Sample records for full model results

  1. DISS. ETH No. 18454 Full Body Modeling from Video Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    DISS. ETH No. 18454 Full Body Modeling from Video Sequences A dissertation submitted to the Swiss-camera calibration and investigates in the reconstruction, modeling and tracking of human body models from video useful combinations with useful results. The spatial and temporal character of the video se- quence

  2. Dust Plume Modeling at Fort Bliss: Full Training Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for air quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating in the training ranges and on the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss is being investigated. The investigation uses the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN to simulate fugitive dust emission and dispersion from typical activities occurring on the installation. This report conveys the results of DUSTRAN simulations conducted using a “Full Training” scenario developed by Fort Bliss personnel. he Full Training scenario includes simultaneous off-road activities of two full Heavy Brigade Combat Teams (HCBTs) and one HCBT battalion on three training ranges. Simulations were conducted for the six-day period, April 25-30, 2005, using previously archived meteorological records. Simulation results are presented in the form of 24-hour average PM10 plots and peak 1-hour PM10 concentration plots, where the concentrations represent contributions resulting from the specified military vehicular activities, not total ambient PM10 concentrations. Results indicate that the highest PM10 contribution concentrations occurred on April 30 when winds were light and variable. Under such conditions, lofted particulates generated by vehicular movement stay in the area of generation and are not readily dispersed. The effect of training duration was investigated by comparing simulations with vehicular activity extending over a ten hour period (0700 to 1700 MST) with simulations where vehicular activity was compressed into a one hour period (0700 to 0800 MST). Compressing all vehicular activity into one hour led to higher peak one-hour and 24-hour average concentration contributions, often substantially higher.

  3. Full-fuel-cycle modeling for alternative transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, S.R.; Gupta, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Greening, L.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of alternative fuels in the transportation sector has been identified as a potential method for mitigation of petroleum-based energy dependence and pollutant emissions from mobile sources. Traditionally, vehicle tailpipe emissions have served as sole data when evaluating environmental impact. However, considerable differences in extraction and processing requirements for alternative fuels makes evident the need to consider the complete fuel production and use cycle for each fuel scenario. The work presented here provides a case study applied to the southeastern region of the US for conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, natural gas, and methanol vehicle fueling. Results of the study demonstrate the significance of the nonvehicle processes, such as fuel refining, in terms of energy expenditure and emissions production. Unique to this work is the application of the MOBILE5 mobile emissions model in the full-fuel-cycle analysis. Estimates of direct and indirect greenhouse gas production are also presented and discussed using the full-cycle-analysis method.

  4. Full-System Power Analysis and Modeling for Server Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozyrakis, Christos

    Full-System Power Analysis and Modeling for Server Environments Dimitris Economou, Suzanne Rivoire-density computer systems, have created a growing demand for better power management in server environments. Despite consumption trends and developing simple yet accurate models to predict full-system power. We study

  5. CMB Maps at 0.5 degree Resolution I: Full-Sky Simulations and Basic Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Hinshaw; C. L. Bennett; A. Kogut

    1994-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have simulated full-sky maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy expected from Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models at 0.5 and 1.0 degree angular resolution. Statistical properties of the maps are presented as a function of sky coverage, angular resolution, and instrument noise, and the implications of these results for observability of the Doppler peak are discussed. The rms fluctuations in a map are not a particularly robust probe of the existence of a Doppler peak, however, a full correlation analysis can provide reasonable sensitivity. We find that sensitivity to the Doppler peak depends primarily on the fraction of sky covered, and only secondarily on the angular resolution and noise level. Color plates and one-dimensional scans of the maps are presented to visually illustrate the anisotropies.

  6. A Full Stochastic Model of Coupled Nanomechanical Electron Shuttles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mo Zhao; Robert H. Blick

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss operation of nanomechanical electron shuttles as a ratchet for radiofrequency current rectification based on a fully stochastic model. In such devices, the mechanical motion of coupled nanopillars and the incoherent electronic tunneling can be modeled as a Markov chain. By treating the process in a correlated stochastic fashion, we present a stochastic model represented by a linear master equation. This is crucial for analyzing symmetry breaking, which is in turn responsible for the observed rectification mechanism. For full device simulation, we propose deterministic equations assuming the multivariate Gaussian distributions.

  7. Portugal, Canada Discuss Marine Fisheries Results of the first full year of joint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portugal, Canada Discuss Marine Fisheries Results of the first full year of joint research may be used to obtain deferment of taxes on certain income derived from commercial fishing operations in the Federal Register the week of 22 Sep- tember 1975. Di rector Named for NOAA oes Environment Program Rudolf

  8. FULL CRITICAL REVIEW Novel approaches to multiscale modelling in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    of nanocrystalline metals and alloys, crack propagation in brittle solids, polymer chain relaxation in nanocomposites, Materials modelling, Molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, Finite element analysis, Hierarchical/hybrid models and mechanical properties, although some discussion of electrical percolation in polymer nanocomposites

  9. Proposal full title: Comprehensive Modelling of the Earth System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couvreux, Fleur

    .....................................................................................................................7 1.1.4 Earth System Model Ensemble-scale integrating project Work programme topics addressed: ENV.2008.1.1.4.1. New components in Earth System modelling for better climate projections Name of the coordinating person: Marco Giorgetta List

  10. INTERNET EVOLUTION AND PROGRESS IN FULL AUTOMATIC FRENCH LANGUAGE MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .Vaufreydaz, Mathias.Gery}@imag.fr Abstract The World Wide Web is the greatest information space unseen until now" evaluation set, show that word accuracy increase from 51% up to 62.30% using two different models automatically calculated on Web corpora. The first corpus was gathered at the beginning of 1999 and the last one

  11. Electrochromic windows for commercial buildings: Monitored results from a full-scale testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, Dennis L.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochromic glazings promise to be the next major advance in energy-efficient window technology, helping to transform windows and skylights from an energy liability to an energy source for the nation's building stock. Monitored results from a full-scale demonstration of large-area electrochromic windows are given. The test consisted of two side-by-side, 3.7x4.6-m, office-like rooms. In each room, five 62x173-cm lower electrochromic windows and five 62x43-cm upper electrochromic windows formed a large window wall. The window-to-exterior-wall ratio (WWR) was 0.40. The southeast-facing electrochromic windows had an overall visible transmittance (Tv) range of Tv=0.11-0.38 and were integrated with a dimmable electric lighting system to provide constant work plane illuminance and to control direct sun. Daily lighting use from the automated electrochromic window system decreased by 6 to 24% compared to energy use with static, low-transmission (Tv =0.11), unshaded windows in overcast to cle ar sky winter conditions in Oakland, California. Daily lighting energy use increased as much as 13% compared to lighting energy use with static windows that had Tv=0.38. Even when lighting energy savings were not obtainable, the visual environment produced by the electrochromic windows, indicated by well-controlled window and room luminance levels, was significantly improved for computer-type tasks throughout the day compared to the visual environment with unshaded 38%-glazing. Cooling loads were not measured, but previous building energy simulations indicate that additional savings could be achieved. To ensure visual and thermal comfort, electrochromics require occasional use of interior or exterior shading systems when direct sun is present. Other recommendations to improve electrochromic materials and controls are noted along with some architectural constraints.

  12. Emissions Resulting from the Full-Scale Cofiring of Pelletized Refuse-Derived Fuel and Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohlsson, O. O.; Daugherty, K.; Venables, B.

    Full-scale cofiring tests of binder-enhanced pellets of densified, refuse-derived fuel (dRDF) and high-sulfur coal were conducted during June and July of 1987 in Boiler #5 at Argonne National Laboratory. These tests were conducted with industry...

  13. How Bromate and Ozone Concentrations can be Modelled at Full Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 How Bromate and Ozone Concentrations can be Modelled at Full Scale based on Lab-Scale Experiments ­ A Case Study Running head title How to model bromate & ozone at full scale based on lab tests Pierre-scale modelling study of an industrial ozonation unit for practical application. The modelling framework combines

  14. On a regularized family of models for the full Ericksen-Leslie system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciprian G. Gal; Louis Tebou

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a general family of regularized systems for the full Ericksen-Leslie model for the hydrodynamics of liquid crystals in $n$-dimensional compact Riemannian manifolds, $n$=2,3. The system we consider consists of a regularized family of Navier-Stokes equations (including the Navier Stokes-$\\alpha $-like equation, the Leray-$\\alpha $ equation, the Modified Leray-$\\alpha $ equation, the Simplified Bardina model, the Navier Stokes-Voigt model and the Navier-Stokes equation) for the fluid velocity $u$ suitably coupled with a parabolic equation for the director field $d$. We establish existence, stability and regularity results for this family. We also show the existence of a finite dimensional global attractor for our general model, and then establish sufficiently general conditions under which each trajectory converges to a single equilibrium by means of a Lojasiewicz-Simon inequality.

  15. Neutron stars in the BPS Skyrme model: mean-field limit vs. full field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, C; Sanchez-Guillen, J; Vazquez, R; Wereszczynski, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a solitonic model of nuclear matter, the BPS Skyrme model, we compare neutron stars obtained in the full field theory, where gravitational back reaction is completely taken into account, with calculations in a mean-field approximation using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff approach. In the latter case, a mean-field-theory equation of state is derived from the original BPS field theory. We show that in the full field theory, where the energy density is non-constant even at equilibrium, there is no universal and coordinate independent equation of state of nuclear matter, in contrast to the mean-field approximation. We also study how neutron star properties are modified by going beyond mean field theory, and find that the differences between mean field theory and exact results can be considerable.

  16. Coupled models and parallel simulations for three-dimensional full-Stokes ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Huai [Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Price, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional full-Stokes computational model is considered for determining the dynamics, temperature, and thickness of ice sheets. The governing thermomechanical equations consist of the three-dimensional full-Stokes system with nonlinear rheology for the momentum, an advective-diffusion energy equation for temperature evolution, and a mass conservation equation for icethickness changes. Here, we discuss the variable resolution meshes, the finite element discretizations, and the parallel algorithms employed by the model components. The solvers are integrated through a well-designed coupler for the exchange of parametric data between components. The discretization utilizes high-quality, variable-resolution centroidal Voronoi Delaunay triangulation meshing and existing parallel solvers. We demonstrate the gridding technology, discretization schemes, and the efficiency and scalability of the parallel solvers through computational experiments using both simplified geometries arising from benchmark test problems and a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry.

  17. A full field model study of the East Velma West Block Sims Sand Unit reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolling, J.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-field numerical model of the East Velma West Block Sims Sand Unit (EVWBSSU) reservoir was developed. From the history-matched model, field performance predictions were made for continued waterflood and various operating scenarios under the present CO/sub 2/ injection scheme. Results include the effect of CO/sub 2/ pipeline supply rate, allocation of CO/sub 2/ and water to injection wells, and uncertain parameters on reservoir performance. From these projections it was concluded that the amount of injected CO/sub 2/ required to produce an incremental barrel of oil over waterflood was not strongly dependent on CO/sub 2/ pipeline supply rate or allocation of injected fluids to injection wells. This conclusion seems reasonable mechanistically because the miscible displacement was dominated by gravity, the areal variation in predicted updip oil saturation was not great, and the continuous injection coupled with high permeability updip caused uniform distribution of CO/sub 2/.

  18. A Full Demand Response Model in Co-Optimized Energy and

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been widely accepted that demand response will play an important role in reliable and economic operation of future power systems and electricity markets. Demand response can not only influence the prices in the energy market by demand shifting, but also participate in the reserve market. In this paper, we propose a full model of demand response in which demand flexibility is fully utilized by price responsive shiftable demand bids in energy market as well as spinning reserve bids in reserve market. A co-optimized day-ahead energy and spinning reserve market is proposed to minimize the expected net cost under all credible system states, i.e., expected total cost of operation minus total benefit of demand, and solved by mixed integer linear programming. Numerical simulation results on the IEEE Reliability Test System show effectiveness of this model. Compared to conventional demand shifting bids, the proposed full demand response model can further reduce committed capacity from generators, starting up and shutting down of units and the overall system operating costs.

  19. Reasoning with Continuations II: Full Abstraction for Models of Control Dorai Sitaram and Matthias Felleisen \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    about extended functional lan­ guages with sophisticated control structures. We show that a direct modelReasoning with Continuations II: Full Abstraction for Models of Control Dorai Sitaram and Matthias with first­ and higher­order control facilities, respectively. Fur­ thermore, both models become fully

  20. EXISTENCE AND NONEXISTENCE FOR THE FULL THERMOMECHANICAL SOUZA-AURICCHIO MODEL OF SHAPE MEMORY WIRES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanelli, Ulisse

    EXISTENCE AND NONEXISTENCE FOR THE FULL THERMOMECHANICAL SOUZA-AURICCHIO MODEL OF SHAPE MEMORY thermomechanical quasi-static evolution of a shape memory wire described by the Souza-Auricchio constitutive model no such restriction, the original Souza-Auricchio model is ill-posed. Key words. Shape Memory Alloys, Thermomechanics

  1. A discussion of the results of an in-situ comparison of three full-vector anemometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.; Scott, G.N.; Allread, J.S.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive field measurements and the numerical modeling of dynamic responses associated with wind turbine rotor blades have pointed to strong interactions with coherent turbulent structures in the turbine inflow. These interactions are thought to be a major source of high-cycle fatigue in the primary structural components of wind turbines. The sources of such turbulent structures are not only natural terrain features but also the wakes from upwind turbines. Many unsteady aerodynamic processes are excited by turbulent eddies ranging in size from several rotor diameters down to the dimensions of the mean blade chord. These processes are responsible for inducing large, fluctuating loads on the turbine rotor blades. For the wind turbine generators now in use, this encompasses a spatial range of about 0.1 to 300 m. To assess our ability to measure the coherent properties of inflow turbulence over such a wide range of spatial range, we performed a study to compare three full-vector anemometers. We believe that to identify the dominant fluid dynamic properties of such flows, the instrumentation used must be capable of good fidelity measurements over the desired spatial range. The sonic anemometer is a primary candidate; we also wanted to compare the results associated with a well-designed mechanical instrument which is available at considerably less cost. Two sonic designs and as propeller-bivane were exposed to turbulent flows downstream of both extremely complex and moderately rolling terrain. This paper discusses some of the results of these comparisons with an emphasis on the measurements of turbulent fluctuations.

  2. First Prev Next Last Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Model Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    ·First ·Prev ·Next ·Last ·Go Back ·Full Screen ·Close ·Quit Model Assessment and Selection Axel ·Prev ·Next ·Last ·Go Back ·Full Screen ·Close ·Quit Model Assessment and Selection 2 Topics Predictive · Restriction · Selection · Regularization #12;·First ·Prev ·Next ·Last ·Go Back ·Full Screen ·Close ·Quit Model

  3. Uncalibrated Building Energy Simulation Modeling Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, M.; Culp, C.H.

    for the Level 1 and Level 2 models with measured data for WERC (2004 post-commissioning data). ESL-PA-06-10-01 VOLUME 12, NUMBER 4, OCTOBER 2006 1151 Figure 6. Comparison of simulated daily total energy consumption for the Level 1 and Level 2 models with 1999...,450 m2]), the simulation using 1999 data underestimates the energy use in all categories except the whole building electrical usage. Table 3 identifies the magnitude of these discrepancies for a full year’s consumption. The Level 1 model actually per...

  4. An ordinary differential equation model for full thickness wounds and the effects of diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maini, Philip K.

    An ordinary differential equation model for full thickness wounds and the effects of diabetes L and diabetic healing. The model can be used to estimate the contributions of growth and contraction to dermal healing. Increasing dermal growth is suggested as a treatment for enhancing healing of diabetic wounds

  5. Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T. [Research Centre on Tools Materials and Processes (CROMeP), Ecole des mines d'Albi-Carmaux, 81013 ALBI Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D)

  6. Full particle simulation of a perpendicular collisionless shock: A shock-rest-frame model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayuki Umeda; Ryo Yamazaki

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The full kinetic dynamics of a perpendicular collisionless shock is studied by means of a one-dimensional electromagnetic full particle simulation. The present simulation domain is taken in the shock rest frame in contrast to the previous full particle simulations of shocks. Preliminary results show that the downstream state falls into a unique cyclic reformation state for a given set of upstream parameters through the self-consistent kinetic processes.

  7. Legrand BBBP Implementation Model Designed for Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horton, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUSTAINABILITY Legrand North America Designed for Results BBBP Implementation Model Pete Horton, VP Business Development, Legrand/Watt Stopper Industrial Energy Technology Conference May 23, 2013 May 23, 20133 ESL-IE-13-05-21 Proceedings... of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 SUSTAINABILITY Overview ? Company Introduction ? Our Commitment ? BBBP Initiative ? Our Strategy ?Our Implementation Model: Sub Metering ? Sub metering Concept...

  8. Delayed detonations in full-star models of Type Ia supernova explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke; J. C. Niemeyer

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We present the first full-star three-dimensional explosion simulations of thermonuclear supernovae including parameterized deflagration-to-detonation transitions that occur once the flame enters the distributed burning regime. Methods: Treating the propagation of both the deflagration and the detonation waves in a common front-tracking approach, the detonation is prevented from crossing ash regions. Results: Our criterion triggers the detonation wave at the outer edge of the deflagration flame and consequently it has to sweep around the complex structure and to compete with expansion. Despite the impeded detonation propagation, the obtained explosions show reasonable agreement with global quantities of observed type Ia supernovae. By igniting the flame in different numbers of kernels around the center of the exploding white dwarf, we set up three different models shifting the emphasis from the deflagration phase to the detonation phase. The resulting explosion energies and iron group element productions cover a large part of the diversity of type Ia supernovae. Conclusions: Flame-driven deflagration-to-detonation transitions, if hypothetical, remain a possibility deserving further investigation.

  9. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to a bb? Pair Using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We combine the results of searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson based on the full CDF Run II data set obtained from ?s=1.96??TeV pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron corresponding to an integrated luminosity ...

  10. Uncalibrated Building Energy Simulation Modeling Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, M.; Culp, C.H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VOLUME 12, NUMBER 4 HVAC&R RESEARCH OCTOBER 2006 1141 Uncalibrated Building Energy Simulation Modeling Results Mushtaq Ahmad Charles H. Culp, PhD, PE Associate Member ASHRAE Fellow ASHRAE Received June 23, 2005; accepted April 17, 2006... the uncalibrated simulations were completed. The dis- crepancies between the simulated and measured total yearly building energy use varied over ±30% with one outlier. The results show that discrepancies ranged over ±90% between the sim- ulations and the measured...

  11. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

  12. Modeling requirements for full-scope reactor simulators of fission-product transport during severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, P.G.; Monson, P.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Mitchell, H.A. (Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes in the needs and requirements to properly and efficiently model fission product transport on full scope reactor simulators. Current LWR simulators can be easily adapted to model severe accident phenomena and the transport of radionuclides. Once adapted these simulators can be used as a training tool during operator training exercises for training on severe accident guidelines, for training on containment venting procedures, or as training tool during site wide emergency training exercises.

  13. Modeling requirements for full-scope reactor simulators of fission-product transport during severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, P.G.; Monson, P.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Mitchell, H.A. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes in the needs and requirements to properly and efficiently model fission product transport on full scope reactor simulators. Current LWR simulators can be easily adapted to model severe accident phenomena and the transport of radionuclides. Once adapted these simulators can be used as a training tool during operator training exercises for training on severe accident guidelines, for training on containment venting procedures, or as training tool during site wide emergency training exercises.

  14. Full employment and competition in the Aspen economic model: implications for modeling acts of terrorism.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acts of terrorism could have a range of broad impacts on an economy, including changes in consumer (or demand) confidence and the ability of productive sectors to respond to changes. As a first step toward a model of terrorism-based impacts, we develop here a model of production and employment that characterizes dynamics in ways useful toward understanding how terrorism-based shocks could propagate through the economy; subsequent models will introduce the role of savings and investment into the economy. We use Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate for validation purposes that a single-firm economy converges to the known monopoly equilibrium price, output, and employment levels, while multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment. However, we find that competition also leads to churn by consumers seeking lower prices, making it difficult for firms to optimize with respect to wages, prices, and employment levels. Thus, competitive firms generate market ''noise'' in the steady state as they search for prices and employment levels that will maximize profits. In the context of this model, not only could terrorism depress overall consumer confidence and economic activity but terrorist acts could also cause normal short-run dynamics to be misinterpreted by consumers as a faltering economy.

  15. Computers & Geosciences 34 (2008) 10051014 Icetools: A full Stokes finite element model for glaciers$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for glaciers$ A.H. Jarosch Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland, Sturlugata 7, 101 Reykjavik Detailed studies of glacier flow and deformation of ice require high-resolution numerical modeling.40.Cy; 92.40.Sn; 92.40.Vq Keywords: Glacier; Finite element method; Full Stokes; Ice 1. Introduction

  16. Full vehicle dynamics model of a formula SAE racecar using ADAMS/Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Russell Lee

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    friction coefficient of 1.0. The ADAMS/Car model can now support the design process as an analysis tool for full vehicle dynamics and with continued refinement, will be able to accurately predict behavior throughout a complete autocross course....

  17. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  18. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

  19. Some guidance on preparing validation plans for the DART Full System Models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Genetha Anne; Hough, Patricia Diane; Hills, Richard Guy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning is an important part of computational model verification and validation (V&V) and the requisite planning document is vital for effectively executing the plan. The document provides a means of communicating intent to the typically large group of people, from program management to analysts to test engineers, who must work together to complete the validation activities. This report provides guidelines for writing a validation plan. It describes the components of such a plan and includes important references and resources. While the initial target audience is the DART Full System Model teams in the nuclear weapons program, the guidelines are generally applicable to other modeling efforts. Our goal in writing this document is to provide a framework for consistency in validation plans across weapon systems, different types of models, and different scenarios. Specific details contained in any given validation plan will vary according to application requirements and available resources.

  20. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

  1. Full-Scale Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Processes in the Earth's Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliasson, B. [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden); Stenflo, L. [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden); Department of Physics, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Shukla, P. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a full-scale simulation study of ionospheric turbulence by means of a generalized Zakharov model based on the separation of variables into high-frequency and slow time scales. The model includes realistic length scales of the ionospheric profile and of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields, and uses ionospheric plasma parameters relevant for high-latitude radio facilities such as Eiscat and HAARP. A nested grid numerical method has been developed to resolve the different length-scales, while avoiding severe restrictions on the time step. The simulation demonstrates the parametric decay of the ordinary mode into Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, followed by a Langmuir wave collapse and short-scale caviton formation, as observed in ionospheric heating experiments.

  2. COMPARING MODEL RESULTS TO NATIONAL CLIMATE POLICY GOALS: RESULTS FROM THE ASIA MODELING EXERCISE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Fawcett, Allen A.; Jiang, Kejun

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the world has yet to adopt a single unified policy to limit climate change, many countries and regions have adopted energy and climate policies that have implications for global emissions. In this paper, we discuss a few key policies and how they are included in a set of 24 energy and integrated assessment models that participated in the Asia Modeling Exercise. We also compare results from these models for a small set of stylized scenarios to the pledges made as part of the Copenhagen Accord and the goals stated by the Major Economies Forum. We find that the targets outlined by the United States, the European Union, Japan, and Korea require significant policy action in most of the models analyzed. For most of the models in the study, however, the goals outlined by India are met without any climate policy. The stringency of climate policy required to meet China’s Copenhagen pledges varies across models and accounting methodologies.

  3. beamer-tu-logo Introduction The full abstraction problem for PCF Quantitative models The resource calculus Conclusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    beamer-tu-logo Introduction The full abstraction problem for PCF Quantitative models The resource Preuves, Programmes et Systčmes Université Paris Diderot #12;beamer-tu-logo Introduction The full The full abstraction problem for PCF 3 Quantitative models 4 The resource calculus 5 Conclusion #12;beamer-tu-logo

  4. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan to look more closely at Vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2-8(H2O)] and Siderite [FeCO3] in the next stage of the project.

  5. A full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach based on the material decomposition model applied in dual-energy computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, C. [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France and CNRS, SUPELEC, UNIV PARIS SUD, L2S, 3 rue Joliot-Curie, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France and CNRS, SUPELEC, UNIV PARIS SUD, L2S, 3 rue Joliot-Curie, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rodet, T.; Mohammad-Djafari, A. [CNRS, SUPELEC, UNIV PARIS SUD, L2S, 3 rue Joliot-Curie, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [CNRS, SUPELEC, UNIV PARIS SUD, L2S, 3 rue Joliot-Curie, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Legoupil, S. [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) makes it possible to get two fractions of basis materials without segmentation. One is the soft-tissue equivalent water fraction and the other is the hard-matter equivalent bone fraction. Practical DECT measurements are usually obtained with polychromatic x-ray beams. Existing reconstruction approaches based on linear forward models without counting the beam polychromaticity fail to estimate the correct decomposition fractions and result in beam-hardening artifacts (BHA). The existing BHA correction approaches either need to refer to calibration measurements or suffer from the noise amplification caused by the negative-log preprocessing and the ill-conditioned water and bone separation problem. To overcome these problems, statistical DECT reconstruction approaches based on nonlinear forward models counting the beam polychromaticity show great potential for giving accurate fraction images.Methods: This work proposes a full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach which allows the reconstruction of high quality fraction images from ordinary polychromatic measurements. This approach is based on a Gaussian noise model with unknown variance assigned directly to the projections without taking negative-log. Referring to Bayesian inferences, the decomposition fractions and observation variance are estimated by using the joint maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation method. Subject to an adaptive prior model assigned to the variance, the joint estimation problem is then simplified into a single estimation problem. It transforms the joint MAP estimation problem into a minimization problem with a nonquadratic cost function. To solve it, the use of a monotone conjugate gradient algorithm with suboptimal descent steps is proposed.Results: The performance of the proposed approach is analyzed with both simulated and experimental data. The results show that the proposed Bayesian approach is robust to noise and materials. It is also necessary to have the accurate spectrum information about the source-detector system. When dealing with experimental data, the spectrum can be predicted by a Monte Carlo simulator. For the materials between water and bone, less than 5% separation errors are observed on the estimated decomposition fractions.Conclusions: The proposed approach is a statistical reconstruction approach based on a nonlinear forward model counting the full beam polychromaticity and applied directly to the projections without taking negative-log. Compared to the approaches based on linear forward models and the BHA correction approaches, it has advantages in noise robustness and reconstruction accuracy.

  6. Full-wave modeling of lower hybrid waves on Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meneghini, Orso (Orso-Maria Cornelio)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on several aspects of the Lower Hybrid (LH) wave physics, the common theme being the development of full-wave simulation codes based on Finite Element Methods (FEM) used in support of experiments carried ...

  7. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exhibits varying rock properties in the vertical direction,Spatial Variability of Rock Properties The large number ofthe geologic model, rock properties, and in situ conditions

  8. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with Top Quarks Using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    A search is presented for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full Run II proton-antiproton collision data set, corresponding to 9.45??fb[superscript -1], collected by the ...

  9. Multiscale Reservoir Simulation: Layer Design, Full Field Pseudoization and Near Well Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Song

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    S = averaged saturation of entire model Outlet wS = water saturation at the outlet )(tSOutletw = averaged water saturation at the outlet t = time xt = diffusive time in x direction zt = diffusive time in z direction T =transmissibility Q... Permeability ................................................................. 100 4.3.3 Enhanced Transmissibility ........................................................... 101 4.3.4 Infinite Conductivity Model...

  10. Abstract--This paper presents the harmonic analysis of offshore wind farm (OWF) models with full converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Abstract--This paper presents the harmonic analysis of offshore wind farm (OWF) models with full will be discussed based on measurements from offshore wind farm. Index Terms--full-rating converters, harmonic analysis, offshore wind farm, wind turbine, validation with measurements I. INTRODUCTION HE tendency

  11. SynFull: Synthetic Traffic Models Capturing Cache Coherent Behaviour Mario Badr Natalie Enright Jerger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enright Jerger, Natalie

    latency, and fit within tight power envelopes that are shared across cores, caches and interconnects be tuned to deliver the re- quired performance within a given cost/power envelope, such as topology indulge in detailed performance simulations without the cost of long-running full-system simulation

  12. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest Valeo, Jay R. Johnson, Eun-Hwa and Cynthia Phillips

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  13. A Comparison of High-Level Full-System Power Models Suzanne Rivoire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivoire, Suzanne

    proposed in the context of enabling specific energy-efficiency optimizations on specific machines compare these models over a wide variation of workloads and machines, from a laptop to a server, two classes of systems that are increasingly prevalent. 1 Introduction In order to maximize energy

  14. Modeling and simulation of HVAC Results in EnergyPlus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5564E Modeling and simulation of HVAC Results in EnergyPlus Mangesh Basarkar, Xiufeng Pang;MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HVAC FAULTS IN ENERGYPLUS Mangesh Basarkar, Xiufeng Pang, Liping Wang, Philip

  15. Elliptic Flow from a Hybrid CGC, Full 3D Hydro and Hadronic Cascade Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetsufumi Hirano; Ulrich W. Heinz; Dmitri Kharzeev; Roy Lacey; Yasushi Nara

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the robustness of the discovery of the perfect fluid through comparison of hydrodynamic calculations with the elliptic flow coefficient v_2 at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 GeV. Employing the Glauber model for initial entropy density distributions, the centrality dependence of v_2 is reasonably reproduced by using an ideal fluid description of the early QGP stage followed by a hadronic cascade in the late hadronic stage. On the other hand, initial conditions based on the Colour Glass Condensate model are found to generate larger elliptic flow due to larger initial eccentricity epsilon. We further predict v_2/epsilon at a fixed impact parameter as a function of collision energy sqrt{s_{NN}} up to the LHC energy.

  16. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s}{approx} 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  17. Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

  18. Results of the Sixth International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2001 This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2002 Metrologia 39 IOPscience #12;metrologia Results of the Sixth International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2001 L di Metrologia "G. Colonnetti" (IMGC), Turin, Italy. M. Diament: Institut de Physique du Globe de

  19. Update On The Wholesale Electricity Price Forecast & Modeling Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,877 Replacement #12;CO2 Emission Modeling § The AURORAxmp® electric market model calculates CO2 emission) Assumptions § CO2 emission modeling § Base Case Results § Scenario/Sensitivities § Emission Projections Database ­ eGRID 2012 Year 2009 ­ Emissions, including CO2, are estimated using information from various

  20. IMA Journal of Numerical Analysis (1988) 8, 415-433 Finite Element Methods for a Model for Full Waveform Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Mark

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMA Journal of Numerical Analysis (1988) 8, 415-433 Finite Element Methods for a Model for Full are given and then a discrete-time, explicit finite element procedure is defined and analysed, with finite on the existence, uniqueness and finite element approximation of the solution of Biot's equations were given in [15

  1. Reuse of Verification Results Conditional Model Checking, Precision Reuse,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, Dirk

    further verification runs of the system; information about the level of abstraction in the abstract modelReuse of Verification Results Conditional Model Checking, Precision Reuse, and Verification checker which parts of the system should be verified; thus, later verification runs can use the output

  2. Energy-aware scheduling: models and complexity results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Energy-aware scheduling: models and complexity results Guillaume Aupy (1st year PhD student) LIP several energy-aware scheduling algorithms whose design is optimized for different speed models. Dynamic plans. I. INTRODUCTION Energy-aware scheduling has proven an important issue in the past decade, both

  3. World oil futures: results from the OILTANK model presented at the energy modeling forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ervik, L.K.; Johannessen, O.; Nunn, D.W.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives results from the OILTANK simulation model presented at the Energy Modeling Forum on future world oil price. 12 scenarios are presented.

  4. Full-fuel-cycle approach to vehicle emissions modeling: A case study of gasoline in the southeastern region of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, S.R.; Gupta, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Greening, L.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of full-fuel-cycle analysis as a scientific, economic, and policy tool for the evaluation of alternative sources of transportation energy has become increasingly widespread. However, consistent methods for performance of these types of analyses are only now becoming recognized and utilized. The work presented here provides a case study of full-fuel-cycle analysis methods applied to the evaluation of gasoline in the southeastern region of the United States. Results of the study demonstrate the significance of nonvehicle processes, such as fuel refining, in terms of energy expenditure and emissions production. Unique to this work is the application of the MOBILE5 mobile emissions model in the full-fuel-cycle analysis. Estimates of direct and indirect greenhouse gas production are also presented and discussed using the full-fuel-cycle analysis method.

  5. Full $0\\hbar?$ shell model calculation of the binding energies of the $1f_{7/2}$ nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Caurier; G. Martinez-Pinedo; F. Nowacki; A. Poves; J. Retamosa; A. P. Zuker

    1998-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Binding energies and other global properties of nuclei in the middle of the $pf$ shell, such as M1, E2 and Gamow-Teller sum rules, have been obtained using a new Shell Model code (NATHAN) written in quasi-spin formalism and using a $j-j$-coupled basis. An extensive comparison is made with the recently available Shell Model Monte Carlo results using the effective interaction KB3. The binding energies for -nearly- all the $1f_{7/2}$ nuclei are compared with the measured (and extrapolated) results.

  6. Full-Wave Algorithm to Model Effects of Bedding Slopes on the Response of Subsurface Electromagnetic Geophysical Sensors near Unconformities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainath, Kamalesh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions however, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling arbitrarily-oriented, relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions. The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each "flattened" (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, ...

  7. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full CDF data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is presented for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full Run II proton-antiproton collision data set, corresponding to 9.45 fb{sup -1}, collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. No significant excess over the expected background is observed, and 95% credibility-level upper bounds are placed on the cross section {sigma}(t{bar t}H {yields} lepton + missing transverse energy + jets). For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c{sup 2}, we expect to set a limit of 12.6, and observe a limit of 20.5 times the standard model rate. This represents the most sensitive search for a standard model Higgs boson in this channel to date.

  8. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of Damage Identification Results Obtained Using Finite Element Model Updating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak; Conte, Joel P; Hemez, François M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling error). A full factorial design of experiments iserror) (E). A full factorial design of experiments isnumerical). A full-factorial design of experiments is used

  9. Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

  10. Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

  11. Constraining hybrid inflation models with WMAP three-year results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoso, Antonio [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 2EG (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the original model of quadratic hybrid inflation in light of the WMAP three-year results and study the possibility of obtaining a spectral index of primordial density perturbations, n{sub s}, smaller than 1 from this model. The original hybrid inflation model naturally predicts n{sub s}{>=}1 in the false vacuum dominated regime but it is also possible to have n{sub s}<1 when the quadratic term dominates. We therefore investigate whether there is also an intermediate regime compatible with the latest constraints, where the scalar field value during the last 50 e-folds of inflation is less than the Planck scale.

  12. Final Report - Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfotenhauer, John M; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  13. Test Results of LARP 3.6 m Nb3Sn Racetrack Coils Support by Full-length and Segmented Shell Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratore, Joseph F.; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Anerella, Michael; Barzi, Emanuela; Bossert, Rodger; Caspi, Shlomo; Cheng, D. W.; Cozzolino, John; Dietderich, Daniel R.; Escallier, John; Feher, Sandor; Felice, Helene; Ferracin, Paolo; Ganetis, George; Ghosh, Arup K.; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joshi, Piyush; Kovach, Paul; Lietzke, A. F.; Louie, Wing; Marone, Andrew; McInturff, Al D.; Nobrega, F.; Sabbi, GianLuca; Schmalzle, Jesse; Thomas, Richard; Turrioni, Daniele; Wanderer, Peter

    2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) to build a high performance quadrupole magnet with Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor, a pair of 3.6 m-long Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack coils has been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and installed in two shell-type support structures built by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL). These magnet assemblies have been tested at 4.5 K at BNL to gauge the effect of extended length and prestress on the mechanical performance of the long structure compared to earlier short models. This paper presents the results of quench testing and compares the overall performance of the two versions of the support structure. We also summarize the shell strain measurements and discuss the variation of quench current with ramp rate.

  14. full potential of MDA, which allows for models at multiple layers of abstraction, and which has a meta-modelling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallis, George

    full potential of MDA, which allows for models at multiple layers of abstraction, and which has across GUI, OO implementation and databases without the role of MDA in separating these viewpoints being good introduction to the use of UML within a limited MDA framework. It provides an emphasis

  15. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Anson, E-mail: piercea2@uthscsa.edu [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran's Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas, 78284 (United States); Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti [Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States)] [Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Yoo, Si-Eun [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran's Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas, 78284 (United States)

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  16. Modeling results for the ITER cryogenic fore pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D. S.; Miller, F. K.; Pfotenhauer, J. M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The cryogenic fore pump (CFP) is designed for ITER to collect and compress hydrogen isotopes during the regeneration process of torus cryopumps. Different from common cryopumps, the ITER-CFP works in the viscous flow regime. As a result, both adsorption boundary conditions and transport phenomena contribute unique features to the pump performance. In this report, the physical mechanisms of cryopumping are studied, especially the diffusion-adsorption process and these are coupled with standard equations of species, momentum and energy balance, as well as the equation of state. Numerical models are developed, which include highly coupled non-linear conservation equations of species, momentum and energy and equation of state. Thermal and kinetic properties are treated as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition. To solve such a set of equations, a novel numerical technique, identified as the Group-Member numerical technique is proposed. It is presented here a 1D numerical model. The results include comparison with the experimental data of pure hydrogen flow and a prediction for hydrogen flow with trace helium. An advanced 2D model and detailed explanation of the Group-Member technique are to be presented in following papers.

  17. Comparison of Blade-Strike Modeling Results with Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner.

  18. H2A Delivery Models and Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration0-1 MarchH-TankModels and Results H2A

  19. Dark Stars: Improved Models and First Pulsation Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanja Rindler-Daller; Michael H. Montgomery; Katherine Freese; Donald E. Winget; Bill Paxton

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the stellar evolution code MESA to study dark stars. Dark stars (DSs), which are powered by dark matter (DM) self-annihilation rather than by nuclear fusion, may be the first stars to form in the Universe. We compute stellar models for accreting DSs with masses up to 10^6 M_{sun}. The heating due to DM annihilation is self-consistently included, assuming extended adiabatic contraction of DM within the minihalos in which DSs form. We find remarkably good overall agreement with previous models, which assumed polytropic interiors. There are some differences in the details, with positive implications for observability. We found that, in the mass range of 10^4 -10^5 M_{sun}, our DSs are hotter by a factor of 1.5 than those in Freese et al.(2010), are smaller in radius by a factor of 0.6, denser by a factor of 3 - 4, and more luminous by a factor of 2. Our models also confirm previous results, according to which supermassive DSs are very well approximated by (n=3)-polytropes. We also perform a first study of dark star pulsations. Our DS models have pulsation modes with timescales ranging from less than a day to more than two years in their rest frames, at z ~ 15, depending on DM particle mass and overtone number. Such pulsations may someday be used to identify bright, cool objects uniquely as DSs; if properly calibrated, they might, in principle, also supply novel standard candles for cosmological studies.

  20. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  1. Direct containment heating: Surtsey test results and models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Nichols, R.T.; Pilch, M.; Brockmann, J.E.; Powers, D.A.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct containment heating is one of the processes that can lead to containment rupture early in a severe reactor accident. The origins and the current understanding of this process are surveyed. Three issues arise in connection with direct containment heating -- threats to containment integrity posed by transfer of energy to the containment atmosphere from dispersed core debris or the generation of hydrogen by reactions of core debris with steam, and the formation of radioactive aerosols available for release from the plant should containment integrity be lost. The two threats to containment integrity have different characteristics. Energy exchange between core debris and the atmosphere depends on the long range dispersal of the debris and the atmosphere depends on the long range dispersal of the debris and can be affected by interactions of the debris with structures and co-dispersed water. Hydrogen generation is dependent on the detailed flows of debris and steam within and near the reactor cavity. Results of four experiments in the Surtsey test facility to explore energy exchange with the atmosphere are presented. These experiments suggest ''single particle'' models of direct heating over-predict the threat to containment integrity and that debris/structure interactions can enhance heating of the containment atmosphere. Results of test to establish the low pressure cut-off to direct heating are reported. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. New Technology Demonstration Program - Results of an Attempted Field Test of Full-Spectrum Polarized Lighting in a Mail Processing/Office Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the potential energy savings associated with the use of full-spectrum polarized lighting in a work space was initiated as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) in 1997. This project was intended to provide information on the effectiveness and application of this technology that could help federal energy managers and other interested individuals determine whether this technology had benefits for their occupied spaces. The use of an actual mail processing/office work area provided the capability of evaluating the technologies effectiveness in the real world.

  3. Results of EPRI/ANL DCH investigations and model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Sehgal, B.R.; Merilo, M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a series of five experiments are described addressing the severity and mitigation of direct containment heating. The tests were performed in a 1:30 linear scale mockup of the Zion PWR containment system using a reactor-material corium melt consisting of 60% UO/sub 2/, 16% ZrO/sub 2/, 24% SSt at nominally 2800C initial temperature. A ''worst-case'' type test involving unimpeded corium dispersal through an air atmosphere in a closed vessel produced an atmosphere heatup of 323K, equivalent to a DCH efficiency of 62%. With the addition of structural features which impeded the corium dispersal, representative of dispersal pathway features at Zion, the DCH efficiency was reduced to 1--5%. (This important result is scale dependent and requires larger scale tests such as the SURTSEY program at SNL plus mechanistic modeling for application to the reactor system.) With the addition of water in the cavity region, there was no measurable heatup of the atmosphere. This was attributable to the vigorous codispersal of water with corium which prevented the temperature of the atmosphere from significantly exceeding T/sub sat/. In this case the DCH load was replaced by the more benign ''steam spike'' from corium quench. Significant oxidation of the corium constituents occurred in the tests, adding chemical energy to the system and producing hydrogen. Overall, the results suggest that with consideration of realistic, plant specific, mitigating features, DCH may be no worse and possibly far less severe than the previously examined steam spike. Implications for accident management are addressed. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Senior Design Projects 2013 Project Title 1 : Monte Carlo Simulations Using a Benchmark Full-Core Pressured Water Rector Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    defined in MCNP. There are a number of approaches in parallel high performance computing that can and 7,168 GPUs. The high performance computing industry is moving toward a hybrid computer model, where

  5. Exact results for ionization of model atomic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costin, O.; Tanveer, S. [Department of Mathematics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Lebowitz, J. L. [Department of Mathematics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Stucchio, C. [Courant Institute, New York University, New York, New York 10276 (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent rigorous results concerning the ionization of model quantum systems by time-periodic external fields. The systems we consider consist of a single particle (electron) with a reference Hamiltonian H{sub 0}=-{delta}+V{sub 0}(x) (x is an element of R{sup d}) having both bound and continuum states. Starting from an initially localized state {psi}{sub 0}(x) is an element of L{sup 2}(R{sup d}), the system is subjected for t{>=}0 to an arbitrary strength time-periodic potential V{sub 1}(x,t)=V{sub 1}(x,t+2{pi}/{omega}). We prove that for a large class of V{sub 0}(x) and V{sub 1}(x,t), the wave function {psi}(x,t) will delocalize as t{yields}{infinity}, i.e., the system will ionize. The only exceptions are cases where there are time-periodic bound states of the Floquet operator associated with H{sub 0}+V{sub 1}. These do occur (albeit rarely) when V{sub 1} is not small. For spatially rapidly decaying V{sub 0} and V{sub 1}, {psi}(x,t) is generally given, for very long times, by a power series in t{sup -1/2} which we prove in some cases to be Borel summable. For the Coulomb potential V{sub 0}(x)=-b|x|{sup -1} in R{sup 3}, we prove ionization for V{sub 1}(x,t)=V{sub 1}(|x|)sin({omega}t-{theta}), V{sub 1}(|x|)=0 for |x|>R and V{sub 1}(x)>0 for |x|{<=}R. For this model, if {psi}{sub 0} is compactly supported both in x and in angular momentum, L, we obtain that {psi}(x,t){approx}O(t{sup -5/6}) as t{yields}{infinity}.

  6. Results from modeling and simulation of chemical downstream etch systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, E.; Vosen, S.R.; Shon, J.W.; Larson, R.S.; Fox, C.A.; Buchenauer

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes modeling work performed at Sandia in support of Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) benchmark and tool development programs under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with SEMATECH. The Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) Modeling Project supports SEMATECH Joint Development Projects (JDPs) with Matrix Integrated Systems, Applied Materials, and Astex Corporation in the development of new CDE reactors for wafer cleaning and stripping processes. These dry-etch reactors replace wet-etch steps in microelectronics fabrication, enabling compatibility with other process steps and reducing the use of hazardous chemicals. Models were developed at Sandia to simulate the gas flow, chemistry and transport in CDE reactors. These models address the essential components of the CDE system: a microwave source, a transport tube, a showerhead/gas inlet, and a downstream etch chamber. The models have been used in tandem to determine the evolution of reactive species throughout the system, and to make recommendations for process and tool optimization. A significant part of this task has been in the assembly of a reasonable set of chemical rate constants and species data necessary for successful use of the models. Often the kinetic parameters were uncertain or unknown. For this reason, a significant effort was placed on model validation to obtain industry confidence in the model predictions. Data for model validation were obtained from the Sandia Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) experiments, from the literature, from the CDE Benchmark Project (also part of the Sandia/SEMATECH CRADA), and from the JDP partners. The validated models were used to evaluate process behavior as a function of microwave-source operating parameters, transport-tube geometry, system pressure, and downstream chamber geometry. In addition, quantitative correlations were developed between CDE tool performance and operation set points.

  7. Constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Aaltonen; CDF Collaboration

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific non-standard Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity $J^P$ = $0^-$ and a graviton-like Higgs boson with $J^P$ = $2^+$, assuming for both a mass of 125 GeV/$c^2$. We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb$^{-1}$. We observe no significant deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV/$c^2$, and set bounds on the possible rate of production of each exotic state.

  8. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Waste in Salt Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of...

  9. Constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific non-standard Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity $J^P$ = $0^-$ and a graviton-like Higgs boson with $J^P$ = $2^+$, assuming for both a mass of 125 GeV/$c^2$. We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb...

  10. Results from Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brozyna, K.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

  11. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  12. Full-f Neoclassical Simulations toward a Predictive Model for H-mode Pedestal Ion Energy, Particle and Momentum Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaglia, D. J. [PPPL; Boedo, J. A. [University of California San Diego; Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics; Chang, C. S. [PPPL; Canik, J. M. [ORNL; deGrassie, J. S. [General Atomics; Gerhardt, S. P. [PPPL; Grierson, B. A. [General Atomics; Groebner, R. J. [General Atomics; Maingi, Rajesh [PPPL; Smith, S. P. [General Atomics

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy and particle transport rates are decoupled in the H-mode edge since the ion thermal transport rate is primarily set by the neoclassical transport of the deuterium ions in the tail of the thermal energy distribution, while the net particle transport rate is set by anomalous transport of the colder bulk ions. Ion orbit loss drives the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describes the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the Ti profile. Non-Maxwellian distributions also drive large intrinsic edge flows, and the interaction of turbulence at the top of the pedestal with the intrinsic edge flow can generate an intrinsic core torque. The primary driver of the radial electric field (Er) in the pedestal and scrapeoff layer (SOL) are kinetic neoclassical effects, such as ion orbit loss of tail ions and parallel electron loss to the divertor. This paper describes the first multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport calculations for ELM-free H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. This interpretative technique quantifies the role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall pedestal structure, and consequently illustrates the importance of including kinetic effects self-consistently in transport calculations around transport barriers.

  13. Electromagnetic scattering from grassland Part II: Measurement and modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiles, James Marion; Ulaby, F. T.; Sarabandi, K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -InvestigatoronmanyprojectssponsoredbyNASA,JPL,ARO,ONR,ARL, and GM all related in one way or the other to microwave and millimeter wave radar remote sensing. He has published many book chapters and more than 80 papers in refereed journals on electromagnetic scattering, random media modeling, microwave measurement...LecturerAwardfromtheGerman Federal Ministry for Education, Science, and Technology. FawwazT.Ulaby(M’68–SM’74–F’80)receivedthe B.S.degreeinphysicsfromtheAmericanUniversity of Beirut, Lebanon, in 1964, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D.degreesinelectricalengineeringfromtheUni- versity...

  14. GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

  15. Dynamic soil-structure interaction-comparison of FEM model with experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Palanivel Rajan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to represent twenty different laboratory experiments. The results of these models are compared with results available from extensive experimental dynamic testing on a geotechnical centrifuge. Though the various results from the finite element analysis...

  16. Transport-theoretic model for the electron-proton-hydrogen atom auroa. II. Model results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, D.J. [Computational Physics, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Daniell, R.E. Jr. [Computational Physics, Inc., Newton, MA (United States); Basu, B. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)] [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a companion paper, a self-consistent transport-theoretic model for the combined electron-proton-hydrogen atom aurora was described. In this paper, numberical results based on the model are presented. This is done for the pure electron aurora, the pure proton-hydrogen atom aurora, and finally for the combined aurora. Adopting commonly used types of energy distributions for the incident particle (electron and proton) fluxes, the authors give numerical solutions for the precipitating electron, proton, and hydrogen atom differential number fluxes. Results are also given for ionization yields and emission yields of the following features: N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative group (3914 {Angstrom}), N{sub 2} second positive group (3371 {Angstrom}), selected N{sub 2} Lyman-Birge-Hopfields bands (1325, 1354, 1383, 1493, and all bands between 1700 and 1800 {Angstrom}), O I (1356 {Angstrom}), L{sub {alpha}} (1216 {Angstrom}), H{sub {beta}} (4861 {Angstrom}), and H{sub {alpha}} (6563 {Angstrom}). The yield at 1493 {Angstrom} also contains a contribution from N I (1493 {Angstrom}), which in fact dominates LBH emission. A major new result of this study is that the secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of aurora interest) cross sections for secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of auroral interest) cross sections for secondary electron production by proton and hydrogen atom impact decrease exponentially with increasing secondary electron energy, whereas the cross sections for electron impact decrease as an inverse power law with increasing secondary energy.

  17. Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

  18. Leaching of BTEX from Aged Crude Oil Contaminated Model Soils: Experimental and Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally assumed that soil properties such as organic matter content, porosity, and mineral surface area have a significant effect on the bioavailability and leachability of aged petroleum hydrocarbons. In order to test this hypothesis, nine model soils or sorbents (i.e., fine and coarse quartz sand, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay, peat, 60? and 150? silica gel, a loam soil, and non-porous glass beads) were spiked with a crude oil, aged for 27 months in the laboratory, and transferred to glass columns for the performance of continuous flow leaching experiments. The column effluents were periodically sampled for 43 days and analyzed for BTEX. A one-dimensional flow model for predicting the dissolution and dispersion of individual hydrocarbons from a multi-component NAPL such as crude oil was used to fit the leaching data (i.e., the BTEX concentration versus time curves) by adjusting the equilibrium oil-leachate partitioning coefficient (Kol) for each respective hydrocarbon. The Peclet number, which is a measure of dispersion and a required modeling parameter, was measured in separate chloride tracer experiments for each soil column. Results demonstrate that soil properties did not significantly affect the leaching kinetics of BTEX from the columns. Instead, BTEX leaching curves could be successfully fitted with the one-dimensional NAPL dissolution flow model for all sorbents with the exception of montmorillonite clay. The fitting parameter Kol for each hydrocarbon was found to be similar to the Kol values that were independently measured for the same crude oil by Rixey et al. (Journal of Hazardous Materials B, 65: 137-156, 1999). In addition, the fitted Kol values were very similar for BTEX leaching from aged compared to freshly spiked loam soil. These findings indicate that leaching of BTEX in the aged soils that are contaminated with crude oil at the high concentrations commonly found in the environment (i.e., >20,000 mg/kg) was not affected by soil properties or aging but rather was governed by the equilibrium dissolution of these hydrocarbons from the crude oil NAPL that is coating the soil particles.

  19. Effect of Blade Torsion on Modeling Results for the Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT): Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Hansen, A. C.; Minnema, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes modeling results from both the FAST and ADAMS aeroelastic simulators characterizing small wind turbine loads and dynamic behavior.

  20. Exploring the full parameter space for an interacting dark energy model with recent observations including redshift-space distortions: application of the parametrized post-Friedmann approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark energy can modify the dynamics of dark matter if there exists a direct interaction between them. Thus a measurement of the structure growth, e.g., redshift-space distortions (RSD), can be a powerful tool to constrain the interacting dark energy (IDE) models. For the widely studied $Q=3\\beta H\\rho_{de}$ model, previous works showed that only a very small coupling ($\\beta\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^{-3})$) can survive in current RSD data. However, all these analyses have to assume $w>-1$ and $\\beta>0$ due to the existence of the large-scale instability in the IDE scenario. In our recent work [Phys.\\ Rev.\\ D {\\bf 90}, 063005 (2014)], we successfully solved this large-scale instability problem by establishing a parametrized post-Friedmann (PPF) framework for the IDE scenario. So we, for the first time, have the ability to explore the full parameter space of the IDE models. In this work, we reexamine the observational constraints on the $Q=3\\beta H\\rho_{de}$ model within the PPF framework. By using the Planck data, th...

  1. SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Myunghee [Retired] [Retired; Chan, Vincent S. [General Atomics] [General Atomics

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

  2. Results of transient /accident analysis for the HEU, first mixed HEU-LEU and for the first full LEU cores of the WWR-SM reactor at INP AS RUZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baytelesov, S.A.; Dosimbaev, A.A.; Kungurov, F.R.; Salikhbaev, U.S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ulugbek, 100214 Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The WWR-SM reactor in Uzbekistan is preparing for the conversion from HEU (36%) fuel to LEU (19.8%) fuel. During this conversion, the HEU fuel assemblies (IRT-3M FA) being discharged at the end of each cycle will be replaced by LEU fuel assemblies (IRT-4M FA); this gradual conversion requires 9 cycles. The safety analysis report for this conversion process has been prepared. This paper presents selected results for postulated transient/accidents during this conversion process; results for transient analysis for the HEU core, the 1st mixed (HEU-LEU) core, and for the first full LEU core are presented for the following initiators: control rod motion (2 cases), loss of power, and FA blockage. These results show that safety is maintained for all transients analyzed and that the behavior of all the analyzed cores is essentially the same. (author)

  3. Efficient Dynamic Modeling, Numerical Optimal Control and Experimental Results for Various Gaits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    Efficient Dynamic Modeling, Numerical Optimal Control and Experimental Results for Various Gaits. A fully three- dimensional dynamical model of Sony's four-legged robot is used to state an optimal control model and the algorithm for evaluating the dynamics. The formulation of the optimal control problem

  4. Capacitive effect of cavitation in xylem conduits: results from a dynamic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    Capacitive effect of cavitation in xylem conduits: results from a dynamic model TEEMU HĂ?LTTĂ?1. A dynamic model is presented that models xylem water potential, xylem sap flow and cavitation, taking; xylem transport. INTRODUCTION Xylem embolism formation by cavitation causes a decrease in plant

  5. Haptic Models of an Automotive Turn-Signal Switch: Identification and Playback Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollerbach, John M.

    Haptic Models of an Automotive Turn-Signal Switch: Identification and Playback Results Mark B of virtual environments. This paper addresses the problem of modeling the feel of an automotive turn- signal would require accurate models of the primary automotive controls, including the steering wheel, gear

  6. Comparison of Statistical Multifragmentation Model simulations with Canonical Thermodynamical Model results: a few representative cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Botvina; G. Chaudhuri; S. Das Gupta; I. Mishustin

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) has been widely used to explain experimental data of intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. A later entrant in the field is the canonical thermodynamic model (CTM) which is also being used to fit experimental data. The basic physics of both the models is the same, namely that fragments are produced according to their statistical weights in the available phase space. However, they are based on different statistical ensembles, and the methods of calculation are different: while the SMM uses Monte-Carlo simulations, the CTM solves recursion relations. In this paper we compare the predictions of the two models for a few representative cases.

  7. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  8. The Multi-Stage Investment Timing Game in Offshore Petroleum Production: Preliminary results from an econometric model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    robustness checks from the econometric model coefficients inPreliminary results from an econometric model C. -Y.paper uses a structural econometric model to analyze the

  9. 2D-Modelling of pellet injection in the poloidal plane: results of numerical tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2D-Modelling of pellet injection in the poloidal plane: results of numerical tests P. Lalousis developed for computing the expansion of pellet-produced clouds in the poloidal plane. The expansion

  10. A Statistical Model for Linking Field and Laboratory Exposure Results for a Model Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Technology (NIST) to generate necessary experimental data and the development of a model relating cumulative fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms and conclusions from them can be seriously of materials in certain applications. These range from jet engine turbine disk materials to highly #12

  11. Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Experimental Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Experimental Results C. Canudas dynamic friction force model for the longitudinal road/tire interaction for wheeled ground vehicles is val- idated via experiments with an actual passenger vehicle. Contrary to common static friction/slip maps

  12. Evaluation of Advanced Wind Power Forecasting Models Results of the Anemos Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Evaluation of Advanced Wind Power Forecasting Models ­ Results of the Anemos Project I. Martí1.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract An outstanding question posed today by end-users like power system operators, wind power producers or traders is what performance can be expected by state-of-the-art wind power prediction models. This paper

  13. Combinatorial Algorithms for Protein Folding in Lattice Models: A Survey of Mathematical Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istrail, Sorin

    Combinatorial Algorithms for Protein Folding in Lattice Models: A Survey of Mathematical Results a comprehensive survey of combinatorial algorithms and theorems about lattice protein folding models obtained in the almost 15 years since the publication in 1995 of the first protein folding approximation algorithm

  14. The International Urban Energy Balance Models Comparison Project: First Results from Phase 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    The International Urban Energy Balance Models Comparison Project: First Results from Phase 1 C. S and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece h University of Lo´ dz´, Lo´ dz´, Poland i Royal) ABSTRACT A large number of urban surface energy balance models now exist with different assumptions about

  15. Election Results and Opportunistic Policies: A New Test of the Rational Political Business Cycle Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aidt, Toke S; Veiga, F J; Veiga, L G

    Election Results and Opportunistic Policies: A New Test of the Rational Political Business Cycle Model#3; Toke S. Aidtay Francisco José Veigab Linda Gonçalves Veigac aUniversity of Cambridge, Faculty of Economics, Sidgwick Avenue Cambridge, CB3 9DD... . These results are consistent with the theoretical model. Keywords: Voting and popularity functions, opportunism, rational political busi- ness cycles, local government, system estimation, Portugal. JEL codes: D72, E32, H72. #3;The authors acknowledge helpful...

  16. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  17. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  18. 6 Year Graduation Model for Full-time Freshmen (Non-SEEK) Students * Students labeled `Not Enrolled' in the charts are either stop outs (may return to QC after a semester off) or drop outs or transfers in this study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    6 Year Graduation Model for Full-time Freshmen (Non-SEEK) Students * Students labeled `Not Enrolled' in the charts are either stop outs (may return to QC after a semester off) or drop outs or transfers Graduation Model for Full-time Transfer Students * Students labeled `Not Enrolled' in the charts are either

  19. Logical Full Abstraction and PCF 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longley, John R; Plotkin, Gordon

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the concept of logical full abstraction, generalising the usual equational notion. We consider the language PCF and two extensions with “parallel” operations. The main result is that, for standard ...

  20. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 1 and 2: Testing and Modeling Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; LaCava, W.; Link, H.; McNiff, B.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) investigates root causes of wind turbine gearbox premature failures and validates design assumptions that affect gearbox reliability using a combined testing and modeling approach. Knowledge gained from the testing and modeling of the GRC gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into internal responses of three-point mounted gearboxes. This paper presents some testing and modeling results of the GRC research during Phase 1 and 2. Non-torque loads from the rotor including shaft bending and thrust, traditionally assumed to be uncoupled with gearbox, affect gear and bearing loads and resulting gearbox responses. Bearing clearance increases bearing loads and causes cyclic loading, which could contribute to a reduced bearing life. Including flexibilities of key drivetrain subcomponents is important in order to reproduce the measured gearbox response during the tests using modeling approaches.

  1. A Heuristic Model of DansgaardOeschger Cycles. Part I: Description, Results, and Sensitivity Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    . Parameterizations are included for latent heat polynyas and sea ice export from the column. The resulting heuristic representing the Nordic seas and is composed of ocean boxes stacked below a one-layer sea ice model in the proxy observational data, with the presence or absence of perennial sea ice in the Nordic seas being

  2. Modeling and simulation results on high sensitivity scattered gamma-ray emission imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Verger, Maď K.

    Modeling and simulation results on high sensitivity scattered gamma-ray emission imaging C. Driol a simulations Numerical image reconstruction a b s t r a c t A new modality in gamma-ray emission imaging, based modality in gamma-ray emission imaging with potential applications in many fields such as bio

  3. TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I -PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    coal or by ex- haust clean up technology. For the power plants, the simplest solution is the preventive- ity well into the 21st century. This dependency on coal calls for better technologies to reduceTURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I - PRELIMINARY RESULTS

  4. Recent results from the UrQMD hybrid model for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleicher, Marcus; Steinheimer, Jan; van Hees, Hendrik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings present recent results from transport-hydrodynamics-hybrid models for heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies. The main focus is on the absorption of (anti-)protons in the hadronic afterburner stage of the reaction, di-lepton production at SPS and heavy quark dynamics.

  5. Computer representation of the model covariance function resulting from travel-time tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Computer representation of the model covariance function resulting from travel-time tomography Lud a supplement to the paper by Klime#20;s (2002b) on the stochastic travel{time tomography. It contains brief covariance function is a function of 6 coordinates with pro- nounced singularities. The computer

  6. Updated search for the standard model Higgs boson in events with jets and missing transverse energy using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present an updated search for the Higgs boson produced in association with a vector boson in the final state with missing transverse energy and two jets. We use the full CDF data set corresponding to an integrated ...

  7. Kalman filtering and smoothing for linear wave equations with model error This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Andrew

    Kalman filtering and smoothing for linear wave equations with model error This article has been:10.1088/0266-5611/27/9/095008 Kalman filtering and smoothing for linear wave equations with model an online approach to state estimation inverse problems when data are acquired sequentially. The Kalman

  8. Phase-field modeling of corrosion kinetics under dual-oxidants This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Phase-field modeling of corrosion kinetics under dual-oxidants This article has been downloaded-field modeling of corrosion kinetics under dual-oxidants You-Hai Wen1 , Long-Qing Chen2 and Jeffrey A Hawk1 1 is proposed to simulate corrosion kinetics under a dual- oxidant atmosphere. It will be demonstrated

  9. Forward Modeling of Active Region Coronal Emissions. II. Implications for Coronal Heating This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McTiernan, James M.

    Forward Modeling of Active Region Coronal Emissions. II. Implications for Coronal Heating of Contents and more related content is available Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;FORWARD MODELING OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL EMISSIONS. II. IMPLICATIONS FOR CORONAL HEATING L. L

  10. Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we describe the 1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and 2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  11. Full-Fledged Indian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Josh Benjamin

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee Stafford is in his seventh summer as a counselor at Camp Arrowdance. While Lee enjoys his status as one of the most popular staff members at camp, he begins to wonder if he's in danger of going "Full-Fledged Indian", ...

  12. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to a bb? Pair in Events with Two Oppositely Charged Leptons Using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45??fb[superscript ...

  13. Constraints on Models of the Higgs Boson with Exotic Spin and Parity using Decays to Bottom-Antibottom Quarks in the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T.

    A search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a ...

  14. Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) Model: Documentation and Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Margolis, R.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) model is a bottom-up, market penetration model that simulates the potential adoption of photovoltaics (PV) on residential and commercial rooftops in the continental United States through 2030. NREL developed SolarDS to examine the market competitiveness of PV based on regional solar resources, capital costs, electricity prices, utility rate structures, and federal and local incentives. The model uses the projected financial performance of PV systems to simulate PV adoption for building types and regions then aggregates adoption to state and national levels. The main components of SolarDS include a PV performance simulator, a PV annual revenue calculator, a PV financial performance calculator, a PV market share calculator, and a regional aggregator. The model simulates a variety of installed PV capacity for a range of user-specified input parameters. PV market penetration levels from 15 to 193 GW by 2030 were simulated in preliminary model runs. SolarDS results are primarily driven by three model assumptions: (1) future PV cost reductions, (2) the maximum PV market share assumed for systems with given financial performance, and (3) PV financing parameters and policy-driven assumptions, such as the possible future cost of carbon emissions.

  15. Acceptor and surface states of ZnO nanocrystals: a unified model This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2011 Nanotechnology 22 475703 (http conductive oxide [5] in solar cells [6]. The size dependence of the optical properties allows for novel process [15­17]. Zinc acetate dihydrate (Zn(CH3COO)2·2H2O, 99.999%) and sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO3

  16. Results on the search for the standard model Higgs boson at CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabozzi, Francesco [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. di Monte S. Angelo Via Cintia - 80126 Napoli (Italy) and Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell'Ateneo Lucano 10 - 85100 Potenza (Italy); Collaboration: CMS Collaboration

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of the results from searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the CMS experiment at LHC with data collected from proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV is presented. The Higgs boson is searched in a multiplicity of decay channels using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities in the range 4.6 - 4.8 fb{sup -1}. The investigated mass range is 110 - 600 GeV. Results are reported for each channel as well as for their combination.

  17. Discrete Element Modeling Results of Proppant Rearrangement in the Cooke Conductivity Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl Mattson; Hai Huang; Michael Conway; Lisa O'Connell

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of propped fracture conductivity began in earnest with the development of the Cooke cell which later became part of the initial API standard. Subsequent developments included a patented multicell design to conduct 4 tests in a press at the same time. Other modifications have been used by various investigators. Recent studies by the Stim-Lab proppant consortium have indicated that the flow field across a Cooke proppant conductivity testing cell may not be uniform as initially believed which resulted is significantly different conductivity results. Post test analysis of low temperature metal alloy injections at the termination of proppant testing prior to the release of the applied stress suggest that higher flow is to be expected along the sides and top of the proppant pack than compared to the middle of the pack. To evaluate these experimental findings, a physics-based two-dimensional (2-D) discrete element model (DEM) was developed and applied to simulate proppant rearrangement during stress loading in the Cooke conductivity cell and the resulting porosity field. Analysis of these simulations are critical to understanding the impact of modification to the testing cell as well as understanding key proppant conductivity issues such as how these effects are manifested in proppant concentration testing results. The 2-D DEM model was constructed to represent a realistic cross section of the Cooke cell with a distribution of four material properties, three that represented the Cooke cell (steel, sandstone,square rings), and one representing the proppant. In principle, Cooke cell materials can be approximated as assemblies of independent discrete elements (particles) of various sizes and material properties that interact via cohesive interactions, repulsive forces, and frictional forces. The macroscopic behavior can then be modeled as the collective behavior of many interacting discrete elements. This DEM model is particularly suitable for modeling proppant mechanical interactions subjected to an applied stress, where the experimental cell is represented as a cohesive body composed of a large number of discrete elements, and proppants can be modeled as the individual discrete particles with various sizes (following the proppant size distribution-density function used in the test) that exhibit no cohesive strength between the particles. Initial 2-D DEM modeling results suggest that proppant rearrangement and non-uniform stress distribution across the proppant pack results in significant non-uniform porosity distribution across the Cooke cell. Larger porosities develop along the edge of the proppant pack beneath the square ring seal and would result in a disproportionate higher flow field along these edges as compared to the middle of the proppant pack. These results suggest that reported conductivity values determined by the Cooke cell may be biased to overestimate the actual conductivity of the proppant at high stresses and that modifications to the standard Cooke cell will affect the magnitude of this bias.

  18. Atomistic simulation and continuum modeling of graphene nanoribbons under uniaxial tension This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui

    for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;IOP PUBLISHING MODELLING determination of the bulk strain energy density, the edge energy density and the hydrogen adsorption energy. These functions can be used to describe mechanical behavior of graphene nanoribbons from the initial linear

  19. A model of the lateral line of fish for vortex sensing This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    field around a fish's body in the presence of a Karman vortex street. Karman and reverse Karman streets LLTC model could explain how a fish identifies the characteristics of a Karman vortex street shed that the main characteristics of a vortex street including the magnitude of vortices, their translational speed

  20. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a bb pair in events with two oppositely-charged leptons using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45/fb. In events consistent with the decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-quark pair and the Z boson to electron or muon pairs, we set 95% credibility level upper limits on the ZH production cross section times the H -> bb branching ratio as a function of Higgs boson mass. At a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c^2 we observe (expect) a limit of 7.1 (3.9) times the standard model value.

  1. Full Screen Prerequisites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash, J. Marshall

    that is punishable under the Academic Integrity Policy could result in additional disciplinary actions by other university officials and possible civil or criminal prosecution. To review the complete Academic Integrity privately to discuss their specific needs. All discussions will remain confidential. To ensure that you

  2. Energetic neutral atom imaging with the Polar CEPPAD/IPS instrument: Initial forward modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Moore, K.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Spence, H.E.; Jorgensen, A.M. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Space Physics; Fennell, J.F.; Blake, J.B. [Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Roelof, E.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the primary function of the CEP-PAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current, detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper, the authors present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies.

  3. A Comparison of Shell Model Results for Some properties of the Even-Even Ge Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Q. Robinson; L. Zamick; Y. Y. Sharon

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we examine two recent effective shell model interactions, JUN45 and JJ4B, that have been proposed for use in the $f_{5/2},p_{3/2}, p_{1/2}, g_{9/2}$ model space for both protons and neutrons. We calculate a number of quantities that did not enter into the fits undertaken to fix the parameters of both interactions. In particular we consider static quadrupole moments (Q's) of excited states of the even-even $^{70-76}$Ge isotopes, as well as the B(E2) values in these nuclei. (We have previously studied $^{70}$Zn isotopes using JJ4B.) Some striking disagreements between the JUN45 prediction and the experimental results had already been noted for the quadrupole moments of the $2_1^+$ states of these nuclei. We investigate whether these discrepancies also occur for the JJ4B interaction. Subsequently, we also apply both interactions to calculate the Q's of some more highly excited states and compare the two sets of predictions regarding the nature of the nuclear states under consideration. In order to gain insight into these more complex large-scale shell-model calculations, we examine the corresponding and much simpler single-j shell model calculations in the $g_{9/2}$ neutron shell.

  4. The solar photospheric abundance of europium. Results from CO5BOLD 3-D hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mucciarelli; E. Caffau; B. Freytag; H. -G. Ludwig; P. Bonifacio

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Europium is an almost pure r-process element, which may be useful as a reference in nucleocosmochronology. Aims. To determine the photospheric solar abundance using CO5BOLD 3-D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. Methods. Disc-centre and integrated-flux observed solar spectra are used. The europium abundance is derived from the equivalent width measurements. As a reference 1D model atmospheres have been used, in addition. Results. The europium photospheric solar abundance is 0.52 +- 0.02 in agreement with previous determinations. We also determine the photospheric isotopic fraction of Eu(151) to be 49 % +- 2.3 % from the intensity spectra and 50% +-2.3 from the flux spectra. This compares well to the the meteoritic isotopic fraction 47.8%. We explore the 3D corrections also for dwarfs and sub-giants in the temperature range ~5000 K to ~6500 K and solar and 1/10--solar metallicities and find them to be negligible for all the models investigated. Conclusions. Our photospheric Eu abundance is in good agreement with previous determinations based on 1D models. This is in line with our conclusion that 3D effects for this element are negligible in the case of the Sun.

  5. AUTOMATED FULL-SYSTEM POWER CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eeckhout, Lieven

    FULL-SYSTEM POWER CHARACTERIZATION WITH DESIRED POWER CHARACTERISTICS ON MULTICORE SERVER PLATFORMS. THE FRAMEWORK CONSTRUCTS FULL-SYSTEM POWER MODELS WITH ERROR BOUNDS ON THE POWER ESTIMATES AND GUIDES THE DESIGN OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT AND COST

  6. Modelling Viscoelastic Behaviour of Polymer by A Mixed Velocity, Displacement Formulation - Numerical and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, VT.; Silva, L.; Digonnet, H.; Combeaud, C.; Billon, N.; Coupez, T. [Centre for Material Forming (CEMEF), MINES ParisTech, Rue Claude Daunesse, Sophia Antipolis cedex (France)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to model the viscoelastic behaviour of polymer from the solid state to the liquid state. With this objective, we perform experimental tensile tests and compare with simulation results. The chosen polymer is a PMMA whose behaviour depends on its temperature. The computation simulation is based on Navier-Stokes equations where we propose a mixed finite element method with an interpolation P1+/P1 using displacement (or velocity) and pressure as principal variables. The implemented technique uses a mesh composed of triangles (2D) or tetrahedra (3D). The goal of this approach is to model the viscoelastic behaviour of polymers through a fluid-structure coupling technique with a multiphase approach.

  7. Ice cloud single-scattering property models with the full phase matrix at wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 mm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    W. Dayton Street, Madison, WI 53706, United States b Texas A&M University, College Station, TX February 2014 Available online 11 March 2014 Keywords: Ice clouds Light scattering Remote sensing Radiative agreement between solar and infrared optical thicknesses. Finally, spectral results are presented

  8. Geomagnetic effects modelling for the PJM interconnection system. Part 2; Geomagnetically induced current study results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhakara, F.S.; Hannett, L.N.; Ringlee, R.J. (Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)); Ponder, J.Z. (PJM Interconnection, Norristown, PA (US))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a computer program for calculation of geomagnetically induced current (GIC) and a GIC power system model for the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection is described in this paper. Results of GIC for three different ionospheric source configurations are shown. A new method is presented for estimating GIC in unmetered parts of the system based on a few measurements and precalculated geomagnetic disturbance conditions. The use of an interactive, menu driven GIC program to study mitigation concepts including the effects of line outages, line series capacitors, transformer neutral blocking resistors and transformer neutral blocking capacitors is also presented.

  9. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C.; Ghan, S.J.; Walton, J.J.; Weissman, P.R.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of ''nuclear winter; '' GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of ''asteroid/comet winter,'' however, are more severe than in ''nuclear winter'' because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects -- which would occur much more frequently than the Cretaceous/Tertiary event deduced by Alvarez and coworkers -- could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a ''patchy'' sense. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The solar photospheric abundance of europium. Results from CO5BOLD 3-D hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucciarelli, A; Freytag, B; Ludwig, H -G; Bonifacio, P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Europium is an almost pure r-process element, which may be useful as a reference in nucleocosmochronology. Aims. To determine the photospheric solar abundance using CO5BOLD 3-D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. Methods. Disc-centre and integrated-flux observed solar spectra are used. The europium abundance is derived from the equivalent width measurements. As a reference 1D model atmospheres have been used, in addition. Results. The europium photospheric solar abundance is 0.52 +- 0.02 in agreement with previous determinations. We also determine the photospheric isotopic fraction of Eu(151) to be 49 % +- 2.3 % from the intensity spectra and 50% +-2.3 from the flux spectra. This compares well to the the meteoritic isotopic fraction 47.8%. We explore the 3D corrections also for dwarfs and sub-giants in the temperature range ~5000 K to ~6500 K and solar and 1/10--solar metallicities and find them to be negligible for all the models investigated. Conclusions. Our photospheric Eu abundance is in good agre...

  11. Hawaii Solar Integration Study: Solar Modeling Developments and Study Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orwig, K.; Corbus, D.; Piwko, R.; Schuerger, M.; Matsuura, M.; Roose, L.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawaii Solar Integration Study (HSIS) is a follow-up to the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study completed in 2010. HSIS focuses on the impacts of higher penetrations of solar energy on the electrical grid and on other generation. HSIS goes beyond the island of Oahu and investigates Maui as well. The study examines reserve strategies, impacts on thermal unit commitment and dispatch, utilization of energy storage, renewable energy curtailment, and other aspects of grid reliability and operation. For the study, high-frequency (2-second) solar power profiles were generated using a new combined Numerical Weather Prediction model/ stochastic-kinematic cloud model approach, which represents the 'sharp-edge' effects of clouds passing over solar facilities. As part of the validation process, the solar data was evaluated using a variety of analysis techniques including wavelets, power spectral densities, ramp distributions, extreme values, and cross correlations. This paper provides an overview of the study objectives, results of the solar profile validation, and study results.

  12. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to a bb? Pair in Events with No Charged Leptons and Large Missing Transverse Energy using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We report on a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a vector boson in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, ...

  13. Using Pre-Modeled Scenarios to Estimate Groundwater VOC Concentrations Resulting from Vadose Zone Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Rice, Amy K.; Johnson, Christian D.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Becker, Dave; Simon, Michelle A.

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a prevalent remediation approach for volatile contaminants in the vadose zone. To support selection of an appropriate endpoint for the SVE remedy, an evaluation is needed to determine whether vadose zone contamination has been diminished sufficiently to protect groundwater. When vapor-phase transport is an important component of the overall contaminant fate and transport from a vadose zone source, the contaminant concentration expected in groundwater is controlled by a limited set of parameters, including specific site dimensions, vadose zone properties, and source characteristics. An approach was developed for estimating the contaminant concentration in groundwater resulting from a contaminant source in the vadose zone based on pre-modeling contaminant transport for a matrix of parameter value combinations covering a range of potential site conditions. An interpolation and scaling process are then applied to estimate groundwater impact for site-specific conditions.

  14. The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

  15. Ab Initio No Core Shell Model - Recent Results and Further Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. Vary; Pieter Maris; Hugh Potter; Mark A. Caprio; Robin Smith; Sven Binder; Angelo Calci; Sebastian Fischer; Joachim Langhammer; Robert Roth; Hasan Metin Aktulga; Esmond Ng; Chao Yang; Dossay Oryspayev; Masha Sosonkina; Erik Saule; Ümit Çatalyürek

    2015-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been significant recent progress in solving the long-standing problems of how nuclear shell structure and collective motion emerge from underlying microscopic inter-nucleon interactions. We review a selection of recent significant results within the ab initio No Core Shell Model (NCSM) closely tied to three major factors enabling this progress: (1) improved nuclear interactions that accurately describe the experimental two-nucleon and three-nucleon interaction data; (2) advances in algorithms to simulate the quantum many-body problem with strong interactions; and (3) continued rapid development of high-performance computers now capable of performing $20 \\times 10^{15}$ floating point operations per second. We also comment on prospects for further developments.

  16. Exact results for the criticality of quench dynamics in quantum Ising models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying Li; M. X. Huo; Z. Song

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the obtained exact results we systematically study the quench dynamics of a one-dimensional spin-1/2 transverse field Ising model with zero- and finite-temperature initial states. We focus on the magnetization of the system after a sudden change of the external field and a coherent time-evolution process. With a zero-temperature initial state, the quench magnetic susceptibility as a function of the initial field strength exhibits strongly similar scaling behaviors to those of the static magnetic susceptibility, and the quench magnetic susceptibility as a function of the final field strength shows a discontinuity at the quantum critical point. This discontinuity remains robust and always occurs at the quantum critical point even for the case of finite-temperature initial systems, which indicates a great advantage of employing quench dynamics to study quantum phase transitions.

  17. The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model : revisions, sensitivities, and comparisons of results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Reilly, John M.; Mayer, Monika.; Eckaus, Richard S.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Hyman, Robert C.

    The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is a component of the MIT Integrated Earth Systems Model (IGSM). Here, we provide an overview of the model accessible to a broad audience and present the detailed ...

  18. Habitability of the Goldilocks Planet Gliese 581g: Results from Geodynamic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Bloh, W; Franck, S; Bounama, C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: In 2010, detailed observations have been published that seem to indicate another super-Earth planet in the system of Gliese 581 located in the midst of the stellar climatological habitable zone. The mass of the planet, known as Gl 581g, has been estimated as between 3.1 and 4.3 Earth masses. In this study, we investigate the habitability of Gl 581g based on a previously used concept that explores its long-term possibility of photosynthetic biomass production, which has already been used to gauge the principal possibility of life regarding the super-Earths Gl 581c and Gl 581d. Methods: A thermal evolution model for super-Earths is used to calculate the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The habitable zone is determined by the limits of photosynthetic biological productivity on the planetary surface. Models with different ratios of land / ocean coverage are pursued. Results: The maximum time span for habitable conditions is attained for water worlds at a position of about 0.14+/-0.015 AU, wh...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic flow model Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    same fashion in symmetry planes of more complicated anisotropic models... in anisotropic media and studied the error of conventional DMO for transversely isotropic models. He...

  20. Mist/steam cooling in a heated horizontal tube -- Part 2: Results and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, T.; Wang, T.; Gaddis, J.L.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies on mist/steam cooling in a heated horizontal tube have been performed. Wall temperature distributions have been measured under various main steam flow rates, droplet mass ratios, and wall heat fluxes. Generally, the heat transfer performance of steam can be significantly improved by adding mist into the main flow. An average enhancement of 100% with the highest local heat transfer enhancement of 200% is achieved with 5% mist. When the test section is mildly heated, an interesting wall temperature distribution is observed: the wall temperature increases first, then decreases, and finally increases again. A three-stage heat transfer model with transition boiling, unstable liquid fragment evaporation, and dry-wall mist cooling has been proposed and has shown some success in predicting the wall temperature of the mist/steam flow. The PDPA measurements have facilitated better understanding and interpreting of the droplet dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, this study has shed light on how to generate appropriate droplet sizes to achieve effective droplet transportation, and has shown that it is promising to extend present results to a higher temperature and higher pressure environment.

  1. Model for Correlating Real-Time Survey Results to Contaminant Concentrations - 12183

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Stuart A. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. 20460 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program is developing a new Counts Per Minute (CPM) calculator to correlate real-time survey results, which are often expressed as counts per minute, to contaminant concentrations that are more typically provided in risk assessments or for cleanup levels, usually expressed in pCi/g or pCi/m{sup 2}. Currently there is no EPA guidance for Superfund sites on correlating count per minute field survey readings back to risk, dose, or other ARAR based concentrations. The CPM calculator is a web-based model that estimates a gamma detector response for a given level of contamination. The intent of the CPM calculator is to facilitate more real-time measurements within a Superfund response framework. The draft of the CPM calculator is still undergoing internal EPA review. This will be followed by external peer review. It is expected that the CPM calculator will at least be in peer review by the time of WM2012 and possibly finalized at that time. The CPM calculator should facilitate greater use of real-time measurement at Superfund sites. The CPM calculator may also standardize the process of converting lab data to real time measurements. It will thus lessen the amount of lab sampling that is needed for site characterization and confirmation surveys, but it will not remove the need for sampling. (authors)

  2. Modelling the molecular Zeeman effect in M-dwarfs: methods and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shulyak, D; Wende, S; Kochukhov, O; Piskunov, N; Seifahrt, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first quantitative results of the surface magnetic field measurements in selected M-dwarfs based on detailed spectra synthesis conducted simultaneously in atomic and molecular lines of the FeH Wing-Ford $F^4\\,\\Delta-X^4\\,\\Delta$ transitions. A modified version of the Molecular Zeeman Library (MZL) was used to compute Land\\'e g-factors for FeH lines in different Hund's cases. Magnetic spectra synthesis was performed with the Synmast code. We show that the implementation of different Hund's case for FeH states depending on their quantum numbers allows us to achieve a good fit to the majority of lines in a sunspot spectrum in an automatic regime. Strong magnetic fields are confirmed via the modelling of atomic and FeH lines for three M-dwarfs YZ~CMi, EV~Lac, and AD~Leo, but their mean intensities are found to be systematically lower than previously reported. A much weaker field ($1.7-2$~kG against $2.7$~kG) is required to fit FeH lines in the spectra of GJ~1224. Our method allows us to measure average...

  3. (1) Likelihood mode of inference: definitions and results (i) Reference population and model.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frangakis, Constantine

    linear regression model with non additive effect. pr" ` "! CU# ` sr)¤ P u X }|e5 ~ ra 5 ¤ A B pr models. (1) Normal linear regression model with additive effect. pr"a`"! sU# ` sr)¤ P u X }| 5~ rf 5

  4. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G. J.

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

  5. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, B.

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: ??, bb, ?? , WW, and ZZ. The explored Higgs boson mass range is ...

  6. Conclusions The results show that the models are able to predict the response of the FETi motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Conclusions The results show that the models are able to predict the response of the FETi motor just one animal might over-fit the noise of that particular animal. However, a model designed strand transmit the movement to the sensory neurons in the FeCO, which excite the motor neurons. Design

  7. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011).pdf. ———. 2012a. “Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2012. ”2013. “Annual Energy Outlook - Model Documentation. ”forecast, the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (DOE EIA 2012a).

  8. Test Results and Modeling of the Honda Insight Using ADVISOR: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, K. J.; Zolot, M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Glinsky, G.; Hieronymus, A. (Environmental Testing Corporation)

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper describing a series of chassis dynamometer and road tests that NREL conducted on the 2000 model-year Honda Insight.

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis model gsam Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Materials Science, Rice University Collection: Engineering 2 2010 Advocate Health Care. All Rights Reserved. Table of Contents Summary: and have launched a redesigned model...

  10. Random sequential adsorption model of damage and crack accumulation: Exact one-dimensional results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Gromenko; V. Privman; M. L. Glasser

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The random sequential adsorption (RSA) model is modified to describe damage and crack accumulation. The exclusion for object deposition (for damaged region formation) is not for the whole object, as in the standard RSA, but only for the initial point (or higher-dimensional defect) from which the damaged region or crack initiates. The one-dimensional variant of the model is solved exactly.

  11. Controls on advance of tidewater glaciers: results from numerical modeling applied to Columbia Glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick, F. M.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Oerlemans, J.

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional numerical ice flow model is used to study the advance of a tidewater glacier into deep water. Starting with ice-free conditions, the model simulates glacier growth at higher elevations followed by advance on land to the head...

  12. MECHANICAL TEST RESULTS ON DIPOLE MODEL C-l 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P~. FI'9 . ~ C.C rv'IW\\ 707~-Th ALUMINUM ' ~LAI2.. o Pl.ATTDIPOLE MODEL C-1 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS C. Peters FebruaryON DIPOLE MODEL C-I 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS· Craig Peters

  13. What is the effect of LiDAR-derived DEM resolution on large-scale watershed model results?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Yang; Daniel B. Ames; Andre Fonseca; Danny Anderson; Rupesh Shrestha; Nancy F. Glenn; Yang Cao

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the effect of raster cell size on hydrographic feature extraction and hydrological modeling using LiDAR derived DEMs. LiDAR datasets for three experimental watersheds were converted to DEMs at various cell sizes. Watershed boundaries and stream networks were delineated from each DEM and were compared to reference data. Hydrological simulations were conducted and the outputs were compared. Smaller cell size DEMs consistently resulted in less difference between DEM-delineated features and reference data. However, minor differences been found between streamflow simulations resulted for a lumped watershed model run at daily simulations aggregated at an annual average. These findings indicate that while higher resolution DEM grids may result in more accurate representation of terrain characteristics, such variations do not necessarily improve watershed scale simulation modeling. Hence the additional expense of generating high resolution DEM's for the purpose of watershed modeling at daily or longer time steps may not be warranted.

  14. Impact of hydrological variations on modeling of peatland CO2 fluxes: Results from the North American Carbon Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    in ecosystem models due to differences in nutrients, peat properties, and plant communities. Citation: Sulman cycle due to large carbon pools resulting from the long-term accumulation of organic matter in peat of the water table exposes peat soils to oxygen, resulting in higher rates of ecosystem respiration (ER

  15. Diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: 2. Modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panday, Arnico K.

    After completing a 9-month field experiment studying air pollution and meteorology in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, we set up the mesoscale meteorological model MM5 to simulate the Kathmandu Valley's meteorology with a ...

  16. Improved Building Energy Performance Modelling through Comparison of Measured Data with Simulated Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bambrook, S.; Jacob, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ICE for the same building. The dataset collected at the demonstration building consists of total energy consumption, weather data, indoor conditions and HVAC system parameters, measured in at least hourly time steps. This paper presents the first steps in modelling...

  17. RHF RELAP5 Model and Preliminary Loss-Of-Offsite-Power Simulation Results for LEU Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Dionne, B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Thomas, F. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (Switzerland). RHF Reactor Dept.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the RELAP5 model for the Institut Laue-Langevin High Flux Reactor (RHF) located in Grenoble, France, and provide an update to the key information required to complete, for example, simulations for a loss of offsite power (LOOP) accident. A previous status report identified a list of 22 items to be resolved in order to complete the RELAP5 model. Most of these items have been resolved by ANL and the RHF team. Enough information was available to perform preliminary safety analyses and define the key items that are still required. Section 2 of this document describes the RELAP5 model of RHF. The final part of this section briefly summarizes previous model issues and resolutions. Section 3 of this document describes preliminary LOOP simulations for both HEU and LEU fuel at beginning of cycle conditions.

  18. Improved Building Energy Performance Modelling through Comparison of Measured Data with Simulated Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bambrook, S.; Jacob, D.

    -ICE for the same building. The dataset collected at the demonstration building consists of total energy consumption, weather data, indoor conditions and HVAC system parameters, measured in at least hourly time steps. This paper presents the first steps in modelling...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol generator model Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S N E E T A L . 2002 American Meteorological Society Summary: by no more than 10% of the cooling caused by aerosols. 1. Introduction Observations and models highlight......

  20. Headcut retreat resulting from plunge pool erosion in a 3D landscape evolution model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Headcut retreat produced by plunge pools is represented using existing concepts about this type of erosion. The model estimates retreat rates, given flow, height of the headcut, upstream slope and Manning's roughness, and ...

  1. Performance of VAV Fan Powered Terminal Units: Experimental Results and Models for Parallel Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furr, J.; O'Neal, D.; Davis, M.; Bryant, J.; Cramlet, A.

    ©2008 ASHRAE 83 ABSTRACT Empirical models of airflow output, power consumption, and primary airflow were developed for parallel fan powered variable air volume terminal units at typical operating pres- sures. Both 8 in. (203 mm) and 12 in. (304 mm...) primary air inlet terminal units from three manufacturers were evaluated. Generalized models were developed from the experimental data with coefficients varying by size and manufacturer. Fan power and airflow data were collected at down- stream static...

  2. Increase of Carbon Cycle Feedback with Climate Sensitivity: Results from a coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Caldeira, K; Delire, C

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in larger warming. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year-2100 global warming in the range of 0 K to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO{sub 2} content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 scenario are used. We use a fully-coupled climate and carbon cycle model, the INtegrated Climate and CArbon model (INCCA) the NCAR/DOE Parallel Coupled Model coupled to the IBIS terrestrial biosphere model and a modified-OCMIP ocean biogeochemistry model. In our model, for scenarios with year-2100 global warming increasing from 0 to 8 K, land uptake decreases from 47% to 29% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. Due to competing effects, ocean uptake (16%) shows almost no change at all. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increases were 48% higher in the run with 8 K global climate warming than in the case with no warming. Our results indicate that carbon cycle amplification of climate warming will be greater if there is higher climate sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; the carbon cycle feedback factor increases from 1.13 to 1.48 when global warming increases from 3.2 to 8 K.

  3. Performance of VAV Fan Powered Terminal Units: Experimental Results and Models for Series Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furr, J.; O'Neal, D.; Davis, M.; Bryant, J.; Cramlet, A.

    ©2008 ASHRAE 91 ABSTRACT Empirical models of airflow output and power consump- tion were developed for series fan powered variable air volume terminal units at typical operating pressures. Terminal units with 8 in. (203 mm) and 12 in. (304 mm... pressures of 0.25 w.g. (63 Pa). Upstream static pressures ranged from 0.1 to 2.0 in w.g. (25 to 498 Pa). Data were collected at four different primary air damper positions and at four terminal unit fan speeds. Model variables included the RMS voltage...

  4. Critical assessment of the first results of the EFOM 12C model. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thonet, C.; Van der Voort, E.; Love, P.; Jadot, P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFOM 12C is intended to model the development and utilization of energy in the European Community for the next forty years. While the actual outcome of energy utilization is totally dependent on human decisions, it was considered to be valuable to model energy development, demand, and utilization for five scenarios. They were:- (a) 'reference case' in which overall costs were minimized, (b) 'mining case' in which imports were minimized, (c) 'decay' where the costs of production were minimized but with no other constraints, (d) 'autonomous case' with import costs limited within an overall cost constraint, and (e) 'dependency case' in which the investment costs were minimized within an overall cost constraint.

  5. Preliminary results of a dynamic system model for a closed-loop Brayton cycle coupled to a nuclear reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Steven Alan

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes preliminary results of a dynamic system model for a closed-loop Brayton-cycle that is coupled to a nuclear reactor. The current model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle, however only minor additions are required to couple the Brayton-cycle through a heat exchanger to either a heat pipe reactor or a liquid metal cooled reactor. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. Sandia National Laboratories has developed steady-state and dynamic models for closed-loop turbo-compressor systems (for space and terrestrial applications). These models are expected to provide a basic understanding of the dynamic behavior and stability of the coupled reactor and power generation loop. The model described in this paper is a lumped parameter model of the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, radiator/waste-heat-rejection system and generator. More detailed models that remove the lumped parameter simplifications are also being developed but are not presented here. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system and its ability to load-follow. However, the model also indicates some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This behavior will require the use of a reactor control system to select an appropriate reactor operating temperature that will optimize the performance of the complete spacecraft system. We expect this model and subsequent versions of it to provide crucial information in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes. Ultimately, Sandia hopes to validate these models and to perform nuclear ground tests of reactor-driven closed Brayton-cycle systems in our nuclear research facilities.

  6. Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

  7. Late breaking results: ARPipes: Aligning Virtual models to their Physical Counterparts with Spatial Augmented Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bruce

    models to their physical representation. ARPipes provides both a visual overlay of physical plant. The paper describes the process of employing original CAD data of plant equipment and transforming the data with maintenance tasks in fabrication plants. This paper presents the first step in the AR process, the visual

  8. A Multi-FhJid CFD Turbulent Entrainment Combustion Model: Formulation and One-Dimensional Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and physical processes that occur during combustion. Short time scales and extremes in temperature and pressure chamber and to predict conditions at the time of spark [1,2]. However, only in the last several years has controlled PREPRINT 1997 SAE Fall Fuels and Lubricants Meeting #12;models of Magnuussen [

  9. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

  10. Carbon pools in Mediterranean forests: comparing eddy covariance and GOTILWA+ model results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gracia, Carlos

    , FLUXNET, Modelling, drought-stress, Mediterranean climate Introduction Changes in regional and global of climate change, where it becomes essential to have an understanding of the future role of terrestrial climate have already been observed, and projections of climate change suggest that higher temperatures

  11. ISO-SWS calibration and the accurate modelling of cool-star atmospheres - II. General results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Decin; B. Vandenbussche; C. Waelkens; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; B. Plez; A. J. Sauval; K. Hinkle

    2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The fine calibration of the ISO-SWS detectors (Infrared Space Observatory - Short Wavelength Spectrometer) has proven to be a delicate problem. We therefore present a detailed spectroscopic study in the 2.38 -- 12 micron wavelength range of a sample of 16 A0 -- M2 stars used for the calibration of ISO-SWS. By investigating the discrepancies between the ISO-SWS data of these sources, the theoretical predictions of their spectra, the high-resolution FTS-KP (Kitt Peak) spectrum of Alpha Boo and the solar FTS-ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) spectrum, both calibration problems and problems in computing the theoretical models and the synthetic spectra are revealed. The underlying reasons for these problems are sought for and the impact on the further calibration of ISO-SWS and on the theoretical modelling is discussed extensively.

  12. Atmospheric Modelling for Neptune's Methane D/H Ratio - Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotton, Daniel V; Bott, Kimberly; Bailey, Jeremy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H ratio) of Solar System bodies is an important clue to their formation histories. Here we fit a Neptunian atmospheric model to Gemini Near Infrared Spectrograph (GNIRS) high spectral resolution observations and determine the D/H ratio in methane absorption in the infrared H-band ($\\sim$ 1.6 {\\mu}m). The model was derived using our radiative transfer software VSTAR (Versatile Software for the Transfer of Atmospheric Radiation) and atmospheric fitting software ATMOF (ATMOspheric Fitting). The methane line list used for this work has only become available in the last few years, enabling a refinement of earlier estimates. We identify a bright region on the planetary disc and find it to correspond to an optically thick lower cloud. Our preliminary determination of CH$_{\\rm 3}$D/CH$_{\\rm 4}$ is 3.0$\\times10^{-4}$, which is in line with the recent determination of Irwin et al. (2014) of 3.0$^{+1.0}_{-0.9}\\sim\\times10^{-4}$, made using the same model parameters and line list but...

  13. Exact theory and numeric results for short pulse ionization of simple model atom in one dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rokhlenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our exact theory for continuous harmonic perturbation of a one dimensional model atom by parametric variations of its potential is generalized for the cases when a) the atom is exposed to short pulses of an external harmonic electric field and b) the forcing is represented by short bursts of different shape changing the strength of the binding potential. This work is motivated not only by the wide use of laser pulses for atomic ionization, but also by our earlier study of the same model which successfully described the ionization dynamics in all orders, i.e. the multi-photon processes, though being treated by the non-relativistic Schr\\"odinger equation. In particular, it was shown that the bound atom cannot survive the excitation of its potential caused by any non-zero frequency and amplitude of the continuous harmonic forcing. Our present analysis found important laws of the atomic ionization by short pulses, in particular the efficiency of ionizing this model system and presumably real ones as well.

  14. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM2: Experimental Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zandofpoint motional%^6 AnnualReference Model

  16. Initial Simulation Results of Storm-Time Ring Current in a Self-Consistent Magnetic Field Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Larry

    , and electrons. The ring current is greatly intensified during geomagnetic storms, and produces large measurement of the magnetic disturbances from all magnetospheric currents on the surface of the EarthInitial Simulation Results of Storm-Time Ring Current in a Self-Consistent Magnetic Field Model S

  17. Considerable ModelData Mismatch in Temperature over China during the Mid-Holocene: Results of PMIP Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solar radiation at the top of the at- mosphere over China during the mid-Holocene. TemperatureConsiderable Model­Data Mismatch in Temperature over China during the Mid-Holocene: Results of PMIP Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China XIANMEI LANG International Center for Climate

  18. Vista at CDF: Results of a model-independent search for new physics in 927 pb**-1 at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudalakis, Georgios; /MIT, LNS

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A global, model-independent search for high-pT exotic phenomena is presented using 927 pb{sup -1} of CDF II data. The search algorithms employed in this analysis are Vista and Sleuth. These proceedings focus on Vista, including a description of the method and a summary of results.

  19. Predictive Modelling of Toxicity Resulting from Radiotherapy Treatments of Head and Neck Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Jamie A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, the radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa (mucosal lining of the throat) is thought to be a major contributing factor to dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction), the most commonly reported severe toxicity. There is a variation in the severity of dysphagia experienced by patients. Understanding the role of the dose distribution in dysphagia would allow improvements in the radiotherapy technique to be explored. The 3D dose distributions delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa of 249 patients treated as part of clinical trials were reconstructed. Pydicom was used to extract DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) data (the standard file formats for medical imaging and radiotherapy data). NumPy and SciPy were used to manipulate the data to generate 3D maps of the dose distribution delivered to the pharyngeal mucosa and calculate metrics describing the dose distribution. Multivariate predictive modelling of severe dysphagia, including descriptions of the d...

  20. Process of Integrating Screening and Detailed Risk-based Modeling Analyses to Ensure Consistent and Scientifically Defensible Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, John W.; McDonald, John P.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support cleanup and closure of these tanks, modeling is performed to understand and predict potential impacts to human health and the environment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a screening tool for the United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection that estimates the long-term human health risk, from a strategic planning perspective, posed by potential tank releases to the environment. This tool is being conditioned to more detailed model analyses to ensure consistency between studies and to provide scientific defensibility. Once the conditioning is complete, the system will be used to screen alternative cleanup and closure strategies. The integration of screening and detailed models provides consistent analyses, efficiencies in resources, and positive feedback between the various modeling groups. This approach of conditioning a screening methodology to more detailed analyses provides decision-makers with timely and defensible information and increases confidence in the results on the part of clients, regulators, and stakeholders.

  1. Evaluation of Model Results and Measured Performance of Net-Zero Energy Homes in Hawaii: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Kiatreungwattana, K.; Kelly, K. J.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kaupuni community consists of 19 affordable net-zero energy homes that were built within the Waianae Valley of Oahu, Hawaii in 2011. The project was developed for the native Hawaiian community led by the Department of Hawaiian Homelands. This paper presents a comparison of the modeled and measured energy performance of the homes. Over the first year of occupancy, the community as a whole performed within 1% of the net-zero energy goals. The data show a range of performance from house to house with the majority of the homes consistently near or exceeding net-zero, while a few fall short of the predicted net-zero energy performance. The impact of building floor plan, weather, and cooling set point on this comparison is discussed. The project demonstrates the value of using building energy simulations as a tool to assist the project to achieve energy performance goals. Lessons learned from the energy performance monitoring has had immediate benefits in providing feedback to the homeowners, and will be used to influence future energy efficient designs in Hawaii and other tropical climates.

  2. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early exposure results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKay, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the early health effects associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 34 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: number of early fatalities, number of cases of prodromal vomiting, population dose within 10 mi of the reactor, population dose within 1000 mi of the reactor, individual early fatality probability within 1 mi of the reactor, and maximum early fatality distance. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: scaling factor for horizontal dispersion, dry deposition velocity, inhalation protection factor for nonevacuees, groundshine shielding factor for nonevacuees, early fatality hazard function alpha value for bone marrow exposure, and scaling factor for vertical dispersion.

  3. NIF Periscope Wall Modal Study Comparison of Results for 2 FEA Models with 2 Modal Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eli, M W; Gerhard, M A; Lee, C L; Sommer, S C; Woehrle, T G

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes experimentally and numerically determined modal properties for one of the reinforced concrete end walls of the NIF Periscope Support Structure in Laser Bay 1. Two methods were used to determine these modal properties: (1) Computational finite-element analyses (modal extraction process); and (2) Experimental modal analysis based on measured test data. This report also includes experimentally determined modal properties for a prototype LM3/Polarizer line-replaceable unit (LRU) and a prototype PEPC LRU. Two important parameters, used during the design phase, are validated through testing [ref 1]. These parameters are the natural frequencies and modal damping (of the system in question) for the first several global modes of vibration. Experimental modal testing provides these modal values, along with the corresponding mode shapes. Another important parameter, the input excitation (expected during normal operation of the NIF laser system) [ref 1], can be verified by performing a series of ambient vibration measurements in the vicinity of the particular system (or subsystem) of interest. The topic of ambient input excitation will be covered in a separate report. Due to the large mass of the Periscope Pedestal, it is difficult to excite the entire series of Periscope Pedestal Walls all at once. It was decided that the experimental modal tests would be performed on just one Periscope End Wall in Laser Bay 1. Experimental modal properties for the Periscope End Wall have been used to validate and update the FE analyses. Results from the analyses and modal tests support the conclusion that the Periscope Pedestal will not exceed the stability budget, which is described in reference 1. The results of the modal tests for the Periscope End Wall in Laser Bay 1 have provided examples of modal properties that can be derived from future modal tests of the entire Periscope Assembly (excluding the LRU's). This next series of larger modal tests can be performed after the support structure for the Periscope Assembly has been completed. There are five optical elements in the Periscope Assembly: PEPC; Polarizer; LM3; LM2; and the Periscope Light Source. All of these optical elements have stability requirements except for the PEPC. During the Title II Design phase, two prototypes of the LM3/Polarizer LRU were used in two different series of modal tests [ref 2,3]. A similar series of modal tests were conducted on a prototype of the PEPC LRU. The results of the modal tests were used to verify the modal properties assumed for use in the corresponding finite-element analyses.

  4. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of food pathway results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the food pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 87 imprecisely-known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, milk growing season dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, area dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, condemnation area, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: fraction of cesium deposition on grain fields that is retained on plant surfaces and transferred directly to grain, maximum allowable ground concentrations of Cs-137 and Sr-90 for production of crops, ground concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137 and I-131 at which the disposal of milk will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, ground concentrations of Cs-134, I-131 and Sr-90 at which the disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, rate of depletion of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the root zone, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, transfer of Cs-137 from soil to pasture, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, and the transfer of cesium, iodine and strontium from animal feed to milk.

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of chronic exposure results with the MACCS reactor accident consequence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the chronic exposure pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 75 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, water ingestion dose, milk growing season dose, long-term groundshine dose, long-term inhalation dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, total latent cancer fatalities, area-dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, population-dependent cost, total economic cost, condemnation area, condemnation population, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: dry deposition velocity, transfer of cesium from animal feed to milk, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, ground concentration of Cs-134 at which the disposal of milk products will be initiated, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, maximum allowable ground concentration of Sr-90 for production of crops, fraction of cesium entering surface water that is consumed in drinking water, groundshine shielding factor, scale factor defining resuspension, dose reduction associated with decontamination, and ground concentration of 1-131 at which disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season.

  6. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deodhar, Ajita [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology and Image-Guided Therapies (United States); Monette, Sebastien [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Laboratory of Comparative Pathology (United States); Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C. [Angiodynamics, Inc (United States); Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology and Image-Guided Therapies (United States)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  7. Drop Test Results for the Combustion Engineering Model No. ABB-2901 Fuel Pellet Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafner, R S; Mok, G C; Hagler, L G

    2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) contracted with the Packaging Review Group (PRG) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct a single, 30-ft shallow-angle drop test on the Combustion Engineering ABB-2901 drum-type shipping package. The purpose of the test was to determine if bolted-ring drum closures could fail during shallow-angle drops. The PRG at LLNL planned the test, and Defense Technologies Engineering Division (DTED) personnel from LLNL's Site-300 Test Group executed the plan. The test was conducted in November 2001 using the drop-tower facility at LLNL's Site 300. Two representatives from Westinghouse Electric Company in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-SC); two USNRC staff members; and three PRG members from LLNL witnessed the preliminary test runs and the final test. The single test clearly demonstrated the vulnerability of the bolted-ring drum closure to shallow-angle drops-the test package's drum closure was easily and totally separated from the drum package. The results of the preliminary test runs and the 30-ft shallow-angle drop test offer valuable qualitative understandings of the shallow-angle impact.

  8. Sunspot umbra atmosphere from full Stokes inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzel, R; Fluri, D M; Arnaud, J; Sainz-Dalda, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sunspots are prominent manifestations of the solar cycle and provide key constraints for understanding its operation. Also, knowing internal structure of sunspots allows us to gain insights on the energy transport in strong magnetic fields and, thus, on the processes inside the convection zone, where solar magnetic fields are generated and amplified before emerging at the surface on various scales, even during solar minima. In this paper, we present results of a spectropolarimetric analysis of a sunspot observed during the declining phase of the solar cycle 23. By inversion of full Stokes spectra observed in several spectral regions in the optical at the THEMIS facility we infer the height dependence of physical quantities such as the temperature and the magnetic field strength for different sunspot regions. The simultaneous use of atomic (Fe{\\sc i} 5250.2 and 5250.6 \\AA) and highly temperature sensitive molecular (TiO 7055 \\AA and MgH 5200 \\AA) lines allow us to improve a model of the sunspot umbra.

  9. High Efficiency Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Application...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Applications High Efficiency Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Applications Large increases in engine thermal efficiency result...

  10. Response of water vapor to interannual variations of SST: Results from NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, De-Zheng [National Center For Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper very briefly documents the response of water vapor to interannual changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in two of the most frequently used climate models: the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM2) and the GFDL spectral model (R30). The corresponding results from radiosonde data are also presented for reference. A simple linear regression model is used to quantify the response of water vapor to changes in SST in the two simulations. Except for the negative response of water vapor over Australia, CCM2 simulates the major characteristics in the horizontal structure of the water vapor response shown in the radiosonde data. The negative response of water over Australia is also not well simulated by GFDL R30. In addition, GFDL R30 significantly underestimates the positive response over the Indian Ocean. The horizontal contrasts between the negative response over the western Pacific and the positive response over the central and eastern Pacific in the model simulations are larger than in the radiosonde data. The negative response in the subtropical region in CCM2 is more pronounced than in R30. Averaged over the tropics, CCM2 has a larger water vapor response in both the boundary layer and the upper troposphere than R30. The correlations between variations of water vapor in the upper troposphere and those at the surface level are also stronger in CCM2 than in R30. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Validation of a blowby model using experimental results in motoring condition with the change of compression ratio and engine speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aghdam, E. Abdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran); Kabir, M.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran); Department of Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Aliabad Katoul Branch, Golestan (Iran)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Blowby and gas flow through the cylinder-piston-ring crevices are phenomena that affect the engine performance and exhaust emissions. Also these phenomena influence the cylinder pressure and temperature and the charge amount during a cycle. The study and validation of a sub-model for these phenomena in the absence of engine combustion deducts all effects arisen from the combustion event. During the current study, blowby sub-model and gas flow through crevices under motoring conditions has been noticed using a volume-orifice theory and the experimental results measured from a research engine. Blowby geometric parameters, consisting of a few critical cross-section areas (orifice areas) and volumes (top land and inter-ring crevice volumes), were measured in ambient temperature and corrected for hot running conditions. The cylinder pressure during cycle was measured by a piezoelectric pressure transducer and the low pressure parts of the cycle were measured using a piezoresistive pressure transducer for referencing purposes. The obtained results show a very good agreement between experimentally measured pressure data and model output for three compression ratios of 7.6, 10.2, 12.4 and three engine speeds of 750, 1500 and 2000 rpm, so that the maximum deviation was almost 5%. The model predicted that the maximum mass loss increased with increase of compression ratio and decreased with increase of engine speed. Also the peak mass loss position happened within the range of 3-9 CA after top dead center. After occurrence of the maximum loss, a reverse flow from the top land crevice into the cylinder was predicted in the model. (author)

  12. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  13. Pattern Alteration: Back Hip Fullness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    these amounts for alterations (Fig. 3). Slash and spread the garment for full buttocks, adding fabric to remove wrinkles and pulls. Note the length and width amounts you need (Fig. 4). Pants Altering the pant back pattern piece only 1. Draw a horizontal line... across the pattern 3 to 5 inches (7.6 cm to 12.7 cm, depending on the pattern size) below the waistline at a right angle to the grainline. 2. Draw a vertical line from the crotch curve to the seamline approximately at the knee (Fig. 5). 3. Beginning...

  14. Benchmark single-differential ionization cross section results for the {ital s}-wave model of electron-hydrogen scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baertschy, M. [Department of Applied Science, University of California--Davis, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Department of Applied Science, University of California--Davis, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Rescigno, T.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Isaacs, W.A.; McCurdy, C.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exterior complex scaling enables one to compute the outgoing wave portion of the wave function for three charged particles without explicitly imposing the asymptotic boundary condition for three-body breakup. This technique is used in connection with a high-order finite difference scheme to provide numerically accurate single-differential ionization cross sections for the Temkin-Poet ({ital s}-wave) model of e-H scattering. These benchmark values are compared with results obtained from several recent close-coupling approaches that employ pseudostates to discretize the ionization continuum, but use a strictly two-body scattering formalism. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. The solar photospheric abundance of hafnium and thorium. Results from CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamic model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisabetta Caffau; L. Sbordone; H. -G. Ludwig; P. Bonifacio; M. Steffen; N. T. Behara

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: The stable element hafnium (Hf) and the radioactive element thorium (Th) were recently suggested as a suitable pair for radioactive dating of stars. The applicability of this elemental pair needs to be established for stellar spectroscopy. Aims: We aim at a spectroscopic determination of the abundance of Hf and Th in the solar photosphere based on a \\cobold 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere. We put this into a wider context by investigating 3D abundance corrections for a set of G- and F-type dwarfs. Method: High-resolution, high signal-to-noise solar spectra were compared to line synthesis calculations performed on a solar CO5BOLD model. For the other atmospheres, we compared synthetic spectra of CO5BOLD 3D and associated 1D models. Results: For Hf we find a photospheric abundance A(Hf)=0.87+-0.04, in good agreement with a previous analysis, based on 1D model atmospheres. The weak Th ii 401.9 nm line constitutes the only Th abundance indicator available in the solar spectrum. It lies in the red wing of an Ni-Fe blend exhibiting a non-negligible convective asymmetry. Accounting for the asymmetry-related additional absorption, we obtain A(Th)=0.09+-0.03, consistent with the meteoritic abundance, and about 0.1 dex lower than obtained in previous photospheric abundance determinations. Conclusions: Only for the second time, to our knowledge, has am non-negligible effect of convective line asymmetries on an abundance derivation been highlighted. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations should be employed to measure Th abundances in dwarfs if similar blending is present, as in the solar case. In contrast, 3D effects on Hf abundances are small in G- to mid F-type dwarfs and sub-giants, and 1D model atmospheres can be conveniently used.

  16. NSTX Disruption Simulations of Detailed Divertor and Passive Plate Models by Vector Potential Transfer from OPERA Global Analysis Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. H. Titus, S. Avasaralla, A.Brooks, R. Hatcher

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) project is planning upgrades to the toroidal field, plasma current and pulse length. This involves the replacement of the center-stack, including the inner legs of the TF, OH, and inner PF coils. A second neutral beam will also be added. The increased performance of the upgrade requires qualification of the remaining components including the vessel, passive plates, and divertor for higher disruption loads. The hardware needing qualification is more complex than is typically accessible by large scale electromagnetic (EM) simulations of the plasma disruptions. The usual method is to include simplified representations of components in the large EM models and attempt to extract forces to apply to more detailed models. This paper describes a more efficient approach of combining comprehensive modeling of the plasma and tokamak conducting structures, using the 2D OPERA code, with much more detailed treatment of individual components using ANSYS electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical analysis. This capture local eddy currents and resulting loads in complex details, and allows efficient non-linear, and dynamic structural analyses.

  17. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Modifications of models resulting from recent reports on health effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrahamson, S. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)); Bender, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Gilbert, E.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The most recent health effects models resulting from these efforts were published in two reports, NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990) and Part 2 (1989). Several major health effects reports have been published recently that may impact the health effects models presented in these reports. This addendum to the Part 2 (1989) report, provides a review of the 1986 and 1988 reports by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council BEAR 5 Committee report and Publication 60 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection as they relate to this report. The three main sections of this addendum discuss early occurring and continuing effects, late somatic effects, and genetic effects. The major changes to the NUREG/CR-4214 health effects models recommended in this addendum are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies like that on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. The results presented in this addendum should be used with the basic NUREG/CR-4214 reports listed above to obtain the most recent views on the potential health effects of radionuclides released accidentally from nuclear power plants. 48 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  18. Full Jet Reconstruction in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevil Salur

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Full jet reconstruction has traditionally been thought to be difficult in heavy ion events due to large multiplicity backgrounds. The search for new physics in high luminosity p+p collisions at the LHC similarly requires the precise measurement of jets over large backgrounds caused by pile up; this has motivated the development of a new generation of jet reconstruction algorithms which are also applicable in the heavy ion environment. We review the latest results on jet-medium interactions as seen in A+A collisions at RHIC, focusing on the new techniques for full jet reconstruction.

  19. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

  20. Atomic Level Green-Kubo Stress Correlation Function for a Model Crystal: An Insight into Molecular Dynamics Results on a Model Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Levashov

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to get insight into the connection between the vibrational dynamics and the atomic level Green-Kubo stress correlation function in liquids we consider this connection in a model crystal instead. Of course, vibrational dynamics in liquids and crystals are quite different and it is not expected that the results obtained on a model crystal should be valid for liquids. However, these considerations provide a benchmark to which the results of the previous molecular dynamics simulations can be compared. Thus, assuming that vibrations are plane waves, we derive analytical expressions for the atomic level stress correlation functions in the classical limit and analyze them. These results provide, in particular, a recipe for analysis of the atomic level stress correlation functions in Fourier space and extraction of the wavevector and frequency dependent information. We also evaluate the energies of the atomic level stresses. Obtained energies are significantly smaller than the energies that were obtained in MD simulations of liquids previously. This result suggests that the average energies of the atomic level stresses in liquids and glasses are largely determined by the structural disorder. We discuss this result in the context of equipartition of the atomic level stress energies. Analysis of the previously published data suggests that it is possible to speak about configurational and vibrational contributions to the average energies of the atomic level stresses in a glass state. However, this separation in a liquid state is problematic. We also consider peak broadening in the pair distribution function with increase of distance. We find that peak broadening (by ~40%) occurs due to the transverse vibrational modes, while contribution from the longitudinal modes does not change with distance. Finally, we introduce and consider atomic level transverse current correlation function.

  1. Generic Quantum Ratchet Accelerator with Full Classical Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiangbin Gong; Paul Brumer

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple model of quantum ratchet transport that can generate unbounded linear acceleration of the quantum ratchet current is proposed, with the underlying classical dynamics fully chaotic. The results demonstrate that generic acceleration of quantum ratchet transport can occur with any type of classical phase space structure. The quantum ratchet transport with full classical chaos is also shown to be very robust to noise due to the large linear acceleration afforded by the quantum dynamics. One possible experiment allowing observation of these predictions is suggested.

  2. Methodology and results of the impacts of modeling electric utilities ; a comparative evaluation of MEMM and REM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baughman, Martin L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares two models of the U.S. electric utility industry including the EIA's electric utility submodel in the Midterm Energy Market Model (MEMM), and the Baughman-Joskow Regionalized Electricity Model (REM). ...

  3. Habitability of Earth-like planets with high obliquity and eccentric orbits: results from a general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsenmeier, Manuel; Lucarini, Valerio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the implications of seasonal variability for the habitability of Earth-like planets as determined by the two parameters polar obliquity and orbital eccentricity. Commonly, the outer boundary of the habitable zone (HZ) is set by a completely frozen planet, or snowball state. Using a general circulation model coupled to a thermodynamic sea-ice model, our results show that seasonal variability can extend this outer limit of the HZ from 1.03 AU (no seasonal variability) to a maximum of 1.69 AU. Also the multistability property of planets close to the outer edge of the HZ is influenced by seasonal variability. Cold states extend far into the HZ for non-oblique planets. On highly oblique planets, cold states can also allow for habitable regions, which highlights the sufficient but not necessary condition of a warm climate state for habitability. While the effect of obliquity on the extent of the HZ is comparatively small on circular orbits, it becomes highly relevant on eccentric orbits. Our experiments ...

  4. A latent discriminative model-based approach for classification of imaginary motor tasks from This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çetin, Müjdat

    Norte, Barranquilla, Colombia E-mail: delgado@sabanciuniv.edu and mcetin@sabanciuniv.edu Received 16 be used to model different brain states in the signal; and (3) involve learned statistical models matched performing methods in BCI competition IV as well as a number of more recent methods and observe that our

  5. Bistability in a self-assembling system confined by elastic walls. Exact results in a one-dimensional lattice model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakub P?kalski; Alina Ciach; Noé G. Almarza

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of confinement on self-assembly of particles interacting with short-range attraction and long-range repulsion (SALR) potential is studied for thermodynamic states corresponding to local ordering of clusters or layers in the bulk. Exact and asymptotic expressions for the local density and for the effective potential between the confining surfaces are obtained for a one-dimensional lattice model introduced in [J. P\\k{e}kalski et al. $J. Chem. Phys.$ ${\\bf 140}$, 144903 (2013)].The simple asymptotic formulas are shown to be in good quantitative agreement with exact results for slits containing at least 5 layers. We observe that the incommensurability of the system size and the average distance between the clusters or layers in the bulk leads to structural deformations that are different for different values of the chemical potential $\\mu$. The change of the type of defects is reflected in the dependence of density on $\\mu$ that has a shape characteristic for phase transitions. Our results may help to avoid misinterpretation of the change of the type of defects as a phase transition in simulations of inhomogeneous systems. Finally, we show that a system confined by soft elastic walls may exhibit bistability such that two system sizes that differ approximately by the average distance between the clusters or layers are almost equally probable. This may happen when the equilibrium separation between the soft boundaries of an empty slit corresponds to the largest stress in the confined self-assembling system.

  6. Characterization of the TRIGA Mark II reactor full-power steady state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Cammi; Matteo Zanetti; Davide Chiesa; Massimiliano Clemenza; Stefano Pozzi; Ezio Previtali; Monica Sisti; Giovanni Magrotti; Michele Prata; Andrea Salvini

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the characterization of the full-power steady state of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor of the University of Pavia is performed by coupling Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for neutronics with "Multiphysics" model for thermal-hydraulics. Neutronic analyses have been performed starting from a MC model of the entire reactor system, based on the MCNP5 code, that was already validated in fresh fuel and zero-power configuration (in which thermal effects are negligible) using the available experimental data as benchmark. In order to describe the full-power reactor configuration, the temperature distribution in the core is necessary. To evaluate it, a thermal-hydraulic model has been developed, using the power distribution results from MC simulation as input. The thermal-hydraulic model is focused on the core active region and takes into account sub-cooled boiling effects present at full reactor power. The obtained temperature distribution is then introduced in the MC model and a benchmark analysis is carried out to validate the model in fresh fuel and full-power configuration. The good agreement between experimental data and simulation results concerning full-power reactor criticality, proves the reliability of the adopted methodology of analysis, both from neutronics and thermal-hydraulics perspective.

  7. |Result List Refine Search Print E-mail Save Formats: Citation HTML Full Text PDF Full Text

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loope, David B.

    for the mass mortality and swift burial. To find out, we 7/13/07 4:00 PMEBSCOhost Page 1 of 7http://web23.epnet, shaped and moved slowly by the wind, migrate across the valleys. Violent sandstorms and thunderstorms

  8. Preliminary Model Comparison Results From the Sim-SEQ Project Using TOUGH2, STOMP, Eclipse, and VESA Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Doughty, Christine A.; Bacon, Diana H.; Bacci, Giacomo; Govindan, Rajesh; Shi, Ji-Quan; Gasda, Sarah E.; Ramanathan, Ramya; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Hosseini, Seyyed; Birkholzer, Jens

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sim-SEQ is an international initiative on model comparison for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), with an objective to understand and, if possible, quantify model uncertainties. Model comparison efforts in Sim-SEQ are initially limited to one specific field test site, hereafter referred to as the Sim-SEQ Study site (or S-3 site). Within Sim-SEQ, different modeling teams are developing conceptual models of CO2 injection at the S-3 site. One of the conceptual models, developed by the LBNL team, is based on TOUGH2/EOS7C. In this paper, we present some preliminary model predictions of the S-3 site using the TOUGH2/EOS7C simulator. We also compare the predictions of the TOUGH2 simulator with three other conceptual models, developed by three different organizations, of the S-3 site.

  9. The equation of state of the n-vector model: collective variables method This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About behavior of the three-dimensional n-vector model in the presence of an external field is investigated for the free energy of the system for the temperatures T > Tc and different n was obtained. The equation

  10. A latent discriminative model-based approach for classification of imaginary motor tasks from This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    , Colombia E-mail: delgado@sabanciuniv.edu and mcetin@sabanciuniv.edu Received 16 November 2011 Accepted in the signal; and (3) involve learned statistical models matched to the classification task, avoiding some experimentally compare this approach to the best performing methods in BCI competition IV as well as a number

  11. Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

  12. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a bb pair in events with one charged lepton and large missing transverse energy using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson in sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV p-pbar collision data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb-1. In events consistent with the decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-quark pair and the W boson to an electron or muon and a neutrino, we set 95% credibility level upper limits on the WH production cross section times the H->bb branching ratio as a function of Higgs boson mass. At a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c2 we observe (expect) a limit of 4.9 (2.8) times the standard model value.

  13. A Method for Broadband Full-Duplex MIMO Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Yingbo; Liang, Ping; Ma, Yiming; Cirik, Ali C; Gao, Qian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    canceller for collocated radios,” IEEE Trans. Microwaveusing off-the shelf radios: Feasibility and first results,”Broadband Full-Duplex MIMO Radio Yingbo Hua, Fellow, IEEE,

  14. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

  15. Toward Full LHC Coverage of Natural Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jared A. Evans; Yevgeny Kats; David Shih; Matthew J. Strassler

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that combining just a handful of searches for new physics at Run I of the LHC is sufficient to exclude most supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model in which the gluino is kinematically accessible and the spectrum is natural. Such models typically give rise to significant MET, top quarks and/or high object multiplicity, and we show that having even one of these signatures generally results in stringent limits. We also identify, among models that lack these signatures, the few gaps in coverage remaining, and propose search strategies to close these gaps. Our results are general and independent of the details of the spectrum, assumptions about minimality, R-parity, etc. Our analysis strategy should remain applicable when the LHC moves to higher energy. Central to our argument are ATLAS and CMS searches for many jets and low MET, a proposed lepton + many jets search, an ATLAS search for 6-7 high-pT jets, and a reexamination of the control and signal regions of the CMS black hole search.

  16. The Multi-Stage Investment Timing Game in Offshore Petroleum Production: Preliminary results from an econometric model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    me to understand the geology of oil production. ShelbyGeology or economics? Testing models of irreversible investment using North Sea oil

  17. Using MiniBooNE NCEL and CCQE cross section results to constrain 3+1 sterile neutrino models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callum Wilkinson; Susan Cartwright; Lee Thompson

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE NCEL and CCQE cross-section measurements (neutrino running) are used to set limits in the $\\Delta m^{2}-\\sin^{2}\\vartheta_{\\mu s}$ plane for a 3+1 sterile neutrino model with a mass splitting $0.1 \\leq \\Delta m^{2} \\leq 10.0$ eV$^{2}$. GENIE is used, with a relativistic Fermi gas model, to relate $E_{\

  18. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic-simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. Volume 2: results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.; Baldwin, A.J.; Craig, R.G.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the input data and computer results for the Geologic Simulation Model. This model is described in detail in the following report: Petrie, G.M., et. al. 1981. Geologic Simulation Model for a Hypothetical Site in the Columbia Plateau, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The Geologic Simulation Model is a quasi-deterministic process-response model which simulates, for a million years into the future, the development of the geologic and hydrologic systems of the ground-water basin containing the Pasco Basin. Effects of natural processes on the ground-water hydrologic system are modeled principally by rate equations. The combined effects and synergistic interactions of different processes are approximated by linear superposition of their effects during discrete time intervals in a stepwise-integration approach.

  19. Comparison of a One-Dimensional Model of a High-Temperature Solid-Oxide Electrolysis Stack with CFD and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional model has been developed to predict the thermal and electrochemical behavior of a high-temperature steam electrolysis stack. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The model includes a temperature-dependent area-specific resistance (ASR) that accounts for the significant increase in electrolyte ionic conductivity that occurs with increasing temperature. Model predictions are shown to compare favorably with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model. The one-dimensional model was also employed to demonstrate the expected trends in electrolyzer performance over a range of operating conditions including isothermal, adiabatic, constant steam utilization, constant flow rate, and the effects of operating temperature.

  20. Deformed shell model results for neutrinoless double beta decay of nuclei in A=60-90 region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sahu; V. K. B. Kota

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model based on Hartree-Fock states. For $^{70}$Zn, jj44b interaction in $^{2}p_{3/2}$, $^{1}f_{5/2}$, $^{2}p_{1/2}$ and $^{1}g_{9/2}$ space with $^{56}$Ni as the core is employed. However, for $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei, a modified Kuo interaction with the above core and model space are employed. Most of our calculations in this region were performed with this effective interaction. However, jj44b interaction has been found to be better for $^{70}$Zn. The above model space was used in many recent shell model and interacting boson model calculations for nuclei in this region. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these three nuclei considered, the NTME are calculated. The deduced half-lives with these NTME, assuming neutrino mass is 1 eV, are $1.1 \\times 10^{26}$ yr, $2.3 \\times 10^{27}$ yr and $2.2 \\times 10^{24}$ yr for $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se, respectively.

  1. Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 P. E. Thornton et al. : Carbon-nitrogen interactionsregulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks Monfray, P. ,T. H. : A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from

  2. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  3. Warped DGP model in warm intermediate inflation with a general dissipative coefficient in light of BICEP2 and Planck results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon Herrera; Nelson Videla; Marco Olivares

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary universe scenario on a warped Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati brane during intermediate inflation is studied. We consider a general form for the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma(T,\\phi)\\propto T^{m}/\\phi^{m-1}$, and also study this model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We analyze the evolution of the universe in the slow-roll approximation, and find the exact solutions to the equations of motion. In both regimes, we utilize recent data from the BICEP2 experiment and also from the Planck satellite to constrain the parameters in our model in accordance with the theory of cosmological perturbations.

  4. Warm intermediate inflation in the Randall-Sundrum II model in the light of Planck 2015 and BICEP2 results: A general dissipative coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Ramón; Olivares, Marco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary Universe in the Randall-Sundrum II model during intermediate inflation is studied. For this purpose, we consider a general form for the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma(T,\\phi)=C_{\\phi}\\,\\frac{T^{m}}{\\phi^{m-1}}$, and also analyze this inflationary model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We study the evolution of the Universe under the slow-roll approximation and find solutions to the full effective Friedmann equation in the brane-world framework. In order to constrain the parameters in our model, we consider the recent data from the BICEP2-Planck 2015 data together with the necessary condition for warm inflation $T>H$, and also the condition from the weak (or strong) dissipative regime.

  5. Warm intermediate inflation in the Randall-Sundrum II model in the light of Planck 2015 and BICEP2 results: A general dissipative coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramón Herrera; Nelson Videla; Marco Olivares

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary Universe in the Randall-Sundrum II model during intermediate inflation is studied. For this purpose, we consider a general form for the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma(T,\\phi)=C_{\\phi}\\,\\frac{T^{m}}{\\phi^{m-1}}$, and also analyze this inflationary model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We study the evolution of the Universe under the slow-roll approximation and find solutions to the full effective Friedmann equation in the brane-world framework. In order to constrain the parameters in our model, we consider the recent data from the BICEP2-Planck 2015 data together with the necessary condition for warm inflation $T>H$, and also the condition from the weak (or strong) dissipative regime.

  6. Physical control oriented model of large scale refrigerators to synthesize advanced control schemes. Design, validation, and first control results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick [INAC, SBT, UMR-E 9004 CEA/UJF-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Alamir, Mazen [Gipsa-Lab, Control Systems Department, CNRS-University of Grenoble, 11, rue des Mathématiques, BP 46, 38402 Saint Martin d'Hčres (France)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a physical method to obtain control-oriented dynamical models of large scale cryogenic refrigerators is proposed, in order to synthesize model-based advanced control schemes. These schemes aim to replace classical user experience designed approaches usually based on many independent PI controllers. This is particularly useful in the case where cryoplants are submitted to large pulsed thermal loads, expected to take place in the cryogenic cooling systems of future fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced Fusion Experiment (JT-60SA). Advanced control schemes lead to a better perturbation immunity and rejection, to offer a safer utilization of cryoplants. The paper gives details on how basic components used in the field of large scale helium refrigeration (especially those present on the 400W @1.8K helium test facility at CEA-Grenoble) are modeled and assembled to obtain the complete dynamic description of controllable subsystems of the refrigerator (controllable subsystems are namely the Joule-Thompson Cycle, the Brayton Cycle, the Liquid Nitrogen Precooling Unit and the Warm Compression Station). The complete 400W @1.8K (in the 400W @4.4K configuration) helium test facility model is then validated against experimental data and the optimal control of both the Joule-Thompson valve and the turbine valve is proposed, to stabilize the plant under highly variable thermals loads. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  7. Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, P. E.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Lamarque, J. F.; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeosciences, 6, 2099–2120, 2009 www.biogeosciences.net/6/2099/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Biogeosciences Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.... Inclusion of fundamental ecological interactions between carbon and nitrogen cycles in the land component of an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) leads to decreased carbon uptake associated with CO2 fertil- ization, and increased carbon...

  8. Model of Procedure Usage – Results from a Qualitative Study to Inform Design of Computer-Based Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johanna H Oxstrand; Katya L Le Blanc

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease the human error rate, especially the human errors associated with procedure use. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been looking at replacing the current paper-based procedures with computer-based procedure systems. The concept of computer-based procedures is not new by any means; however most research has focused on procedures used in the main control room. Procedures reviewed in these efforts are mainly emergency operating procedures and normal operating procedures. Based on lessons learned for these previous efforts we are now exploring a more unknown application for computer based procedures - field procedures, i.e. procedures used by nuclear equipment operators and maintenance technicians. The Idaho National Laboratory, the Institute for Energy Technology, and participants from the U.S. commercial nuclear industry are collaborating in an applied research effort with the objective of developing requirements and specifications for a computer-based procedure system to be used by field operators. The goal is to identify the types of human errors that can be mitigated by using computer-based procedures and how to best design the computer-based procedures to do this. The underlying philosophy in the research effort is “Stop – Start – Continue”, i.e. what features from the use of paper-based procedures should we not incorporate (Stop), what should we keep (Continue), and what new features or work processes should be added (Start). One step in identifying the Stop – Start – Continue was to conduct a baseline study where affordances related to the current usage of paper-based procedures were identified. The purpose of the study was to develop a model of paper based procedure use which will help to identify desirable features for computer based procedure prototypes. Affordances such as note taking, markups, sharing procedures between fellow coworkers, the use of multiple procedures at once, etc. were considered. The model describes which affordances associated with paper based procedures should be transferred to computer-based procedures as well as what features should not be incorporated. The model also provides a means to identify what new features not present in paper based procedures need to be added to the computer-based procedures to further enhance performance. The next step is to use the requirements and specifications to develop concepts and prototypes of computer-based procedures. User tests and other data collection efforts will be conducted to ensure that the real issues with field procedures and their usage are being addressed and solved in the best manner possible. This paper describes the baseline study, the construction of the model of procedure use, and the requirements and specifications for computer-based procedures that were developed based on the model. It also addresses how the model and the insights gained from it were used to develop concepts and prototypes for computer based procedures.

  9. Deformed shell model results for neutrinoless double beta decay of nuclei in A=60-90 region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sahu; V. K. B. Kota

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model based on Hartree-Fock states. For $^{70}$Zn, jj44b interaction in $^{2}p_{3/2}$, $^{1}f_{5/2}$, $^{2}p_{1/2}$ and $^{1}g_{9/2}$ space with $^{56}$Ni as the core is employed. However, for $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei, a modified Kuo interaction with the above core and model space are employed. Most of our calculations in this region were performed with this effective interaction. However, jj44b interaction has been found to be better for $^{70}$Zn. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these three nuclei considered, the NTME are calculated. The deduced half-lives with these NTME, assuming neutrino mass is 1 eV, are $9.6 \\times 10^{25}$yr, $1.9 \\times 10^{27}$yr and $1.95 \\times 10^{24}$yr for $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se, respectively.

  10. Deformed shell model results for neutrinoless double beta decay of nuclei in A=60-90 region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model based on Hartree-Fock states. For $^{70}$Zn, jj44b interaction in $^{2}p_{3/2}$, $^{1}f_{5/2}$, $^{2}p_{1/2}$ and $^{1}g_{9/2}$ space with $^{56}$Ni as the core is employed. However, for $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei, a modified Kuo interaction with the above core and model space are employed. Most of our calculations in this region were performed with this effective interaction. However, jj44b interaction has been found to be better for $^{70}$Zn. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these three nuclei considered, the NTME are calculated. The deduced half-lives with these NTME, assuming neutrino mass is 1 eV, are $9.6 \\times 10^{25}$yr, $1.9 \\times 10^{27}$yr and $1.95 \\times 10^{24}$yr for $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se, respectively.

  11. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  12. Full expandable model of parallel self-excited induction generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simőes, Marcelo Godoy

    possibilities for incorporating advanced control to monitor and optimise a parallel installation of SEIGs and small induction motors. Typically, generators rated 15kVA are cost effective; but 100kVA [4] was found, the trend has changed from installing a few wind turbines to planning large wind farm installations

  13. The rapidly evolving field of decadal climate prediction, using initialized climate models to produce time-evolving predictions of regional climate, is producing new results for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and it is on those time scales of interest to water managers that decadal climate prediction is being appliedThe rapidly evolving field of decadal climate prediction, using initialized climate models to produce time-evolving predictions of regional climate, is producing new results for predictions

  14. 15APR91 DDT results on a Sun IPC, a Sun Sparcstation 2, a IBM RS/6000 Model 550, and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    15APR91 DDT results on a Sun IPC, a Sun Sparcstation 2, a IBM RS/6000 Model 550, and a Convex C1. Brian Glendenning & Gareth Hunt November 13, 1991 1 Introduction The Large DDT has been run on a Sun IPC

  15. Characterizing fractured rock for fluid-flow, geomechanical, and paleostress modeling: Methods and preliminary results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C.C.; Larsen, E.; Page, W.R.; Howard, T.M.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures have been characterized for fluid-flow, geomechanical, and paleostress modeling at three localities in the vicinity of drill hole USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada. A method for fracture characterization is introduced that integrates mapping fracture-trace networks and quantifying eight fracture parameters: trace length, orientation, connectivity, aperture, roughness, shear offset, trace-length density, and mineralization. A complex network of fractures was exposed on three 214- to 260-m 2 pavements cleared of debris in the upper lithophysal unit of the Tiva Canyon Member of the Miocene Paint-brush Tuff. The pavements are two-dimensional sections through the three-dimensional network of strata-bound fractures. All fractures with trace lengths greater than 0.2 m were mapped and studied.

  16. amplitudes full analytic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Full analytic results CERN Preprints Summary: We consider one-loop amplitudes of a Higgs boson coupled to gluons in the limit of a large top quark mass. We treat the Higgs as the...

  17. Numerical modeling of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate of pressure solution creep in limestone: Preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renard, Francois; Hellmann, Roland; Collombet, Marielle; Guen, Yvi Le

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its dissolution into solution results in acidification of the pore waters. As a consequence, the pore waters become more reactive, which leads to enhanced dissolution-precipitation processes and a modification of the mechanical and hydrological properties of the rock. This effect is especially important for limestones given that the solubility and reactivity of carbonates is strongly dependent on pH and the partial pressure of CO2. The main mechanism that couples dissolution, precipitation and rock matrix deformation is commonly referred to as intergranular pressure solution creep (IPS) or pervasive pressure solution creep (PSC). This process involves dissolution at intergranular grain contacts subject to elevated stress, diffusion of dissolved material in an intergranular fluid, and precipitation in pore spaces subject to lower stress. This leads to an overall and pervasive reduction in porosity due to both grain indent...

  18. Page 1 of 100 Full Screen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    ()d. #12;Home Page Title Page Contents Page 7 of 100 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit The behavior of bothHome Page Title Page Contents Page 1 of 100 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Scenario Generation Uncertainty Quantification in Industrial and Energy Applications: Experiences and Challenges, Minneapolis

  19. 1 October, 2012 FULL PROJECT COMMISSIONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    1 October, 2012 FULL PROJECT COMMISSIONING This procedure defines the process for performing full construction-phase commissioning (Cx) on new building, building addition and major renovation projects. When the process is performed by an external commissioning firm, it shall be performed in accordance with the U

  20. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

  1. Pattern Alteration: Increasing Bodice Front Fullness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A bodice too small in the bust may cause wrinkles and pull lines between the breasts. This publication explains how to alter patterns for bust fullness, including those for bodices or dresses with French darts, princess lines or modified princess...

  2. Engineering Capabilities Full Lifecycle Program Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Engineering Capabilities Full Lifecycle Program Management-loopandprecisionclosed-loopcontrol Flight Software · Embeddedsystemstocontrolflightinstrumentsandspacecraft · Groundsystemssuchas · Vacuumandthermalenvironmentaltestingfacilities LASP specializes in the design and development of flight instruments and spacecraft, with a focus

  3. Engineering Capabilities Full Lifecycle Program Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Mechanical and Thermal Engineering · Opticalandelectromagneticfieldsinstrumentdesign, analysis,andtest · One-changing technologies. Mechanical and Thermal Engineering Calibration and Test Systems Engineering ElectricalEngineering Capabilities Full Lifecycle Program Management

  4. Copley Square : realizing its full potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haque, Reaz

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to form a basis for realizing the full potential of Copley Square, and also to establish an approach to the issues of preservation and revitalization of historic urban squares. The objective ...

  5. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: gamma pair, b-quark pair, tau lepton pair, W pair, and Z pair. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-600 GeV. The analysed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6-4.8 inverse femtobarns. The expected excluded mass range in the absence of the standard model Higgs boson is 118-543 GeV at 95% CL. The observed results exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the mass range 127-600 GeV at 95% CL, and in the mass range 129-525 GeV at 99% CL. An excess of events above the expected standard model background is observed at the low end of the explored mass range making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal. The largest excess, with a local significance of 3.1 sigma, is observed for a Higgs boson mass hypothesis of 124 GeV. The global significance of observing an excess with a local significance greater than 3.1 sigma anywhere in the search range 110-600 (110-145) GeV is estimated to be 1.5 sigma (2.1 sigma). More data are required to ascertain the origin of this excess.

  6. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: gamma pair, b-quark pair, tau lepton pair, W pair, and Z pair. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-600 GeV. The analysed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6-4.8 inverse femtobarns. The expected excluded mass range in the absence of the standard model Higgs boson is 118-543 GeV at 95% CL. The observed results exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the mass range 127-600 GeV at 95% CL, and in the mass range 129-525 GeV at 99% CL. An excess of events above the expected standard model background is observed at the low end of the explored mass range making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal. The largest excess, with a local significance of 3.1 sigma, is observed for a Higgs boson mass hypothesis of 124 GeV. The global significance of observing an excess with a local significance greater than 3.1 sigma anywhere in the search range 110-600 (110-145) GeV is estimated to be 1.5 sigma (2.1 sigma). More data are required to ascertain the origin of this excess.

  7. Characterization of the TRIGA Mark II reactor full-power steady state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cammi, Antonio; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Magrotti, Giovanni; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the characterization of the full-power steady state of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor of the University of Pavia is performed by coupling Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for neutronics with "Multiphysics" model for thermal-hydraulics. Neutronic analyses have been performed starting from a MC model of the entire reactor system, based on the MCNP5 code, that was already validated in fresh fuel and zero-power configuration (in which thermal effects are negligible) using the available experimental data as benchmark. In order to describe the full-power reactor configuration, the temperature distribution in the core is necessary. To evaluate it, a thermal-hydraulic model has been developed, using the power distribution results from MC simulation as input. The thermal-hydraulic model is focused on the core active region and takes into account sub-cooled boiling effects present at full reactor power. The obtained temperature distribution is then introduced in the MC model and a benchmark analysis is carr...

  8. Full Text Glossary | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFull Text Glossary Full Text Glossary The

  9. Friction in full view A. P. Merklea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    Friction in full view A. P. Merklea and L. D. Marksb Materials Science and Engineering proposed friction mechanisms explaining the unique tribological properties of graphite. Wear of graphite chemical or struc- tural information from the interface during a friction experi- ment. Examples

  10. Full bridge converter Transformers and isolated converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Full bridge converter Transformers and isolated converters Most DC power supplies have the following requirements: 1. Regulated output voltage Solved by a large capacitor at the output, and feedback control. 2. High power factor PFC - discussed previously. 3. Isolation 4. Multiple outputs Isolated

  11. Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion in Full Bloom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagadorn, Whitey

    4 Burgess Shale: Cambrian Explosion in Full Bloom James W. Hagadorn T he middle cambrian burgess shale is one of the world's best-known and best-studied fossil deposits. The story of the discovery in the Burgess Shale Formation of the Canadian Rockies, Charles Walcott discovered a remarkable "phyl- lopod

  12. Introduction My soul is full of longing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1 Introduction My soul is full of longing For the secret of the sea, And the heart whose oceans and atmosphere are rich in structure, and alive with currents, waves and eddies spanning of the trade winds also shuts down upwelling in the eastern equatorial Pacific, reducing the inflow

  13. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  14. Full Additivity of the Entanglement of Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo A. Paz-Silva; John H. Reina

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general strategy that allows a more flexible method for the construction of fully additive multipartite entanglement monotones than the ones so far reported in the literature of axiomatic entanglement measures. Within this framework we give a proof of a conjecture of outstanding implications in information theory: the full additivity of the Entanglement of Formation.

  15. Page 1 of 9 Full Screen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levene, Mark

    Evolution of Database Systems Graph-Based Relational Object-Relational 1960's-1970's 1980's-1990's 1990's-Oriented programming language with a DBMS 3 One approach is to implement on top of a relational DBMS. · Object #12;Home Page Title Page Page 5 of 9 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Object-Relational Evolution

  16. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High School (9-12) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download The BEAM Project: Building Efficient Architectural Models This...

  17. Emissions Resulting from the Full-Scale Cofiring of Pelletized Refuse-Derived Fuel and Coal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohlsson, O. O.; Daugherty, K.; Venables, B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and baghouse to remove S02 and particulates from the flue gases. A schematic of the steam-generating equipment and air pollution control devices is shown in Fig. 1. During the ANL/NTSU test burns, Boiler IS was the only boiler being used. The other four... Precipitation Inc., contains 105 cyclones and has part iculate removal efficiencies of 80% and 90% for gas flo[1 rates of 50,000 and 25,000 standard ft 3 /min respectively. After the flue gases exit the multiclone collector, they enter the spray dryer...

  18. Electrochromic windows for commercial buildings: Monitored results from a full-scale testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, Dennis L.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lifetime prediction of electrochromic windows for buildingsenergy performance of electrochromic windows. ” Proceedingsin the Proceedings. Electrochromic Windows for Commercial

  19. E-print Network : Main View : Search Results for Full Record: "gamma ray

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work with Jefferson LabDynein

  20. Full Nexus between Newtonian and Relativistic Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sardin

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full nexus between Newtonian and relativistic mechanics is set. Contrarily to what is commonly thought, Newtonian mechanics can be amended to suit all speeds up to c. It is demonstrated that when introducing the fact that the pulse of oscillators, i.e. emitters and clocks, is sensitive to speed, the Newtonian framework can be extended to all speeds. For this aim, it is formulated the concept of actor scenario vs. observer scenario. This differentiation is essential to avoid confusion between effective reality (actor scenario) and appearance (observer scenario). Measurements are subjected to kinematical aberrations, the observer scenario being inertial. These must be removed to attain intrinsic reality, i.e. that of actors. The lack of demarcation between the two scenarios leads to conceptual confusions. The amended Newtonian mechanics is of full application. Here, it has been mainly applied to the Newtonian Doppler effect, amended to suit all speeds.

  1. Full wave simulation of waves in ECRIS plasmas based on the finite element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrisi, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Universitŕ Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell'Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I (Italy); Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Patti, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania (Italy); Di Donato, L. [Universitŕ degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sorbello, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Universitŕ degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Isernia, T. [Universitŕ Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell'Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the modeling and the full wave numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves propagation and absorption in an anisotropic magnetized plasma filling the resonant cavity of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The model assumes inhomogeneous, dispersive and tensorial constitutive relations. Maxwell's equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM), using the COMSOL Multiphysics{sup ®} suite. All the relevant details have been considered in the model, including the non uniform external magnetostatic field used for plasma confinement, the local electron density profile resulting in the full-3D non uniform magnetized plasma complex dielectric tensor. The more accurate plasma simulations clearly show the importance of cavity effect on wave propagation and the effects of a resonant surface. These studies are the pillars for an improved ECRIS plasma modeling, that is mandatory to optimize the ion source output (beam intensity distribution and charge state, especially). Any new project concerning the advanced ECRIS design will take benefit by an adequate modeling of self-consistent wave absorption simulations.

  2. Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

  3. Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21Year Jan FebFull Report Energy

  4. A Full Scale Wireless Ad Hoc Network Test Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Timothy X.

    that are bench top, indoor, fixed outdoor, and mobile outdoor. Bench top test beds employ MAC filtering, RF and propagation of the outdoor environment. Full scale outdoor test beds are often restricted to fixed sites [1 features: 1. Test bed results are reproducible. 2. The test bed provides a common platform for testing

  5. Combatting Ionic Aggregation using Dielectric Forces Combining Modeling/Simulation and Experimental Results to Explain End-capping of Primary Amine Functionalized Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Goswami, Monojoy [ORNL; Pickel, Deanna L [ORNL; Uhrig, David [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chain-end functionalization of living poly(styryl)lithium using 1-(3-bromopropyl)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-aza-2,5-disilacyclo-pentane (BTDP) to generate primary amine end-functionalized polystyrene was investigated using high vacuum anionic polymerization techniques. 13C NMR spectroscopy and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to evaluate polymer end-groups and demonstrated that quantitative amine functionalized polymer was attained under appropriate reaction conditions. In general, the polymerization of styrene was conducted in benzene and the end-capping reaction was performed by adding tetrahydrofuran (THF) to the reaction prior to the addition of BTDP in THF at room temperature. Results indicated that approximately 20% THF by volume is required to obtain 100% end-capping free from side reactions. When too little or no THF was present, side reactions such as lithium halogen exchange followed by Wurtz coupling resulted in unfunctionalized head-to-head dimer as well as other byproducts. Modeling and simulation of the solvent effects using hybrid methods (the so-called QM/MM method) suggest that THF effectively dissociated the anionic chain-end aggregation, thereby resulting in the desired primary amine functionalized polymer. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to develop an understanding of the physics of counterions involved in the end-functionalization process.

  6. Electronic Enhancements Full expression for q1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McElreath, Richard

    (see Figures 8 and 9). Thus our results do not depend in a sensitive way on the perfect nature right group connecting back to the far left group. R2 (the dotted line) is the squared correlation smaller values of e We have already assumed that cultural transmission is not vertical--people acquire

  7. Electronic Enhancements Full expression for q1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    -like groups much of the time (see Figures 8 and 9). Thus our results do not depend in a sensitive way right group connecting back to the far left group. R2 (the dotted line) is the squared correlation smaller values of e We have already assumed that cultural transmission is not vertical--people acquire

  8. Full CKM matrix with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Masataka; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors show that it is now possible to fully determine the CKM matrix, for the first time, using lattice QCD. |V{sub cd}|, |V{sub cs}|, |V{sub ub}|, |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub us}| are, respectively, directly determined with the lattice results for form factors of semileptonic D {yields} {pi}lv, D {yields} Klv, B {yields} {pi}lv, B {yields} Dlv and K {yields} {pi}lv decays. The error from the quenched approximation is removed by using the MILC unquenced lattice gauge configurations, where the effect of u, d and s quarks is included. The error from the ''chiral'' extrapolation (m{sub l} {yields} m{sub ud}) is greatly reduced by using improved staggered quarks. The accuracy is comparable to that of the Particle Data Group averages. In addition, |V{sub ud}|, |V{sub ts}|, |V{sub ts}| and |V{sub td}| are determined by using unitarity of the CKM matrix and the experimental result for sin (2{beta}). In this way, they obtain all 9 CKM matrix elements, where the only theoretical input is lattice QCD. They also obtain all the Wolfenstein parameters, for the first time, using lattice QCD.

  9. Sensitivity and Scenario Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Presents the results of various scenarios using models used to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin, and discusses the policy and investment implications. The water allocations per ...

  10. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R. J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E. F. Jaeger, K. Indireshkumar, E. Lerche, D. McCune, C. K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  11. FullSWOF: A software for overland flow simulation / FullSWOF : un logiciel pour la simulation du ruissellement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delestre, Olivier; Darboux, Frédéric; Du, Mingxuan; James, Francois; Laguerre, Christian; Lucas, Carine; Planchon, Olivier

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overland flow on agricultural fields may have some undesirable effects such as soil erosion, flood and pollutant transport. To better understand this phenomenon and limit its consequences, we developed a code using state-of-the-art numerical methods: FullSWOF (Full Shallow Water equations for Overland Flow), an object oriented code written in C++. It has been made open-source and can be downloaded from http://www.univ-orleans.fr/mapmo/soft/FullSWOF/. The model is based on the classical system of Shallow Water (SW) (or Saint-Venant system). Numerical difficulties come from the numerous dry/wet transitions and the highly-variable topography encountered inside a field. It includes runon and rainfall inputs, infiltration (modified Green-Ampt equation), friction (Darcy-Weisbach and Manning formulas). First we present the numerical method for the resolution of the Shallow Water equations integrated in FullSWOF_2D (the two-dimension version). This method is based on hydrostatic reconstruction scheme, coupled with a ...

  12. Liquid drops on a surface: using density functional theory to calculate the binding potential and drop profiles and comparing with results from mesoscopic modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam P. Hughes; Uwe Thiele; Andrew J. Archer

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution to the free energy for a film of liquid of thickness $h$ on a solid surface, due to the interactions between the solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces is given by the binding potential, $g(h)$. The precise form of $g(h)$ determines whether or not the liquid wets the surface. Note that differentiating $g(h)$ gives the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure. We develop a microscopic density functional theory (DFT) based method for calculating $g(h)$, allowing us to relate the form of $g(h)$ to the nature of the molecular interactions in the system. We present results based on using a simple lattice gas model, to demonstrate the procedure. In order to describe the static and dynamic behaviour of non-uniform liquid films and drops on surfaces, a mesoscopic free energy based on $g(h)$ is often used. We calculate such equilibrium film height profiles and also directly calculate using DFT the corresponding density profiles for liquid drops on surfaces. Comparing quantities such as the contact angle and also the shape of the drops, we find good agreement between the two methods. We also study in detail the effect on $g(h)$ of truncating the range of the dispersion forces, both those between the fluid molecules and those between the fluid and wall. We find that truncating can have a significant effect on $g(h)$ and the associated wetting behaviour of the fluid.

  13. Fluctuations and Correlations of net baryon number, electric charge, and strangeness: A comparison of lattice QCD results with the hadron resonance gas model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bazavov; Tanmoy Bhattacharya; C. E. DeTar; H. -T. Ding; Steven Gottlieb; Rajan Gupta; P. Hegde; Urs Heller; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; L. Levkova; Swagato Mukherjee; P. Petreczky; Christian Schmidt; R. A. Soltz; W. Soeldner; R. Sugar; Pavlos M. Vranas

    2012-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the quadratic fluctuations of net baryon number, electric charge and strangeness as well as correlations among these conserved charges in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD at zero chemical potential. Results are obtained using calculations with tree level improved gauge and the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) actions with almost physical light and strange quark masses at three different values of the lattice cut-off. Our choice of parameters corresponds to a value of 160 MeV for the lightest pseudo scalar Goldstone mass and a physical value of the kaon mass. The three diagonal charge susceptibilities and the correlations among conserved charges have been extrapolated to the continuum limit in the temperature interval 150 MeV net baryon number fluctuations in QCD agree with HRG model calculations while, the net electric charge fluctuations in QCD are about 10% smaller and net strangeness fluctuations are about 20% larger. These findings are relevant to the discussion of freeze-out conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  14. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter; Austin, Phillip A.; Bacmeister, J.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; Del Genio, Anthony D.; De Roode, Stephan R.; Endo , Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco A.; Jean-Louis, Dufresne; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Koehler, M.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian; Lohmann, U.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Molod, Andrea M.; Neggers, Roel; Rasch, Philip J.; Sandu, Irina; Senkbeil, Ryan; Siebesma, A. P.; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, Colombe; Stevens, Bjorn; Suarez, Max; Xu, Kuan-Man; Von Salzen, Knut; Webb, Mark; Wolf, Audrey; Zhao, M.

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Large Eddy Models (LES) and Single Column Models (SCM) are used in a surrogate climate change 101 to investigate the physical mechanism of low cloud feedbacks in climate models. Enhanced surface-102 driven boundary layer turbulence and shallow convection in a warmer climate are found to be 103 dominant mechanisms in SCMs.

  15. The full weak charge density distribution of 48Ca from parity violating electron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Z

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The ground state neutron density of a medium mass nucleus contains fundamental nuclear structure information and is at present relatively poorly known. Purpose: We explore if parity violating elastic electron scattering can provide a feasible and model independent way to determine not just the neutron radius but the full radial shape of the neutron density $\\rho_n(r)$ and the weak charge density $\\rho_W(r)$ of a nucleus. Methods: We expand the weak charge density of $^{48}$Ca in a model independent Fourier Bessel series and calculate the statistical errors in the individual coefficients that might be obtainable in a model parity violating electron scattering experiment. Results: We find that it is feasible to determine roughly six Fourier Bessel coefficients of the weak charge density of 48Ca within a reasonable amount of beam time. However, it would likely be much harder to determine the full weak density of a significantly heavier nucleus such as 208Pb. Conclusions: Parity violating elastic elec...

  16. A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

  17. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  18. Stiffness effects on the dynamics of the bar-mode instability of Neutron Stars in full General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Löffler; Roberto De Pietri; Alessandra Feo; Luca Franci; Francesco Maione

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on the effect of the stiffness of the equation of state on the dynamical bar-mode instability in rapidly rotating polytropic models of neutron stars in full General Relativity. We determine the change in the threshold for the emergence of the instability for a range of the adiabatic $\\Gamma$ index from 2.0 to 3.0, including two values chosen to mimic more realistic equations of state at high densities.

  19. Quantum dynamics of CO-H$_2$ in full dimensionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Benhui; Wang, X; Stancil, P C; Bowman, J M; Balakrishnan, N; Forrey, R C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate rate coefficients for molecular vibrational transitions due to collisions with H$_2$, critical for interpreting infrared astronomical observations, are lacking for most molecules. Quantum calculations are the primary source of such data, but reliable values that consider all internal degrees of freedom of the collision complex have only been reported for H$_2$-H$_2$ due to the difficulty of the computations. Here we present essentially exact full-dimensional dynamics computations for rovibrational quenching of CO due to H$_2$ impact. Using a high-level six-dimensional potential surface, time-independent scattering calculations, within a full angular-momentum-coupling formulation, were performed for the deexcitation of vibrationally excited CO. Agreement with experimentally-determined results confirms the accuracy of the potential and scattering computations, representing the largest of such calculations performed to date. This investigation advances computational quantum dynamics studies representing...

  20. The periodic standing-wave approximation: computations in full general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napoleon Hernandez; Richard H. Price

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The periodic standing wave method studies circular orbits of compact objects coupled to helically symmetric standing wave gravitational fields. From this solution an approximation is extracted for the strong field, slowly inspiralling motion of binary black holes and binary neutron stars. Previous work on this project has developed a method using a few multipoles of specially adapted coordinates well suited both to the radiation and the source regions. This method had previously been applied to linear and nonlinear scalar field models, to linearized gravity, and to a post-Minkowski approximation. Here we present the culmination of this approach: the application of the method in full general relativity. The fundamental equations had previously been developed and the challenge presented by this step is primarily a computational one which was approached with an innovative technique. The numerical results of these computations are compared with the corresponding results from linearized and post-Minkowksi computations.

  1. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 12 results. Download Solar Cell Simulation Students model the flow of energy from the sun as it enters a...

  3. Volume dependence of light hadron masses in full lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Orth; T. Lippert; K. Schilling

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the GRAL project is to simulate full QCD with standard Wilson fermions at light quark masses on small to medium-sized lattices and to obtain infinite-volume results by extrapolation. In order to establish the functional form of the volume dependence we study systematically the finite-size effects in the light hadron spectrum. We give an update on the status of the GRAL project and show that our simulation data for the light hadron masses depend exponentially on the lattice size.

  4. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schultz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, G.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.

    2012-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z{sub a}) is defined to quantitatively assess the models performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z{sub a} climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z{sub a} than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z{sub a} is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z{sub a} is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  5. The iPEPS algorithm, improved: fast full update and gauge fixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho N. Phien; Johann A. Bengua; Hoang D. Tuan; Philippe Corboz; Roman Orus

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The infinite Projected Entangled Pair States (iPEPS) algorithm [J. Jordan et al, PRL 101, 250602 (2008)] has become a useful tool in the calculation of ground state properties of 2d quantum lattice systems in the thermodynamic limit. Despite its many successful implementations, the method has some limitations in its present formulation which hinder its application to some highly-entangled systems. The purpose of this paper is to unravel some of these issues, in turn enhancing the stability and efficiency of iPEPS methods. For this, we first introduce the fast full update scheme, where effective environment and iPEPS tensors are both simultaneously updated (or evolved) throughout time. As we shall show, this implies two crucial advantages: (i) dramatic computational savings with essentially no loss of accuracy, and (ii) improved overall stability. Besides, we extend the application of the local gauge fixing, successfully implemented for finite-size PEPS [M. Lubasch, J. Ignacio Cirac, M.-C. Ba\\~nuls, PRB 90, 064425 (2014)], to the iPEPS algorithm. We see that the gauge fixing not only further improves the stability of the method, but also accelerates the convergence of the alternating least squares sweeping in the (either "full" or "fast full") tensor update scheme. The improvement in terms of computational cost and stability of the resulting "improved" iPEPS algorithm is benchmarked by studying the ground state properties of the quantum Heisenberg and transverse-field Ising models on an infinite square lattice.

  6. Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Mathematical Analysis of Full Fuel Cycle Energy Use. ”of Policy for Adopting Full-Fuel-Cycle Analyses Into Energyof Policy for Adopting Full-Fuel-Cycle Analyses Into Energy

  7. Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential of Domestic Natural Gas Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential of Domestic...

  8. RESRAD-BUILD: A computer model for analyzing the radiological doses resulting from the remediation and occupancy of buildings contaminated with radioactive material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; LePoire, D.J.; Jones, L.G. [and others

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material. The transport of radioactive material inside the building from one compartment to another is calculated with an indoor air quality model. The air quality model considers the transport of radioactive dust particulates and radon progeny due to air exchange, deposition and resuspension, and radioactive decay and ingrowth. A single run of the RESRAD-BUILD code can model a building with up to: three compartments, 10 distinct source geometries, and 10 receptor locations. A shielding material can be specified between each source-receptor pair for external gamma dose calculations. Six exposure pathways are considered in the RESRAD-BUILD code: (1) external exposure directly from the source; (2) external exposure to materials deposited on the floor; (3) external exposure due to air submersion; (4) inhalation of airborne radioactive particulates; (5) inhalation of aerosol indoor radon progeny; and (6) inadvertent ingestion of radioactive material, either directly from the sources or from materials deposited on the surfaces of the building compartments. 4 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 21 - 30 of 34 results. Download Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single DisplacementRedox Reaction As the popularity of photovoltaic...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 31 - 40 of 32 results. Download Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single DisplacementRedox Reaction As the popularity of photovoltaic...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 21 - 30 of 23 results. Download Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single DisplacementRedox Reaction As the popularity of photovoltaic...

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 21 - 30 of 25 results. Download Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single DisplacementRedox Reaction As the popularity of photovoltaic...

  13. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 31 - 40 of 35 results. Download Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single DisplacementRedox Reaction As the popularity of photovoltaic...

  14. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download The BEAM Project: Building Efficient Architectural Models This activity allows students the opportunity to explore...

  15. A full-scale simulation of streaming electrification in a large core-form transformer winding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, M.A.; Nelson, J.K.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A network based approach for streaming electrification developed elsewhere and experimentally calibrated is extended to a full-scale transformer structure. This model offers several improvements on the basic macroscopic electrification methodology first proposed by Roach and Templeton. A complete range of flow conditions from laminar to fully turbulent are considered and the effects of power frequency electric fields are included. In addition, the influence of temperature is recognized and static potentials are calculated based on an appropriate leakage current matrix. A complete section of an eight-pass core-form transformer winding has been examined under a variety of conditions. The results show that the size of the structure is critical and demonstrate the impact of entering charge from the cooling system. Static potentials in excess of 10 kV are shown to be possible under proper conditions with the potential distribution being highly dependent upon energization, flow rate and temperature.

  16. A full-scale thermal test and analytical evaluation of the beneficial uses shipping system cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moya, J.L.; Akau, R.L.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal test of the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) cask containing irradiation source capsules was conducted to verify a two-dimensional axisymmetric thermal model developed for the Safety Analysis Report. The BUSS cask is a Type B package developed to transport irradiation source capsules of cesium chloride or strontium fluoride to commercially licensed food and pharmaceutical irradiating facilities. The uniqueness of this test is that it was performed on an internally instrumented, full-scale cask with actual radioactive capsules. This resulted in more realistic system temperatures than those obtained if heaters were used to simulate the large gamma source. In addition, the thermal test provides benchmark data for other thermal codes. 12 refs.; 24 figs.; 2 tabs.

  17. Full Spectrum Light Therapy Full spectrum light bulbs are said to not only improve mood, but also

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Rebecca A.

    Full Spectrum Light Therapy Full spectrum light bulbs are said to not only improve mood, but also spectrum light bulbs produce light that is seen by the human eye in a bluish-white tint. Where is full

  18. Aspects of full-custom VLSI microprocessor design and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Daebum.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a broad spectrum of design styles that have proven successful for the construction of VLSI circuits and systems. Semi-custom to full-custom design styles offer a wide range of resulting performance, expected turn-around time, and required design effort. Implementation alternatives, such as replacing dynamic memory for static memory to implement a denser on-chip memory, also exist at all levels of design hierarchy. To make the best use of scarce resources on a single chip microprocessor and to make the emerging CAD tools truly useful, alternatives in the implementation of a microprocessor must be carefully evaluated. The research reported in this thesis focuses on issues concerning these alternatives, especially in the areas of on-chip memory design and automated control logic design.

  19. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single DisplacementRedox Reaction As the popularity of photovoltaic...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Enter terms Search Showing 41 - 50 of 42 results. Download Solar Cell Simulation Students model the flow of energy from the sun as it enters a photovoltaic...

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Enter terms Search Showing 51 - 60 of 53 results. Download Solar Cell Simulation Students model the flow of energy from the sun as it enters a photovoltaic...

  3. Kinetics of the smectite to illite transformation in the Denver Basin: Clay mineral, K-Ar data, and mathematical model results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, W.C.; Aronson, J.L.; Matisoff, G. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)); Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay mineral data, potassium-argon (K-Ar) ages, and mathematical model simulations indicate the important kinetic factors controlling the smectite to illite transformation (illitization) in Upper Cretaceous Mowry and Niobrara core and outcrop bentonites from the Denver basin. The data also provide additional information on the thermal history of the basin. Data show that both the percentages of illite layers and the K-Ar ages of mixed layer illite-smectite (I/S) increase with increasing depths of burial, and this trend was simulated mathematically employing a very simplified burial model with a fifth-order overall kinetic expression for the information of illite. For most of the basin, the data is compatible with I/S having been formed in response to increased temperature from progressive burial, because the oldest K-Ar ages of I/S are from the deepest buried I/S along the basin axis. In addition, these data qualitatively suggest that I/S even as small as <0.1 {mu}m retains radiogenic argon under Denver basin burial temperatures. I/S separated from drill core bentonites from the Watenberg gas field, astride the basin axis and known to have been subjected to an anomalously high temperature history, are the most illitic and among the oldest measured from core in this study. The ages of illitization (about 60 Ma) are coincident with the Laramide time of structural development of the basin and uplift of the Front Range. The reconstructions of the burial history, and the modeling of the timing and extent of illitization, suggest that the area of the Wattenberg as field was an upper Cretaceous depocenter, an area of relatively deeper burial along the basin axis.

  4. The first full orbit of Eta Carinae seen by Fermi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitberger, K; Reimer, O; Takahashi, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The binary system eta Carinae has completed its first 5.54y orbit since the beginning of science operation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We are now able to investigate the high-energy gamma-ray source at the position of eta Carinae over its full orbital period. By this, we can address and confirm earlier predictions for temporal and spectral variability. Newer versions of the LAT datasets, instrument response functions and background models allow for a more accurate analysis. Therefore it is important to re-evaluate the previously analyzed time period along with the new data to further constrain location, spectral shape, and flux time history of the gamma-ray source. We confirm earlier predictions of increasing flux values above 10 GeV toward the next periastron passage. For the most recent part of the data sample, flux values as high as those before the first periastron passage in 2008 are recorded. A comparison of spectral energy distributions around periastron and apastron passages reveals stron...

  5. Full fuel-cycle comparison of forklift propulsion systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L. L.; Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen has received considerable attention as an alternative to fossil fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigates the technical and economic feasibility of promising new technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells. A recent report for DOE identified three near-term markets for fuel cells: (1) Emergency power for state and local emergency response agencies, (2) Forklifts in warehousing and distribution centers, and (3) Airport ground support equipment markets. This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell propulsion for existing technologies based on batteries and fossil fuels. Industry data and the Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model are used to estimate full fuel-cycle emissions and use of primary energy sources, back to the primary feedstocks for fuel production. Also considered are other environmental concerns at work locations. The benefits derived from using fuel-cell propulsion are determined by the sources of electricity and hydrogen. In particular, fuel-cell forklifts using hydrogen made from the reforming of natural gas had lower impacts than those using hydrogen from electrolysis.

  6. FullSWOF Paral: Comparison of two parallelization strategies (MPI and SKELGIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are often used to model overland flow kinematic (KW) and diffusive wave (DW) equations [1], [2-orleans.fr/mapmo/soft/FullSWOF/ that solves shallow water equa- tions for applications in hydrology) based on a domain decomposition strategy]. But following [3], [4], [5], we choose to use the shallow water (Saint-Venant [6]) physical model. Indeed KW

  7. Proposal to Acquire Experimental Data and to Model the Results with a Monte Carlo Calculation of a Secondary Source Correction Factor for Area Source Acquisitions of Holdup y-PHA Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewberry, R.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an interference observed when acquiring y-ray holdup data. The interference comes from secondary contaminated surfaces that contribute to the y-ray signal when acquiring data in the area source configuration. It is often the case that these unwanted contributions can not be isolated and eliminated, so it is necessary to mathematically correct for the contribution. In this report we propose experiments to acquire the necessary data to determine the experimental correction factor specifically for highly enriched uranium holdup measurements. We then propose to use the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code to model the contribution in several acquisition configurations and for multiple interfering y-ray energies. Results will provide a model for calculation of this secondary source correction factor for future holdup measurements. We believe the results of the experiments and modeling of the data acquired in this proposal will have a significant impact on deactivation and de commissioning activities throughout the DOE weapons complex.

  8. Morphology of gold nanoparticles determined by full-curve fitting of the light absorption spectrum. Comparison with X-ray scattering and electron microscopy data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyantyn Slyusarenko; Benjamin Abécassis; Patrick Davidson; Doru Constantin

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize the size and shape of gold nanoparticles. We present a full-spectrum model that yields reliable results for the commonly encountered case of mixtures of spheres and rods in varying proportions. We determine the volume fractions of the two populations, the aspect ratio distribution of the nanorods (average value and variance) and the interface damping parameter. We validate the model by checking the fit results against small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy data and show that correctly accounting for the polydispersity in aspect ratio is essential for a quantitative description of the longitudinal plasmon peak.

  9. St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but has a high tolerance for shade-season grass. It does best in full sun and high temperatures. Goes dormant and turns brown in winter. Very

  10. New orthogonal space-time block codes with full diversity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalton, Lori Anne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown from the Hurwitz-Radon theorem that square complex orthogonal space-time code designs cannot achieve full diversity and full rate simul-taneously, except in the two transmit antenna case. However, this ...

  11. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E. [CD-adapco, 60 Broadhollow Road, Melville, NY 11747 (United States); Yan, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  12. Feasibility Study --Project Full Breeze By the Wind Energy Projects in Action (WEPA) Full Breeze Project team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feasibility Study -- Project Full Breeze By the Wind Energy Projects in Action (WEPA) Full Breeze Department of Facilities approached the wind energy sub-community in the spring of 2009 to assist in a study

  13. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the parent aluminum skin must experience significant yield strains before any damage to the doubler will occur.

  14. Full-f gyrokinetic simulation over a confinement time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idomura, Yasuhiro, E-mail: idomura.yasuhiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8587 (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8587 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A long time ion temperature gradient driven turbulence simulation over a confinement time is performed using the full-f gyrokinetic Eulerian code GT5D. The convergence of steady temperature and rotation profiles is examined, and it is shown that the profile relaxation can be significantly accelerated when the simulation is initialized with linearly unstable temperature profiles. In the steady state, the temperature profile and the ion heat diffusivity are self-consistently determined by the power balance condition, while the intrinsic rotation profile is sustained by complicated momentum transport processes without momentum input. The steady turbulent momentum transport is characterized by bursty non-diffusive fluxes, and the resulting turbulent residual stress is consistent with the profile shear stress theory [Y. Camenen et al., “Consequences of profile shearing on toroidal momentum transport,” Nucl. Fusion 51, 073039 (2011)] in which the residual stress depends not only on the profile shear and the radial electric field shear but also on the radial electric field itself. Based on the toroidal angular momentum conservation, it is found that in the steady null momentum transport state, the turbulent residual stress is cancelled by the neoclassical counterpart, which is greatly enhanced in the presence of turbulent fluctuations.

  15. Downloaded 11 Oct 2012 to 75.102.90.233. Redistribution subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions Full band atomistic modeling of homo-junction InGaAs band-to-band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    in the valley current region. Overall, the presented model reproduces experimental data well. VC 2012 American transistors (MOSFETs) has lead to a drastic increase of power consumption, an unmanageable heat generation due in the determination of the current peak and the second turn-on in the forward bias region. Empirical excess current

  16. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypcial converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests.

  17. Physics-based multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor simulation Numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is a key technology in the quest for improvements in efficiency, safety,...

  18. Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM Instruments for Simultaneous Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM Instruments for...

  19. ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE/FULL PROFESSOR Diabetes, Obesity, Metabolic Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE/FULL PROFESSOR Diabetes, Obesity, Metabolic Disease Department strengths in diabetes, obesity and metabolic disease. Outstanding candidates with expertise

  20. Full Steam Ahead for PV in US Homes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full Steam Ahead for PV in US Homes? Mark Bolinger, Galenutility-scale photovoltaic (PV) installations in the yearsimplications for PV rebate program administrators, PV system

  1. Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects Below are the project presentations and respective peer...

  2. Smart Energy Management of Multiple Full Cell Powered Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOhammad S. Alam

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this research project the University of South Alabama research team has been investigating smart energy management and control of multiple fuel cell power sources when subjected to varying demands of electrical and thermal loads together with demands of hydrogen production. This research has focused on finding the optimal schedule of the multiple fuel cell power plants in terms of electric, thermal and hydrogen energy. The optimal schedule is expected to yield the lowest operating cost. Our team is also investigating the possibility of generating hydrogen using photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells through finding materials for efficient light harvesting photoanodes. The goal is to develop an efficient and cost effective PEC solar cell system for direct electrolysis of water. In addition, models for hydrogen production, purification, and storage will be developed. The results obtained and the data collected will be then used to develop a smart energy management algorithm whose function is to maximize energy conservation within a managed set of appliances, thereby lowering O/M costs of the Fuel Cell power plant (FCPP), and allowing more hydrogen generation opportunities. The Smart Energy Management and Control (SEMaC) software, developed earlier, controls electrical loads in an individual home to achieve load management objectives such that the total power consumption of a typical residential home remains below the available power generated from a fuel cell. In this project, the research team will leverage the SEMaC algorithm developed earlier to create a neighborhood level control system.

  3. A Full Key Recovery Attack on HMAC-AURORA-512

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Full Key Recovery Attack on HMAC-AURORA-512 Yu Sasaki NTT Information Sharing Platform.yu@lab.ntt.co.jp Abstract. In this note, we present a full key recovery attack on HMAC- AURORA-512 when 512-bit secret keys is 2259 AURORA-512 operations, which is significantly less than the complexity of the exhaustive search

  4. Employment Status -All Respondents Full-time Employment -36%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    1 36% 4% 10% 28% 5% 5% 2% 1% 1% 8% Employment Status - All Respondents Full-time Employment - 36% Part-time Employment - 4% Continuing Current Employment - 10% Postdoctoral Fellowship - 28% Medical Residency (MD/PhDs) - 5% Full-time Graduate Studies - 5% Self-Employed - 2% Temporary Employment - 1% Other

  5. Effects of coal combustion residues on survival, antioxidant potential, and genotoxicity resulting from full-lifecycle exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    (CCRs), largely derived from coal-fired electrical generation, are rich in numerous trace elements A byproduct of coal-fired electricity generation is solid coal combustion residues (CCRs), which are typically). In 2000, the U.S. produced over 1 billion tons of coal, 90% of which was used for power generation (NRC

  6. 5177Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 19 / Tuesday, January 29, 2008 / Notices 1 The full postponement would result in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) require NMFS to publish an annual harvest guideline for lobster Permit Area 1, comprised of Federal waters the status of the lobster stocks. In 2006, Presidential Proclamation No. 8031 established the NWHI Marine

  7. Best Practices for Emergency Response to Incidents Involving Electric Vehicles Battery Hazards: A Report on Full-Scale Testing Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Departmentofof EnergyBest Practices

  8. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 20 of 19 results. Download Scale Models and Wind Turbines As wind turbines and wind farms become larger to take advantage of the economies of scale and increased wind speeds at...

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 20 of 18 results. Download Scale Models and Wind Turbines As wind turbines and wind farms become larger to take advantage of the economies of scale and increased wind speeds at...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 20 of 14 results. Download Scale Models and Wind Turbines As wind turbines and wind farms become larger to take advantage of the economies of scale and increased wind speeds at...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Scale Models and Wind Turbines As wind turbines and wind farms become larger to take advantage of the economies of scale and increased wind speeds at...

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 20 of 24 results. Download Scale Models and Wind Turbines As wind turbines and wind farms become larger to take advantage of the economies of scale and increased wind speeds at...

  13. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 30 of 35 results. Download Scale Models and Wind Turbines As wind turbines and wind farms become larger to take advantage of the economies of scale and increased wind speeds at...

  14. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 40 of 58 results. Download Scale Models and Wind Turbines As wind turbines and wind farms become larger to take advantage of the economies of scale and increased wind speeds at...

  15. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 20 of 12 results. Download Scale Models and Wind Turbines As wind turbines and wind farms become larger to take advantage of the economies of scale and increased wind speeds at...

  16. Q AS A LITHOLOGICAL/HYDROCARBON INDICATOR: FROM FULL WAVEFORM SONIC TO 3D SURFACE SEISMIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge O. Parra; C.L. Hackert; L. Wilson; H.A. Collier; J. Todd Thomas

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to develop a method to exploit viscoelastic rock and fluid properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic measurements to the presence of hydrocarbon saturation. To reach the objective, Southwest Research Institute scientists used well log, lithology, production, and 3D seismic data from an oil reservoir located on the Waggoner Ranch in north central Texas. The project was organized in three phases. In the first phase, we applied modeling techniques to investigate seismic- and acoustic-frequency wave attenuation and its effect on observable wave attributes. We also gathered existing data and acquired new data from the Waggoner Ranch field, so that all needed information was in place for the second phase. During the second phase, we developed methods to extract attenuation from borehole acoustic and surface seismic data. These methods were tested on synthetic data constructed from realistic models and real data. In the third and final phase of the project, we applied this technology to a full data set from the Waggoner site. The results presented in this Final Report show that geological conditions at the site did not allow us to obtain interpretable results from the Q processing algorithm for 3D seismic data. However, the Q-log processing algorithm was successfully applied to full waveform sonic data from the Waggoner site. A significant part of this project was technology transfer. We have published several papers and conducted presentations at professional conferences. In particular, we presented the Q-log algorithm and applications at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Development and Production Forum in Austin, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest from the attendees and, at the request of the SEG delegates, it was placed on the Southwest Research Institute Internet site. The presentation can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/Algorithm.pps In addition, we presented a second application of the Q algorithm at the SEG International Conference in Houston, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest there as well, and it can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/attenuation.pps.

  17. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  18. AB 1007 Full Fuel Cycle Analysis (FFCA) Peer Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, D; Armstrong, D; Campbell, C; Lamont, A; Gallegos, G; Stewart, J; Upadhye, R

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL is a participant of California's Advanced Energy Pathways (AEP) team funded by DOE (NETL). At the AEP technical review meeting on November 9, 2006. The AB 1007 FFCA team (Appendix A) requested LLNL participate in a peer review of the FFCA reports. The primary contact at the CEC was McKinley Addy. The following reports/presentations were received by LLNL: (1) Full Fuel Cycle Energy and Emissions Assumptions dated September 2006, TIAX; (2) Full Fuel cycle Assessment-Well to Tank Energy Inputs, Emissions, and Water Impacts dated December 2006, TIAX; and (3) Full Fuel Cycle Analysis Assessment dated October 12, 2006, TIAX.

  19. Preliminary Results from the Structural Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Validation o Actual generation levels (without distinction among coal steam technologies) and load 9.14 %9 generation levels (without distinction among coal steam technologies), load, and emissions 5.06 %5: reference case n Actual generation, demand, and emissions n Optimized coal and natural gas flows o Case B

  20. H2A Delivery Models and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Single delivery mode - 100 kgd or 1500 kgd forecourts * Delivery mode defined by user - Pipeline with geologic storage - Liquid hydrogen (LH2) via terminal and truck - Compressed...

  1. Apparatus and method for detecting full-capture radiation events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for sampling the output signal of a radiation detector and distinguishing full-capture radiation events from Compton scattering events. The output signal of a radiation detector is continuously sampled. The samples are converted to digital values and input to a discriminator where samples that are representative of events are identified. The discriminator transfers only event samples, that is, samples representing full-capture events and Compton events, to a signal processor where the samples are saved in a three-dimensional count matrix with time (from the time of onset of the pulse) on the first axis, sample pulse current amplitude on the second axis, and number of samples on the third axis. The stored data are analyzed to separate the Compton events from full-capture events, and the energy of the full-capture events is determined without having determined the energies of any of the individual radiation detector events. 4 figs.

  2. Apparatus and method for detecting full-capture radiation events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, Daniel M. C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sampling the output signal of a radiation detector and distinguishing full-capture radiation events from Compton scattering events. The output signal of a radiation detector is continuously sampled. The samples are converted to digital values and input to a discriminator where samples that are representative of events are identified. The discriminator transfers only event samples, that is, samples representing full-capture events and Compton events, to a signal processor where the samples are saved in a three-dimensional count matrix with time (from the time of onset of the pulse) on the first axis, sample pulse current amplitude on the second axis, and number of samples on the third axis. The stored data are analyzed to separate the Compton events from full-capture events, and the energy of the full-capture events is determined without having determined the energies of any of the individual radiation detector events.

  3. Dual Superconductivity and Chiral Symmetry in Full QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Carmona; M. D'Elia; L. Del Debbio; A. Di Giacomo; B. Lucini; G. Paffuti

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A disorder parameter detecting dual superconductivity of the vacuum is measured across the chiral phase transition in full QCD with two flavours of dynamical staggered fermions. The observed behaviour is similar to the quenched case.

  4. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with...

  5. Verification of full functional correctness for imperative linked data structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zee, Karen K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the verification of full functional correctness for a collection of imperative linked data structures implemented in Java. A key technique that makes this verification possible is a novel, integrated proof ...

  6. analysis full genome: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maize Human (partial) "I came into the class with little to no understanding of what genomics entailedGoals Full Genome Microarrays Data Analysis Bioinformatics RNA-free Teaching...

  7. Axion results: what is new?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduard Masso; Javier Redondo

    2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The PVLAS collaboration has obtained results that may be interpreted in terms of a light axion-like particle, while the CAST collaboration has not found any signal of such particles. Moreover, the PVLAS results are in gross contradiction with astrophysical bounds. We develop a particle physics model with two paraphotons and with a low energy scale in which these apparent inconsistencies are circumvented.

  8. Hot Zero and Full Power Validation of PHISICS RELAP-5 Coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Lodi; C. Rabiti; A. Alfonsi; A. Epiney; M. Sumini

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHISICS is a reactor analysis toolkit developed in the last 3 years at the Idaho National Laboratory that has been also coupled with the thermo-hydraulic plant simulator RELAP5-3D. PHISICS is aimed to provide an optimal trade off between needed computational resources and accuracy in the range of 10~100 cores. In fact this range has been identified as the next 5 to 10 years average computational capability available to nuclear engineer designing and optimizing nuclear reactor cores. Different publication has been already presented [1] showing test of the single modules composing the PHISICS package. Lately the Idaho National Laboratory had the opportunity to access to plant data for the first cycle of a PWR including Hot Zero Power (HZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP). This data provided the opportunity to validate the transport solver, the interpolation capability for mixed macro and micro cross section and the criticality search option of the PHISICS package. In the following we will firstly recall briefly the structure of the different PHISICS modules and then we will illustrate the modeling process and some preliminary results.

  9. Fracture assessment of weld material from a full-thickness clad RPV shell segment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture analysis was applied to full-thickness clad beam specimens containing shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPV) at beginning of life. The beam specimens were fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include gradients of material properties and residual stresses due to welding and cladding applications. Fracture toughness estimates were obtained from load vs load-line displacement and load vs crack-mouth-opening displacement data using finite-element methods and estimation schemes based on the {eta}-factor method. One of the beams experienced a significant amount of precleavage stable ductile tearing. Effects of precleavage tearing on estimates of fracture toughness were investigated using continuum damage models. Fracture toughness results from the clad beam specimens were compared with other deep- and shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) data generated previously from A533 Grade B plate material. Range of scatter for the clad beam data is consistent with that from the laboratory-scale SENB specimens tested at the same temperature.

  10. FULL SHEET CONTROL THROUGH THE USE OF STEER-ABLE NIPS Edgar I. Ergueta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Roberto

    FULL SHEET CONTROL THROUGH THE USE OF STEER-ABLE NIPS Edgar I. Ergueta University of California model, and the control law necessary to precisely correct for the lateral and angular positions with the addition of internal loops for the control of the process direction velocity and steering position

  11. Combination of searches for the Higgs boson using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson using the full CDF run II data set, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.45–10.0??fb[superscript ?1] collected from s? = 1.96??TeV p[Ż ...

  12. Full Text of the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFull Text Glossary Full Text Glossary

  13. MELCOR validation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, C.D.; Byers, R.K.; Shaffer, C.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent comparisons of MELCOR predictions to three sets of experiments, the ABCOVE Aerosol Experiments, the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, and the Battelle-Frankfurt Gas Mixing Experiments are presentd. All three comparisons involve conditions that are of concern in an LWR containment during a severe accident. MELCOR results are compared to the experimental data and the predictions of at least one other state-of-the-art code for each test. In the ABCOVE comparisons, the MELCOR aerosol modeling is demonstrated. In comparisons to the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, MELCOR predictions of the response of the containment to the release of steam from the primary system are shown, and in the Battelle-Frankfurt comparisons, MELCOR predictions of the diffusion in a containment of an injected hydrogen-nitrogen gas are studied. These comparisons provide critical testing of the MELCOR control volume hydrodynamics package, the radionuclide package, and the flow path package.

  14. Results from Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuo Takeuchi; for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent results from Super-Kamiokande (SK) are reported. On atmospheric neutrino analysis, we have performed a full 3-flavor oscillation analysis with SK-I+II+III data. A CPT violation study on atmospheric neutrino is also done with SK-I+II+III data. On solar neutrino analysis, a 3-flavor oscillation analysis with SK-III data is performed.

  15. Results from Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent results from Super-Kamiokande (SK) are reported. On atmospheric neutrino analysis, we have performed a full 3-flavor oscillation analysis with SK-I+II+III data. A CPT violation study on atmospheric neutrino is also done with SK-I+II+III data. On solar neutrino analysis, a 3-flavor oscillation analysis with SK-III data is performed.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph Dorit Ron and Adi Shamir Department.ron,adi.shamir}@weizmann.ac.il Abstract. The Bitcoin scheme is a rare example of a large scale global payment system in which all and how they spend their bitcoins, the balance of bitcoins they keep in their accounts, and how they move

  17. Anonymity for Bitcoin with accountable mixes (Full version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mixcoin Anonymity for Bitcoin with accountable mixes (Full version) Joseph Bonneau1 , Arvind to facilitate anonymous pay- ments in Bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies. We build on the emergent phenomenon compatible with Bitcoin. Against a passive attacker, our scheme provides an anonymity set of all other users

  18. Resource Assessment Overview and MIT Full Breeze Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    treat uncertainty explicitly by generating distributions versus point estimates #12;Assessment;Full Breeze Project Overview · Student-run project to assess the installation of a small wind turbine Tower 1 out performs Met Tower 2 under most prevailing wind directions · Winds often come from 270

  19. Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John C.

    Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks J. C. Wright , P. T. Bonoli , C hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron

  20. Clinical Cancer Care Full screening services and diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Clinical Cancer Care · Full screening services and diagnostics · Advanced treatments for all forms of cancer · Most frequent cancers at the Cancer Center: Breast 15% Gastrointestinal 13% Skin 17% Lung 13 treatment protocols that link the latest Cancer Center research to clinical care · Familial Cancer Program

  1. Elenco dei periodici elettronici in Ovid Full text Academic Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malerba, Donato

    & Their Treatment Advances in Anatomic Pathology Age & Ageing AIDS AIDS Patient Care & Stds AJN, American JournalElenco dei periodici elettronici in Ovid ­ Full text Academic Medicine Addictive Disorders Care Current Opinion in Critical Care Current Opinion in Endocrinology & Diabetes Current Opinion

  2. 168 ICTP Full Technical Report 2011 SCIENTIFIC PAPERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    molecular dynamics and computational spectroscopy study of a dye-sensitized solar cell. New Journal.144119 De Angelis, F.; Fantacci S.; Gebauer R. 2011. Simulating dye-sensitized TiO2 #12;ICTP Full Technical Douma, D.; Gebauer, R. 2011. Optical properties of dye sensitized TiO2 nanowires from time

  3. Periodicity of the solar full-disk magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Zhai, Q. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, CAS, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-disk solar magnetogram has been measured each day since 1970 January 19, and the daily Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and the daily Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) were calculated for each magnetogram at the Mount Wilson Observatory. The MPSI and MWSI are used to investigate the periodicity of the solar full-disk magnetic activity through autocorrelation analyses. Just two periods, the solar cycle and the rotation cycle, are determined in both the MPSI (the solar full-disk weak magnetic field activity) and MWSI (the solar full-disk strong magnetic field activity) with no annual signal found. The solar cycle for MPSI (10.83 yr) is found to be obviously longer than that for MWSI (9.77 yr). The rotation cycle is determined to be 26.8 ± 0.63 sidereal days for MPSI and 27.4 ± 2.4 sidereal days for MWSI. The rotation cycle length for MPSI is found to fluctuate around 27 days within a very small amplitude, but for MWSI it obviously temporally varies with a rather large amplitude. The rotation cycle for MWSI seems longer near solar minimum than at solar maximum. Cross-correlation analyses of daily MPSI and MWSI are carried out, and it is inferred that the MPSI components partly come from relatively early MWSI measurements.

  4. heplat/9311002 Full QCD on APE100 Machines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", UniversitĂ  di

    hep­lat/9311002 Full QCD on APE100 Machines. Stefano ANTONELLI, Marco BELLACCI, Andrea DONINI of QCD with two flavours of dynamical Wilson fermions using the Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm (HMCA on the lattice by means of Monte Carlo methods have become an important tool to understand and pre­ dict non

  5. FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO WHEELS ENERGY INPUTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO WHEELS ENERGY INPUTS, EMISSIONS, AND WATER IMPACTS Preparation for the AB 1007 (Pavley) Alternative Transportation Fuels Plan Proceeding Prepared For: California Energy, Project Manager Ray Tuvell, Manager EMERGING FUELS & TECHNOLOGY OFFICE Rosella Shapiro, Deputy Director

  6. FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS, EMISSIONS, AND WATER IMPACTS Prepared For Manager McKinley Addy, Project Manager Ray Tuvell, Manager EMERGING FUELS & TECHNOLOGY OFFICE Rosella Shapiro, Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION B.B Blevins Executive Director DISCLAIMER

  7. Journal Title Journal Homepage ISSN Full text Accounting and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqi, Sajjad Ahmed

    Journal Title Journal Homepage ISSN Full text from Accounting and Finance Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal www.emeraldinsight.com/aaj.htm 0951- 3574 1988 International Journal of Managerial Finance www.emeraldinsight.com/ijmf.htm 1743- 9132 2005 Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change www

  8. Validation of the SASSI2010 Subtraction Method Using Full Scale...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications SASSI Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Results SASSI Breakout Session Application of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis of WTP Facilities...

  9. Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 3 Number 1 : Full issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

    1966-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ). 2. These districts are: gnya' nang, skyid grong, rong shar, rdf,(lng dza', shtl dkar, glint skyes. ~. The Full Assembly consists of: all the government officials exeept the Regent and the Ministers of State (bka' blon); all the acting and retired... OK, SIKKIM 21 FEBRLARY 1966 PRINTED BY THE MANAGER, SIKKIM DARBAR PRESS AND PUBLISHED BY THE DIRECTOR NAMGYAL INS1ITUTE OF TIBETOLOGY, GANGTOK. ( . , t • CONTENTS THE GLOTTAL STOP AND GLOTTAL CONSTRICTION IN LEPCHA R. K. SPRIGG Page 5 TAX...

  10. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  11. Recent heavy flavor results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider have pioneered and established the role of flavor physics in hadron collisions. A broad program is now at its full maturity. We report on three new results sensitive to physics beyond the standard model, obtained using the whole CDF dataset: a measurement of the difference of CP asymmetries in K{sup +}K{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays of D{sup 0} mesons, new bounds on the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing phase and on the decay width difference of B{sub s}{sup 0} mass-eigenstates, and an update of the summer 2011 search for B{sub (s)}{sup 0} mesons decaying into pairs of muons. Finally, the D0 confirmation of the observation of a new hadron, the {chi}{sub b}(3P) state, is briefly mentioned.

  12. Investigation of soil damping on full-scale test piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Reenen, Dirk Andries

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per foot. This value of friction damping is obtained using the mathematical model with impact velocity exponent equal to 1. 0. The point damping parameter required for piles all in clay is 0. 15 seconds per foot with the velocity exponent equal..., but the pile tips were embedded in sand. Using the mathematical model with a velocity exponent of 1. 0 and a point damping value of 0. 15 seconds per foot, extremely high values of friction damping are needed to achieve agreement between predicted and actual...

  13. Collagen scaffolds in full- and hemi- resection spinal cord injury models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cholas, Rahmatullah H. (Rahmatullah Hujjat)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic scientific research over the past few decades has shown some light on the complex pathophysiology of SCI and has enhanced our understanding of some of the important factors that contribute to the lack of regeneration ...

  14. Numerical Modelling of Combined Heat Transfers in a Double Skin Faade -Full Scale Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , thermal comfort, visual comfort or energy gain [1]. In the current context of global warming, depletion heat transfers are also taken into account to obtain a global coupling between the different phenomena on two levels: during the winter period, the solar energy is used to heat the air in the façade [2], and

  15. Full-wave algorithms for model order reduction and electromagnet analysis of impedance and scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemas, Thomas J. (Thomas Jonas)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As technology advances and sophisticated electronic systems achieve ubiquity, the demand for thorough, efficient Electromagnetic (EM) analysis continues to rise. The prohibitive costs of constructing and maintaining ...

  16. J. Mol. Model. 2000, 6, 1 8 Springer-Verlag 2000FULL PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhua, Lai

    candidates in the conformational space of a protein loop. This high efficiency is due to our grid mapping with a simplified energy function and a grid-map- ping method. As a comparison of single simulation, it takes only, Cluster analysis, Simplified energy function, Grid-mapping method Correspondence to: L. Lai #12;2 J. Mol

  17. Carlsbad Area Office unveils full-scale model of new WIPP waste transportation cask

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l aNanocomposites,ProgramsCarl Wieman,

  18. Utility Rate Design Revision - A Frisbee Full of Boomerangs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannenmaier, J. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising electricity prices have prompted investigation of utility rates and proposals for changed in their design. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current design of electric rates, changes proposed, actual trends, and predictable results...

  19. Pricing and Forwarding Games for Inter-domain Full version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    , Koushik Kar, and Michael Usher Department of Computer Science Department of Electrical & Computer-to-anywhere pricing) [16]. It has been argued correctly that point-to-point or destination-based pric- ing can result

  20. Full protection of superconducting qubit systems from coupling errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Storcz; J. Vala; K. R. Brown; J. Kempe; F. K. Wilhelm; K. B. Whaley

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state qubits realized in superconducting circuits are potentially extremely scalable. However, strong decoherence may be transferred to the qubits by various elements of the circuits that couple individual qubits, particularly when coupling is implemented over long distances. We propose here an encoding that provides full protection against errors originating from these coupling elements, for a chain of superconducting qubits with a nearest neighbor anisotropic XY-interaction. The encoding is also seen to provide partial protection against errors deriving from general electronic noise.

  1. Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 13 Number 3 : Full issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

    with (he Pal}-chen Lama. He made greal otlerings and presents to all the monasteries. and remained in Lhasa until he was 32 years old (1759). While in Central Tibet, he entered Sgo-mang college (gra-tshang) of 'Bras-spungs monastery and received... and enthroned in the Potala. Then in the second month of the Iron-Sheep year (1751), the Seventh Dalai Lama assumed full spiritual and temporal powers over Tibet. For details see 'Dad-pa'i snye-ma (A biography of the Seventh Dalai Lama) by Lcang-skya Rol...

  2. Behavior of a full scale tieback wall in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Moonkyung

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEHAVIOR OP A PULL SCALE TIEBACK WALL IN SAND A Thesis by MOONKYUNG CHUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering BEHAUIOR OF A FULL SCALE TIEBACR WALL IN SAND A Thesis MOONKYUNG CHUNG Approved as to style and content by ean-Louis Briaud hair of Committee) Derek V. Morris (Member) Christo her C. Mathewson (Member) Jam T. P. ao...

  3. Full light absorption in single arrays of spherical nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ra'di, Y; Kosulnikov, S U; Omelyanovich, M M; Morits, D; Osipov, A V; Simovski, C R; Tretyakov, S A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we show that arrays of core-shell nanoparticles function as effective thin absorbers of light. In contrast to known metamaterial absorbers, the introduced absorbers are formed by single planar arrays of spherical inclusions and enable full absorption of light incident on either or both sides of the array. We demonstrate possibilities for realizing different kinds of symmetric absorbers, including resonant, ultra-broadband, angularly selective, and all-angle absorbers. The physical principle behind these designs is explained considering balanced electric and magnetic responses of unit cells. Photovoltaic devices and thermal emitters are the two most important potential applications of the proposed designs.

  4. Full Core Reactor Analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL] [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL] [ORNL; Davidson, Gregory G [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic neutron transport simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to more than 160k processors. Cell-homogenized cross sections were used with step-characteristics, linear-discontinuous finite element, and trilinear-discontinuous finite element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large-aspect ratio meshes than using step-characteristics.

  5. Phase transitions in full counting statistics for periodic pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri A. Ivanov; Alexander G. Abanov

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the problem of full counting statistics for periodic pumping. The probability generating function is usually defined on a circle of the "physical" values of the counting parameter, with its periodicity corresponding to charge quantization. The extensive part of the generating function can either be an analytic function on this circle or have singularities. These two cases may be interpreted as different thermodynamic phases in time domain. We discuss several examples of phase transitions between these phases for classical and quantum systems. Finally, we prove a criterion for the "analytic" phase in the problem of a quantum pump for noninteracting fermions.

  6. Alaska/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)AirwaysourceAlaskaAlaska/Wind Resources/Full

  7. Full Service Leased Space Data Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies ProgramOutfitted with SCREnginesFull Service Leased

  8. Full Text of the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies ProgramOutfitted with SCREnginesFull Service

  9. SBIR Full Application Preparation and Submission Information | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundAof Energy Full Application

  10. Utah/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLCEnergy)PeteforsythUtah/Wind Resources/Full Version

  11. Indiana/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP WindSatelliteInSARIndianaIndiana/Wind Resources/Full

  12. Iowa/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | OpenSuperior Wind FarmIowa/Wind Resources/Full

  13. Ohio/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns JumpsourceOffshoreInformationOhio/Wind Resources/Full

  14. Oklahoma/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and Gas CompanyOklahoma/Wind Resources/Full

  15. Michigan/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc Jump to:Michigan/Wind Resources/Full Version <

  16. Minnesota/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc JumpMicroPlanetMinnesota/Wind Resources/Full Version

  17. Missouri/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman Wind LLCMissouri/Wind Resources/Full

  18. Nebraska/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to: navigation,Nebraska/Wind Resources/Full Version

  19. Connecticut/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |UseCondonConnecticut/Wind Resources/Full

  20. Property:Full-Scale Test | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:Docket Number Jump to: navigation,Full-Scale

  1. Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Desai, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Murphy, James D. [School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor response and 1-year freedom from local progression.

  2. **FULL TITLE** ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, **YEAR OF PUBLICATION**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnstedt, JĂĽrgen

    .S.A. Abstract. The DAO-type white dwarf LS V+4621 is the hydrogen-rich cen- tral star of the possible planetary is the source of the BLP ­ in other words, pure hydrogen models are not well suited for the spectral analysis by the standard pipeline data reduction. A FUSE observation (905- 1195 °A, 67.6 ksec, 0.05 °A) was performed

  3. CV DJ Stacchiola Full List of Journal Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    -Gas Shift Reaction and Ethanol Steam Reforming: Fundamental Studies with Well-Defined Model Catalysts" SD-12298...........................................................................................................(2013) 91 - "Steam Reforming of Ethanol on Ni/CeO2: Reaction Pathway and Interaction between Ni and the CeO2-12025 .....................................................................................(2013) 89 - "Ethanol Photo Reaction on RuOx/Ru Modified TiO2(110)" S Kundu, AB Vidal, A Nadeem, SD

  4. Ris-R-1392(EN) Full scale testing of wind turbine blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř-R-1392(EN) Full scale testing of wind turbine blade to failure - flapwise loading Erik R F. Sřrensen Risř National Laboratory, Roskilde June 2004 #12;Abstract A 25m wind turbine blade test of a 25m Vestas wind turbine blade. The major results of the entire project can be found

  5. Full Citation: Nassauer, J. I. 1993. Ecological Function and the Perception of Suburban Residential Landscapes. In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassauer, Joan Iverson

    Full Citation: Nassauer, J. I. 1993. Ecological Function and the Perception of Suburban residents' perceptions of the proposed alternatives. While the results suggest that ecological knowledge Technical Report, USDA Forest Service North Central Forest Exp. Sta., St. Paul, MN. #12;ECOLOGICAL

  6. Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's regulatory and demonstration testing of MAGNOX fuel flasks in the United Kingdom (the CEGB 'Operation Smash Hit' tests), and the 1980's regulatory drop and fire tests conducted on the TRUPACT II containers used for transuranic waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The primary focus of the paper is a detailed evaluation of the cask testing programs proposed by the NRC in its decision implementing staff recommendations based on the Package Performance Study, and by the State of Nevada recommendations based on previous work by Audin, Resnikoff, Dilger, Halstead, and Greiner. The NRC approach is based on demonstration impact testing (locomotive strike) of a large rail cask, either the TAD cask proposed by DOE for spent fuel shipments to Yucca Mountain, or a similar currently licensed dual-purpose cask. The NRC program might also be expanded to include fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask. The Nevada approach calls for a minimum of two tests: regulatory testing (impact, fire, puncture, immersion) of a rail cask, and extra-regulatory fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask, based on the cask performance modeling work by Greiner. The paper concludes with a discussion of key procedural elements - test costs and funding sources, development of testing protocols, selection of testing facilities, and test peer review - and various methods of communicating the test results to a broad range of stakeholder audiences. (authors)

  7. A Full-Featured User Friendly CO{sub 2}-EOR and Sequestration Planning Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, Bill

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A Full-Featured, User Friendly CO{sub 2}-EOR and Sequestration Planning Software This project addressed the development of an integrated software solution that includes a graphical user interface, numerical simulation, visualization tools and optimization processes for reservoir simulation modeling of CO{sub 2}-EOR. The objective was to assist the industry in the development of domestic energy resources by expanding the application of CO{sub 2}-EOR technologies, and ultimately to maximize the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the U.S. The software resulted in a field-ready application for the industry to address the current CO{sub 2}-EOR technologies. The software has been made available to the public without restrictions and with user friendly operating documentation and tutorials. The software (executable only) can be downloaded from NITEC’s website at www.nitecllc.com. This integrated solution enables the design, optimization and operation of CO{sub 2}-EOR processes for small and mid-sized operators, who currently cannot afford the expensive, time intensive solutions that the major oil companies enjoy. Based on one estimate, small oil fields comprise 30% of the of total economic resource potential for the application of CO{sub 2}-EOR processes in the U.S. This corresponds to 21.7 billion barrels of incremental, technically recoverable oil using the current “best practices”, and 31.9 billion barrels using “next-generation” CO{sub 2}-EOR techniques. The project included a Case Study of a prospective CO{sub 2}-EOR candidate field in Wyoming by a small independent, Linc Energy Petroleum Wyoming, Inc. NITEC LLC has an established track record of developing innovative and user friendly software. The Principle Investigator is an experienced manager and engineer with expertise in software development, numerical techniques, and GUI applications. Unique, presently-proprietary NITEC technologies have been integrated into this application to further its ease of use and technical functionality.

  8. Full-field velocity measurements of single and two phase flows using digital pulsed laser velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canaan, Robert Ernst

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particles. The use of a cylindrical constant heat flux emitting conductor enabled full-field velocity measurement of unsteady natural convective flows over a wide range of single phase flow regimes. The method was additionally extended to the measurement... and will utilize a constant heat flux emitting electrical conductor in order to represent a simple model of a nuclear reactor fuel element vertically positioned within a rectangular coolant channel. Natural convective cooling is of particularly recent concern...

  9. Center Vortex vs. Abelian models of the QCD vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Höllwieser, Roman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that the center vortex model of confinement is more consistent with lattice results than other currently available models. In particular we show that Abelian field distributions predicted by monopole plasma, caloron gas or dual superconductor models cannot reproduce the area-law falloff of double winding Wilson loops in full $SU(2)$ and center vortex only gauge fields.

  10. Tokamak fusion reactors with less than full tritium breeding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Gilligan, J.G.; Jung, J.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of commercial, tokamak fusion reactors with tritium concentrations and tritium breeding ratios ranging from full deuterium-tritium operation to operation with no tritium breeding is presented. The design basis for these reactors is similar to those of STARFIRE and WILDCAT. Optimum operating temperatures, sizes, toroidal field strengths, and blanket/shield configurations are determined for a sequence of reactor designs spanning the range of tritium breeding, each having the same values of beta, thermal power, and first-wall heat load. Additional reactor parameters, tritium inventories and throughputs, and detailed costs are calculated for each reactor design. The disadvantages, advantages, implications, and ramifications of tritium-depleted operation are presented and discussed.

  11. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the grant entitled, ���¢��������Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions.���¢������� The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  12. Database Access Pattern Protection Without Full-shuffles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Xuhua

    , Singapore Abstract--Privacy protection is one of the fundamental security requirements for database executions. The standard Private Information Retrieval (PIR) schemes, which are widely regarded storage size. The resulting privacy assurance is as strong as PIR. Though with O(1) online computation

  13. Singlet Free Energies and Renormalized Polyakov Loop in full QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Petrov

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the free energy of a static quark anti-quark pair and the renormalized Polyakov loop in 2+1- and 3- flavor QCD using $16^3 \\times 4$ and $16^3 \\times 6$ lattices and improved staggered p4 action. We also compare the renormalized Polyakov loop with the results of our earlier studies.

  14. CULTURAL RATCHETING RESULTS PRIMARILY FROM SEMANTIC COMPRESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryson, Joanna J.

    CULTURAL RATCHETING RESULTS PRIMARILY FROM SEMANTIC COMPRESSION JOANNA J. BRYSON Artificial Models that cultural ratcheting requires the communication of beliefs about #12;hypotheses. Clearly, cultural

  15. Full-waveform inversion in the time domain with an energy-weighted gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhigang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When applying full-waveform inversion to surface seismic reflection data, one difficulty is that the deep region of the model is usually not reconstructed as well as the shallow region. We develop an energy-weighted gradient method for the time-domain full-waveform inversion to accelerate the convergence rate and improve reconstruction of the entire model without increasing the computational cost. Three different methods can alleviate the problem of poor reconstruction in the deep region of the model: the layer stripping, depth-weighting and pseudo-Hessian schemes. The first two approaches need to subjectively choose stripping depths and weighting functions. The third one scales the gradient with only the forward propagation wavefields from sources. However, the Hessian depends on wavefields from both sources and receivers. Our new energy-weighted method makes use of the energies of both forward and backward propagated wavefields from sources and receivers as weights to compute the gradient. We compare the reconstruction of our new method with those of the conjugate gradient and pseudo-Hessian methods, and demonstrate that our new method significantly improves the reconstruction of both the shallow and deep regions of the model.

  16. Source-independent full waveform inversion of seismic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of seismic trace data is collected in an input data set that is first Fourier transformed in its entirety into the frequency domain. A normalized wavefield is obtained for each trace of the input data set in the frequency domain. Normalization is done with respect to the frequency response of a reference trace selected from the set of seismic trace data. The normalized wavefield is source independent, complex, and dimensionless. The normalized wavefield is shown to be uniquely defined as the normalized impulse response, provided that a certain condition is met for the source. This property allows construction of the inversion algorithm disclosed herein, without any source or source coupling information. The algorithm minimizes the error between data normalized wavefield and the model normalized wavefield. The methodology is applicable to any 3-D seismic problem, and damping may be easily included in the process.

  17. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  18. Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    About the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office (WIPO) including information on plans, implementations, and results.

  19. Regional Portfolio Model ResultsRegional Portfolio Model Results Michael Schilmoeller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plans on the efficient frontier Interpreting a plan Issue Studies Carbon control and climate changeChanges in Assumptions and Data CO2 penalty likelihood distribution Conservation base case New programs and re on the efficient frontier Interpreting a plan Issue Studies Carbon control and climate change The economic effects

  20. The KamLAND Full-Volume Calibration System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KamLAND Collaboration; Berger, B. E.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Decowski, M. P.; Dwyer, D. A.; Elor, G.; Frank, A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Galloway, M.; Gray, F.; Heeger, K. M.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Keefer, G.; Lendvai, C.; McKee, D.; O'Donnell, T.; Piepke, A.; Steiner, H. M.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Ebihara, T.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Owada, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Tamae, K.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Leonard, D. S.; Luk, K.-B.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have successfully built and operated a source deployment system for the KamLAND detector. This system was used to position radioactive sources throughout the delicate 1-kton liquid scintillator volume, while meeting stringent material cleanliness, material compatibility, and safety requirements. The calibration data obtained with this device were used to fully characterize detector position and energy reconstruction biases. As a result, the uncertainty in the size of the detector fiducial volume was reduced by a factor of two. Prior to calibration with this system, the fiducial volume was the largest source of systematic uncertainty in measuring the number of antineutrinos detected by KamLAND. This paper describes the design, operation and performance of this unique calibration system.

  1. Hazard analysis results report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

  2. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

  3. Electronic full-image reports at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosier, M.L.

    1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a Department of Energy laboratory operated by the University of California. There are over 10,000 laboratory employees and contractors, many engaged in a variety of scientific and technical research. The laboratory covers forty-three square miles in northern New Mexico, one hundred miles from the nearest city which might reasonably be expected to meet the needs of the researchers. Because of the remoteness of the institution, the Research Library is a vital source for scientific and technical information. Due to the size of the institution, access to the physical library is difficult. These barriers, along with advances in technology, have led the Research Library to provide desktop access to all formal, unlimited Los Alamos reports. Older reports have been scanned and newer ones are received in electronic format. Currently over 10,000 reports are available in portable document format (PDF) via the World Wide Web (http://lib-www.lanl.gov). Researchers can search the library Web catalog (on a Z39.50 server), find a report, and click on a link to automatically bring up the report. This has been an extremely successful project as shown by the high usage, over 3,000 files retrieved per month in 1997 compared with around 100 for the hardcopy. This paper will discuss the reasons for, and the mechanics of, digitizing the reports, the results that have been observed, and plans for the future.

  4. www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/326/5949/112/DC1 Supporting Online Material for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montagner, Jean-Paul

    ) with a global 1-D model (PREM) (7). The crustal model has a maximum of seven layers: water, ice, soft sediment), are evaluated at frequency f. Here C0(f) is the dispersion curve for PREM. To correct our model, we resample. The six resulting phase-velocity maps exhibit a dispersion curve at each point. Strong heterogeneity

  5. 3-D unrestricted TDHF fusion calculations using the full Skyrme interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

    2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of fusion cross sections using a new generation Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) code which contains no approximations regarding collision geometry and uses the full Skyrme interaction, including all of the time-odd terms. In addition, the code uses the Basis-Spline collocation method for improved numerical accuracy. A comparative study of fusion cross sections for $^{16}O + ^{16,28}O$ is made with the older TDHF results and experiments. We present results using the modern Skyrme forces and discuss the influence of the new terms present in the interaction.

  6. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  7. CFD study of natural convection mixing in a steam generator mock-up: Comparison between full geometry and porous media approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehbi, A.; Badreddine, H. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5234 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In CFD simulations of flow mixing in a steam generator (SG) during natural circulation, one is faced with the problem of representing the thousands of SG U-tubes. Typically simplifications are made to render the problem computationally tractable. In particular, one or a number of tubes are lumped in one volume which is treated as a single porous medium. This approach dramatically reduces the computational size of the problem and hence simulation time. In this work, we endeavor to investigate the adequacy of this approach by performing two separate simulations of flow in a mock-up with 262 U-tubes, i.e. one in which the porous media model is used for the tube bundle, and another in which the full geometry is represented. In both simulations, the Reynolds Stress (RMS) model of turbulence is used. We show that in steady state conditions, the porous media treatment yields results which are comparable to those of the full geometry representation (temperature distribution, recirculation ratio, hot plume spread, etc). Hence, the porous media approach can be extended with a good degree of confidence to the full scale SG. (authors)

  8. Geothermal: Search Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Results Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links The...

  9. User Survey Results | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have accessed computing resources during the prior year. The results of the most recent survey are posted here with management responses to concerns or issues identified by our...

  10. The Influence of Seasonal and Decadal Trends in Coastal Ocean Processes on the Population Biology of the Krill Species Euphausia pacifica: Results of a Coupled Ecosystem and Individual Based Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorman, Jeffrey G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    allows parameters for bioenergetics (ingestion, respiration,robust set of data on the bioenergetics and physiology of E.time in the model. Bioenergetics. The bioenergetics of the

  11. The Influence of Seasonal and Decadal Trends in Coastal Ocean Processes on the Population Biology of the krill species Euphausia pacifica: Results of a coupled ecosystem and individual based modeling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    allows parameters for bioenergetics (ingestion, respiration,robust set of data on the bioenergetics and physiology of E.time in the model. Bioenergetics. The bioenergetics of the

  12. Yield estimates and comparisons for full custom, standard cell, and gate array design methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norte, Marcella Evelyn

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 3. 2 Critical Area. 3. 3 One-Path Modules. 3. 4 Two-Path Modules 3. 5 Large Number of Long Conductors 28 31 34 40 46 IV DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 4. 1 Results, 4. 2 Conclusions and Contributions. 52 52 69 PAGE 4. 3 Further Research... 17 19 6 Hypothetical Size Distribution of Defect Density . . 20 7 Ideal Chip Model 21 8 Hierarchical Model of (n+1) Arbitrary Level Module . 30 9 Defect in Long Conductor of Length L and Width w. . . 32 10 Defect with Diameter x in Long...

  13. Overview of ALICE results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryshen, E L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected ALICE results on the global event properties, particle spectra, azimuthal anisotropy, heavy flavour and quarkonium production in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV are presented. First results on p-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.02 TeV are briefly reviewed.

  14. Recent results from TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enomoto, Ryoji [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  15. NA57 Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antinori, F.; Dainese, A.; Morando, M.; Quercigh, E.; Segato, G.; Soramel, F.; Turrisi, R. [University of Padua, Padua (Italy); INFN, Padua (Italy); Bacon, P.; Bloodworth, I.; Bull, S. A.; Clarke, R. F.; Evans, D.; Jones, G. T.; Jovanovic, P.; Jusko, A.; Kinson, J. B.; Lietava, R.; Norman, P. I.; Platt, R. J.; Villalobos-Baillie, O. [University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperon enhancements at 160 and 40 A Gev/c are presented and compared. The momentum spectra are analysed in the framework of the blast wave model and freeze-out temperature, transverse and longitudinal flows are extracted. Nuclear modification factors are presented and discussed.

  16. QCD results at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent QCD measurements from the CDF collaboration at the Tevatron are presented, together with future prospects as the luminosity increases. The measured inclusive jet cross section is compared to pQCD NLO predictions. Precise measurements on jet shapes and hadronic energy flows are compared to different phenomenological models that describe gluon emissions and the underlying event in hadron-hadron interactions.

  17. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  18. Recent MEG results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cavoto

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    New results of a search for the ultra-rare decay $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ by the MEG collaboration are reported in this contribution. The data were taken during 2009 and correspond to approximately 6.5 10$^{13}$ muon stopped on target. A maximum likelihood analysis sets an upper limit at 90\\% C.L. on the branching ratio, BF($\\mu \\to e \\gamma$) $< $1.5 10$^{-11}$. The results presented here are preliminary.

  19. Full Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCLA, Law School

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    things, traditional service contracts are costly to monitor;we no longer need service contracts to mask the bitter tastethat the traditional service contract is not a perfect

  20. Full Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCLA, Law School

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. , International Emissions Trading Rules as a Compliancethe Economic Benefits of Emissions Trading Under the KyotoGreenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: Who Should Be Held Liable

  1. Full Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCLA, Law School

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Role in the American Corporate Governance Structure, 22 C2005) (“[E]ffective corporate governance, which enhancesmetric for effective corporate governance. Id. at 892 (“I

  2. Full Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCLA, Law School

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What Is a “Sanctuary”? , 61 SMU L. REV. 133, 151–54 (2008);Improve Income Distribution, 61 SMU L. REV. 23, 25 (2008) (

  3. Full Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCLA, Law School

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US National Power and the Post-War Trading Regime, 1 WORLDtrading will take place between enterprises, whether private or state-controlled. For example, Duke Power

  4. Full Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCLA, Law School

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    women who want to return to work sooner may tend to select employers that offer paid leave policies and vice versa.

  5. Full accuracy differential GPS C/A code pseudorange error correction concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Rajendra Laxman

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are minimal and suitable for harbour and harbour entry navigation . Texas Instruments L2] demonstrated the advantage of differential position correction . However i n the Texas Instruments test the pseudolite ground station and user used the same set...-View Determination. Ib Satellite Select. ion Procedure. Position determination IV NAVIGATION ANO PSEUDQLITE NODEL GPS Navigation model Ine Pseudolite Data Channel 22 22 Simulation Results. CONCLUSION. Recommendations. 31 31 REI. ERENCES. APPENDIX A...

  6. Free energy of static quarks and the renormalized Polyakov loop in full QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Petrov; for the RBC-Bielefeld Collaboration

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a detailed study of singlet free energies in full QCD with realistic quark masses. An improved scheme for the non-perturbative renormalization of the Polyakov loop is used and we compare its temperature dependence for QCD with different flavor content. We also analyze screening masses extracted from singlet free energies at various temperatures close to and above the QCD transition temperature. We conclude that the temperature dependence of screening masses is well described by perturbation theory up to a non-perturbative pre-factor. An effective running coupling has been determined for all temperature values giving additional insight into screening phenomena at high temperature.

  7. Transonic airfoil design and analysis using the full potential equation and approximate boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purcell, Timothy Wayne

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 14 Fine grid comparison for Y = 0 and Y = full cases . . . 34 15 Comparison of analysis and design pressure results, a= 1'. 35 16 17 Actual and designed airfoil slopes, u = 1'. Calculated and actual ordinates, u ~ 1 0 36 37 18 Comparison... The goal of this work is to investigate and to develop new numerical techniques for the analysis and design of airfoils in the transonic regime. Presently, there are several methods available for 1-4 two-dimensional transonic airfoil analysis...

  8. Top physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. They present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. they have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

  9. Reporting Conservation Results in the Chemical Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doerr, R. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, the Manufacturing Chemists Association (MCA) developed an energy rate method for reporting the energy conservation results of the chemical industry to the Federal Energy Administration. The MCA Energy Rate Method has served as a model...

  10. Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office carries out technology research, development, and deployment through an ongoing process of planning and analysis, implementation, and review. This Web page includes links to documents that support and document the program management process, and the results and public benefits that derive from it.

  11. Recent results from MAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  12. Experimental Characterization of the Full Load Vortex Rope Pulsation in the Draft Tube of a Francis Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turbine Objective Francis turbines working in off design operating conditions may experience the formation the stability of the machine operation, since it is a major source of pressure fluctuation in the hydraulic of the draft tube on a reduce scale model of a Francis turbine operating at full load. In particular

  13. Objective Full-time position as a software engineer, interested in data mining, machine learning, and database Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zordan, Victor

    Modeling on Sequential Data Mining · Integrated heuristic methods to largely minimize the construction costLexiang Ye Objective Full-time position as a software engineer, interested in data mining, machine University of California, Riverside, CA, USA Ph.D., Computer Science and Engineering Sep 2006 - Dec 2009

  14. atlas tracking results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS results will be given on Standard Model measurements, the discovery of the Higgs boson, searches for supersymmetry and exotics and on heavy-ion results. Vasiliki A....

  15. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enercon Services, Inc.

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Enercon Services, Inc. (ENERCON) was requested under Task Order No.2 to identify scientific and technical data needed to benchmark and justify Full Burnup Credit, which adds 16 fission products and 4 minor actinides1 to Actinide-Only burnup credit. The historical perspective for Full Burnup Credit is discussed, and interviews of organizations participating in burnup credit activities are summarized as a basis for identifying additional data needs and making recommendation. Input from burnup credit participants representing two segments of the commercial nuclear industry is provided. First, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been very active in the development of Full Burnup Credit, representing the interests of nuclear utilities in achieving capacity gains for storage and transport casks. EPRI and its utility customers are interested in a swift resolution of the validation issues that are delaying the implementation of Full Burnup Credit [EPRI 2010b]. Second, used nuclear fuel storage and transportation Cask Vendors favor improving burnup credit beyond Actinide-Only burnup credit, although their discussion of specific burnup credit achievements and data needs was limited citing business sensitive and technical proprietary concerns. While Cask Vendor proprietary items are not specifically identified in this report, the needs of all nuclear industry participants are reflected in the conclusions and recommendations of this report. In addition, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were interviewed for their input into additional data needs to achieve Full Burnup Credit. ORNL was very open to discussions of Full Burnup Credit, with several telecoms and a visit by ENERCON to ORNL. For many years, ORNL has provided extensive support to the NRC regarding burnup credit in all of its forms. Discussions with ORNL focused on potential resolutions to the validation issues for the use of fission products. SNL was helpful in ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost compared to the acquisition of equivalent experimental data. ENERCON concludes that even with the cos

  16. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Borissov

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the $p \\bar p$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy $b$- and $c$-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays $B^0, B^0_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in $B_s \\to J\\psi \\phi$ decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the $B_s \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  17. UNDERGRAD FULL-TIME PART-TIME UNDERGRAD FULL-TIME PART-TIME Arts & Social Sciences 4706 1118 15 -19 3910 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -TIME UNDERGRAD FULL-TIME PART-TIME Year 1 3431 432 Tri-County area 7533 1474 Year 2 3012 406 Rest of Ontario 2929 GRADUATE FULL-TIME PART-TIME GRADUATE FULL-TIME PART-TIME Tri-County area 586 80 Spec & Cert 3 2 Rest

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF A FULL-SCALE RETROFIT OF THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Hrdlicka; William Swanson

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector (AHPC), developed in cooperation between W.L. Gore & Associates and the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), is an innovative approach to removing particulates from power plant flue gas. The AHPC combines the elements of a traditional baghouse and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) into one device to achieve increased particulate collection efficiency. As part of the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy and Otter Tail Power Company. The EERC is the patent holder for the technology, and W.L. Gore & Associates was the exclusive licensee for this project. The project objective was to demonstrate the improved particulate collection efficiency obtained by a full-scale retrofit of the AHPC to an existing electrostatic precipitator. The full-scale retrofit was installed on an electric power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, Otter Tail Power Company's Big Stone Plant, in Big Stone City, South Dakota. The $13.4 million project was installed in October 2002. Project related testing concluded in December 2005. The following Final Technical Report has been prepared for the project entitled ''Demonstration of a Full-Scale Retrofit of the Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Technology'' as described in DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41420. The report presents the operation and performance results of the system.

  19. Test Facility for Full-Equipped Chambers for the LHCb Muon Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nóbrega, Rafael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb Muon System is made up by more than 1300 chambers of 20 different types, resulting in more than 120k readout channels. In order to guarantee high-quality performance during the experiment it is of crucial importance to get a complete knowledge of the fully equipped detector functionalities.A complete test system was built and a C++ ROOT software was developed to allow carring out a variety of studies on the many LHCb Muon chambers. Such system provides full control of the frontend, the high-voltage and the acquisition electronics and makes available a number of procedures to study the chambersâ?? performance. It was used for studies and a quality control on the chambers before and during the final positioning on the detector. In this note an overview of the hardware setup and of the software will be given. Results of measurements related to front-end channels characteristics will be presented.

  20. RESULTS OF SLICE MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear accelerator ELBE delivers high-brightness electron bunches to multiple user stations, including two IR-FEL oscillators [1], [2]. In the framework of an upgrade program the current thermionic injector is being replaced by a SRF-photoinjector [3], [4]. The SRF injector promises higher beam quality, especially required for future experiments with high power laser radiation. During the commissioning phase, the SRF-injector was running in parallel to the thermionic gun. After installation of a injection beamline (dogleg), beam from the SRF-injector can now be injected into the ELBE linac. Detailed characterization of the electron beam quality delivered by the new electron injector includes vertical slice emittance measurements in addition to measurements of projected emittance values. This report gives an overview of the status of the project and summarizes first measurement results as well as results of simulations performed with measurement settings.

  1. Tevatron Top Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Clement

    2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I present the latest results from the CDF and D0 collaborations on top quark production (single top and top quark pair production) at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at sqrt(s) =1.96 TeV, measurements of the top quark decay properties such as the branching ratio B(t -> Wb), the W helicity in t -> Wb decays, and measurements of fundamental parameters such as the top quark charge and mass.

  2. Search for the Higgs boson in the all-hadronic final state using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    This paper reports the result of a search for the standard model Higgs boson in events containing four reconstructed jets associated with quarks. For masses below 135 GeV/c [superscript 2], the Higgs boson decays to ...

  3. Double Chooz: Latest results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Crespo-Anadón; for the Double Chooz collaboration

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are presented. A detector located at an average distance of 1050 m from the two reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant has accumulated a live time of 467.90 days, corresponding to an exposure of 66.5 GW-ton-year (reactor power $\\times$ detector mass $\\times$ live time). A revised analysis has boosted the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties compared to previous publications, paving the way for the two detector phase. The measured $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.090^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ is extracted from a fit to the energy spectrum. A deviation from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is found, being consistent with an unaccounted reactor flux effect, which does not affect the $\\theta_{13}$ result. A consistent value of $\\theta_{13}$ is measured in a rate-only fit to the number of observed candidates as a function of the reactor power, confirming the robustness of the result.

  4. Simulating the universe(s) II: phenomenology of cosmic bubble collisions in full General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll L. Wainwright; Matthew C. Johnson; Anthony Aguirre; Hiranya V. Peiris

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing the relics of collisions between bubble universes would provide direct evidence for the existence of an eternally inflating Multiverse; the non-observation of such events can also provide important constraints on inflationary physics. Realizing these prospects requires quantitative predictions for observables from the properties of the possible scalar field Lagrangians underlying eternal inflation. Building on previous work, we establish this connection in detail. We perform a fully relativistic numerical study of the phenomenology of bubble collisions in models with a single scalar field, computing the comoving curvature perturbation produced in a wide variety of models. We also construct a set of analytic predictions, allowing us to identify the phenomenologically relevant properties of the scalar field Lagrangian. The agreement between the analytic predictions and numerics in the relevant regions is excellent, and allows us to generalize our results beyond the models we adopt for the numerical studies. Specifically, the signature is completely determined by the spatial profile of the colliding bubble just before the collision, and the de Sitter invariant distance between the bubble centers. The analytic and numerical results support a power-law fit with an index $1< \\kappa \\lesssim 2$. For collisions between identical bubbles, we establish a lower-bound on the observed amplitude of collisions that is set by the present energy density in curvature.

  5. Measuring BR($h \\to \\tau ^+ \\tau ^-$) at the ILC: a full simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawada, Shin-ichi; Suehara, Taikan; Takahashi, Tohru; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Harumichi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the expected measurement accuracy of the branching ratio of the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into tau pairs at the ILC with a full simulation of the ILD detector concept. We assume a Higgs mass of 125 GeV, a branching ratio of BR($h \\to \\tau ^+ \\tau ^-$) = 6.32%, a beam polarization of electron (positron) of -0.8(+0.3), and an integrated luminosity of 250 fb$^{-1}$. The Higgs-strahlung process $e^+ e^- \\to Zh$ with $Z \\to q\\overline{q}$ is analyzed. We estimate the measurement accuracy of the branching ratio $\\Delta (\\sigma \\times \\mathrm{BR}) / (\\sigma \\times \\mathrm{BR})$ to be 3.4% with using a multivariate analysis technique.

  6. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preceding paper described designs and analyses of thermionic reactors employing full-core-length single-cell converters with their heated emitters located on the outside of their internally cooled collectors, and it presented results of detailed parametric analyses which illustrate the benefits of this unconventional design. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypical converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests. The unfueled converter tests demonstrated the practicality of operating such long converters without shorting across a 0.3-mm interelectrode gap. They produced a measured peak output of 751 watts(e) from a single diode and a peak efficiency of 15.4%. The fueled converter tests measured the parametric performance of prototypic UO(subscript 2)-fueled converters designed for subsequent in-pile testing. They employed revolver-shaped tungsten elements with a central emitter hole surrounded by six fuel chambers. The full-length converters were heated by a water-cooled RF-induction coil inside an ion-pumped vacuum chamber. This required development of high-vacuum coaxial RF feedthroughs. In-pile test rules required multiple containment of the UO (subscript 2)-fuel, which complicated the fabrication of the test article and required successful development of techniques for welding tungsten and other refractory components. The test measured a peak power output of 530 watts(e) or 7.1 watts/cm (superscript 2) at an efficiency of 11.5%. There are three copies in the file. Cross-Reference a copy FSC-ESD-217-94-529 in the ESD files with a CID #8574.

  7. Recent Results from HAPPEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Michaels

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering of 3GeV electrons off hydrogen and helium-4 targets at theta{sub lab} = 6 degrees are reported. The helium-4 result is A = (+6.40 {+-} 0.23 (stat) {+-} 0.12 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A = (-1.58 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for helium-4 is a function solely of G{sub E}{sup s}. The combination of the two measurements separates G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} and provide new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions. We extract G{sub E}{sup s} = 0.002 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.007 at Q{sup 2} = 0.077 GeV{sup 2} and G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.09 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.007 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.006 at Q{sup 2} = 0.109 GeV{sup 2}.

  8. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  9. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  10. Clustering Web Search Results Using Fuzzy Ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Clustering Web Search Results Using Fuzzy Ants Steven Schockaert,* Martine De Cock, Chris Cornelis and Uncertainty Modelling Research Unit, Krijgslaan 281 (S9), B-9000 Gent, Belgium Algorithms for clustering Web existing approaches and illustrates how our algorithm can be applied to the problem of Web search results

  11. Results from NEMO 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Flack; for the NEMO 3 collaboration

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEMO 3 experiment is located in the Modane Underground Laboratory and has been taking data since 2003 with seven isotopes. It is searching for the double beta decay process with two or zero neutrinos emitted in the final state. Precision measurements of the half-life of the isotopes due to two neutrino double beta decay have been performed and new results for 96Zr, 48Ca and 150Nd are presented here. Measurements of this process are important for reducing the uncertainties on the nuclear matrix elements. No evidence for zero neutrino double beta decay has been found and a 90% Confidence Level lower limit on the half-life of this process is derived. From this an upper limit can be set on the effective Majorana neutrino mass using the most recent nuclear matrix elements calculations.

  12. Results from NA49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hoehne

    2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of results from the CERN experiment NA49 is presented with emphasis on most recent measurements. NA49 has systematically studied the dependence of hadron production on energy and system size or centrality. At top-SPS energy the detailed investigation of hadron production, now also extending to elliptic flow of Lambda-baryons and to identified particle yields at high p_t, shows that the created matter behaves in a similar manner as at RHIC energies. In the lower SPS energy range a distinct structure is observed in the energy dependence of the rate of strangeness production and in the slopes of p_t-spectra suggesting the onset of the creation of a deconfined phase of matter.

  13. AVTA: 2010 Quantum Escape PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Quantum Escape PHEV, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  14. adaptive full-spectrum solor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    causes a biochemical "full-spectrum" implies a light source that closely resembles daylight. Like natural daylight, full Bates, Rebecca A. 2 Age and metallicity of Galactic...

  15. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations using muon neutrinos from antimuon decay at rest. The electron antineutrinos are detected via the reaction electron antineutrino + proton {r_arrow} positron + neutron, correlated with the 2.2-MeV gamma from neutron + proton {r_arrow} deuteron + gamma. The use of tight cuts to identify positron events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with positron energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup -8}. A chi-squared fit to the entire positron sample results in a total excess of 51.8 {sup +18.7}{sub -16.9} {+-} 8.0 events with positron energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of (0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05){percent}. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; LSND Collaboration

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations using {anti v}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest. The {anti v}{sub e} are detected via the reaction {anti v}{sub e} p {yields} e{sup +}n, correlated with the 2.2 MeV {gamma} from n p {yields} d {gamma}. The use of tight cuts to identify e{sup +} events with correlated {gamma} rays yielded 22 events with e{sup +} energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}. A {chi}{sup 2} fit to the entire e{sup +} sample results in a total excess of 51.8{sub {minus}16.9}{sup +18.7} {+-} 8.0 events with e{sup +} energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of 0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05%.

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    models and the issues surrounding models and their accuracy when developing a large wind farm. Worksheets are included. http:energy.goveereeducationdownloads...

  18. Full Diversity Codes for MISO Systems Equipped with Linear or ML Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jing; Wong, Kon Max

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a general criterion for space time block codes (STBC) to achieve full-diversity with a linear receiver is proposed for a wireless communication system having multiple transmitter and single receiver antennas (MISO). Particularly, the STBC with Toeplitz structure satisfies this criterion and therefore, enables full-diversity. Further examination of this Toeplitz STBC reveals the following important properties: a) The symbol transmission rate can be made to approach unity. b) Applying the Toeplitz code to any signalling scheme having nonzero distance between the nearest constellation points results in a non-vanishing determinant. In addition, if QAM is used as the signalling scheme, then for independent MISO flat fading channels, the Toeplitz codes is proved to approach the optimal diversity-vs-multiplexing tradeoff with a ZF receiver when the number of channel uses is large. This is, so far, the first non-orthogonal STBC shown to achieve the optimal tradeoff for such a receiver. On the other han...

  19. Quantum Ratchets on Maximally Uniform States in Phase Space: Semiclassical Full-Chaos Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic kind of quantum chaotic ratchet is introduced, based on initial states that are \\emph{uniform} in phase space with the \\emph{maximal possible} resolution of one Planck cell. Unlike a classical phase-space uniform density, such a state usually carries a \\emph{nonzero} ratchet current, even in \\emph{symmetric} systems. This quantum ratchet effect basically emerges from the generic asymmetry of the state quasicoordinates in the Planck cell. It is shown, on the basis of exact results, general arguments, and extensive numerical evidence, that in a semiclassical full-chaos regime the variance of the current over all the states is nearly proportional to the chaotic-diffusion rate and to the square of the scaled Planck constant. Experimental realizations are suggested.

  20. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.