to active soil restoration. Successfully immobilizing chromium in the vadose zone as Cr(III) will reduce the amount of chromium that reaches the groundwater table. The results from the solution experiments indicated that chromium was rapidly and stoichiometrically reduced by Fe(II) in solution. Also, the slurry experiments showed that the aquifer solids removed Fe(II) from solution, but a portion of the iron removed remained available for reaction with Cr(VI), but at a slower rate. A model to predict different amounts of iron pseudo-components was developed, which allowed prediction of iron amounts required to reduce chromium under in situ conditions.

Batchelor, B.; Schlautman, M.; Hwang, I.; Wang, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Policy Flash 2014-10 Update to Congressional Notifications - Full  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 Update to Congressional Notifications - Full 0 Update to Congressional Notifications - Full Implementation of Advanced Notification of Awards (ANA) System Policy Flash 2014-10 Update to Congressional Notifications - Full Implementation of Advanced Notification of Awards (ANA) System The ANA system can be accessed directly at: https://iportalwc.doe.gov/pls/apex/f?p=ANA This flash and its attachments may be viewed at http://management.energy.gov/policy_guidance/policy_flashes.htm. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Elle Clayton at 202-287-1444 or ellen.clayton@hq.doe.gov. New Policy_Flash_2013- ANA1172013 ec.pdf ANA User's Guide.pdf More Documents & Publications POLICY FLASH 2014-10 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION_ FULL IMPLEMENTATION OF ANA SYSTEM Policy Flash 2013-36 Update to Congressional Notifications - Acquisition

479

2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Full Presentations | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Full Presentations Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Full Presentations 2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Full Presentations The Transmission Reliability R&D Reliability & Markets Peer Review included 11 presentations over 2 days on August 7 - 8, 2012 at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. The full presentations are available below. Presentation summaries are also available. 2012 R&M Peer Review - Transmission Investment Assessment Under Uncertainty - Ben Hobbs 2012 R&M Peer Review - Renewable Integration Through Risk-Limiting Dispatch - Pravin Varaiya 2012 R&M Peer Review - Development and Testing of New Tools - Ray Zimmerman 2012 R&M Peer Review - Commercialization of the SuperOPF Framework - Hsiao-Dong Chiang 2012 R&M Peer Review - Essence of Structure Preserving Network Reductions -

480

Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective February 24, 2012 - 4:45pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaking at the 2011 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. | Energy Department file photo. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaking at the 2011 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. | Energy Department file photo. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs Check out the full conference program for more on the 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. When the third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit convenes in Washington, DC, next week, key innovators from across the country and around the world will meet to share ideas for solving our greatest energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "full section iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Category:FullServiceRestaurant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FullServiceRestaurant FullServiceRestaurant Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Pages in category "FullServiceRestaurant" This category contains only the following page. O Openei test page Media in category "FullServiceRestaurant" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 66 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Baltimore MD Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 69 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 72 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Boulder CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png

482

Full-length Ebola glycoprotein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Filoviridae family comprises of Ebola and Marburg viruses, which are known to ... pathogens. The envelope glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus, which mediates entry into target cells ... with full-length and muci...

Suchita Bhattacharyya; Thomas J Hope

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION Prepared For: California to Tank, Criteria Pollutants, Multi-media impacts, EMFAC #12;#12;vii Table of Contents Acknowledgements

484

Putting together the full solar tandem cell | Center for Bio...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center Video Library Bisfuel Picture Gallery Putting together the full solar tandem cell 24 Oct 2012 Ben Sherman is a graduate student working in the Gust-Moore-Moore...

485

Full-Field Stress Measurement From Strain and Load Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In experimental mechanics, the possibility of tracking on component surfaces the full-field stress and strain states during deformation, always stimulated the research and the study of new measurement techniqu...

Giovanni B. Broggiato; Luca Cortese

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with...

487

Full-Color Emission and Temperature Dependence of the Luminescence...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Luminescence in Poly-P -Phenylene Ethynylene-ZnS:Mn2+ Composite Particles. Full-Color Emission and Temperature Dependence of the Luminescence in Poly-P -Phenylene...

488

Full-Arm Haptics in an Accessibility Task Matthew Frey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Full-Arm Haptics in an Accessibility Task Matthew Frey Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Utah David E. Johnson John Hollerbach School of Computing University of Utah ABSTRACT

Hollerbach, John M.

489

Full Steam Ahead for PV in US Homes?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar investment tax credits (ITCs) for an unprecedentedITC on the full cost (or “tax credit basis”) of the system.of the rebate, the tax credit basis to which the federal ITC

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Pre- and Post-Full-Application General Information  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Only those applicants that submit an LOI through the DOE PAMS system by the due date at 5 p.m. Eastern time (ET) are eligible to submit a full application.

491

The spin content of the proton in full QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present preliminary results on the proton spin structure function in full QCD. The measurement has been done using 4 flavours of staggered fermions and an improved definition of the lattice topological charge density.

B. Alles; G. Boyd; M. D'Elia; A. Di Giacomo

1997-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

492

Experimental Validation of Simulations Using Full-field Measurement Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calibration by reference materials of dynamic full-field measurement systems is discussed together with their use to validate numerical simulations of structural mechanics. The discussion addresses three challenges that are faced in these processes, i.e. how to calibrate a measuring instrument that (i) provides full-field data, and (ii) is dynamic; (iii) how to compare data from simulation and experimentation.

Hack, Erwin [Laboratory Electronics/Metrology/Reliability, EMPA, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Patterson, Eann A. [Composite Vehicle Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

493

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

494

Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program This document contains the Final...

495

DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Section 1512 Reporting - For Grant and Loan Recipients More Documents & Publications DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting - For Contractors Slide 1 Slide 1...

496

Production and blast-furnace smelting of boron-alloyed iron-ore pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial test data are presented regarding the production (at Sokolovsk-Sarbaisk mining and enrichment enterprise) and blast-furnace smelting (at Magnitogorsk metallurgical works) of boron-alloyed iron-ore pellets (500000 t). It is shown that, thanks to the presence of boron, the compressive strength of the roasted pellets is increased by 18.5%, while the strength in reduction is doubled; the limestone consumption is reduced by 11%, the bentonite consumption is halved, and the dust content of the gases in the last section of the roasting machines is reduced by 20%. In blast-furnace smelting, the yield of low-sulfur (<0.02%) hot metal is increased from 65-70 to 85.1% and the furnace productivity from 2.17-2.20 to 2.27 t/(m{sup 3} day); coke consumption is reduced by 3-8 kg/t of hot metal. The plasticity and stamping properties of 08IO auto-industry steel are improved by microadditions of boron.

A.A. Akberdin; A.S. Kim [Abishev Chemicometallurgical Institute, Abishev (Kazakhstan)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

498

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable

499

Solvent Tuning of Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solvent Tuning of Properties of Solvent Tuning of Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins Figure 1. Schematic repre-sentation of the common active-site iron-sulfur cluster structural motif. Proteins containing Fe4S4 iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous in nature and catalyze one-electron transfer processes. These proteins have evolved into two classes that have large differences in their electrochemical potentials: high potential iron-sulfur proteins (HiPIPs) and bacterial ferredoxins (Fds). The role of the surrounding protein environment in tuning the redox potential of these iron sulfur clusters has been a persistent puzzle in biological electron transfer [1]. Although HiPIPs and Fds have the same iron sulfur structural motif - a cubane-type structure - (Figure 1), there are large differences in their electrochemical

500

Method for the production of hydrocarbons using iron-carbon-based catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for producing C/sub 2/+ aliphatic hydrocarbons from a CO and H/sub 2/ mixture comprising the step of contacting the mixture with a catalyst comprising finely divided nonpyrophoric iron-carbon catalyst particles comprising iron and carbon, in the substantial absence of silicon, a substantial portion of which is dementite, which was produced in a reaction zone in the presence of laser radiation under such conditions of laser flux density, power adsorption, concentration of iron compound reactants selected from the group consisting of iron carbonyls, iron acetylacetonate, and ferrocene, and pressure sufficient to produce non-pyrophoric iron-carbon particles having average diameters between 1 and 100 nm.

Rice, G.W.; Fiato, R.A.; Soled, S.L.

1988-11-29T23:59:59.000Z