National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for full section iron

  1. NAABB Full Final Report Section I

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REPORT SECTION I FULL FINAL REPORT SECTION I FULL FINAL REPORT SECTION I Program Overview Table of Contents Executive Summary ......

  2. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  3. Implementation of Division B, Title I, Section 1101(a)(2) of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 2011-04 provides implementing instructions and guidance for Section 1101(a)(2) of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, Pub. L. 112-10 (hereinafter "Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011). Section 1101(a)(2) of the Act provides that, unless otherwise specified, the authority and conditions provided for projects or activities (including the costs of direct loans and loan guarantees) appropriated, authorized, or funded in the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010, Pub. L. 111-85, still apply.

  4. New Starts, Requests for Proposals, Funding Opportunity Announcements and other Similar Arrangements as Implemented under Division B, Title I, Section 1418 of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 2011-04 implementing instructions and guidance for Section 1101(a)(2) of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, Pub. L. 112-10 (hereinafter Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011), is hereby revised to add Section 1418 on new starts, requests for proposals, requests for quotations, request for information and funding opportunity announcements.

  5. SECTION E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. A143 E - i SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE WTP Contract Section E Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru...

  6. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Contract Section H Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 360 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE ...

  7. SECTION G

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CORRESPONDENCE PROCEDURES ......

  8. Full Proposal Instructions_2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Full Proposal Instructions NIF Facility Time Proposal Please prepare your full proposal according to the following instructions. Append biographical sketches(CVs) for the Principal Investigator (PI) and no more than 5 additional key team members to the end of this proposal. Submission Deadlines: Save the entire document as a single file in pdf format, and submit via the Web submission tool before 11:59 p.m. on September 1, 2015, PDT. I. COVER SHEET: (1 page) 1) Please provide the proposal title,

  9. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    K-1 SECTION J APPENDIX K CONTRACTOR'S TRANSITION PLAN (RESERVED) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-K-2

  10. Section 16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are compared with measured values determined from vertical time sections of signal-to- noise ratio (proportional to the structure function of the index of refraction, ) from the...

  11. SECTION I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section I, Page i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE OF CONTENTS I-1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (NOV 2013) (AS MODIFIED BY DEAR 952.202-1) (REPLACED MODS 020, 029, 0084) ................................................................................................................................ 1 I-2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ................................................................................................. 1 I-3 FAR

  12. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Contract Section H Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 370 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE TRANSITION .......................................................................................................... 1 H.2 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS ................................................................. 1 H.3 POST-CONTRACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PENSION AND OTHER BENEFIT PLANS ........ 19 H.4

  13. Full containment spray drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, K.

    1999-11-01

    Aspects of safety, environmental protection, and powder quality will continue to influence advances within spray dryer design and operation, and the concept of full containment spray drying offers a means to meet future industrial requirements. Process air recycle and powder containment within the drying chamber leads to no process air discharge to atmosphere, provides a more favorable operator environment around the spray dryer installation, reduces regions within the dryer layout where potential explosive powder/air mixtures can exist, improves yields, reduces powder losses, and provides easier cleaning operations with reduced wash water requirements.

  14. Section I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Near-symmetric Collisions of 10A MeV Heavy Ions with Solid Targets V. Horvat, . Smit, R. L. Watson and K. Zaharakis Energy Dependence of Electron Loss Cross Sections for...

  15. SECTION F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Occupational Medical Services at Hanford F-1 PART I- THE SCHEDULE SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS F.1 PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE ...........................................................................................................................2 F.2 PRINCIPAL PLACE OF PERFORMANCE .........................................................................................................2 F.3 HOURS OF SERVICE

  16. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    J-1 SECTION J APPENDIX J PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (TO BE NEGOTIATED AFTER CONTRACT AWARD) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-J-2 Page Blank

  17. Section 66

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ) (CF 2 Cl 2 ) (CHFCl 2 ) SF 6 CF 4 CCl 4 Session Papers 277 Figure 1. Spectral absorption cross-sections of CF 4 between 1281 and 1284 cm . The experimental -1 conditions...

  18. 14655 Section I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A099 I-i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES River Corridor Closure Contract Section I Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 649 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2 CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available.

  19. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING ON HUMAN RESOURCES (TO BE NEGOTIATED DURING CONTRACT TRANSITION) The personnel appendix required by DEAR Subpart 970.31 entitled "Contract Cost Principles and Procedures" as referenced in Section I Clause, DEAR 970.5232-2, "Payments and Advances" will be Appendix A of the contract. The personnel appendix will be negotiated between DOE OCRWM and the selected offeror during the contract transition period. Contract No.: DE-RW0000005

  20. Section CC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 J-12-1 ATTACHMENT J-12 GOVERNMENT FURNISHED SERVICES AND INFORMATION TABLE J-12.1 GFS/I LIST FROM SECTION C (SOW) ID GFS/I GFS/I Due Contract Section GF0001 DOE will administer MOUs with other law enforcement agencies or other Federal agencies (e.g., U.S. Department of Defense [Yakima Training Center]). DOE will provide copies of MOUs and/or contracts to the MSC. As required C.2.1.1.1 GF0002 DOE will provide Federal Commissions for Hanford Patrol personnel. As required C.2.1.1.1 GF0003 DOE

  1. Section CC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 464 J-11-1 ATTACHMENT J-11 CONTRACT DELIVERABLES TABLE J-11.1 DELIVERABLE LIST FROM SECTION C (SOW) ID Deliverable DOE Contract Deliverable Due Contract Section Action Response Time a CD0001 Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix Approve 30 days July 24, 2009; thereafter by request as applicable C.1.3 CD0002 Annual Forecast of Services and Infrastructure Review NA November 21, 2009; annually thereafter by November 31 C.1.3 CD0003

  2. SECTION C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C-1 PART 1 - THE SCHEDULE SECTION C DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATIONS/PERFORMANCE WORK STATEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS C.1 Hanford Occupational Medical Program .................................................................C-3 C.2 Description of Program Performance Requirements ................................................C-6 C.2.1 Firm Fixed Price Scope...................................................................................C-6 C.2.1.1 Medical Monitoring and Qualification Examinations

  3. SECTION E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mod 042 Occupational Medical Services at Hanford E-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS E.1 INSPECTION..........................................................................................................E-2 E.2 ACCEPTANCE........................................................................................................E-2 E.3 FIXED PRICE CLAUSES.......................................................................................E-2 E.4 COST

  4. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Modification 499 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE TRANSITION .......................................................................................................... 1 H.2 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS ................................................................. 1 H.3 POST-CONTRACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PENSION AND OTHER BENEFIT PLANS ........ 14 H.4 NO THIRD PARTY BENEFICIARIES

  5. SECTION H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H Contract No: DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 491 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE TRANSITION ............................................................................................................ 1 H.2 EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: PAY AND BENEFITS ................................................................... 1 H.3 POST-CONTRACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PENSION AND OTHER BENEFIT PLANS .......... 14 H.4 NO THIRD PARTY

  6. Electrical and thermal transport properties of iron and iron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrical and thermal transport properties of iron and iron-silicon alloy at high pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrical and thermal transport properties ...

  7. Section J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    M-1 Section J Appendix M Key Design, Licensing and Site Management M&O Milestone Chart Activity Planned Date Develop and Submit CD-2 (25%-30%) 08/2009 Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Balance of Plant Support Facilities (OCRWM Start of Construction 3/2012) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Initial Handling Facility (IHF) (OCRWM Start of Construction for IHF: 9/2013) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Wet Handling

  8. Section Number:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives," the following list of directives is applicable to this contract. List A Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives," the Contractor shall comply with the requirements of applicable Federal, State, and local laws and regulations, unless relief has been granted in writing by the appropriate

  9. SECTION B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 7, 2013 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) AWARD FEE PLAN (AFP) 1 OCTOBER 2013 THROUGH 30 SEPTEMBER 2014 CONTRACT DE-EM0001971 I. INTRODUCTION This Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) provides a standard process for development, administration, and coordination of all phases of the fee determination process consistent with Section B.2 of the subject contract. Fee determinations are not subject to the Disputes Clause of the contract. II. ORGANIZATIONAL

  10. SECTION B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY16 PEMP 10-22-15 Mod 119 1 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) ANNUAL FEE PLAN (AFP) 1 OCTOBER 2015 THROUGH 30 SEPTEMBER 2016 CONTRACT DE-EM0001971 October 22, 2015 I. INTRODUCTION This Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) contains a standard process for development, administration, and coordination of all phases of the fee determination process consistent with Section B.2 of the subject contract. II. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND DUTIES The following organizational

  11. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    D-1 SECTION J APPENDIX D KEY PERSONNEL Name Position Doug Cooper General Manager John Donnell Repository Licensing Lead Al Ebner, PE, PhD Repository Design Lead Steve Piccolo Deputy General Manager Steve White Quality & Performance Assurance Lead George Clare Project Management & Integration Lead Mike Hitchler Preclosure Safety Analysis Lead Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-D-2 POSITION DESCRIPTIONS OCRWM SPECIFIED KEY PERSONNEL 1. General Manager: Requires 10 years experience as a

  12. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    J-F-1 SECTION J APPENDIX F CRITICAL STAFF Subject Matter Expert Subject Matter Canister Transfer Machine Engineering Waste Package Transfer Trolley Engineering Transport and Emplacement Vehicle Engineering Cask Transfer Trolley Engineering Criticality and Nuclear Engineering Subsurface Thermal Management Engineering Pre-closure Safety Analysis Specialist Waste Package and Drip Shields Engineering Waste Package Closure System Engineering NOG-1 Cranes Engineering Subsurface Design Engineering

  13. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    H-1 SECTION J APPENDIX H CONTRACT GUIDANCE FOR PREPARATION OF DIVERSITY PLAN This Guidance is to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the Diversity elements and where these issues may already be addressed in the contract. To the extent these issues are already addressed in the contract, the Contractor need only cross reference the location. Contractor's Workforce The Department's contracts contain clauses on Equal Employment

  14. Section L

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Section L - Attachment F - Past Performance Cover Letter and Questionnaire Date: ________________ Dear _________________: Our firm is submitting a proposal for a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Contract for the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site with an estimated value of approximately $550M per year. Our firm is seeking your assistance. We are asking you to complete the attached questionnaire evaluating our performance on

  15. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  16. Section J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    L-1 Section J Appendix L MEMORANDUM FROM DAVID R. HILL, GENERAL COUNSEL, DATED NOVEMBER 30, 2006, SUBJECT: ONGOING LICENSING SUPPORT NETWORK ("LSN") OBLIGATIONS Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-2 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-3 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-4 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-5 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-6 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-7 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-8 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-9 Contract No.:

  17. Origin of banded iron formations : oceanic crust leaching & self...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 58 GEOSCIENCES; IRON; LEACHING; OCEANIC CRUST; ORIGIN Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles Find in Google Scholar Find in Google Scholar Search WorldCat ...

  18. Full hoop casing for midframe of industrial gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Gerald A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2015-12-01

    A can annular industrial gas turbine engine, including: a single-piece rotor shaft spanning a compressor section (82), a combustion section (84), a turbine section (86); and a combustion section casing (10) having a section (28) configured as a full hoop. When the combustion section casing is detached from the engine and moved to a maintenance position to allow access to an interior of the engine, a positioning jig (98) is used to support the compressor section casing (83) and turbine section casing (87).

  19. Power Full | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Sector: Wind energy Product: China-based investment holding company that owns 100% of Ruifeng Windpower. References: Power Full1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  20. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  1. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  2. Iron and Steel (2010 MECS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

  3. Interface driven magnetic interactions in nanostructured thin films of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desautels, R. D. Lierop, J. van; Shueh, C.; Lin, K.-W.; Freeland, J. W.

    2015-05-07

    We have fabricated thin films of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix using a dual ion beam assisted deposition technique. A secondary End-Hall ion beam bombarded the iron atoms during deposition altering significantly the morphology of the films and allowing for control of the intermixing between iron and copper components. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray reflectometry experiments indicated that the morphology of the films was that of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix. Rietveld refinements of the diffraction pattern identified fcc-copper and amorphous iron. An increased amount of disorder was observed with a reduction in the amount of deposited iron from a 1:1 Fe:Cu ratio to 0.25:0.75 Fe:Cu ratio. Interfacial copper-iron alloys were identified by DC susceptibility experiments through their reduced T{sub C,Alloy} (370, 310, and 280 K) compared with that of bulk iron (∼1000 K). Element specific x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments were performed to identify the contributions to the magnetism from the iron and the copper-iron alloy.

  4. RFP Section H and Section L Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 26, 2011, two draft RFP Section H templates "Performance Requirements" and "Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan" and one draft RFP Section L template "Proposal Preparation Instructions – Cover Letter and Volume I, Offer and Other Documents" were distributed for Procurement Director (PD), Head of Contracting Activity (HCA), General Counsel and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate. The final version of the three aforementioned RFP Section H and L templates are available in STRIPES.

  5. SECTION L… ATTACHMENT H

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    III-SECTION J APPENDIX K TRANSITION PLAN To be Added at a Later Date

  6. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarma, Balu; Downing, Kenneth B.

    1999-01-01

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

  7. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

    1999-03-23

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

  8. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  9. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welbon, W.W.

    1983-11-08

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

  10. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welbon, William W.

    1983-01-01

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  11. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-03-06

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  12. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    E SECTION J APPENDIX E PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT(S) [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to contract award. For Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) template, see Section L, Attachment A.]

  13. Section D - G

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING Request for Proposal DE-RFP 36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging......

  14. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I SECTION J APPENDIX I SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to...

  15. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I SECTION J APPENDIX I SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to

  16. Steelmaking with iron carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, G.H.; Stephens, F.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The concept of using iron carbide in steelmaking is not new. Tests were run several decades ago, using carbide made from ore, in steelmaking furnaces. The problem was that at that time, the need for the product was not clear and the economics of production were not favorable. In the early 1970's Frank M. Stephens, Jr., conceived the basis for the present process, and considerable development work has been done during the past decade to bring the carbide production process to its present state, with the first commercial unit now under construction. The process utilizes the following overall reaction to produce Fe[sub 3]C from ore: 3Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] + 5H[sub 2] + 2 CH[sub 4][equals]2 Fe[sub 3]C + 9 H[sub 2]O. Hydrogen gas from a natural gas reformer is blended with natural gas to form the process gas that is recirculated through the fluid bed reactor, the cooling tower, to remove reaction product water, and back through the reactor again, after reheating. The closed loop nature of the process means that virtually 100% of the process reagents are utilized by the process. The only exception is that a small stream of the process gas is burned as fuel in the reheating step, in order to maintain the level of inerts in the process gas at an acceptable level. The quantity of the bleed stream is entirely dependent on the concentration of inert gases in the fuel supply.

  17. System and method for making metallic iron with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiesel, Richard F; Englund, David J; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for making metallic iron nodules with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions is disclosed. The method includes: assembling a linear hearth furnace having entry and exit portions, at least a conversion zone and a fusion zone, and a moving hearth adapted to move reducible iron bearing material through the furnace on contiguous hearth sections; assembling a shrouded return substantially free of air ingress extending adjacent at least the conversion and fusion zones of the furnace through which hearth sections can move from adjacent the exit portion to adjacent the entry portion of the furnace; transferring the hearth sections from the furnace to the shrouded return adjacent the exit portion; reducing reducible material in the linear hearth furnace to metallic iron nodules; and transporting gases from at least the fusion zone to the shrouded return to heat the hearth sections while in the shrouded return.

  18. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX B AWARD FEE PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....

  19. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX M CONTRACTOR COMMITMENTS, AGREEMENTS, AND UNDERSTANDINGS Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....

  20. 14655 Section D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING......

  1. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION AGREEMENT FOR USE WITH THE ... and ... the Financial Institution a financial institution ...

  2. Section 106 Archaeology Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation's Section 106 guidance is designed to assist federal agencies in making effective management decisions about archaeological resources in completing the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). This guidance highlights the decision-making role of the federal agency in the Section 106 process. It is also designed for use by State and Tribal Historic Preservation Officers, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and cultural resource management professionals when assisting federal agencies to meet their responsibilities under Section 106.

  3. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant...

  4. Kumba Iron Ore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kumba Iron Ore is a company located in Pretoria, South Africa . References "Kumba Iron Ore" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  5. Iron Edison Battery Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a company based in Lakewood, Colorado. Iron Edison is redefining off-grid energy storage using advanced Nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) battery technology. Vastly out-lasting the 7...

  6. 14655 Section D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING......................................................................................................................................1 D.2 MARKING ..........................................................................................................................................1 D-i River Corridor Closure Contract Section D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I

  7. 14655 Section H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section H Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 INCUMBENT EMPLOYEES HIRING PREFERENCES ................................................................... 1 H.2 PAY AND BENEFITS ....................................................................................................................... 1 H.3 LABOR RELATIONS

  8. Sectional device handling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candee, Clark B.

    1988-07-12

    Apparatus for remotely handling a device in an irradiated underwater environment includes a plurality of tubular sections interconnected end-to-end to form a handling structure, the bottom section being adapted for connection to the device. A support section is connected to the top tubular section and is adapted to be suspended from an overhead crane. Each section is flanged at its opposite ends. Axially retractable bolts in each bottom flange are threadedly engageable with holes in the top flange of an adjacent section, each bolt being biased to its retracted position and retained in place on the bottom flange. Guide pins on each top flange cooperate with mating holes on adjacent bottom flanges to guide movement of the parts to the proper interconnection orientation. Each section carries two hydraulic line segments provided with quick-connect/disconnect fittings at their opposite ends for connection to the segments of adjacent tubular sections upon interconnection thereof to form control lines which are connectable to the device and to an associated control console.

  9. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  10. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.

  11. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophagesmore » with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.« less

  12. Welding studies of nickel aluminide and nickel-iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M.L.; David, S.A.; Horton, J.A.; White, C.L.; Liu, C.T.

    1985-08-01

    Because welding is often used during the fabrication of structural components, one of the key issues in the development of nickel aluminides and nickel-iron aluminides for engineering applications is their weldability. The goals of this study were to characterize weldment microstructures and to identify some of the factors controlling weldability of ductile Ni/sub 3/Al alloys. The alloys used in this initial study were Ni/sub 3/Al containing 500 wppm boron and Ni/sub 3/Al containing 10 at. % iron and either 500 wppm or 20 wppm boron. Full-penetration autogenous welds were made in sheet shock by the electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) processes. The main process variables were travel speed and preheat. The as-welded coupons were examined visually and in detail by the usual optical and electron metallographic methods. Weldments of boron-doped Ni/sub 3/Al were composed of nearly 100% ordered ..gamma..' phase. Weldments of the nickel-iron aluminides were ..gamma..' + ..beta..' phase mixtures, with martensitic ..beta..' distributed interdendritically in the fusion zone and decorating grain boundaries in the heat-affected zone. All welds made in this particular boron-doped Ni/sub 3/Al alloy contained cracks. Weldability improved with the addition of iron, and defect-free welds were made in the nickel-iron aluminides by both EB and GTA welding. Nevertheless, the iron-containing alloys were susceptible to cracking, and their weldability was affected by boron concentration, welding speed, and (for GTA) gas shielding. Defect-free welds were found to have good tensile properties relative to those of the base metal. 34 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE (MB) is a e search (B. Fleming, next session) - High rates and good particle ID also allow accurate cross section measurements. - Important for MB and...

  14. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, Mod 332 J.6-1 ATTACHMENT J.6 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.6, Mod 332 J.6-2 SMALL...

  15. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    E SECTION J APPENDIX E PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT(S) Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to contract award. For Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) template,...

  16. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, Revision 4 ATTACHMENT J.10 WAGE DETERMINATIONS - SERVICE CONTRACT ACT (SCA) AND DAVIS-BACON ACT J.10-1 Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788...

  17. Section I - Contract Clauses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and protections under 41 U.S.C. 4712, as described in section 3.908 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation. (c) The Contractor shall insert the substance of this clause, including...

  18. Section 1705 Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Section 1705 Loan Program authorizes loan guarantees for U.S.-based projects that commenced construction no later than September 30, 2011 and involve certain renewable energy systems, electric...

  19. Section 1251 Report Update

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    November 2010 Update to the National Defense Authorization Act of FY2010 Section 1251 Report New START Treaty Framework and Nuclear Force Structure Plans 1. Introduction This paper updates elements of the report that was submitted to Congress on May 13, 2010, pursuant to section 1251 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84) ("1251 Report"). 2. National Nuclear Security Administration and modernization of the complex - an overview From FY 2005

  20. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX J DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE In accordance with Section I clause DEAR 970.5226-1, Diversity Plan, this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) for each of the diversity elements within the clause. The Contractor shall submit a Diversity Plan to the Contracting Officer for approval within 90 days after the effective date of this

  1. Section II INT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/14/11 Page 1 of 9 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-IN (06/14/11) SECTION II GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE SIGNATURE PAGE OR SECTION I OF THIS CONTRACT. IN01 ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS This Contract

  2. Iron production maintenance effectiveness system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augstman, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    In 1989, an internal study in the Coke and Iron Maintenance Department identified the opportunities available to increase production, by decreasing unscheduled maintenance delays from 4.6%. A five year front loaded plan was developed, and presented to the company president. The plan required an initial investment of $1.4 million and a conservative break-even point was calculated to be 2.5 years. Due to budget restraints, it would have to be self-funded, i.e., generate additional production or savings, to pay for the program. The program began in 1991 at number 2 coke plant and the blast furnaces. This paper will describe the Iron Production Maintenance Effectiveness System (ME), which began with the mechanical and pipefitting trades.

  3. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, Mod 420 J.6-1 ATTACHMENT J.6 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.6, Mod 420 J.6-2 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN for United States Department of Energy Plateau Remediation Contract Submitted by: CH2M HILL PLATEAU REMEDIATION COMPANY Prime Contractor FISCAL YEARS 2009-2018 (Base and Option Period) CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC06-08RL14788 Revision 4 December 30, 2014 Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract

  4. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von L. Richards

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. ???¢???????¢ Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  5. 14655 Section B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 166 B-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT - ITEMS BEING ACQUIRED ..................................................................... 1 B.2 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS .............................................................................. 2 B.3 ALLOWABILITY OF SUBCONTRACTOR FEE ............................................................................... 2 B.4

  6. 14655 Section C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 226 C-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION C - STATEMENT OF WORK TABLE OF CONTENTS C.1 PURPOSE, OVERVIEW, END-STATES, AND ORGANIZATION ................................................... 1 C.1.1 PURPOSE AND OVERVIEW ................................................................................................ 1 C.1.2 END-STATES ........................................................................................................................ 1 C.1.3

  7. 14655 Section E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS E.1 FAR 52.246-5 INSPECTION OF SERVICES - COST REIMBURSEMENT (APR 1984) .................1 E.2 FIELD INSPECTION ..........................................................................................................................1 E.3 DOE INSPECTION ............................................................................................................................2 E.4

  8. SECTIONS B THROUGH H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Modification 492 B-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT ................................................................................................ B-1 B.2 ITEM(S) BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................... B-1 B.3 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS ........................................................... B-5 B.4 CONTRACT

  9. SECTIONS B THROUGH H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 372 B-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT .................................................................................................... 2 B.2 ITEM(S) BEING ACQUIRED ........................................................................................... 2 B.3 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS ............................................................. 3 B.4

  10. Full Circle Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Full Circle Fuels Place: Oberlin, Ohio Zip: 44074 Sector: Biofuels Product: Alternative fuels center dedicated to increasing awareness and use of biofuels in...

  11. Full Permit Application Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HandbookLegal Abstract Permit Applicant Hnadbook for Full RCRA Equivalent Hazardous Waste Facility Permits, current through August 7, 2014. Published NA Year Signed or Took...

  12. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 19F(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2008CO03 19F(p, γ): σ Ecm = 200 - 700 keV X4 05/14/2014 1979SU13 19F(p, γ): σ 0.2 - 1.2 X4 05/06/2014 2006COZY 19F(p, γ1): capture yield 200 - 800 keV thin target 12/08/2014 19F(p, γ): capture yield thick target 19F(p, α2γ): capture yield thin target, thick target 2008CO03 19F(p, γ1): reaction cross section Ecm = 200 - 800 keV thin target, thick target

  13. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, Modification 332 J.7-1 ATTACHMENT J.7 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.7, Modification 332 J.7-2 Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) Participation Program Targets ATTACHMENT J.7 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS (a) OFFEROR - CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company - Prime: AREVA Federal Services, LLC; Fluor Federal Services, Inc. (base period only); East

  14. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, Revision 3, 420 J.8-1 ATTACHMENT J.8 ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF COSTS In accordance with the Section H Clause entitled, Advance Understanding of Costs, this attachment sets forth the basis for determining the allowability of costs associated with expenditures that have cost implications under the Contract, that are not identified in other documents requiring the review and approval of the contracting officer. Unless a date is provided within an item of cost identified below, all items within

  15. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 J-1 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J -- LIST OF ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Attachment Number Title of Attachment Modification Number Number of Pages J.1 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYM LIST 0 6 J.2 REQUIREMENTS SOURCES AND IMPLEMENTING DOCUMENTS 331 8 J.3 HANFORD SITE SERVICES AND INTERFACE REQUIREMENTS MATRIX 246 107 J.4 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) 249 50 J.5 PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT 0 3 J.6 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN

  16. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14655 640 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ATTACHMENT J-1 TABLE OF RIVER CORRIDOR CLOSURE CONTRACT WORK SCOPE ATTACHMENT J-2 DOE DIRECTIVES APPLICABLE TO THE RIVER CORRIDOR CLOSURE CONTRACT ATTACHMENT J-3 PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENTS ATTACHMENT J-4 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN ATTACHMENT J-5 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS ATTACHMENT J-6 ADVANCE AGREEMENT,

  17. Notices SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    112 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 182 / Wednesday, September 19, 2012 / Notices SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 3506 of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. chapter 35) requires that Federal agencies provide interested parties an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. The Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Privacy, Information and Records Management Services, Office of Management, publishes this notice containing proposed information

  18. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION AGREEMENT FOR USE WITH THE PAYMENTS-CLEARED FINANCING ARRANGEMENT Note: (1) The Contractor shall enter into a new banking agreement(s) during the Transition Term of the Contract, utilizing the format contained in this Appendix and include other applicable Contract terms and conditions. (2) Items in brackets [ ] below are provided for clarification and will be removed from the document prior to execution. Agreement entered into this,

  19. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Corporation Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. 585 Attachment 2 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the

  20. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    H DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE To Be Updated during Transition With regard to the Contract Section I Clause entitled "Diversity Plan", this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the clause's Diversity elements. If the Contractor's current policy or procedure already addresses the following elements, the Contractor need only provide a copy of the policy or procedure to the Contracting Officer and

  1. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Wednesday, 24 February 2010 00:00 In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of

  2. Weldability and hot ductility of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, D.I.; Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); David, S.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The weldability of iron aluminide alloys is discussed. Although readily welded with electron beam (EB) and gas-tungsten arc (GTA) techniques, iron aluminides are sometimes susceptible to cracking during cooling when welded with the GTA welding process. Taken into account are the effects of microstructural instability (grain growth), weld heat input (cooling rate) and environment on the hot ductility of an iron aluminide alloy designated FA-129. 64 refs., 59 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  4. High pressure effects on the iron iron oxide and nickel nickel oxide oxygen

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fugacity buffers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect High pressure effects on the iron iron oxide and nickel nickel oxide oxygen fugacity buffers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High pressure effects on the iron iron oxide and nickel nickel oxide oxygen fugacity buffers The chemical potential of oxygen in natural and experimental samples is commonly reported relative to a specific oxygen fugacity (fO{sub 2}) buffer. These buffers are precisely known at 1 bar, but under high

  5. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

  6. Oregon Iron Works Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Oregon Iron Works Inc Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  7. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Kathrein, Hendrik (McMurray, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  8. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related ...

  9. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  10. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between different theoretical models and experimental data indicated that, instead of localized states due to strong electron interactions, electrons in iron pnictides prefer...

  11. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At bottom left, the kinds of iron species found in two transects of the Southern Ocean are ... (ACC stands for Antarctic Circumpolar Current.) The map shows chlorophyll ...

  12. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccha...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the...

  13. Full Text Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Text Glossary Full Text Glossary The full-text glossary includes terms used throughout the website and in Biomass Program publications. Terms are listed alphabetically for easy reference. The term index lists all of the terms defined in the glossary. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A acid: A solution that has an excess of hydrogen ions (H+), with a pH of less than 7. acetic acid: An acid with the structure of C2H4O2.

  14. The production of iron carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.M.; Scheel, J.

    1997-12-31

    From start-up in 1994 to present, Nucor`s Iron Carbide plant has overcome many obstacles in achieving design production. Many of these impediments were due to flaws in equipment design. With the integration existing within the plant, limitations in any one system reduced the operating capacity of others. For this reason, as modifications were made and system capacities were increased, the need for additional modifications became apparent. Subsequently, operating practices, maintenance scheduling, employee incentives, and production objectives were continually adapted. This paper discusses equipment and design corrections and the quality issues that contributed to achieving the plant`s production capacity.

  15. 10Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1970GO04 10Be(p, γ0): σ 0.6 - 6.3 θ = 0°, θ = 90° 06/05/2012 1987ERZY 10Be(p, n): σ 0.9 - 2 X4 05/15/2012 The following references may be related but not included. 1991GOZV Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March 2016

  16. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, Modification 476 J.2-1 ATTACHMENT J.2 REQUIREMENTS SOURCES AND IMPLEMENTING DOCUMENTS The following lists are provided in accordance with the Section I Clause entitled, DEAR 970.5204-2, Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives. LIST A: APPLICABLE FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS Table J.2.1 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Document Number Title 10 CFR 63 Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada 10 CFR 71 Packaging And Transportation Of

  17. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, Revision 5 J.10-1 ATTACHMENT J.10 WAGE DETERMINATIONS - SERVICE CONTRACT ACT (SCA) AND DAVIS-BACON ACT Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.10, Revision 5 J.10-2 SERVICE CONTRACT ACT WAGE DETERMINATION WD 05-2569 (Rev.-18) was first posted on www.wdol.gov on 07/14/2015 ***************************************************************************** REGISTER OF WAGE DETERMINATIONS UNDER | U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE SERVICE CONTRACT ACT | EMPLOYMENT

  18. HASQARD Section 4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HASQARD Section 4.2.4, Volume 2, Revision 3 requires: "The field custodian shall seal the cap of the individual sample container so that any tampering is easy to detect. Custody seals shall be used to verify that sample integrity has been maintained during transport." The HASQARD Focus Group provides the following clarification to the requirement: Note: The presence of, or fixative residue from, custody seals can interfere with the functionality of equipment used during analysis (e.g.,

  19. HASQARD Section 4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    text of the sixth paragraph in HASQARD Volume 2, Revision 3, Section 4.2.4 is revised to say: "Custody seals shall be used to verify that sample integrity has been maintained during transport. The field custodian shall seal the cap of the individual sample container so that any tampering is easy to detect. In lieu of using a custody seal directly applied to sample containers, the sample container may be placed inside a secondary container that is sealed with a custody seal. Custody tape

  20. Section II INT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (11-03-2010) Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for International Commercial Transactions Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Initial Release Date: 11/3/10 Page 1 of 8 PPQD-TMPLT-008R01 Template Release Date: 12/01/09 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Before using a printed copy to perform work, verify the version against the electronic document to ensure you are using the correct version. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-IN (11-03-2010) SECTION II GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR

  1. Section II INT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IN (01-12-2010) Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for International Commercial Transactions Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Initial Release Date: 01/12/10 Page 1 of 6 PPQD-TMPLT-008R01 Template Release Date: 12/01/09 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Before using a printed copy to perform work, verify the version against the electronic document to ensure you are using the correct version. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-IN (01-12-2010) SECTION II GENERAL PROVISIONS

  2. Microbial reduction of iron ore (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a...

  3. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print Wednesday, 30 April 2008 00:00 It is now known that the iron present...

  4. Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferritin Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in Ferritin Almost all organisms require iron as a co-factor in numerous metalloproteins and enzymes. In particular, phytoplankton, which are aquatic, free-drifting, single-celled organisms that can harvest energy from the sun, have an elevated demand for iron due to the large role it plays in their photosynthetic machinery. In 30-40% of the world's oceans iron concentrations are low enough to limit the growth of

  5. Evaluation of Characterization Techniques for Iron Pipe Corrosion Products

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Iron Oxide Thin Films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Evaluation of Characterization Techniques for Iron Pipe Corrosion Products and Iron Oxide Thin Films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of Characterization Techniques for Iron Pipe Corrosion Products and Iron Oxide Thin Films A common problem faced by drinking water studies is that of properly characterizing the corrosion products (CP) in iron pipescor synthetic Fe (hydr)oxides used to simulate

  6. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron and Steel (2010 MECS) Iron and Steel (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint PDF icon Iron and Steel More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October

  7. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus; Muftikian, Rosy; Korte, Nic

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products.

  8. IRON COATED URANIUM AND ITS PRODUCTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1960-03-15

    A method of applying a protective coating to a metallic uranium article is given. The method comprises etching the surface of the article with an etchant solution containlng chloride ions, such as a solution of phosphoric acid and hydrochloric acid, cleaning the etched surface, electroplating iron thereon from a ferrous ammonium sulfate electroplating bath, and soldering an aluminum sheath to the resultant iron layer.

  9. Production of iron from metallurgical waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, David W; Iwasaki, Iwao

    2013-09-17

    A method of recovering metallic iron from iron-bearing metallurgical waste in steelmaking comprising steps of providing an iron-bearing metallurgical waste containing more than 55% by weight FeO and FeO equivalent and a particle size of at least 80% less than 10 mesh, mixing the iron-bearing metallurgical waste with a carbonaceous material to form a reducible mixture where the carbonaceous material is between 80 and 110% of the stoichiometric amount needed to reduce the iron-bearing waste to metallic iron, and as needed additions to provide a silica content between 0.8 and 8% by weight and a ratio of CaO/SiO.sub.2 between 1.4 and 1.8, forming agglomerates of the reducible mixture over a hearth material layer to protect the hearth, heating the agglomerates to a higher temperature above the melting point of iron to form nodules of metallic iron and slag material from the agglomerates by melting.

  10. Section L, Paragraph L-4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION L ATTACHMENT D CROSS REFERENCE MATRIX Section L Section M Offeror's Proposal Criterion 1: PAST PERFORMANCE L-15 (a) M-3 (a) Criterion 2: SITE ORGANIZATION AND...

  11. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 01/21/2015) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1992MC03 10B(α, α): σ relative to Rutherford scattering 1 - 3.3 X4 05/02/2012 1969GA01 10B(α, p), (α α'): relative σ at θ = 90° for Eγ = 1.0 - 3.5 0.170 MeV, 3.088 MeV, 3.682 MeV, 3.852 MeV, 0.717 MeV 06/18/2012 1973VA25 10B(α, n): laboratory differential σ 1.0 - 5.0 for n0: θ = 0°, θ = 90°, θ = 160° X4 04/04/2011 for n1: θ = 0°, θ = 90° for n23: θ = 0°, θ = 90° 10B(α, n):

  12. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1991WA02 11B(α, n): thick-target yield of Eα = 411, 605 and 606 keV resonance 350 - 2400 keV 1 X4 04/04/2011 11B(α, n): for 606-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): for 411-keV resonance after subtraction of the 605-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): S-factor 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thick-target 400 - 500 keV 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thin-target 1 1966MA04, Errata 11B(α, n): excitation curve < 4.5 for

  13. 11C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013SO11 11C(p, γ): deduced astrophysical reaction rates and S-factors X4 12/14/2015 2003LI51 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor low X4 09/12/2011 2003TA02 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor 0 - 0.7 X4 09/12/2011 2003KU36 11C(p, p): elastic scattering σ ~ 0.2 - 3.2 θcm = 180° 09/08/2011 Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March

  14. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 10/28/2014 1993CH02 12C(p, X): σ for η production ≤ 0.9 GeV X4 03/07/2012 1974RO29 12C(p, γ): σ 150 - 3000 keV X4 08/27/2013 1951GO1B 12C(p, p): yield curve of elastic scattering 0.2 - 4.0 θ = 164° 11/05/2014 1976ME22 12C(p, p): absolute σ 0.3 - 2.0 X4 08/07/2013 2008BU19 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors. 354, 390, 460, 463, 565,

  15. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 13C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 09/12/2011 1994KI02 13C(p, γ): γ-ray yield, calculated S(E) 120 - 950 keV X4 09/12/2011 2008HE11 13C(p, γ): reaction yield at the resonance 448.5-keV for a fresh target and after an integrated charge of 1C 435 - 470 keV σ X4 11/07/2011 1991BR19 13C(p, γ): reaction yield near the resonance 0.44 - 0.6 483.3-keV, 0.55-MeV X4 11/07/2011

  16. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2006JO11 13C(α, n): deduced S(E) ~ 0 - 1 from (1993BR17), from (1993DR08) X4 08/04/2011 2001HE22 13C(α, n): S(E) 0 - 2 S-factor 11/15/2011 2003KA51 13C(α, n): deduced S-factors, reaction rate Ecm ~ 200 - 800 keV X4 05/01/2012 1993DR08 13C(α, n): excitation function and S(E) ~ 275 - 1075 keV σ, S-factor X4 08/04/2011 2008HE11 13C(α, n): σ, reaction yields and S(E) Ecm = 320 - 700 keV σ, Table

  17. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003MU12 14N(p, γ): deduced astrophysical S-factors < 600 keV X4 05/06/2013 1990WA10 14N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2005CO16, 2006BE50 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors, resonance strength 70 - 228 keV X4 05/08/2013 2006LE13 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors 70 - 228 keV X4 05/30/2013 2005BR04, 2005BR15 14N(p, γ): astrophysical S-factors ~ 0.1 - 2.5 1 08/15/2013 2004FO02,

  18. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971CO27 14N(α, γ): thick target yield 0.5 - 1.2 1 08/04/2011 2000GO43 14N(α, γ): resonance yields, deduced astrophysical reaction rates 550 - 1300 keV X4 03/01/2012 1973RO03 14N(α, γ): γ-ray yield 1.0 - 3.2 1 04/30/2012 1980MA26 14N(α, α): σ 1.5, 1.6 X4 03/01/2012 2007CH25 14N(α, γ): deduced resonance parameters 1620 - 1775 keV X4 03/01/2012 1994YE11 14N(α, α): σ(θ)/σ(Rutherford) 2

  19. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1973MC12 16O(p, α): σ threshold - 7.7 X4 10/17/2012 1981DY03 16O(p, pα): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 4.44-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 16O(p, p'): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1997MO27 16O(p, p), (p, γ): elastic, capture σ Ecm = 200 - 3750 keV X4 03/28/2013 1973RO34 16O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 3.1 S-Factor X4 05/10/2011 16O(p, γ): differential σ for the DC → ground

  20. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013DA10 4He(α, γ): deduced σ 19 - 29 X4 01/27/2016 1978HI04 4He(α, α): elastic scattering excitation function 32.6 - 35.4 θ = 30.5°, θ = 53.7°, θ = 54.7°, θ = 71.5°, θ = 90.0° 04/24/2012 1995DE18 4He(α, γ): excitation function for the decay to the 3 MeV level 33 - 34.7 θlab = 90.0° 04/24/2012 1975NA12 4He(α, γ): excitation function 33 - 36 1 07/19/2011 1977PA26 4He(α, γ): γ

  1. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004TU02 6Li(p, α): coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low 1, S-factors from direct data, S-factors from indirect data 03/20/2012 2004TU06 6Li(p, α): σ, coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low σ, coincidence yields, S-factors from direct data, S-factors from indirect data 03/20/2012 1966GE11 6Li(p, α): S-factor Ec.m. = 0.01 - 1.00 X4 12/15/2015 2005CR05 6Li(p, α): S-factor 20 - 100 keV X4

  2. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(α, γ): γ thick target yield resonance X4 02/15/2012 1966FO05 6Li(α, γ): σ 0.9 - 3.0 2 < Eγ < 4 MeV, 4 < Eγ < 7 MeV, thick target capture γ-ray yield, capture γ-ray yield of 2.43 MeV resonance 02/29/2012 1989BA24 6Li(α, γ): σ 1.085, 1.175 X4 02/15/2012 1979SP01 6Li(α, γ): thick target yield curve for 718 keV γ-rays 1140 - 1250 keV 1175 keV resonance 07/19/2011

  3. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12/16/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997GO13 7Li(pol. p, γ): total σ, S-factor for capture to third-excited state 0 - 80 keV X4 06/12/2014 1994CH23 7Li(pol. p, γ): deduced S-factor ≤ 80 keV X4 06/12/2014 1999SP09 7Li(p, α): deduced S-factor < 0.4 X4 06/12/2014 1974BU16 7Li(p, n): σ < 3.8 X4 03/14/2012 2011PI04 7Li(p, α): analyzed excitation functions Ecm = 0 - 7 X4 06/12/2014 2001LA35 7Li(p, α): deduced S(E)-factor 10 -

  4. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003DA19 18O(α, γ): deduced resonance strengths ~ 470 - 770 keV X4 02/13/2012 1978TR05 18O(α, γ): excitation function for the 1.27 MeV secondary γ-ray transition 0.6 - 2.3 θγ = 0° 02/29/2012 1990VO06 18O(α, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.78 X4 02/13/2012 1973BA10 18O(α, n): σ with target thickness 1 - 5 6 keV, 13 keV 06/06/2011 1956BO61 18O(α, n): neutron yields 1.8 - 5.3 0° - 30° X4

  5. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008UG01 19F(α, p): yield curves, σ 792 - 1993 keV X4 09/14/2011 2005UG04 19F(α, p1γ): excitation curve 1238 - 2009 keV 1 11/30/2011 19F(α, p0): excitation curve 1 19F(α, p1): excitation curve 1 1984CS01 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 3.7 X4 09/14/2011 1994CH36 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 4.5 X4 09/14/2011 2000WR01 19F(α, n): neutron yields and σ 2.28 - 3.10 X4 09/14/2011 1977VA10 19F(α, n): differential

  6. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'γ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 20Ne(p, pαγ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1975RO08 20Ne(p, γ): S-factors 0.37 - 2.10 Direct Capture (DC) → 332-keV state, DC → 2425-keV state, tail of 2425-keV state X4 04/19/2011 20Ne(p, γ): differential σ at θγ = 90° DC → 332-keV state, 332-keV state →

  7. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS ...

  8. Neutron scattering of iron-based superconductors (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron scattering of iron-based superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron scattering of iron-based superconductors Low-energy spin excitations have been...

  9. Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption ...

  10. Pressure-Driven Quantum Criticality in Iron-Selenide Superconductors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pressure-Driven Quantum Criticality in Iron-Selenide Superconductors Title: Pressure-Driven Quantum Criticality in Iron-Selenide Superconductors Authors: Guo, Jing ; Chen, Xiao-Jia ...

  11. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.

    1986-09-16

    An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  12. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs' blood and muscle cells during decay, and were able to identify iron-facilitated reactions that...

  13. Laboratory Shock Experiments on Basalt - Iron Sulfate Mixes at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Shock Experiments on Basalt - Iron Sulfate Mixes at 40 - 50 GPa and their ... Title: Laboratory Shock Experiments on Basalt - Iron Sulfate Mixes at 40 - 50 GPa and ...

  14. Phase Discrimination through Oxidant Selection for Iron Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phase Discrimination through Oxidant Selection for Iron Oxide Ultrathin Films Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Phase Discrimination through Oxidant Selection for Iron...

  15. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come...

  16. SECTION J, APPENDIX B - PEP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION J APPENDIX B PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PLAN Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084 Intentionally left blank for Internet posting purposes. Section J, Appendix B, Page 1

  17. PART III-SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C SECTION J APPENDIX C TRANSITION PLAN Plan: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer. Requirements: In accordance with Section F, Deliverables During Transition, the Contractor...

  18. SECTION J, APPENDIX B - PEP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION J APPENDIX B PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PLAN Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084 Intentionally left blank for Internet posting purposes. Section J, Appendix B, Page 1...

  19. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  20. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010LA11 10B(p, α): deduced S(E) E(cm) = 0 - 0.15 1 11/30/2011 1993AN06 10B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/07/2011 1993AN09 10B(p, α): absolute fusion σ and S(E) E(cm) = 48 - 159 keV X4 11/07/2011 1972SZ02 10B(p, α): total reaction σ and S(E) 60 - 180 keV 1 X4 03/03/2011 1983WI09 10B(p, γ): γ yield, capture σ(E) 0.07 - 2.2 X4 11/07/2011 2003TO21 10B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced

  1. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12/17/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, α): deduced σ, S-factor Ecm ~ 0 - 1 X4 11/07/2012 2010LA11 11B(p, α): deduced S-factor E(cm) = 0 - 0.6 1 11/30/2011 2000KE10 11B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor < 100 keV X4 11/07/2012 1993AN06 11B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/29/2012 1979DA03 11B(p, 3α): σ 35.4 - 1500 keV X4 07/30/2014 1992CE02 11B(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012

  2. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2009MA70 12C(α, γ0): σ 0 - 2.27 X4 05/01/2012 2012OU01 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.3 - 3.5 X4 02/12/2015 1997KU18 12C(α, γ): analyzed S-factor Ecm = 0.9 - 3 X4 05/10/2012 1987RE02 12C(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 0.94 - 2.84 X4 05/09/2012 2001HA31 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.95 - 2.78 E1, E2 06/18/2012 2001KU09 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.95 - 2.8 X4 05/09/2012

  3. 14C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1969SI04 14C(p, γ): γ-rays yield for 230 - 690 keV Eγ ≥ 2.8 MeV 08/15/2013 1990GO25 14C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 250 - 740 keV X4 10/28/2014 1968HE12 14C(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.6 - 2.7 γ0 01/06/2015 1991WA02 14C(p, n): σ 1.0 - 1.55 X4 10/28/2014 1968HA27 14C(p, p): σ at θcm = 1.0 - 2.7 39.2°, 54.7°, 90°, 125.3°, 161.4° 08/15/2013 1971KU01 14C(p, γ0): excitation function at θ = 90° 1.3 - 2.6 1

  4. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 15N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1982RE06 15N(p, α): σ 78 - 810 keV X4 09/12/2011 1979ZY02 15N(p, α0): σ, deduced S-factor 93 - 418 keV X4 09/12/2011 2010LE21, 2013DE03 15N(p, γ): σ, S-factors 130 - 1800 keV X4 05/01/2012 & 02/01/2016 2012IM02 15N(p, γ), (p, αγ): σ, S-factors 0.14 - 1.80 X4 02/01/2016 1974RO37 15N(p, γ), (p, αγ): σ 150 - 2500 keV X4 09/12/2011 1968GO07

  5. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2002WI18 15N(α γ): σ 461 - 2642 keV X4 09/12/2011 1997WI12 15N(α γ): σ 0.65 - 2.65 X4 09/12/2011 1995WI26 15N(α γ): σ 0.67 - 0.69 X4 09/12/2011 1969AI01 15N(α γ): γ-ray excitation curve for 3.0 ≤ Eγ ≤ 7.0 MeV 2.5 - 3.2 1 11/30/2011 1977DI08 15N(α, γ): γ-ray excitation curve near Eα = 3.15 MeV for transitions to 3146 - 3158 keV five low-lying states, 4.65 MeV (13/2+) state

  6. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6O(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971TO06 16O(α, γ): σ 0.85 - 1.8 X4 09/15/2011 1953CA44 16O(α, α): σ 0.94 - 4.0 X4 09/15/2011 1997KU18 16O(α, γ): analyzed S-factor 1 - 3.25 X4 05/10/2012 1980MA27 16O(α, α): σ 1.305 - 1.330; 2.950 - 3.075 X4 02/14/2012 16O(α, γ): σ 1.37, 2.6, 2.9, 3.036 1987HA24 16O(α, γ): σ Ecm = 1.7 - 2.35 X4 02/14/2012 1990LE06 16O(α, α): σ 1.8 - 5 X4 03/12/2011 1985JA17 16O(α, α): σ 2

  7. 17O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010SE11 17O(p, α): nuclear excitation function 0 - 0.7 1 06/22/2011 1973RO03 17O(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.15 - 1.4 1 08/01/2012 2015BU02 17O(p, γ): total S(E)-factors 0.17 - 0.53 X4 03/03/2016 2012SC16, 2014DI01 17O(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.2 - 0.4 X4 03/03/2016 1973RO34 17O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 1.9 S-Factor X4 06/22/2011 17O(p, γ): σ for the γ-ray transition 0.94 → 0 MeV 17O(p, γ):

  8. 17O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013BE11; see also 2012BEZP 17O(α, n), (α, γ): σ, S-factors 0.8 - 2.3 X4 02/12/2015 1973BA10 17O(α, n): neutron yields with target thickness 0.9 - 5.3 ~ 2.5 keV, 6 keV, 13 keV, ~ 35 keV 06/06/2011 1976MC12 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.4 - 2.3 θγ = 50° 04/28/2011 17O(α, n0): yield of neutrons θn = 120° 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.825 - 1.885 θγ = 0° 05/03/2011 17O(α,

  9. 3H Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3H(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001TO07 3H(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.05 - 0.8 X4 01/09/2012 1994BR25 3H(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor Ecm = 50 - 1200 keV X4 01/09/2012 1987SC18 3H(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor Ecm = 79 - 464 keV X4 01/09/2012 1988SA13 3H(α, α): recoil σ 0.5 - 2.5 X4 01/09/2012 1987BU18 3H(α, γ): σ and S-factor 0.7 - 2 X4 01/09/2012 1968IV01 3H(α, α): elastic scattering σ 3 - 11 Table 9 X4

  10. 3He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1982KR05 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 107 - 1266 keV X4 01/05/2012 1969NA24 3He(α, γ): σ and S-factor 164 - 245 keV σ, S(E) X4 07/19/2011 1984OS03 3He(α, γ): σ 165 - 1169 keV X4 01/05/2012 1982OS02 3He(α, γ): S-factor 165 - 1170 keV S34(Ecm) X4 07/19/2011 1988HI06 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 195 - 686 keV X4 01/05/2012 2007CO17 3He(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor 220, 250, 400 keV X4 01/05/2012

  11. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1974KR07 4He(p, p): σ 0.5 - 3 X4 10/23/2014 2004PU02 4He(p, p): σ(θ = 128.7°) 1.2 - 5.2 X4 10/23/2014 1997NU02 4He(p, p): σ 1.4 - 6 X4 10/23/2014 1976BR17 4He(p, p): σ(168.8°)/σ(104.4°) 2.24 - 5.90 X4 10/23/2014 1977DO01 4He(p, p): σ 11 - 14 X4 10/23/2014 1969GA12 4He(p, p): σ 12.04, 14.23, 17.45 X4 10/23/2014 1974SO06 4He(p, X): total reaction σ 18 - 48 1 03/08/2011 1976SO01 4He(p, X),

  12. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997ZA06 9Be(p, α), (p, d): S-factor 16 - 390 keV X4 01/23/2013 1973SI27 9Be(p, α), (p, d): σ 30 - 700 keV X4 01/24/2013 1992CE02 9Be(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012 1995ZA04 9Be(p, γ): deduced σ 75 - 1800 keV X4 01/23/2013 1994LI51 9Be(p, p): σ at θ = 170° 0.15- 3 X4 01/11/2012 1973SZ07 9Be(p, γ): σ 200 - 750 keV X4 01/09/2013 1972RE07 9Be(p, γ): σ 0.20 - 0.85 X4

  13. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8O(p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008LA06 18O(p, α): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0 - 1.5 θα = 46° 12/03/2012 1990CH32 18O(p, α): σ < 2 X4 10/04/2012 1990VO06 18O(p, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.22 X4 02/13/2012 2008LA13 18O(p, α): deduced σ 0 - 250 keV X4 10/20/2014 1973BA31 18O(p, n): total neutron-production σ < 5 1 X4 05/10/2011 1990WA10 18O(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1979LO01 18O(p, α): σ 72 - 935 keV X4

  14. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  15. The Full Function Test Explosive Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Griffith, L V; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-12-13

    We have conducted three tests of a new pulsed power device called the Full Function Test (FFT). These tests represented the culmination of an effort to establish a high energy pulsed power capability based on high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) technology. This involved an extensive computational modeling, engineering, fabrication, and fielding effort. The experiments were highly successful and a new US record for magnetic energy was obtained.

  16. On Boolean matrices with full factor rank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shitov, Ya

    2013-11-30

    It is demonstrated that every (0,1)-matrix of size nm having Boolean rank n contains acolumn with at least ?n/2?1 zero entries. This bound is shown to be asymptotically optimal. As acorollary, it is established that the size of afull-rank Boolean matrix is bounded from above by afunction of its tropical and determinantal ranks. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  17. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

  18. Full particle orbit tracing with RIO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18/12/2014 at 22:28 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Full particle orbit tracing with the RIO code in the presence of broad-spectrum MHD activity in a reversed-field pinch View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104007 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/54/10/104007) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience | International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Fusion Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 104007 (10pp)

  19. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1998-06-02

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  20. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:08 The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is

  1. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus; Muftikian, Rosy; Korte, Nic

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds.

  2. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus; Muftikian, Rosy; Korte, Nic

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds.

  3. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-03-18

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  4. Synthesis of iron based hydrocracking catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Eldredge, Patricia A. (Barboursville, VA); Ladner, Edward P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A method of preparing a fine particle iron based hydrocracking catalyst and the catalyst prepared thereby. An iron (III) oxide powder and elemental sulfur are reacted with a liquid hydrogen donor having a hydroaromatic structure present in the range of from about 5 to about 50 times the weight of iron (III) oxide at a temperature in the range of from about 180.degree. C. to about 240.degree. C. for a time in the range of from about 0 to about 8 hours. Various specific hydrogen donors are disclosed. The catalysts are active at low temperature (<350.degree. C.) and low pressure.

  5. Full body powder antichip. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-17

    Chipping is the major paint defect listed for automobile customer dissatisfaction. The improved chip resistance and smoother paint surfaces produced by full body powder antichip will result in greater customer satisfaction and greater demand for US-produced automobiles. Powder antichip contains virtually no solvent, thereby reducing the potential VOC emissions from Newark Assembly by more than 90 tons per year as compared to the solvent-borne material presently applied in most full body applications. Since Newark Assembly Plant is in a severe non-attainment air quality area, which must demonstrate a 15% reduction in emissions by 1996, projects such as this are crucial to the longevity of industry in this region. The liquid paint spray systems include incineration of the oven volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) at 1,500 F. Since there are minimal VOC`s in powder coatings and the only possible releases occur only during polymerization, incineration is not required. The associated annual savings resulting from the elimination of the incinerator utilized on the liquid spray system is 1.44 {times} 10{sup 10} BTU`s per unit installed. The annual cost savings is approximately $388 thousand, far below the original estimates.

  6. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Animal, Vegetable or Mineral? Iron is a limiting nutrient in many parts of the oceans, nowhere more so than in the Southern Ocean's photic zone, which receives enough sunlight for...

  7. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-07-29

    A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

  8. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which prevents two electrons from occupying the same site, resulting in a so-called Mott insulator. The lack of information on the strength of electron correlation in the iron...

  9. MECS 2006 - Iron and Steel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Iron and Steel MECS 2006 - Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006) All available footprints and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint PDF icon Iron and Steel More Documents & Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006

  10. Center for Inverse Design Highlight: Iron Chalcogenide PV Absorbers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Chalcogenide Photovoltaic Absorbers The Center for Inverse Design has identified the iron-based ternary chalcogenide materials Fe 2 SiS 4 and Fe 2 GeS 4 as promising new photovoltaic materials, which circumvent the problems historically encountered with iron sulfide FeS 2 (iron pyrite). There is intense interest in earth-abundant materials, including iron-bearing systems, for the widespread development of photovoltaic (PV) technologies to sustainably meet growing energy needs. The inverse

  11. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  12. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  13. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  14. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One

  15. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One

  16. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One

  17. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One

  18. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One

  19. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One

  20. Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One

  1. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  2. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  3. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-04-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. 10 figs.

  4. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separatemore » the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.« less

  5. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separate the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.

  6. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  7. Section L, Paragraph L-4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION L ATTACHMENT D CROSS REFERENCE MATRIX Section L Section M Offeror's Proposal Criterion 1: PAST PERFORMANCE L-15 (a) M-3 (a) Criterion 2: SITE ORGANIZATION AND QUALIFICATIONS OF KEY PERSONNEL L-15 (b)(1) M-3 (b)(1) L-15 (b)(2) M-3 (b)(2) Criterion 3: SMALL BUSINESS PARTICIPATION L-15 (c) M-3 (c)

  8. Full waveform inversion of solar interior flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2014-12-10

    The inference of flows of material in the interior of the Sun is a subject of major interest in helioseismology. Here, we apply techniques of full waveform inversion (FWI) to synthetic data to test flow inversions. In this idealized setup, we do not model seismic realization noise, training the focus entirely on the problem of whether a chosen supergranulation flow model can be seismically recovered. We define the misfit functional as a sum of L {sub 2} norm deviations in travel times between prediction and observation, as measured using short-distance filtered f and p {sub 1} and large-distance unfiltered p modes. FWI allows for the introduction of measurements of choice and iteratively improving the background model, while monitoring the evolution of the misfit in all desired categories. Although the misfit is seen to uniformly reduce in all categories, convergence to the true model is very slow, possibly because it is trapped in a local minimum. The primary source of error is inaccurate depth localization, which, due to density stratification, leads to wrong ratios of horizontal and vertical flow velocities ({sup c}ross talk{sup )}. In the present formulation, the lack of sufficient temporal frequency and spatial resolution makes it difficult to accurately localize flow profiles at depth. We therefore suggest that the most efficient way to discover the global minimum is to perform a probabilistic forward search, involving calculating the misfit associated with a broad range of models (generated, for instance, by a Monte Carlo algorithm) and locating the deepest minimum. Such techniques possess the added advantage of being able to quantify model uncertainty as well as realization noise (data uncertainty).

  9. LLNL Section I Clauses/Prescriptions

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AC52-06NA27344 LLNL Section I, Page 56 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I I-1 CONTRACT CLAUSES Unless conditionally "Noted", all contract clauses are hereby incorporated by full text. The references cited herein are from the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) (48 CFR Chapter 1) and the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) (48 CFR Chapter 9). Note: The titles and page locations of the clauses are as follows: CLAUSE TITLE PAGE I001 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JUL 2004)

  10. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 2, Sections 6 and 7: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A.; Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M.; Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A.

    1992-11-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of the mechanisms governing the ash aerosol size segregated composition resulting from the combustion of pulverized coal in a laboratory scale down-flow combustor are described. The results of modeling activities used to interpret the results of the experiments conducted under his subtask are also described in this section. Although results from the entire program are included, Phase II studies which emphasized: (1) alkali behavior, including a study of the interrelationship between potassium vaporization and sodium vaporization; and (2) iron behavior, including an examination of the extent of iron-aluminosilicate interactions, are highlighted. Idealized combustion determination of ash particle formation and surface stickiness are also described.

  11. Understanding the Factors Affecting the Formation of Carbonyl Iron Electrodes in Rechargeable Alkaline Iron Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Yang, B; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2012-01-01

    Rechargeable iron-based alkaline batteries such as iron - air and nickel - iron batteries are attractive for large-scale electrical energy storage because iron is inexpensive, globally-abundant and environmentally-friendly. Further, the iron electrode is known for its robustness to repeated charge/discharge cycling. During manufacturing these batteries are charged and discharged 20 to 50 times during which the discharge capacity of the iron electrode increases gradually and attains a stable value. This process of achieving stable capacity is called formation. In this study we have focused our efforts on understanding the effect of electrode design on formation. We have investigated the role of wetting agent, pore-former additive, and sulfide additive on the formation of carbonyl iron electrodes. The wetting agent increased the rate of formation while the pore-former additive increased the final capacity. Sodium sulfide added to the electrolyte worked as a de-passivation agent and increased the final discharge capacity. We have proposed a phenomenological model for the formation process that predicts the rate of formation and final discharge capacity given the design parameters for the electrode. The understanding gained here will be useful in reducing the time lost in formation and in maximizing the utilization of the iron electrode. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.021301jes] All rights reserved.

  12. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  13. PART III-SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C SECTION J APPENDIX C TRANSITION PLAN Plan: [To be inserted by the Contracting Officer.] Requirements: In accordance with Section F, Deliverables During Transition, the Contractor shall submit a Transition Plan for the Contracting Officer's approval 10 days after Contract award. The Transition plan shall describe the process, details, schedule, and cost for providing an orderly transition during the Contract's Transition Term stated in Section F, F-3 Period of Performance. The Transition Plan

  14. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, Ming-Shing (Rocky Point, NY); Yang, Ralph T. (Middle Island, NY)

    1980-01-01

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  15. SECTION J, APPENDIX A - SOW

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0007749 SECTION J, APPENDIX A: STATEMENT OF WORK TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. OBJECTIVES, SCOPE, AND REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................... 1 1.0 OBJECTIVE .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND

  16. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX B AWARD FEE PLAN [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award.]

  17. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX M CONTRACTOR COMMITMENTS, AGREEMENTS, AND UNDERSTANDINGS [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award.]

  18. Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

    2011-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting iron ore to metallic iron nodules. Various types of coals including a bio-coal produced though torrefaction can result in production of NRI at reduced GHG levels. The process results coupled with earlier already reported developments indicate that this process technique should be evaluated at the next level in order to develop parameter information for full scale process design. Implementation of the process to full commercialization will require a full cost production analysis and comparison to other reduction technologies and iron production alternatives. The technical results verify that high quality NRI can be produced under various operating conditions at the pilot level.

  19. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  20. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced...

  1. Phase Discrimination through Oxidant Selection for Iron Oxide Ultrathin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Films | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory Phase Discrimination through Oxidant Selection for Iron Oxide Ultrathin Films Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Phase Discrimination through Oxidant Selection for Iron Oxide Ultrathin Films

  2. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.

    1985-10-28

    Disclosed is an improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  3. Baotou Iron and Steel Group Baotou Steel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Baotou Iron and Steel Group (Baotou Steel) Place: Baotou, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China Product: Baotou-based iron and steel maker as well as a rare...

  4. Iron County, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype B. Registered Energy Companies in Iron County, Utah Solar Unlimited USA Places in Iron County, Utah...

  5. City of Mountain Iron, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Mountain Iron, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Mountain Iron Place: Minnesota Phone Number: (218)748-7570 Website: www.mtniron.com...

  6. Minnesota Jobs to Come with Efficient Iron Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New energy-efficient iron plant offers a ray of hope for workers after local mining company shuts down.

  7. Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments Plutonium subsurface mobility is primarily controlled by its oxidation state, which in turn is loosely coupled to the oxidation state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on

  8. 1996 Central New Mexico Section [American Chemical Society] annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M.E.

    1997-02-07

    The main goal of the Central New Mexico Section this year was to increase attendance at the local meetings. Throughout the course of the year attendance at the meeting more than doubled. This was brought on by several factors: having the meeting spread throughout the section (Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Socorro, Los Alamos); supplementing the ACS National Tour speakers with interesting local sections speakers; and making full use of the newly formed Public Relations Committee. Activities during 1996 are summarized.

  9. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD ...................................................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA ..........................................................3 M-4 COST CRITERION .............................................................................................................6 Section M, Page 2 M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS

  10. SECTION J - TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Conformed to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section J Page i PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Statement of Work (Replaced by Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029) Appendix B Performance Evaluation Plan (Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084) Appendix C Contractor's Transition Plan Appendix D Sensitive Foreign Nations Control Appendix E Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) Appendix F National Work Breakdown

  11. RFP Section H Clause Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 3, 2011, twenty two draft Section H clause templates were distributed for Procurement Director (PD), Head of Contracting Activity (HCA), General Counsel and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate including the elimination of six clauses. The final version of the sixteen RFP Section H clause templates identified below will be available in STRIPES.

  12. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  13. Exploring the structure of high temperature, iron-bearing liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilding, Martin; Benmore, Chris; Weber, Rick; Parise, John; Lazareva, Lena; Skinner, Lawrie; Alderman, Oliver; Tamalonis, Antony

    2015-06-25

    This paper describes the direct measurements of the structure of iron-bearing liquids using a combination of containerless techniques and insitu high energy x-ray diffraction. These capabilities provide data that is important to help model and optimize processes such as smelting, steel making, and controlling slag chemistry. A successful programme of liquid studies has been undertaken and the Advanced Photon Source using these combined techniques which include the provision of gas mixing and the control of pO? and the changing influence of mixed valance elements. It is possible to combine rapid image acquisition with quenching of liquids to obtain the full diffraction patterns of deeply supercooled liquids and the metastable supercooled liquid regime, where the liquid structures and viscosity change most dramatically, can also be explored.

  14. RFP Section L Attachment Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 29,2010, six draft RFP Section L Attachment templates (Past Performance Information Questionnaire, Past Performance Questionnaire Cover Letter, Letter of Commitment, Past Performance Reference Information Form, ESH&Q Past Performance Information Form, and Resume Format) were distributed for Procurement Director (PD) and Head of Contracting Activity (HCA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate. The final versions of the six aforementioned RFP Section L Attachment templates will be e-mailed directly to the Procurement Directors and made available in the STRIPES Library. For RFP's generated in STRIPES, the Section L Attachments should be identified in clause DOE-L-1033 and the file with each Attachment should be attached to the RFP.

  15. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  16. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N u F a c t 0 9 11th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, Superbeams and Beta Beams July 20-25, 2009 - Illinois Institute of Technology - Chicago David Schmitz, Fermilab Outline  Quick Audience Survey  Introduction  Relevant Energies and Targets  Current Cross-Section Experiments  Recent Results and Mysteries  Future Cross-Section Experiments NuFact09 - IIT, Chicago - 07/24/2009 D. Schmitz, Fermilab White Sox Survey D. Schmitz, Fermilab NuFact09 - IIT, Chicago -

  17. Microsoft Word - WTP Contract Section I - Conformed Thru 363.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section I Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. 363 I - i SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES WTP Contract Section I Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. 363 I - ii SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES FULL TEXT OF REFERENCED CLAUSES Clause No. Clause Title Page No. I.1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (OCT 1995); DEAR 952.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 1997) ............................... 1 I.2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)

  18. Section CIR: CASE IDENTIFICATION RECORD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... A-20 NumFullBaths NCOMBATH A full bathroom is one that has a sink with running water, a ... B-13c IceThruDoor1 ICE Does this refrigerator have through-the-door ice and water service? ...

  19. SECTION J, APPENDIX A - SOW

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029; Modified Mod 0049) Honeywell FM&T, LLC Contract No. DE-NA0000622 SECTION J APPENDIX A STATEMENT OF WORK 09/19/12 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. OBJECTIVES, SCOPE, AND REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................... 1 1.0 OBJECTIVE .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND

  20. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD.............................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA...........................................3 M-4 COST CRITERION.................................................................................5 Section M, Page 2 M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS (a) This acquisition will be conducted using the policies and procedures in Federal

  1. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS......................................................................176 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD...................................................................177 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA..........................................177 M-4 COST CRITERION.............................................................................................179 Section M, Page 176 M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS (a) This acquisition will be

  2. Water Clustering on Nanostructured Iron Oxide Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merte, L. R.; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, Guowen; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Zeuthen, Helene; Knudsen, Jan; Laegsgaard, E.; Wendt, Stefen; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2014-06-30

    The adhesion of water to solid surfaces is characterized by the tendency to balance competing moleculemolecule and moleculesurface interactions. Hydroxyl groups form strong hydrogen bonds to water molecules and are known to substantially influence the wetting behaviour of oxide surfaces, but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moire-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer islands form on the are film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous water are found to coexist at adjacent hydroxylated and hydroxyl-free domains of the moire structure.

  3. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  4. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  5. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  6. Spectroscopic absorption measurements of an iron plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, P.T.; Fields, D.J.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K.; Goldstein, W.H.; Iglesias, C.A.; Rogers, F.J.; Swenson, J.K.; Chen, M.H.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Stewart, R.E. Nuclear Research Center Negev, P.O. Box 9001, Beer-Sheva 84190 )

    1992-12-28

    The first quantitative measurement of photoabsorption in the region determining the Rosseland and Planck mean opacities is obtained for a well-characterized, radiatively heated iron plasma using new techniques and instrumentation. The plasma density and temperature are simultaneously constrained with high accuracy, allowing unambiguous comparisons with opacity models used in modeling radiative transfer in equilibrium astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The experimental Rosseland and Planck group means are constrained to an accuracy of 15%.

  7. Crystal Structure of Iron-dependent Halogenase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron-dependent Halogenase Over 4000 natural products contain halide atoms such as chlorine, bromine, or iodine.1 Halogenated natural products are medically valuable and include antibiotics (chlorotetracycline and vancomycin), antitumor agents (rebeccamycin and calichemycin), and human thyroid hormone (thyroxine).2 Halogenation is essential to the biological activity and chemical reactivity of such compounds, and often generates versatile molecular building blocks for synthetic organic chemists.

  8. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tesanovic, Zlatko [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

    2010-09-01

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides ushered in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that followed - with physicists throwing everything from fancy gauge theories to synchrotron radiation into its kitchen sink - only recently began to show any signs of waning. In the spring of 2008, as if on cue, a new family of iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors burst on the scene, hinting at an alternative route to room-temperature superconductivity and all of its momentous consequences. Fueled by genuine excitement - and a bit of hype - the iron-based superconductivity turned into a science blockbuster of 2009. I will present a pedagogical review of this new field, contrast the physics of iron- and copper-based systems, and speculate on the microscopic origins of the two types of high-temperature superconductivity.

  9. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Filippi, Arthur M.; Sprecace, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  10. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  11. POLICY FLASH 2014-10 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION_ FULL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION FULL IMPLEMENTATION OF ANA SYSTEM POLICY FLASH 2014-10 UPDATE TO CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION FULL IMPLEMENTATION OF ANA SYSTEM An updated ...

  12. Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM Instruments for Simultaneous Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ...

  13. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  14. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    18 Section J Appendix F List of Applicable Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the Contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the CRD in whole or in part. For those Directives whereby the Contractor has been granted an

  15. Mission Support Contract Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 298 1 ATTACHMENT J-4-d Mission Support Contract FY 2013 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan The Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) details the administration of performance incentives and allocation of total available fee as defined in Section B, Supplies or Services and Prices/Costs. 1. PERFORMANCE INCENTIVES This PEMP contains both objective and subjective performance incentives in order to maximize the efficacy of the

  16. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jason

    2013-05-15

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, H{sub c2}(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was #12;tted with a power-law function {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T) = AT{sup n}. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s{sub {+-}}#6; scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s{sub {+-}}#6; gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at {lambda}#21;(T), in optimally - doped, SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (T{sub c} ~ #25;25 K) and annealed (T{sub c} ~ #25;35 K) single crystals of SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from #21;{lambda}(0) = 300 {+-}#6; 10 nm in as-grown samples to {lambda}#21;(0) = 275{+-}#6;10 nm. At low temperatures, {lambda}#21;(T) #24;~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from the charge-doped materials. In-plane resistivity measurements as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and its orientation with respect to the crystallographic ab-plane were used to study the upper critical field, H{sub c2}, of two overdoped compositions of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}, x=0.054 and x=0.072. Measurements were performed using precise alignment (with accuracy less than 0.1{degree}) of the magnetic field with respect to the Fe-As plane. The dependence of the H{sub c2} on angle {theta}#18; between the field and the ab- plane was measured in isothermal conditions in a broad temperature range. We found that the shape of the H{sub c2} vs. {theta}#18; curve clearly deviates from the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  17. Full Service Leased Space Data Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Service Leased Space Data Report Full Service Leased Space Data Report The Full Service Leased Space Data Report is to be used for voluntary reporting of scope 3 emissions from fully serviced leased space where the agency does not purchase energy directly. File Download the Full Service Leased Space Data Report.

  18. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, D.E.

    1998-05-12

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe{sup 3+} provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided. 21 figs.

  19. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, Delbert E.

    1998-01-01

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

  20. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  1. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  2. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  3. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Thursday, 21 August 2014 10:43 Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were

  4. Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Source on Ocean Photosynthesis Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of Aerosol Source on Ocean Photosynthesis figure 1 Figure 1. Dust storm blowing glacial dusts from the Copper River Basin of southeast Alaska into the North Pacific Ocean, which depends on this and other external iron sources to support its biological communities. (Image: NASA MODIS satellite image, Nov. 1, 2006. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=7094) Iron is one of

  5. Iron-titanium-mischmetal alloys for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandrock, Gary Dale

    1978-01-01

    A method for the preparation of an iron-titanium-mischmetal alloy which is used for the storage of hydrogen. The alloy is prepared by air-melting an iron charge in a clay-graphite crucible, adding titanium and deoxidizing with mischmetal. The resultant alloy contains less than about 0.1% oxygen and exhibits a capability for hydrogen sorption in less than half the time required by vacuum-melted, iron-titanium alloys.

  6. Reduction and carburization reactions in the iron bath smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uemura, Kenichiro

    1993-01-01

    Slag-metal-coal reactions in the iron-bath smelter were analyzed based on a reaction model. It was concluded that the productivity and carbon content of the hot metal produced in a smelter can be controlled by adjusting the slag volume and iron oxide content in slag. Furthermore, iron oxide content is determined by the slag volume and the stirring intensity of the slag.

  7. Determination of ferrous and total iron in refractory spinels (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Determination of ferrous and total iron in refractory spinels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Determination of ferrous and total iron in refractory spinels Accurate and precise determination of the redox state of iron (Fe) in spinels presents a significant challenge due to their refractory nature. The resultant extreme conditions needed to obtain complete dissolution generally oxidize some of the Fe(II) initially present and thus prevent the use of

  8. COLLOQUIUM: How Trenton Iron and Steel Innovations Reshaped America |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab April 9, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: How Trenton Iron and Steel Innovations Reshaped America Mr. Clifford Zink Independent Historian Iron and steel innovations in Trenton helped transform modern life with new methods of transportation, construction, and communications. Peter Cooper established his Trenton Iron Company on the Delaware River in 1847, and rolled America's first I-beams in the early 1850s. Cooper then established the

  9. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  10. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  11. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  12. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue Print Researchers studying organic material from dinosaur bones have been able to show that the organic material in the samples contained original soft tissue material from Mesozoic dinosaurs. The x-ray techniques at the ALS were key to showing a possible mechanism for this unexpected preservation-iron nanoparticles associated with dinosaur blood vessels were identified at the ALS. Researchers hypothesized that the iron had come from dinosaurs'

  13. Bandwidth Study U.S. Iron and Steel Manufacturing | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This bandwidth study examines energy consumption and potential energy savings opportunities in U.S. iron and steel manufacturing. The study relies on multiple sources to estimate ...

  14. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Wednesday, 30 April 2014 00:00 Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron

  15. Big Iron for Big Data: An Unnatural Alliance?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Big Iron for Big Data: An Unnatural Alliance? Steve Plimpton Sandia National Labs Salishan Conference on High-Speed Computing April 2012 Big data analytics (BD) versus scientific...

  16. Low Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnicitide Superconductors - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Low Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnicitide Superconductors Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology...

  17. Low Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnicitide Superconductors - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Resistivity Contact to Iron-Pnicitide Superconductors Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Superconductors are materials which carry...

  18. Iron active electrode and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Seidel, Joseph (Pittsburgh, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Verona, PA)

    1982-10-26

    An iron active electrode and method of preparing same in which iron sulfate is calcined in an oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range of from about 600.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. for a time sufficient to produce an iron oxide with a trace amount of sulfate. The calcined material is loaded into an electrically conductive support and then heated in a reducing atmosphere at an elevated temperature to produce activated iron having a trace amount of sulfide which is formed into an electrode plate.

  19. Iron County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Iron County, Wisconsin Anderson, Wisconsin Carey, Wisconsin Gurney, Wisconsin Hurley, Wisconsin Kimball, Wisconsin...

  20. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.; Littlejohn, D.; Shi, Y.

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH{sub 3}. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: (a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20 and 90 C to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution. 34 figs.

  1. Pressure-Induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Iron Oxyhydroxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Pressure-Induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Iron Oxyhydroxide ... Publication Date: 2014-07-21 OSTI Identifier: 1123936 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  2. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Littlejohn, David; Shi, Yao

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH.sub.3. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20.degree. and 90.degree. C. to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution.

  3. Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    occurring mechanism for stabilization of soft tissues has implications beyond paleontology. If iron-mediated reactions are part of a continuum from those that facilitate life...

  4. Recoil-free fractions of iron in aluminous bridgmanite fromtemperatur...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from temperature-dependent Mssbauer spectra Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recoil-free fractions of iron in aluminous bridgmanite from temperature-dependent ...

  5. Microstructural Modification of a Cast Iron by Magnetic Field Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The current study deals with the microstructural modification of a nodular cast iron during solidification under the influence of high magnetic fields (up to 18 tesla).

  6. Correlation effects in the iron pnictides (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here we address this issue through the phenomenology of ...

  7. Melting of clinopyroxene + magnesite in iron-bearing planetary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Melting of clinopyroxene + magnesite in iron-bearing planetary mantles and implications for the Earth and Mars Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Melting of clinopyroxene + ...

  8. Mountain Iron, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain Iron, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.5324267, -92.623515 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  9. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery: A Robust and Inexpensive Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: USC is developing an iron-air rechargeable battery for large-scale energy storage that could help integrate renewable energy sources into the electric grid. Iron-air batteries have the potential to store large amounts of energy at low costiron is inexpensive and abundant, while oxygen is freely obtained from the air we breathe. However, current iron-air battery technologies have suffered from low efficiency and short life spans. USC is working to dramatically increase the efficiency of the battery by placing chemical additives on the batterys iron-based electrode and restructuring the catalysts at the molecular level on the batterys air-based electrode. This can help the battery resist degradation and increase life span. The goal of the project is to develop a prototype iron-air battery at significantly cost lower than todays best commercial batteries.

  10. Turbine airfoil having outboard and inboard sections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazzola, Stefan; Marra, John J

    2015-03-17

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and formed from at least an outboard section and an inboard section such that an inner end of the outboard section is attached to an outer end of the inboard section. The outboard section may be configured to provide a tip having adequate thickness and may extend radially inward from the tip with a generally constant cross-sectional area. The inboard section may be configured with a tapered cross-sectional area to support the outboard section.

  11. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  12. Enhancing the Performance of the Rechargeable Iron Electrode in Alkaline Batteries with Bismuth Oxide and Iron Sulfide Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-09-07

    Iron-based alkaline rechargeable batteries have the potential of meeting the needs of large-scale electrical energy storage because of their low-cost, robustness and eco-friendliness. However, the widespread commercial deployment of iron-based batteries has been limited by the low charging efficiency and the poor discharge rate capability of the iron electrode. In this study, we have demonstrated iron electrodes containing bismuth oxide and iron sulfide with a charging efficiency of 92% and capable of being discharged at the 3C rate. Such a high value of charging efficiency combined with the ability to discharge at high rates is being reported for the first time. The bismuth oxide additive led to the in situ formation of elemental bismuth and a consequent increase in the overpotential for the hydrogen evolution reaction leading to an increase in the charging efficiency. We observed that the sulfide ions added to the electrolyte and iron sulfide added to the electrode mitigated-electrode passivation and allowed for continuous discharge at high rates. At the 3C discharge rate, a utilization of 0.2 Ah/g was achieved. The performance level of the rechargeable iron electrode demonstrated here is attractive for designing economically-viable large-scale energy storage systems based on alkaline nickel-iron and iron-air batteries. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

  14. Template:PrintFullVersionButton | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PrintFullVersionButton Jump to: navigation, search This is the PrintFullVersionButton template. It is intended for inclusion on any page where the printing of a superset of pages...

  15. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel ... with Ultralow-Sulfur Fuel Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission ...

  16. Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production Doosan Fuel Cell Takes Closed Plant to Full Production December 8, 2015 - 12:06pm Addthis Photo Courtesy | Doosan Fuel Cell ...

  17. Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Energy Systems Division About ... UChicago Argonne, LLC. ANLESD08-3 Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion ...

  18. Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Find resources to help you design a production and manufacturing process for a new clean energy technology or product. For full-scale production, other areas to consider include workforce development; R&D funding; and regional, state, and local resources. For more resources, see the Clean Energy

  19. Part IV: Section D - Packaging and Marking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section D - Page ii PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging 1 D.2 Marking ...

  20. Vermont Section 401 Water Quality Certification Application ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Application required for Section 401 water quality certification under the Clean Water Act. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Section 401 Water Quality...

  1. OpenEI Community - Section 7

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Wed, 05 Sep...

  2. Investigation of Iron Aluminide Weld Overlays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.B.; Levin, B.F.; Marder, A.R.

    1999-08-02

    Conventional fossil fired boilers have been retrofitted with low NO(sub)x burners in order for the power plants to comply with new clean air regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion typically has been enhanced resulting in premature tube failure. To protect the existing panels from accelerated attack, weld overlay coatings are typically being applied. By depositing an alloy that offers better corrosion resistance than the underlying tube material, the wastage rates can be reduced. While Ni-based and stainless steel compositions are presently providing protection, they are expensive and susceptible to failure via corrosion-fatigue due to microsegregation upon solidification. Another material system presently under consideration for use as a coating in the oxidation/sulfidation environments is iron-aluminum. These alloys are relatively inexpensive, exhibit little microsegregation, and show excellent corrosion resistance. However, their use is limited due to weldability issues and their lack of corrosion characterization in simulated low NO(sub)x gas compositions. Therefore a program was initiated in 1996 to evaluate the use of iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in fossil fired boilers with low NO(sub)x burners. Investigated properties included weldability, corrosion behavior, erosion resistance, and erosion-corrosion performance.

  3. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  4. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-09-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to investigate reducing processing temperature, controlling the gas temperature and gas atmosphere over metallized iron nodules, and effectively using sub-bituminous coal as a reductant for producing high quality metallized iron nodules at low cost.

  5. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to investigate reducing processing temperature, controlling the gas temperature and gas atmosphere over metalized iron nodules, and effectively using sub-bituminous coal as a reductant for producing high quality metalized iron nodules at low cost.

  6. Electrochemical Deposition of Iron Nanoneedles on Titanium Oxide Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan Y. X.; Zhang L.; Gan B.J.

    2011-10-01

    Iron as a catalyst has wide applications for hydrogen generation from ammonia, photodecomposition of organics, and carbon nanotube growth. Tuning the size and shape of iron is meaningful for improving the catalysis efficiency. It is the objective of this work to prepare nanostructured iron with high surface area via electrochemical deposition. Iron nanoneedles were successfully electrodeposited on Ti supported TiO2 nanotube arrays in a chlorine-based electrolyte containing 0.15 M FeCl2 {center_dot} 4H2O and 2.0 M HCl. Transmission electron microscopic analysis reveals that the average length of the nanoneedles is about 200 nm and the thickness is about 10 nm. It has been found that a high overpotential at the cathode made of Ti/TiO2 nanotube arrays is necessary for the formation of the nanoneedles. Cyclic voltammetry test indicates that the electrodeposition of iron nanoneedles is a concentration-limited process.

  7. System and method for producing metallic iron nodules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bleifuss, Rodney L.; Englund, David J.; Iwasaki, Iwao; Lindgren, Andrew J.; Kiesel, Richard F.

    2011-09-20

    A method for producing metallic iron nodules by assembling a shielding entry system to introduce coarse carbonaceous material greater than 6 mesh in to the furnace atmosphere at location(s) where the temperature of the furnace atmosphere adjacent at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material is between about 2200 and 2650.degree. F. (1200 and 1450.degree. C.), the shielding entry system adapted to inhibit emission of infrared radiation from the furnace atmosphere and seal the furnace atmosphere from exterior atmosphere while introducing coarse carbonaceous material greater than 6 mesh into the furnace to be distributed over the at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material, and heating the covered at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material in a fusion atmosphere to assist in fusion and inhibit reoxidation of the reduced material during fusion to assist in fusion and inhibit reoxidation of the reduced material in forming metallic iron nodules.

  8. 2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Full Presentations | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Full Presentations 2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Full Presentations The Transmission Reliability R&D Reliability & Markets Peer Review included 11 presentations over 2 days on August 7 - 8, 2012 at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. The full presentations are available below. Presentation summaries are also available. PDF icon 2012 R&M Peer Review - Transmission Investment Assessment Under Uncertainty - Ben Hobbs PDF icon 2012 R&M Peer Review - Renewable

  9. Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on Full Diameter

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SNF Interim Storage Canister Mockup | Department of Energy Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on Full Diameter SNF Interim Storage Canister Mockup Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on Full Diameter SNF Interim Storage Canister Mockup The goal of work described in this document is to assess the effects of the manufacturing process on canister performance by evaluating the properties of a full-diameter cylindrical mockup of an interim storage

  10. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service Access Road over Lena Gulch | Department of Energy Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch from South Golden Road to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, Golden, Colorado. PDF

  11. ARM: Portable Radiation Package: Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer full

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    resolution 6-s sampling (Dataset) | Data Explorer Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer full resolution 6-s sampling Title: ARM: Portable Radiation Package: Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer full resolution 6-s sampling Portable Radiation Package: Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer full resolution 6-s sampling Authors: Annette Koontz ; R. Reynolds Publication Date: 2012-11-02 OSTI Identifier: 1095577 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data

  12. Enterprise Assessments Review, Pantex Plant 2014 Full Participation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exercise - April 2015 | Department of Energy Review, Pantex Plant 2014 Full Participation Exercise - April 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review, Pantex Plant 2014 Full Participation Exercise - April 2015 April 2015 Review of the Pantex Plant 2014 Full Participation Exercise The Office of Emergency Management Assessments, within the U.S. Department of Energy's independent Office of Enterprise Assessments, Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, conducted an independent oversight

  13. BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity - Full Applications Webinar (Text Version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 6 Funding Opportunity - Full Applications Webinar (Text Version) BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity - Full Applications Webinar (Text Version) Here is the text version of the webinar BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity - Full Applications, presented in March 2016. Watch the presentation. Karma Sawyer: Presentation cover slide: Good afternoon, everyone. Welcome to our webinar. Thank-you for your interest in the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts on renewable energy and

  14. Elastic scattering and total cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1990-03-01

    This report discusses concepts of elastic scattering and cross sections of proton-proton interactions. (LSP)

  15. Savannah River Site Contractor Resumes Full Operations Following...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River Site Contractor Resumes Full Operations Following Pause April 27, 2016 - 12:25pm Addthis AIKEN, S.C. - Savannah River Site management and operations contractor ...

  16. Validation of the SASSI2010 Subtraction Method Using Full Scale...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the SASSI2010 Subtraction Method Using Full Scale Independent Verification Lisa Anderson Farhang Ostadan Bechtel National, Inc. USDOE NPH Workshop October 2014 Validation of the...

  17. Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects Below are the project presentations and respective peer ...

  18. New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New culturing tool reveals New culturing tool reveals a full genome from single cells A new technique for genetic analysis, "gel microdroplets," helps scientists generate complete...

  19. Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plasma material interaction in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment divertor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma ...

  20. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bleifuss, Rodney L.; Englund, David J.; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R.; Brandon, Mark M.; True, Bradford G.

    2012-01-17

    A hearth furnace 10 for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing 11 having a drying/preheat zone 12, a conversion zone 13, a fusion zone 14, and optionally a cooling zone 15, the conversion zone 13 is between the drying/preheat zone 12 and the fusion zone 14. A moving hearth 20 is positioned within the furnace housing 11. A hood or separation barrier 30 within at least a portion of the conversion zone 13, fusion zone 14 or both separates the fusion zone 14 into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth 20 and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth 20. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth 20. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

  1. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

    2013-09-17

    A hearth furnace for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing having a drying/preheat zone, a conversion zone, a fusion zone, and optionally a cooling zone, the conversion zone is between the drying/preheat zone and the fusion zone. A moving hearth is positioned within the furnace housing. A hood or separation barrier within at least a portion of the conversion zone, fusion zone or both separates the fusion zone into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

  2. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandon, Mark M. (Charlotte, NC); True, Bradford G. (Charlotte, NC)

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  3. Predict carbonation rate on iron catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dry, M.E.

    1980-02-01

    On solely thermodynamic grounds, the main hydrocarbon product of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction should be methane; in practice, however, carbon is frequently produced as well and deposited on the iron catalyst, fouling the active surface sites. South African Coal, Oil and Gas Corp., Ltd.'s experiments with a fluidized Fischer-Tropsch catalyst bed demonstrate that the rate of carbon deposition is strongly dependent on the hydrogen partial pressure in the reactor, much less dependent on the CO pressure, and not affected at all by the pressure of CO/sub 2/. A suggested reaction scheme for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis explains these observations and provides a basis for a correlation useful in predicting carbon-deposition rates.

  4. CASL - VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated in a Full Core

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated in a Full Core Simulation In December, CASL reported on the latest results from its Watts Bar reactor progression problem modeling. The most recent simulation includes quarter-core representation with coupled neutronics (including embedded cross section generation and neutron transport) and thermal - hydraulics. Last July, the team completed a demonstration of physics coupling that included heat generation and thermal-hydraulic

  5. Rhombohedral magnetostriction in dilute iron (Co) alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Nicholas J. Wun-Fogle, Marilyn; Restorff, J. B.; Petculescu, Gabriela; Clark, Arthur E.; Hathaway, Kristl B.; Schlagel, Deborah; Lograsso, Thomas A.

    2015-05-07

    Iron is a well-utilized material in structural and magnetic applications. This does not mean, however, that it is well understood, especially in the field of magnetostriction. In particular, the rhombohedral magnetostriction of iron, λ{sub 111}, is anomalous in two respects: it is negative in sign, in disagreement with the prediction of first principles theory, and its magnitude decreases with increasing temperature much too rapidly to be explained by a power law dependence on magnetization. These behaviors could arise from the location of the Fermi level, which leaves a small region of the majority 3d t{sub 2g} states unfilled, possibly favoring small internal displacements that split these states. If this view is correct, adding small amounts of Co to Fe fills some of these states, and the value of λ{sub 111} should increase toward a positive value, as predicted for perfect bcc Fe. We have measured the magnetostriction coefficients (λ{sub 111} and λ{sub 100}) of pure Fe, Fe{sub 97}Co{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 94}Co{sub 6} single crystals from 77 K to 450 K. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy has been used to check for anomalies in the associated elastic constants, c{sub 44} and c′. The additional electrons provided by the cobalt atoms indeed produced positive contributions to both magnetostriction constants, λ{sub 111} and λ{sub 100}, exhibiting an increase of 2.8 × 10{sup −6} per at. % Co for λ{sub 111} and 3.8 × 10{sup −6} per at. % Co for λ{sub 100}.

  6. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of FischerTropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  7. Iron aluminide alloy coatings and joints, and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Julie K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A method of joining two bodies together, at least one of the bodies being predominantly composed of metal, the two bodies each having a respective joint surface for joining with the joint surface of the other body, the two bodies having a respective melting point, includes the following steps: a) providing aluminum metal and iron metal on at least one of the joint surfaces of the two bodies; b) after providing the aluminum metal and iron metal on the one joint surface, positioning the joint surfaces of the two bodies in juxtaposition against one another with the aluminum and iron positioned therebetween; c) heating the aluminum and iron on the juxtaposed bodies to a temperature from greater than or equal to 600.degree. C. to less than the melting point of the lower melting point body; d) applying pressure on the juxtaposed surfaces; and e) maintaining the pressure and the temperature for a time period effective to form the aluminum and iron into an iron aluminide alloy joint which bonds the juxtaposed surfaces and correspondingly the two bodies together. The method can also effectively be used to coat a body with an iron aluminide coating.

  8. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-04-30

    The impact of activation procedure on the phase composition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts has been studied. Catalyst samples taken during activation and FT synthesis have been characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Formation of iron carbide is necessary for high FT activity. Hydrogen activation of precipitated iron catalysts results in reduction to predominantly metallic iron and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Metallic iron is not stable under FT 3 4 conditions and is rapidly converted to {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas 2.2 with low hydrogen partial pressure reduces catalysts to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and a small amount of 5 2 superparamagnetic carbide. Exposure to FT conditions partially oxidizes iron carbide to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}; however, catalysts promoted with potassium or potassium and copper maintain a constant carbide content and activity after the initial oxidation. An unpromoted iron catalyst which was activated with carbon monoxide to produce 94% {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}, deactivated rapidly as the carbide was oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. No difference in activity, stability or deactivation rate was found for {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C.

  9. Iron aluminide alloy coatings and joints, and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K.; Moore, G.A.

    1994-09-27

    Disclosed is a method of joining two bodies together, at least one of the bodies being predominantly composed of metal, the two bodies each having a respective joint surface for joining with the joint surface of the other body, the two bodies having a respective melting point, includes the following steps: (a) providing aluminum metal and iron metal on at least one of the joint surfaces of the two bodies; (b) after providing the aluminum metal and iron metal on the one joint surface, positioning the joint surfaces of the two bodies in juxtaposition against one another with the aluminum and iron positioned therebetween; (c) heating the aluminum and iron on the juxtaposed bodies to a temperature from greater than or equal to 600 C to less than the melting point of the lower melting point body; (d) applying pressure on the juxtaposed surfaces; and (e) maintaining the pressure and the temperature for a time period effective to form the aluminum and iron into an iron aluminide alloy joint which bonds the juxtaposed surfaces and correspondingly the two bodies together. The method can also effectively be used to coat a body with an iron aluminide coating.

  10. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst, E-mail: rousseau@uri.edu [Mechanical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, 92 Upper College Rd., Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370?MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490?MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.941.2?GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  11. Full Text of the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2006

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Full Text Glossary Full Text Glossary The full-text glossary includes terms used throughout the website and in Biomass Program publications. Terms are listed alphabetically for easy reference. The term index lists all of the terms defined in the glossary. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A acid: A solution that has an excess of hydrogen ions (H+), with a pH of less than 7. acetic acid: An acid with the structure of C2H4O2.

  12. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  13. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  14. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  15. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  16. How Trenton Iron and Steel Innovations Reshaped America Clifford Zink

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trenton Iron and Steel Innovations Reshaped America Clifford Zink Independent Historian Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a U.s. DeParTmenT of energy faciliTy Iron and steel innovations in Trenton helped transform modern life with new methods of transportation, construction, and communications. Peter Cooper established his Trenton Iron Company on the Delaware River in 1847, and rolled America's first I-beams in the

  17. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print Wednesday, 30 April 2008 00:00 It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the

  18. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  19. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  20. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Brygoo, S.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Mazevet, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Boehly, T.; and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  1. Synchrotron infrared reflectivity measurements of iron at high pressures

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Synchrotron infrared reflectivity measurements of iron at high pressures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synchrotron infrared reflectivity measurements of iron at high pressures The infrared reflectance of iron was studied using high-pressure synchrotron radiation methods up to 50 GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell of 1000-8000 cm{sup -1} (1.25-10 {mu}m). The magnitude of the reflectivity shows a weak pressure

  2. Iron-carbon compacts and process for making them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes iron-carbon compacts and a process for making them. The process includes preparing a slurry comprising iron powder, furfuryl alcohol, and a polymerization catalyst for initiating the polymerization of the furfuryl alcohol into a resin, and heating the slurry to convert the alcohol into the resin. The resulting mixture is pressed into a green body and heated to form the iron-carbon compact. The compact can be used as, or machined into, a magnetic flux concentrator for an induction heating apparatus.

  3. Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    eXperiment divertor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment ...

  4. Apparatus and method for detecting full-capture radiation events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, Daniel M. C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling the output signal of a radiation detector and distinguishing full-capture radiation events from Compton scattering events. The output signal of a radiation detector is continuously sampled. The samples are converted to digital values and input to a discriminator where samples that are representative of events are identified. The discriminator transfers only event samples, that is, samples representing full-capture events and Compton events, to a signal processor where the samples are saved in a three-dimensional count matrix with time (from the time of onset of the pulse) on the first axis, sample pulse current amplitude on the second axis, and number of samples on the third axis. The stored data are analyzed to separate the Compton events from full-capture events, and the energy of the full-capture events is determined without having determined the energies of any of the individual radiation detector events.

  5. Apparatus and method for detecting full-capture radiation events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-10-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for sampling the output signal of a radiation detector and distinguishing full-capture radiation events from Compton scattering events. The output signal of a radiation detector is continuously sampled. The samples are converted to digital values and input to a discriminator where samples that are representative of events are identified. The discriminator transfers only event samples, that is, samples representing full-capture events and Compton events, to a signal processor where the samples are saved in a three-dimensional count matrix with time (from the time of onset of the pulse) on the first axis, sample pulse current amplitude on the second axis, and number of samples on the third axis. The stored data are analyzed to separate the Compton events from full-capture events, and the energy of the full-capture events is determined without having determined the energies of any of the individual radiation detector events. 4 figs.

  6. Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resiliency | Department of Energy Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and Resiliency Coming Full Circle in Florida: Improving Electric Grid Reliability and Resiliency May 2, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis Inside Florida Power & Light's Transmission Performance Diagnostic Center. | Photo courtesy of Florida Power & Light. Inside Florida Power & Light's Transmission Performance Diagnostic Center. | Photo courtesy of Florida Power & Light. In 2009, at the

  7. IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu Citation Details In-Document Search Title: IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu The solid-state properties of most elements are now well understood on the basis of quantum physics - with few exceptions, notably the element number 94, plutonium. Plutonium has six

  8. AVTA: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures AVTA: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures PDF icon EV America Test Specifications PDF icon ETA-TP001 Implementation of SAE Standard J1263, February 1996 - Road Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques PDF icon ETA-TP002 Implementation of SAE Standard J1666, May 1993 - Electric Vehicle Acceleration, Gradeability, and Deceleration Test Procedure PDF icon

  9. Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Sector Manufacturing Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing The U.S. Manufacturing Sector Static Sankey diagram shows how total primary energy is used by U.S. manufacturing plants. Click on the Onsite Generation, Process Energy or Nonprocess Energy thumbnails below the diagram to see further detail on energy flows in manufacturing. Also, see the Dynamic Manufacturing Energy Sankey Tool to pan, zoom, and customize the manufacturing Sankey data and compare energy consumption across

  10. Supercomputers Help a Catalyst Reach its Full Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Help a Catalyst Reach its Full Potential Supercomputers Help a Catalyst Reach its Full Potential Placing Protons Prevents Wasteful Profligate Reactions April 23, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov +1 510 495 2402 protondeliverystory.jpg While one configuration (endo/endo) of a popular nickel catalyst can produce thousands of hydrogen molecules a second, the other forms that place the proton farther from the center are slower and less efficient. Chemical reactions facilitated by catalysts are

  11. 'What is Space?': Full of Possibilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    'What is Space?': Full of Possibilities 'What is Space?': Full of Possibilities November 2, 2011 - 10:21am Addthis Host Brian Greene explores the possibilities of space in tonight's premiere episode of PBS NOVA's "The Fabric of the Cosmos." Host Brian Greene explores the possibilities of space in tonight's premiere episode of PBS NOVA's "The Fabric of the Cosmos." Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Communications Specialist (detailee) How can I watch? Check your local

  12. Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective Business, Government and Tech Leaders Give the Full Perspective February 24, 2012 - 4:45pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaking at the 2011 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. | Energy Department file photo. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaking at the 2011 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. | Energy Department file photo. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Former Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of

  13. High-voltage compatible, full-depleted CCD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2007-09-18

    A charge coupled device for detecting electromagnetic and particle radiation is described. The device includes a high-resistivity semiconductor substrate, buried channel regions, gate electrode circuitry, and amplifier circuitry. For good spatial resolution and high performance, especially when operated at high voltages with full or nearly full depletion of the substrate, the device can also include a guard ring positioned near channel regions, a biased channel stop, and a biased polysilicon electrode over the channel stop.

  14. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Philip J. (122 Clark La., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Paris, Alan M. (P.O. Box 64, Tarrs, PA 15688); Vought, Joseph D. (124 Cove Point Rd., Rockwood, TN 37854)

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  15. Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008

  16. OpenEI Community - Section 12

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Wed, 05 Sep 2012 04:36:43 +0000 Kyoung 488...

  17. Spontaneous Potential (book section) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Spontaneous Potential (book section) Author NA Published NA, The date "NA" was not understood.The date "NA" was not understood....

  18. SRS FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. In accordance with NDAA Section 3116, certain waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is not high...

  19. Regulatory Review Comment Section | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment » Regulatory Review Comment Section Regulatory Review Comment Section DOE Comments on Radiation Protection (Atomic Energy Act) DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste

  20. Part V: Section H: Special Contract Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M801 Section H - Page 2 of 50 PART I SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 No Third Party Beneficiaries...

  1. Section 12 | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  2. Section 7 | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  3. Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS Request for Proposal DE-RP36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service Being ...

  4. Section 1703 Loan Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 1703 Loan Program Section 1703 Loan Program About the Section 1703 Loan Program Section 1703 of Title XVII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorizes the U.S. Department of Energy to support innovative clean energy technologies that are typically unable to obtain conventional private financing due to high technology risks. In addition, the technologies must avoid, reduce, or sequester air pollutants or anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Technologies we will consider include:

  5. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rogers Iron Works Co - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Ohio Analytical Data Sheet 9908; August 2, 1956 MO.10-2 - MemorandumChecklist, Williams to File; Subject: Rogers Iron; June 1, 1990 MO.10-3 - DOE Memorandum; Williams to the...

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Armco-Rustless Iron and...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    from Further Consideration Under FUSRAP; November 17, 1987 MD.03-2 - AEC Memorandum; Harris to Wolf; Subject: Rolling of Billets at Armco-Rustless Iron & Steel, Baltimore, MD;...

  8. Modernization of the iron making plant at SOLLAC FOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crayelynghe, M. van; Dufour, A.; Soland, J.; Feret, J.; Lebonvallet, J.

    1995-12-01

    When the blast furnaces at SOLLAC/FOS were relined, the objective being to ensure a worklife of 15 years, it was decided that the iron making plant would be modernized at the same time: the coking plant has been overhauled and renovated and its coking time increased to ensure a worklife of at least 34 years. The surface area of the sinter strand was increased from 400 to 520 m{sup 2}, the burden preparation circuit were simplified, and pig iron production capacity increased from 4.2 to 4.5 million metric tons per year. Coal injection was developed so as to obtain 170 kg/t of pig iron, an expert system was added to ensure more efficient blast furnace operation, and new measures have been carried out for environmental protection. Since these heavy investments have been completed, SOLLAC/FOS is a high-performance iron making plant, allowing it to face new challenges in the future.

  9. Verification of Steelmaking Slags Iron Content Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.Y. Hwang

    2006-10-04

    The steel industry in the United States generates about 30 million tons of by-products each year, including 6 million tons of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slag. The recycling of BF (blast furnace) slag has made significant progress in past years with much of the material being utilized as construction aggregate and in cementitious applications. However, the recycling of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slags still faces many technical, economic, and environmental challenges. Previous efforts have focused on in-plant recycling of the by-products, achieving only limited success. As a result, large amounts of by-products of various qualities have been stockpiled at steel mills or disposed into landfills. After more than 50 years of stockpiling and landfilling, available mill site space has diminished and environmental constraints have increased. The prospect of conventionally landfilling of the material is a high cost option, a waste of true national resources, and an eternal material liability issue. The research effort has demonstrated that major inroads have been made in establishing the viability of recycling and reuse of the steelmaking slags. The research identified key components in the slags, developed technologies to separate the iron units and produce marketable products from the separation processes. Three products are generated from the technology developed in this research, including a high grade iron product containing about 90%Fe, a medium grade iron product containing about 60% Fe, and a low grade iron product containing less than 10% Fe. The high grade iron product contains primarily metallic iron and can be marketed as a replacement of pig iron or DRI (Direct Reduced Iron) for steel mills. The medium grade iron product contains both iron oxide and metallic iron and can be utilized as a substitute for the iron ore in the blast furnace. The low grade iron product is rich in calcium, magnesium and iron oxides and silicates. It has a sufficient lime value and can be utilized for acid mine drainage treatment. Economic analysis from this research demonstrates that the results are favorable. The strong demand and the increase of price of the DRI and pig iron in recent years are particularly beneficial to the economics. The favorable economics has brought commercial interests. ICAN Global has obtained license agreement on the technology from Michigan Tech. This right was later transferred to the Westwood Land, Inc. A demonstration pilot plant is under construction to evaluate the technology. Steel industry will benefit from the new supply of the iron units once the commercial plants are constructed. Environmental benefits to the public and the steel industry will be tremendous. Not only the old piles of the slag will be removed, but also the federal responsible abandoned mines from the old mining activities can be remediated with the favorable product generated from the process. Cost can be reduced and there will be no lime required, which can avoid the release of carbon dioxide from lime production process.

  10. Iron speciation in minerals and glasses probed by M [subscript...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Iron speciation in minerals and glasses probed by M subscript 23 -edge X-ray Raman scattering ...

  11. Shewanella loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial mats in the Pacific Ocean A novel marine bacterial strain, PV-4T, isolated from a microbial mat located at a hydrothermal vent...

  12. Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... at high pressure (64 GPa) and temperature (3,300 K). a,b, The channel in a has been confirmed to be iron-rich material by element-sensitive nanoscale tomographic imaging; the ...

  13. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial...

  14. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory...

  15. Dopant Site Determination in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Utilizing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dopant Site Determination in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Utilizing X-ray Absorption Techniques Monday, September 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Dr....

  16. Probing high-energy spin fluctuations in iron pnictide superconductors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spin fluctuations in iron pnictide superconductors and the metal-insulator transition in rare-earth nickelates by soft X-ray RIXS Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 3:00pm...

  17. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Siderophore Complexes by Layer Type...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon sequestration as the global carbon dioxide concentration rises. In the marine environment, iron is typically found in subnanomolar total concentrations (0.02-1 nM), which...

  18. Korea Iron Steel Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steel Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Korea Iron & Steel Co Ltd Place: Changwon, South Gyeongsang, Korea (Republic) Zip: 641 370 Product: Korea-based manufacturer of steel...

  19. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-23

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

  20. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Kiesel, Richard F.; Englund, David J; Hendrickson, Dave

    2012-12-18

    A method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets may include providing multiple layers of agglomerates, such as briquettes, balls and extrusions, of a reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and of a reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) on a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material) and providing a coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material over at least some of the agglomerates. Heating the agglomerates of reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  1. Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries (IN-11...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries (IN-11-024) Low-Cost Phosphate ... that are highly functional when used in high-power and high-energy lithium batteries. ...

  2. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  3. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) | Department of Energy - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) PDF icon steel_footprint_2012.pdf More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Iron and Steel Iron and Steel (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Cement

    Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 49

  4. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Smith, Jeremy M.

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  5. Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Ozone is used commercially for treatment of potable and non-potable water, and as an industrial oxidant. ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for using iron in ozone oxidation that significantly improves the speed of oxidation reactions. Description Ozone is recognized as potent and effective oxidizing agent, and has a

  6. Iron-based composition for magnetocaloric effect (MCE) applications and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    method of making a single crystal (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Iron-based composition for magnetocaloric effect (MCE) applications and method of making a single crystal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Iron-based composition for magnetocaloric effect (MCE) applications and method of making a single crystal A method of making a single crystal comprises heating a material comprising magnetic anisotropy to a temperature T sufficient to form a melt of the material. A magnetic

  7. Progress in Understanding Iron Peak Elements in Young Supernova Remnants

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Progress in Understanding Iron Peak Elements in Young Supernova Remnants Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Progress in Understanding Iron Peak Elements in Young Supernova Remnants Authors: Eriksen, Kristoffer A. [1] ; Hughes, Jack [2] ; Fontes, Christopher J. [1] ; Colgan, James P. [1] ; Hungerford, Aimee L. [1] ; Fryer, Christopher L. [1] ; Zhang, Honglin [1] ; Badenes, Carles [3] ; Slane, Patrick [4] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National

  8. Pressure-Induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Iron Oxyhydroxide (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Pressure-Induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Iron Oxyhydroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pressure-Induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Iron Oxyhydroxide Authors: Xu, Weiming ; Greenberg, Eran ; Rozenberg, Gregory Kh. ; Pasternak, Moshe P. ; Bykova, Elena ; Boffa-Ballaran, Tiziana ; Dubrovinsky, Leonid ; Prakapenka, Vitali ; Hanfland, Michael ; Vekilova, Olga Yu. ; Simak, Sergei I. ; Abrikosov, Igor A. [1] ; Link) [2] ;

  9. Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition | Argonne National Laboratory Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition Title Controlled Phase and Tunable Magnetism in Ordered Iron Oxide Nanotube Arrays Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2016 Authors Zhang, Y, Liu, M, Peng, B, Zhou, Z, Chen, X, Yang, S-M, Jiang, Z-D, Zhang, J, Ren, W, Ye, Z-G Journal Scientific Reports

  10. High-temperature fabricable nickel-iron aluminides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-02-02

    Nickel-iron aluminides are described that are based on Ni.sub.3 Al, and have significant iron content, to which additions of hafnium, boron, carbon and cerium are made resulting in Ni.sub.3 Al base alloys that can be fabricated at higher temperatures than similar alloys previously developed. Further addition of molybdenum improves oxidation and cracking resistance. These alloys possess the advantages of ductility, hot fabricability, strength, and oxidation resistance.

  11. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  12. DE-FE0004001 Full text of Clauses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PART I SECTION A - SOLICITATION/CONTRACT FORM OMB Approval No. 9000-0008 SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD 1. RATING PAGE OF 1 246 PAGES 2. CONTRACT NO. DE-FE0004001 3. SOLICITATION NO. DE-SO26-08000664 4. TYPE OF SOLICITATION SEALED BID (IFB) X NEGOTIATED (RFP) 5. DATE ISSUED January 30, 2009 6. REQUISITION/PURCHASE NO. 26-08NT007047 7. ISSUED BY CODE 8. ADDRESS OFFER TO (If other than Item 7) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory PO Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road

  13. Full Core Multiphysics Simulation with Offline Mesh Deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merzari, E.; Shemon, E. R.; Yu, Y.; Thomas, J. W.; Obabko, A.; Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay; Solberg, Jerome; Ferencz, R.; Whitesides, R.

    2015-12-21

    In this report, building on previous reports issued in FY13 we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core. The focus of the present report is a full core simulation with off-line mesh deformation.

  14. Optical caustics of Kerr spacetime: The full structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozza, V.

    2008-09-15

    I present an exhaustive numerical investigation of the optical caustics in gravitational lensing by a spinning black hole for an observer at infinity. Besides the primary caustic, I examine higher order caustics, formed by photons performing one or several loops around the black hole. My investigation covers the whole parameter space, including the black hole spin, its inclination with respect to the line of sight, the source distance, and the caustic order. By comparing my results with the available analytical approximations, I find perfect agreement in their respective domains of validity. I then prove that all caustics maintain their shape (a tube with astroidal cross section) in the entire parameter space without suffering any transitions to different caustic shapes. For nearly extremal spin, however, higher order caustics grow so large that their cross sections at fixed radii wind several times around the black hole. As a consequence, for each caustic order, the number of images ranges from 2 to 2(n+1), where n is the number of loops spanned by the caustic. As for the critical curves, I note that for high values of the spin they develop a small dip on the side corresponding to prograde orbits.

  15. Interplay between interband coupling and ferromagnetism in iron pnictide superconductor/ferromagnet/iron pnictide superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S. Y.; Tao, Y. C.; Hu, J. G.

    2014-08-28

    An extended eight-component Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation is applied to study the Josephson effect between iron-based superconductors (SCs) with s{sub }-wave pairing symmetry, separated by an ferromagnet (FM). The feature of damped oscillations of critical Josephson current as a function of FM thickness, the split of the peaks induced by the interband coupling is much different from that for the junction with the s{sub }-wave SCs replaced by s{sub ++}-wave ones. In particular, a 0?? transition as a function of interband coupling strength ? is found to always exhibit with the corresponding dip shifting toward the larger ? due to enhancing the spin polarization in the FM, while there exits no 0?? transition for the SC with s{sub ++}-wave pairing symmetry. The two features can be used to identify the pairing symmetry in the iron pnictide SC different from the s{sub ++}-wave one in MgB{sub 2}. Experimentally, by adjusting the doping level in the s{sub }-wave SCs, one can vary ?.

  16. Cross-Sectional Transport Imaging in a Multijunction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haegel, Nancy M.; Ke, Chi-Wen; Taha, Hesham; Guthrey, Harvey; Fetzer, C. M.; King, Richard

    2015-06-14

    Combining highly localized electron-beam excitation at a point with the spatial resolution capability of optical near-field imaging, we have imaged carrier transport in a cross-sectioned multijunction (GaInP/GaInAs/Ge) solar cell. We image energy transport associated with carrier diffusion throughout the full width of the middle (GaInAs) cell and luminescent coupling from point excitation in the top cell GaInP to the middle cell. Supporting cathodoluminescence and near-field photoluminescence measurements demonstrate excitation-dependent Fermi level splitting effects that influence cross-sectioned spectroscopy results as well as transport limitations on the spatial resolution of cross-sectional measurements.

  17. Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Arthur L. (Kenyon, MN); Krawza, Kenneth I. (Lakeville, MN)

    1997-01-01

    In a hydraulically powered pump for excavating and transporting slurries in hich it is immersed, the improvement of a gravel and cobble eductor including an expandable mixing section, comprising: a primary flow conduit that terminates in a nozzle that creates a water jet internal to a tubular mixing section of the pump when water pressure is applied from a primary supply flow; a tubular mixing section having a center line in alignment with the nozzle that creates a water jet; a mixing section/exit diffuser column that envelopes the flexible liner; and a secondary inlet conduit that forms an opening at a bas portion of the column and adjacent to the nozzle and water jet to receive water saturated gravel as a secondary flow that mixes with the primary flow inside of the mixing section to form a combined total flow that exits the mixing section and decelerates in the exit diffuser.

  18. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  19. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  20. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  1. Section 106 Archaeology Guidance (ACHP, 2009)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation's Section 106 guidance is designed to assist federal agencies in making effective management decisions about archaeological resources in completing the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). This guidance highlights the decision-making role of the federal agency in the Section 106 process. It is also designed for use by State and Tribal Historic Preservation Officers, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and cultural resource management professionals when assisting federal agencies to meet their responsibilities under Section 106.

  2. RPM Sections - RPM-2 RPM-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clock History Browse Pages Blog Labels Attachments Index Recent updates RSS feed builder Home RPM Sections Asset Management Information Technology (Assets) Lifecycle Management...

  3. Montana Watershed Protection Section Contacts Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    contact information for the Watershed Protection Section of the Water Quality Planning Bureau. Author Montana Water Quality Planning Bureau Published State of Montana, Date Not...

  4. Cal. PRC Section 21065 - Environmental Quality Definitions |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Cal. PRC Section 21065 - Environmental Quality DefinitionsLegal Abstract Contains...

  5. Microsoft Word - SECTION D.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Medical Services at Hanford D-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING ......

  6. ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Explanatory Material Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material Abstract This...

  7. The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

    1983-03-28

    The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

  9. Modeling the efficient access of full-text information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, M.; Kero, R.; Korp, P.; McCusker-Whiting, M.; Tsur, S.; Dunlap, K.; Johnson, L.

    1996-05-01

    The title of this paper describes a research goal set by many offices within US DOE. This paper reviews efficient full-text searching techniques being developed to better understand and meet this goal. Classical computer human interaction (CHI) approaches provided by commercial information retrieval (IR) engines fail to contextualize information in ways that facilitate timely decision making. Use of advanced CHI techniques (eg, visualization) in combination with deductive database technology augment the weaknesses found in presentation capabilities of IR engines and are discussed. Various techniques employed in a Web-based prototype system currently under development are presented.

  10. Insights into the Structure and Metabolic Function of Microbes That Shape Pelagic Iron-Rich Aggregates ( Iron Snow )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, S; Chourey, Karuna; REICHE, M; Nietzsche, S; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Kusel, K

    2013-01-01

    Metaproteomics combined with total nucleic acid-based methods aided in deciphering the roles of microorganisms in the formation and transformation of iron-rich macroscopic aggregates (iron snow) formed in the redoxcline of an acidic lignite mine lake. Iron snow had high total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies, with 2 x 109 copies g (dry wt)-1 in the acidic (pH 3.5) central lake basin and 4 x 1010 copies g (dry wt)-1 in the less acidic (pH 5.5) northern lake basin. Active microbial communities in the central basin were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria (36.6%) and Actinobacteria (21.4%), and by Betaproteobacteria (36.2%) in the northern basin. Microbial Fe-cycling appeared to be the dominant metabolism in the schwertmannite-rich iron snow, because cloning and qPCR assigned up to 61% of active bacteria as Fe-cycling bacteria (FeB). Metaproteomics revealed 70 unique proteins from central basin iron snow and 283 unique proteins from 43 genera from northern basin. Protein identification provided a glimpse into in situ processes, such as primary production, motility, metabolism of acidophilic FeB, and survival strategies of neutrophilic FeB. Expression of carboxysome shell proteins and RubisCO indicated active CO2 fixation by Fe(II) oxidizers. Flagellar proteins from heterotrophs indicated their activity to reach and attach surfaces. Gas vesicle proteins related to CO2-fixing Chlorobium suggested that microbes could influence iron snow sinking. We suggest that iron snow formed by autotrophs in the redoxcline acts as a microbial parachute, since it is colonized by motile heterotrophs during sinking which start to dissolve schwertmannite.

  11. MiniBooNE Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sections Group e-mail: BOONE-CROSSSECTIONS(AT)fnal.gov convenors: Alessandro Curioni (alessandro.curioni(AT)yale.edu) and Sam Zeller (gzeller(AT)fnal.gov) Cross Sections at MiniBooNE, Meetings, Reference Articles, Conferences, Useful Links Last updated on 07/19/07

  12. Iron aluminide knife and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy cutting edge. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800.degree. C. for a period of time followed by rolling at 650.degree. C., cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge.

  13. Iron aluminide knife and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, V.K.

    1997-08-05

    Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy cutting edge is discussed. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800 C for a period of time followed by rolling at 650 C, cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge. 1 fig.

  14. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper to nickel-chromium-iron. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2303-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper N04400 (P-42) to nickel-chromium-iron N06600 (P-43), in thickness range of 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  15. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental & Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control.

  16. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  17. Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

  18. Reaction of iron and steel slags with refractories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, S.; Anderson, M.W.

    1993-04-01

    Slag corrosion and erosion has been a major wear factor for refractories wear in contact with molten iron and steel. In blast furnace ironmaking, the slag/iron interface plays a more important role than does the slag/refractory interface. On the other hand in steelmaking, the slag in the ladles and tundish predominantly affect refractory wear. This paper presents the results of a detailed microstructural evaluation of (a) slag and slag/iron interactions with A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C refractories for ironmaking in blast furnaces, (b) basic oxygen furnace and ladle slag interactions with alumina spinel refractories for steelmaking, and (c) slag interactions with working refractory lining for continuous casting tundishes. Results will also be presented on refractory wear/failure due to simultaneous corrosion and penetration by the slag.

  19. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Lindgren, Andrew J.; Kiesel, Richard F.

    2013-06-25

    Method and system for producing metallic nuggets includes providing reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) that may be arranged in discrete portions, such as mounds or briquettes, on at least a portion of a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material). A coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material may be provided over at least some of the discrete portions. Heating the reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  20. Surface runoff from full-scale coal combustion product pavements during accelerated loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.M.; Taerakul, P.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing coal combustion products (CCPs) was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under well-controlled conditions. An equivalent of 20 years of highway traffic loading was simulated at the OSU/OU Accelerated Pavement Load Facility (APLF). Three types of portland cement concrete driving surface layers were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (PC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). In general, the concentrations of minor and trace elements were higher in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates than in the leachates obtained from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure and ASTM leaching procedures. Importantly, none of the leachate concentrations exceeded the TCLP limits or primary drinking water standards. Surface runoff monitoring results showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, whereas there were little differences in release rates between PC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for Cr, elements were released as particulates (>0.45 {mu} m) rather than dissolved constituents. The incorporation of fly ash in the PC cement concrete pavements examined in this study resulted in little or no deleterious environmental impact from the leaching of inorganic elements over the lifetime of the pavement system.

  1. SECTION V. SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H SECTION J APPENDIX H KEY PERSONNEL [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after

    B, Page 1 SECTION L ATTACHMENT B LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL TITLE NAME [Note: Add/remove extra rows if needed]

    A, Page 1 SECTION L ATTACHMENT A PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT For value received, and in consideration of, and in order to induce the United States (the Government) to enter into Contract [insert Contract number] for the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site

  2. Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 Using polarized and unpolarized neutron scattering we show that interstitial Fe in superconducting Fe$$_{1+y}$$Te$$_{1-x}$$Se$_x$ induces a magnetic Friedel-like oscillation that diffracts at $${\bf

  3. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O,

  4. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O,

  5. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O,

  6. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O,

  7. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  8. Electronic spin state of iron in lower mantle perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Struzhkin, V.; Mao, H.-k.; Shu, J.; Hemley, R.; Fei, Y.; Mysen, B.; Dera, P.; Parapenka, V.; Shen, G.

    2010-11-16

    The electronic spin state of iron in lower mantle perovskite is one of the fundamental parameters that governs the physics and chemistry of the most voluminous and massive shell in the Earth. We present experimental evidence for spin-pairing transition in aluminum-bearing silicate perovskite (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O{sub 3} under the lower mantle pressures. Our results demonstrate that as pressure increases, iron in perovskite transforms gradually from the initial high-spin state toward the final low-spin state. At 100 GPa, both aluminum-free and aluminum-bearing samples exhibit a mixed spin state. The residual magnetic moment in the aluminum-bearing perovskite is significantly higher than that in its aluminum-free counterpart. The observed spin evolution with pressure can be explained by the presence of multiple iron species and the occurrence of partial spin-paring transitions in the perovskite. Pressure-induced spin-pairing transitions in the perovskite would have important bearing on the magnetic, thermoelastic, and transport properties of the lower mantle, and on the distribution of iron in the Earth's interior. The lower mantle constitutes more than half of the Earth's interior by volume (1), and it is believed to consist predominantly (80-100%) of (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O{sub 3} perovskite (hereafter called perovskite), with up to 20% (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase (2). The electronic spin state of iron has direct influence on the physical properties and chemical behavior of its host phase. Hence, knowledge on the spin state of iron is important for the interpretation of seismic observations, geochemical modeling, and geodynamic simulation of the Earth's deep interior (3, 4). Crystal field theory (4, 5) and band theory (6) predicted that a high-spin to low-spin transition would occur as a result of compression. To date, no experimental data exist on the spin sate of iron in Al-bearing perovskite. To detect possible spinpairing transition of iron in perovskite under the lower mantle conditions, we measured the x-ray emission spectra of an Al-bearing perovskite sample to 100 GPa. For comparison, a parallel measurement was also carried out on an Al-free perovskite sample.

  9. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iran Deal is Working The Iran Deal is Working Addthis Topic Nuclear Security & Safety Since the Iran Deal came into effect in October 2015, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) verified that Iran undertook critical steps to ensure its four pathways to a nuclear bomb are blocked. Watch to see how the Iran Deal is working

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a

  10. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O,

  11. The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O,

  12. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dobbins, Michael S.; Murtha, Marlyn J.

    1983-05-31

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  13. Evaluation of Neutron Elastic Scatter (NES) technique for detection of graphitic corrosion in gas cast iron pipe. Final report, March 1996-April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charatis, G.; Hugg, E.; McEllistrem, M.

    1997-04-01

    PENETRON, Inc., in two phases, demonstrated the effectiveness of its Neutron elastic Scatter (NES) techniques in detecting the change in the carbon weight percentage (CWt%) as a measure of corrosion in gray cast iron pipe. In Phase I, experiments were performed with synthetic standards supplied by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) to test the applicability of the NES techniques. Irradiation experiments performed at the University of Kentucky showed that CWt% could be detected, ranging from 1.6% to 13%, within an uncertainty of around 4%. In Phase II, experiments were performed on seven (7) corroded pipe sections supplied by MichCon. Tests were made on pipe sliced lengthwise into quarter sections, and in re-assembled whole pipe sections. X-ray films of the quarter sections indicated probable areas of corrosion for each quarter section.

  14. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enercon Services, Inc.

    2011-03-14

    Enercon Services, Inc. (ENERCON) was requested under Task Order No.2 to identify scientific and technical data needed to benchmark and justify Full Burnup Credit, which adds 16 fission products and 4 minor actinides1 to Actinide-Only burnup credit. The historical perspective for Full Burnup Credit is discussed, and interviews of organizations participating in burnup credit activities are summarized as a basis for identifying additional data needs and making recommendation. Input from burnup credit participants representing two segments of the commercial nuclear industry is provided. First, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been very active in the development of Full Burnup Credit, representing the interests of nuclear utilities in achieving capacity gains for storage and transport casks. EPRI and its utility customers are interested in a swift resolution of the validation issues that are delaying the implementation of Full Burnup Credit [EPRI 2010b]. Second, used nuclear fuel storage and transportation Cask Vendors favor improving burnup credit beyond Actinide-Only burnup credit, although their discussion of specific burnup credit achievements and data needs was limited citing business sensitive and technical proprietary concerns. While Cask Vendor proprietary items are not specifically identified in this report, the needs of all nuclear industry participants are reflected in the conclusions and recommendations of this report. In addition, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were interviewed for their input into additional data needs to achieve Full Burnup Credit. ORNL was very open to discussions of Full Burnup Credit, with several telecoms and a visit by ENERCON to ORNL. For many years, ORNL has provided extensive support to the NRC regarding burnup credit in all of its forms. Discussions with ORNL focused on potential resolutions to the validation issues for the use of fission products. SNL was helpful in ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost compared to the acquisition of equivalent experimental data. ENERCON concludes that even with the costs of code data library updating, the use of S/U analysis methodologies could be accomplished on a shorter schedule and a lower cost than the gathering of sufficient experimental data. ENERCON estimates of the costs of an updated S/U computer code and data suite are $5M to $10M with a schedule of two to three years. Recent ORNL analyses using the S/U analysis method show that the bias and uncertainty values for fission product cross sections are smaller than previously expected. This result is confirmed by a similar EPRI approach using different data and computer codes. ENERCON also found that some issues regarding the implementation of burnup credit appear to have been successfully resolved especially the axial burnup profile issue and the depletion parameter issue. These issues were resolved through data gathering activities at the Yucca Mountain Project and ORNL.

  15. Magnetic states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides AFe2Se3 Prev Next Title: Magnetic states of the two-leg-ladder alkali metal iron selenides AFe2Se3 Authors: Luo, ...

  16. ITP Steel: Energy and Environmental Profile fo the U.S. Iron...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Environmental Profile fo the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry ITP Steel: Energy and Environmental Profile fo the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry PDF icon steelprofile.pdf More ...

  17. Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Pt/yttrium iron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Ptyttrium iron garnetPt(Ta) trilayers Title: Observation of magnon-mediated current drag in Ptyttrium iron garnetPt(Ta) trilayers ...

  18. Iron Pyrite Thin Films Synthesized from an Fe(acac)[subscript...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Iron Pyrite Thin Films Synthesized from an Fe(acac)subscript 3 Ink Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Iron Pyrite Thin Films Synthesized from an Fe(acac)subscript 3 Ink...

  19. Solvent Tuning of Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Proteins Figure 1. Schematic repre-sentation of the common active-site iron-sulfur cluster structural motif. Proteins containing Fe4S4 iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous in...

  20. Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility ...

  1. Use of fine gridding in full field simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greaser, G.R.; Doerr, T.C.; Chea, C.; Parvez, N.

    1995-10-01

    A full field 3D simulation study was completed for a large Saudi Arabian oilfield located in the Arabian Gulf. The subject field produced from a highly layered Arab D carbonate reservoir which exhibited a strong water drive. The objective of the study was to determine future platform locations and timing with respect to water encroachment. The large areal extent (13{times}23 km) and highly layered nature of this reservoir necessitated use of coarse grids in order to obtain a reasonable model size. The coarse grid model was constructed with 86,000 grid cells. Using the coarse model, prediction studies showed an advantage to future platform development with horizontal wells. However, these results were suspect since it was thought that the coarse cell model may not properly model water coning and encroachment around the horizontal wellbores. To improve the modeling of water movement, fine grid numerical simulation techniques were investigated. This paper discusses the use of sector and local grid refinement modeling techniques with commercially available software. Fine grid simulation studies were conducted for a proposed new platform. The fine grid simulation studies showed significantly different results compared with the coarse model predictions. The fine grid simulation results will be discussed, the two fine grid simulation techniques will be compared, and reasons presented why performance differences exist. Performance of the fine grid models on an Unix RISC based workstation is included.

  2. Lightweight alumina refractory aggregate: Phase 3, Full-scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swansiger, T.G.; Pearson, A.

    1996-07-16

    Technical problems (higher than target fired density, and poor intermediate strength after burnout but before sintering) were addressed and solved; solution involved use of large loading of CP-5 alumina (controlled pore, rehydratable), increased loading of one of the binders, and a steam aging step. Resistance of the lightweight aggregate in a brick formulation to steel slag penetration was assessed in a preliminary test and found to be almost as good as that of T-64. Pelletized process economic feasibility study was updated, based on production levels of 10,000 and 20,000 mt/year, the most up- to-date raw material costs, and the assumption of a retrofit into the Arkansas plant tabular production facility. For the 10,000 mt/y production level, the required selling price of 35% more than the T- 64 selling price exceeds the {le}25% objective. The market survey will determine whether to proceed with the full scale demonstration that will produce at least 54.4 mt (120,000 lb) of the aggregate for incorporation into products, followed by end-user testing and evaluation.

  3. Full fuel-cycle comparison of forklift propulsion systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L. L.; Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-11-05

    Hydrogen has received considerable attention as an alternative to fossil fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigates the technical and economic feasibility of promising new technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells. A recent report for DOE identified three near-term markets for fuel cells: (1) Emergency power for state and local emergency response agencies, (2) Forklifts in warehousing and distribution centers, and (3) Airport ground support equipment markets. This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell propulsion for existing technologies based on batteries and fossil fuels. Industry data and the Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model are used to estimate full fuel-cycle emissions and use of primary energy sources, back to the primary feedstocks for fuel production. Also considered are other environmental concerns at work locations. The benefits derived from using fuel-cell propulsion are determined by the sources of electricity and hydrogen. In particular, fuel-cell forklifts using hydrogen made from the reforming of natural gas had lower impacts than those using hydrogen from electrolysis.

  4. Reduction of Islands in Full-pressure Stellarator Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.R. Hudson; D.A. Monticello; A.H. Reiman

    2001-04-30

    The control of magnetic islands is a crucial issue in designing Stellarators. Islands are associated with resonant radial magnetic fields at rational rotational-transform surfaces and can lead to chaos and poor plasma confinement. In this article, we show that variations in the resonant fields of a full-pressure stellarator equilibrium can be related to variations in the boundary via a coupling matrix, and inversion of this matrix determines a boundary modification for which the island content is significantly reduced. The numerical procedure is described and the results of island optimization are presented. Equilibria with islands are computed using the Princeton Iterative Equilibrium Solver, and resonant radial fields are calculated via construction of quadratic-flux-minimizing surfaces. A design candidate for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment [Phys. Plasmas 8, 2001], which has a large island, is used to illustrate the technique. Small variations in the boundary shape are used to reduce island size and to reverse the phase of a major island chain.

  5. Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program I. Purpose In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005; Public Law 109-58) Congress established a new program to support the expansion ...

  6. Section 311 Revised Template January 4 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01.

  7. MODELING AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS FOR AMERICIUM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROCHMAN, D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2005-05-01

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on the modeling and fission cross section for americium isotopes (May 2004-June 2005). The purpose of the contract was to provide fission cross sections for americium isotopes with the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE 2.19. The following work was performed: (1) Fission calculations capability suitable for americium was implemented to the EMPIRE-2.19 code. (2) Calculations of neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 239}Am to {sup 244g}Am were performed with EMPIRE-2.19 for energies up to 20 MeV. For the neutron-induced reaction of {sup 240}Am, fission cross sections were predicted and uncertainties were assessed. (3) Set of fission barrier heights for each americium isotopes was chosen so that the new calculations fit the experimental data and follow the systematics found in the literature.

  8. Section 311 Revised Template August 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01.

  9. Microsoft Word - Section F (Mod 616).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on or before September 30, 2016. The period of performance for the Recovery Act work specified in Section C and Table J-1 shall be for the period of performance beginning...

  10. EPAct Section 242 Comments and DOE Responses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 2, 2014 in the Federal Register, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published and requested comment on draft guidance for implementing Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct...

  11. Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01.

  12. Section 999: Annual Plans | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 999: Annual Plans Section 999: Annual Plans October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 Federal Register Notice for October 8, 2013 UDAC Meeting The 24th Meeting of the Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee (UDAC), previously scheduled for October 8, 2013, is postponed until further notice due to a lapse in Federal funding. October 2, 2013 URTAC Meeting - October 2013 Federal Register Notice for October 10, 2013 URTAC Meeting The 24th Meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology

  13. Section 999 Program Library | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offshore Drilling » Section 999 Program Library Section 999 Program Library Cost-Shared Program Publications October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 October 2, 2013 URTAC Meeting - October 2013 September 10, 2013 Draft 2014 Annual Plan More Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee (UDAC) Activities and Products January 27, 2014 UDAC 2014 Report November 27, 2013 UDAC Meeting - December 16, 2013 November 20, 2013 UDAC Meeting - December 9, 2013 More Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory

  14. Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program I. Purpose In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005; Public Law 109-58) Congress established a new program to support the expansion of hydropower energy development at existing dams and impoundments through an incentive payment procedure. Under section 242 of EPAct 2005, the Secretary of Energy is directed to provide incentive payments to the owner or authorized operator of qualified hydroelectric facilities for electric energy generated and sold

  15. QuickSite Cross Section Processing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-05-27

    This AGEM-developed system produces cross sections by inputting data in both standard and custom file formats and outputting a graphic file that can be printed or further modified in a commercial graphic program. The system has evolved over several years in order to combine and visualize a changing set of field data more rapidly than was possible with commercially available cross section software packages. It uses some commercial packages to produce the input and tomore » modify the output files. Flexibility is provided by a dynamic set of programs that are customized to accept varying input and accomodate varying output requirements. There are two basic types of routines: conversion routines and cross section generation routines. The conversion routines convery various data files to logger file format which is compatible with a standard file format for LogPlot 98, a commonly used commercial log plotting program. The cross section routines generate cross sections and apply topography to these cross sections. All of the generation routines produce a standard graphic DXF file, which is the format used in AutoCAD and can then be modified in a number of available graphics programs.« less

  16. Bandwidth Study U.S. Iron and Steel Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Iron and Steel Manufacturing Bandwidth Study U.S. Iron and Steel Manufacturing Bandwidth Study U.S. Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy bandwidth studies of U.S. manufacturing sectors can serve as foundational references in framing the range (or bandwidth) of potential energy savings opportunities. This bandwidth study examines energy consumption and potential energy savings opportunities in U.S. iron and steel manufacturing. The study relies on multiple sources to estimate the energy used in

  17. Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah | Department of Energy Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah PDF icon Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah More

  18. Chromium modified nickel-iron aluminide useful in sulfur bearing environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cathcart, John V.; Liu, Chain T.

    1989-06-13

    An improved nickel-iron aluminide containing chromium and molybdenum additions to improve resistance to sulfur attack.

  19. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint- Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input

  20. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  1. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, C H

    1991-02-14

    Progress is reported for a four-year fundamental investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which were to (1) determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation and (2) model the global rates of deactivation at the surface of the catalyst for the same catalysts. A computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was designed, constructed and tested. Kinetic data for CO hydrogenation on unsupported, unpromoted iron, 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K-promoted 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were obtained as functions of temperature, reactant particle pressures and time. The activity/selectivity and kinetic data are consistent with those previously reported for supported, unpromoted and promoted iron. Two kinds of deactivation were observed during FT synthesis on these samples: (1) loss of surface area after reduction of unsupported, unpromoted iron at 400{degree}C and (2) loss of activity with time due to carbon deposition, especially in the case of K-promoted 99% Fe/1% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deactivation rate data were obtained for CO hydrogenation on promoted Fe as a function of time, temperature, and H{sub 2}/CO ratio. 50 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Alteration of Iron-Rich Lacustrine Sediments by Dissimilatory Iron-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe,S.; Roberts, J.; Weisener, C.; Fowle, D.

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of Fe during bacterial anaerobic respiration in sediments and soils not only causes the degradation of organic matter but also results in changes in mineralogy and the redistribution of many nutrients and trace metals. Understanding trace metal patterns in sedimentary rocks and predicting the fate of contaminants in the environment requires a detailed understanding of the mechanisms through which they are redistributed during Fe reduction. In this work, lacustrine sediments from Lake Matano in Indonesia were incubated in a minimal media with the dissimilatory iron reducing (DIR) bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens 200R. These sediments were reductively dissolved at rates slower than pure synthetic goethite despite the presence of an 'easily reducible' component, as defined by selective extractions. DIR of the lacustrine sediments resulted in the substrate-dependent production of abundant quantities of extracellular polymeric substances. Trace elements, including Ni, Co, P, Si, and As, were released from the sediments with progressive Fe reduction while Cr was sequestered. Much of the initial trace metal mobility can be attributed to the rapid reduction of a Mn-rich oxyhydroxide phase. The production of organo-Fe(III) reveals that DIR bacteria can generate significant metal complexation capacity. This work demonstrates that DIR induces the release of many elements associated with Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, despite secondary mineralization.

  3. SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 The Energy Policy Act of 2005 added section ...

  4. American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Bar Association Section on Environment Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60610 Product: The Section of...

  5. NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Section ...

  6. SECTION J, APPENDIX L - DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L [Note: The Diversity Plan shall be submitted to the Contracting Officer in accordance with DEAR 970.5226-1] DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE 12/1/10 In accordance with the Contract's Section I Clause entitled "DEAR 970.5226-1, Diversity Plan," this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) for each of the clause's Diversity

  7. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  8. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  9. Iron Aerogel and Xerogel Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bali, S.; Huggins, F; Huffman, G; Ernst, R; Pugmire, R; Eyring, E

    2009-01-01

    Iron aerogels, potassium-doped iron aerogels, and potassium-doped iron xerogels have been synthesized and characterized and their catalytic activity in the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction has been studied. Iron aerogels and xerogels were synthesized by polycondensation of an ethanolic solution of iron(III) chloride hexahydrate with propylene oxide which acts as a proton scavenger for the initiation of hydrolysis and polycondensation. Potassium was incorporated in the iron aerogel and iron xerogel by adding aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to the ethanolic solutions of the Fe(III) precursor prior to addition of propylene oxide. Fischer-Tropsch activities of the catalysts were tested in a fixed bed reactor at a pressure of 100 psi with a H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 2:1. Iron aerogels were found to be active for F-T synthesis, and their F-T activities increased on addition of a K containing promoter. Moessbauer spectroscopic data are consistent with an open, nonrigid iron(III) aerogel structure progressing to an iron carbide/metallic iron catalyst via agglomeration as the F-T synthesis proceeds in the course of a 35 h fixed bed reaction test.

  10. Use of bimodal carbon distribution in compacts for producing metallic iron nodules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao

    2014-04-08

    A method for use in production of metallic iron nodules comprising providing a reducible mixture into a hearth furnace for the production of metallic iron nodules, where the reducible mixture comprises a quantity of reducible iron bearing material, a quantity of first carbonaceous reducing material of a size less than about 28 mesh of an amount between about 65 percent and about 95 percent of a stoichiometric amount necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material, and a quantity of second carbonaceous reducing material with an average particle size greater than average particle size of the first carbonaceous reducing material and a size between about 3 mesh and about 48 mesh of an amount between about 20 percent and about 60 percent of a stoichiometric amount of necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material.

  11. Use of bimodal carbon distribution in compacts for producing metallic iron nodules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao

    2012-10-16

    A method for use in production of metallic iron nodules comprising providing a reducible mixture into a hearth furnace for the production of metallic iron nodules, where the reducible mixture comprises a quantity of reducible iron bearing material, a quantity of first carbonaceous reducing material of a size less than about 28 mesh of an amount between about 65 percent and about 95 percent of a stoichiometric amount necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material, and a quantity of second carbonaceous reducing material with an average particle size greater than average particle size of the first carbonaceous reducing material and a size between about 3 mesh and about 48 mesh of an amount between about 20 percent and about 60 percent of a stoichiometric amount of necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material.

  12. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  13. Navy's Section 2922a Legislation Success Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—features U.S. Department of Navy success stories in relation to Section 2922a legislation, which involves contracts for energy or fuel for military installations.

  14. IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Knowledge on Oscillation Knowledge on Oscillation Measurements Measurements M. Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and U. of Valencia) IDS-NF, RAL, Jan 16-17 2008 M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 2 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 3 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA Beta

  15. Arsenic Sequestration By Sorption Processes in High-Iron Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Root, R.A.; Dixit, S.; Campbell, K.M.; Jew, A.D.; Hering, J.G.; O'Day, P.A.

    2009-06-04

    High-iron sediments in North Haiwee Reservoir (Olancha, CA), resulting from water treatment for removal of elevated dissolved arsenic in the Los Angeles Aqueduct system, were studied to examine arsenic partitioning between solid phases and porewaters undergoing shallow burial. To reduce arsenic in drinking water supplies, ferric chloride and a cationic polymer coagulant are added to the aqueduct upstream of Haiwee Reservoir, forming an iron-rich floc that scavenges arsenic from the water. Analysis by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the aqueduct precipitate is an amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) similar to ferrihydrite, and that arsenic is associated with the floc as adsorbed and/or coprecipitated As(V). Arsenic-rich floc and sediments are deposited along the inlet channel as aqueduct waters enter the reservoir. Sediment core samples were collected in two consecutive years from the edge of the reservoir along the inlet channel using 30- or 90-cm push cores. Cores were analyzed for total and extractable arsenic and iron concentrations. Arsenic and iron speciation and mineralogy in sediments were examined at selected depths by synchrotron XAS and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Sediment-porewater measurements were made adjacent to the core sample sites using polyacrylamide gel probe samplers. Results showed that sediment As(V) is reduced to As(III) in all cores at or near the sediment-water interface (0--4 cm), and only As(III) was observed in deeper sediments. Analyses of EXAFS spectra indicated that arsenic is present in the sediments mostly as a bidentate-binuclear, inner-sphere sorption complex with local atomic geometries similar to those found in laboratory studies. Below about 10 cm depth, XAS indicated that the HFO floc had been reduced to a mixed Fe(II, III) solid with a local structure similar to that of synthetic green rust (GR) but with a slightly contracted average interatomic Fe-Fe distance in the hydroxide layer. There was no evidence from XRD for the formation of a crystalline GR phase. The release of dissolved iron (presumably Fe{sup 2+}) and arsenic to solution, as monitored by in situ gel probes, was variable but, in general, occurred at greater depths than arsenic reduction in the sediments by spectroscopic observations and appears to be near or below the depth at which sediment GR was identified. These data point to reductive dissolution of the sorbent iron phase as the primary mechanism of release of sorbed arsenic to solution.

  16. Effects of fine particulate matter and its constituents on low birth weight among full-term infants in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Rupa; Harris, Maria; Sie, Lillian; Malig, Brian; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Rochelle

    2014-01-15

    Relationships between prenatal exposure to fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) and birth weight have been observed previously. Few studies have investigated specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, which may identify sources and major contributors of risk. We examined the effects of trimester and full gestational prenatal exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and 23 PM{sub 2.5} constituents on birth weight among 646,296 term births in California between 2000 and 2006. We used linear and logistic regression models to assess associations between exposures and birth weight and risk of low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g), respectively. Models were adjusted for individual demographic characteristics, apparent temperature, month and year of birth, region, and socioeconomic indicators. Higher full gestational exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and several PM{sub 2.5} constituents were significantly associated with reductions in term birth weight. The largest reductions in birth weight were associated with exposure to vanadium, sulfur, sulfate, iron, elemental carbon, titanium, manganese, bromine, ammonium, zinc, and copper. Several of these PM{sub 2.5} constituents were associated with increased risk of term LBW. Reductions in birth weight were generally larger among younger mothers and varied by race/ethnicity. Exposure to specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, especially traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals, were associated with decreased birth weight in California. -- Highlights: Examine full gestational and trimester fine particle and its constituents on term birth weight. Fine particles and several of its constituents associated with birth weight reductions. Largest reductions for traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals. Greater birth weight reductions for younger mothers, and varied by race/ethnicity.

  17. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  18. Automated remote control of fuel supply section for the coal fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudin, O.V.; Maidan, B.V.; Tsymbal, A.A.

    1996-05-01

    Approximately 6,000 miles east of Moscow, lays the city of Khabarovsk. This city`s coal-fired Power Plant 3 supplies electricity, heat and hot water to approximately 250,000 customers. Plant 3 has three units with a combined turbine capacity of 540 MW, (3 {times} 180) electrical and 780 (3 {times} 260) Gkal an hour thermal capacity with steam productivity of 2010 (3 {times} 670) tons per hour at 540 C. Coal fired thermal electric power plants rely on the equipment of the fuel supply section. The mechanism of the fuel supply section includes: conveyor belts, hammer crushers, guiding devices, dumping devices, systems for dust neutralizing, iron separators, metal detectors and other devices. As a rule, the fuel path in the power plant has three main directions: from the railroad car unloading terminal to the coal warehouse; from the coal warehouse to the acceptance bunkers of the power units, and the railroad car unloading terminal to the acceptance bunkers of power units. The fuel supply section always has a reserve and is capable of uninterruptible fuel supply during routine maintenance and/or repair work. This flexibility requires a large number of fuel traffic routes, some of which operate simultaneously with the feeding of coal from the warehouse to the acceptance bunkers of the power units, or in cases when rapid filling of the bunkers is needed, two fuel supply routes operate at the same time. The remote control of the fuel handling system at Power Plant 3 is described.

  19. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorman, Mark Edward; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  20. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2006-03-03

    Efforts during this second year focused on four areas: (1) continued searching and summarizing of published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) investigation of CO adsorption/desorption and temperature programmed hydrogenation (TPH) of carbonaceous species after FTS on unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts; (3) activity tests of alumina-supported iron catalysts in a fixed bed reactor; (4) sequential design of experiments, for the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor, and nonlinear-regression analysis to obtain kinetic parameters. Literature sources describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts were compiled in a review. Temperature-programmed desorption/reaction methods (the latter using mass-spectrometry detection and also thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA)) were utilized to study CO adsorption/-desorption on supported and unsupported iron catalysts. Molecular and dissociative adsorptions of CO occur on iron catalysts at 25-150 C. The amounts adsorbed and bond strengths of adsorption are influenced by supports and promoters. That CO adsorbs dissociatively on polycrystalline Fe at temperatures well below those of FT reaction indicates that CO dissociation is facile and unlikely to be the rate-limiting step during FTS. Carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for only 5 minutes at 200 C were initially hydrogenated under mild, isothermal condition (200 C and 1 atm), followed by TPH to 800 C. During the mild, isothermal hydrogenation, only about 0.1-0.2 mL of atomic carbon is apparently removed, while during TPH to 800 C multilayer equivalents of atomic, polymeric, carbidic, and graphitic carbons are removed. Rates of CO conversion on alumina-supported iron catalysts at 220-260 C and 20 atm are correlated well by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be rate-determining steps. In the coming year, studies will focus on quantitative determination of the rates of kinetically-relevant elementary steps on Fe catalysts with/without K and Pt promoters and at various levels of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support, providing a database for understanding (1) effects of promoter and support on elementary kinetic parameters and (2) for validation of computational models that incorporate effects of surface structure and promoters. Kinetic parameters will be incorporated into a microkinetics model, enabling prediction of rate without invoking assumptions, e.g. of a rate-determining step or a most-abundant surface intermediate. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on two model surfaces: (1) Fe(110) with 1/4 ML subsurface carbon, and (2) Fe(110) with 1/4 ML Pt adatoms. Reaction networks for FTS on these systems were characterized in full detail by evaluating the thermodynamics and kinetics of each elementary step. We discovered that subsurface C stabilizes all the reactive intermediates, in contrast to Pt, which destabilizes most of them. A comparative study of the reactivities of the modified-Fe surfaces against pure Fe is expected to yield a more comprehensive understanding of promotion mechanisms for FTS on Fe.

  1. Full Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... locations - Increase options for web-based data sharing and analysis Pretty much Yes. ... on-demand connections and crappy latency in fundamental operations such as MPIAlltoall. ...

  2. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrick, Howard F.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a bimodal distribution of gamma prime phase within a network of dislocations, the alloy consisting essentially of about 25% to 45% nickel, 10% to 16% chromium, 1.5% to 3% of an element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. To obtain optimum results, the alloy is heated to a temperature of 1025.degree. C. to 1075.degree. C. for 2-5 minutes, cold-worked about 20% to 60%, aged at a temperature of about 775.degree. C. for 8 hours followed by an air-cool, and then heated to a temperature in the range of 650.degree. C. to 700.degree. C. for 2 hours followed by an air-cool.

  3. The world`s first commercial iron carbide plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prichard, L.C.; Schad, D.

    1995-12-01

    The paper traces the development of Nucor`s investigation of clean iron unit processes, namely, direct reduction, and the decision to build and operate the world`s first commercial iron carbide plant. They first investigated coal based processes since the US has abundant coal reserves, but found a variety of reasons for dropping the coal-based processes from further consideration. A natural gas based process was selected, but the failure to find economically priced gas supplies stopped the development of a US based venture. It was later found that Trinidad had economically priced and abundant supplies of natural gas, and the system of government, the use of English language, and geographic location were also ideal. The cost estimates required modification of the design, but the plant was begun in April, 1993. Start-up problems with the plant are also discussed. Production should commence shortly.

  4. Synthesis of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles by detonation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guilei, E-mail: sunguilei@126.com [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China)] [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China); Li, Xiaojie, E-mail: dalian03@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang, Qiquan [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China)] [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China); Yan, Honghao [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by detonating a mixture of ferrocene, naphthalene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in an explosion vessel under low vacuum conditions (8.1 kPa). The RDX functioned as an energy source for the decomposition of ferrocene and naphthalene. The carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were formed as soot-like deposits on the inner surface of the reactor, which were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. And a portion of the detonation soot was treated with hydrochloric acid. The product was carbon-coated nanoparticles in perfect core-shell structures with graphitic shells and bcc-Fe cores. The detonation technique offers an energy-saving route to the synthesis of carbon-coated nanomaterials.

  5. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1980-04-03

    A method is described for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime, the alloy consisting essentially of about 25 to 45% nickel, 10 to 16% chromium, 1.5 to 3% of an element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. To obtain optimum results, the alloy is heated to a temperature of 1025 to 1075/sup 0/C for 2 to 5 minutes, cold-worked about 20 to 60%, aged at a temperature of about 775/sup 0/C for 8 hours followed by an air-cool, and then heated to a temperature in the range of 650 to 700/sup 0/C for 2 hours followed by an air-cool.

  6. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  7. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  8. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  9. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  10. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan; Singh, Prabhakar; Sikka, Vinod Kumar

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  11. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, Claudette G. (Knoxville, TN); Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  12. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1980-01-01

    A method for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime phase, the alloy consisting essentially of about 40 to 50% nickel, 7.5 to 14% chromium, 1.5 to 4% niobium, 0.3 to 0.75% silicon, 1 to 3% titanium, 0.1 to 0.5% aluminum, 0.02 to 1% carbon, 0.002 to 0.0015% boron and the remain substantially all iron. To obtain optimal results, the alloy is cold-worked 20 to 60% followed by heating at 1050.degree. C. for 1/2 hour with an air-cool plus heating at 800.degree. C. for 2 hours with a furnace cool to 625.degree. C. The alloy is then held at 625.degree. C. for 12 hours, followed by an air-cool.

  13. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  14. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  15. Iron beam acceleration using direct plasma injection scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura, M.; Kanesue, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Fuwa, Y.; RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198

    2014-02-15

    A new set of vanes of radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator was commissioned using highly charged iron beam. To supply high intensity heavy ion beams to the RFQ, direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) with a confinement solenoid was adopted. One of the difficulties to utilize the combination of DPIS and a solenoid field is a complexity of electro magnetic field at the beam extraction region, since biasing high static electric field for ion extraction, RFQ focusing field, and the solenoid magnetic field fill the same space simultaneously. To mitigate the complexity, a newly designed magnetic field clamps were used. The intense iron beam was observed with bunched structure and the total accelerated current reached 2.5 nC.

  16. Cation-exchange fiber reduces iron oxide leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacClure, S.L.

    1993-10-01

    This article describes how addition of new fiber in powdered-resin precoat improves demineralizer crud-retention capability and reduces disposal cost for radioactive spent resin. Various attempts have been made to reduce the concentrations of iron oxide at the outlet of filter/demineralizer (FTD) vessels. Each vessel is fitted with an array of tubular septa that are precoated with powdered ion-exchange resin. The coatings perform filtering and ion-exchange actions on incoming feedwater, removing both suspended and dissolved solids. Experience at Duane Arnold Energy Center (CAED) indicates that use of a powdered-resin precoat containing cation-exchange fibers rather than cellulose fibers can reduce iron oxide levels in FTD effluent significantly.

  17. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  18. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  19. Low resistivity contact to iron-pnictide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tanatar, Makariy; Prozorov, Ruslan; Ni, Ni; Bud'ko, Sergey; Canfield, Paul

    2013-05-28

    Method of making a low resistivity electrical connection between an electrical conductor and an iron pnictide superconductor involves connecting the electrical conductor and superconductor using a tin or tin-based material therebetween, such as using a tin or tin-based solder. The superconductor can be based on doped AFe.sub.2As.sub.2, where A can be Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu or combinations thereof for purposes of illustration only.

  20. Bifunctional air electrodes containing elemental iron powder charging additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chia-tsun; Demczyk, Brian G.; Gongaware, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A bifunctional air electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer essentially comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon; (ii) elemental iron particles having a particle size of between about 25 microns and about 700 microns diameter; (iii) an oxygen evolution material; (iv) a nonwetting agent; and (v) a catalyst, where at least one current collector is formed into said composite.