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1

Fukushima Daiichi:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Units 1, 2, and 3 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant...THE NUCLEAR REACTORS The six Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors were...did Units 3 and 4. Figure 1 Aerial view of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station...

Edward D. Blandford; Joonhong Ahn

2

Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011 051311JointDOEGoJAMSTrainDataFINALv2.pptx More Documents & Publications Radiation Monitoring Data from...

3

Office of Nuclear Energy Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident John E. Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Office of Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy June 15, 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors Earthquake 3/11 14:36 JST Earthquake 15:41 JST Tsunami Magnitude: 9.0 Generated a 14m Tsunami Many thousands perished More that 100 thousand people were homeless without food, water, or heat 5 Accident Sequence for Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors  Grid power lost due to the earthquake  Plant experienced station blackout after emergency diesels were damaged by the tsunami (nearly 1 hour later)  Eventual loss of batteries and cooling to control steam driven emergency pumps  Core overheats, cladding oxidizes and melts producing hydrogen

4

Simultaneous Sampling of Indoor and Outdoor Airborne Radioactivity after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simultaneous Sampling of Indoor and Outdoor Airborne Radioactivity after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident ... Large amts. of radioactive substances were released into the environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plants in eastern Japan as a consequence of the great earthquake (M 9.0) and tsunami of 11 March 2011. ... Proceedings of the International Symposium on Environmental Monitoring and Dose Estimation of Residents after Accident of TEPCOs Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station; Shiran Hall, Kyoto, Japan, Dec 14, 2012; http://www.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/anzen_kiban/outcome/. ...

Tetsuo Ishikawa; Atsuyuki Sorimachi; Hideki Arae; Sarata Kumar Sahoo; Miroslaw Janik; Masahiro Hosoda; Shinji Tokonami

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

Episode Analysis of Deposition of Radiocesium from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Episode Analysis of Deposition of Radiocesium from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident ... Center for Regional Environment Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2, Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8506, Japan ...

Yu Morino; Toshimasa Ohara; Mirai Watanabe; Seiji Hayashi; Masato Nishizawa

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

137Cs Trapped by Biomass within 20 km of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

137Cs Trapped by Biomass within 20 km of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant ... Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan ...

Akio Koizumi; Tamon Niisoe; Kouji H. Harada; Yukiko Fujii; Ayumu Adachi; Toshiaki Hitomi; Hirohiko Ishikawa

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

Numerical study and prediction of nuclear contaminant transport from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, a large earthquake and subsequent tsunami near the east coast of Japan destroyed the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FD-NPP), causing a massive ... Pacific circulation model, based on th...

Hui Wang; ZhaoYi Wang; XueMing Zhu; DaKui Wang; GuiMei Liu

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

SciTech Connect

This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

Guss, P. P.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Release of Pu Isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the Marine Environment Was Negligible  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of Pu Isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the Marine Environment Was Negligible ... On 11 March 2011, a massive earthquake with a magnitude of M 9.0 occurred in the western North Pacific about 180 km off the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in the northeast coast of Japan and it was followed by gigantic tsunami. ... Since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (1FNPP), significant levels of anthropogenic radionuclides have been detected in seabed sediments off the east coast of Japan. ...

Wenting Bu; Miho Fukuda; Jian Zheng; Tatsuo Aono; Takashi Ishimaru; Jota Kanda; Guosheng Yang; Keiko Tagami; Shigeo Uchida; Qiuju Guo; Masatoshi Yamada

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Numerical simulation of propagation of radioactive pollution in the ocean from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of the large-scale horizontal mixing and transport of radioactive water from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (NPP) (14102? E, 3727? N, east coast of Honshu Island, Japan) and ...

S. V. Prants; M. Yu. Uleysky; M. V. Budyansky

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Detection of radioxenon in Darwin, Australia following the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A series of 133Xe detections in April 2011 made at the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) International Monitoring System noble gas station in Darwin, Australia, were analysed to determine the most likely source location. Forward and backwards atmospheric transport modelling simulations using FLEXPART were conducted. It was shown that the most likely source location was the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. Other potential sources in the southern hemisphere were analysed, including the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) radiopharmaceutical facility, but it was shown that sources originating from these locations were highly unlikely to be the source of the observed 133Xe Darwin detections.

Blake Orr; Michael Schppner; Rick Tinker; Wolfango Plastino

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Atmospheric radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor accident observed in Vietnam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radionuclides from the reactor accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were observed in the surface air at stations in Hanoi, Dalat, and Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) in Vietnam, about 4500km southwest of Japan, during the period from March 27 to April 22, 2011. The maximum activity concentrations in the air measured at those three sites were 193, 33, and 37?Bqm?3 for 131I, 134Cs, and 137Cs, respectively. Peaks of radionuclide concentrations in the air corresponded to arrival of the air mass from Fukushima to Vietnam after traveling for 8d over the Pacific Ocean. Cesium-134 was detected with the 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio of about 0.85 in line with observations made elsewhere. The 131I/137Cs activity ratio was observed to decrease exponentially with time as expected from radioactive decay. The ratio at Dalat, where is 1500m high, was higher than those at Hanoi and HCMC in low lands, indicating the relative enrichment of the iodine in comparison to cesium at high altitudes. The time-integrated surface air concentrations of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the Southeast Asia showed exponential decrease with distance from Fukushima.

N.Q. Long; Y. Truong; P.D. Hien; N.T. Binh; L.N. Sieu; T.V. Giap; N.T. Phan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Aerial radiation monitoring around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant using an unmanned helicopter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 generated a series of large tsunami that seriously damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), which resulted in the release of radioactive materials into the environment. To provide further details regarding the distribution of air dose rate and the distribution of radioactive cesium (134Cs and 137Cs) deposition on the ground within a radius of approximately 5km from the nuclear power plant, we carried out measurements using an unmanned helicopter equipped with a radiation detection system. The distribution of the air dose rate at a height of 1m above the ground and the radioactive cesium deposition on the ground was calculated. Accordingly, the footprint of radioactive plumes that extended from the FDNPP was illustrated.

Yukihisa Sanada; Tatsuo Torii

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Activities for the remediation of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

With the aim of fulfilling recovery work for the Fukushima Daiichi NPP, technological efforts have been made for the development of a survey robot system, adequate communication infrastructure technologies, high radiation environment compatible gamma cameras, heavy machinery-type robots (ASTACO-SoRa), remote decontamination devices (AROUNDER), and contaminated waste water treatment system. We have developed a new type of absorbents which remove cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) simultaneously at a high removal rate of 99 % or more. We will provide valuable solutions and rational systems for waste water treatment using this developed adsorbent as well as other various adsorbents for the recovery of Fukushima Daiichi NPP.

Kinoshita, Hirofumi; Kometani, Yutaka; Asano, Takashi; Ishiwata, Masayuki; Fukasawa, Tetsuo [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., 2-2, Omika-cho, 5-chome, Hitachi-shi Ibaraki-ken, 319-1221 (Japan); Tadokoro, Takahiro; Nagumo, Yasushi; Kani, Yuko; Matsui, Tetsuya [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd. 2-2, Omika-cho, 5-chome, Hitachi-shi Ibaraki-ken, 319-1221 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

How radiation and its effect were explained?: Scientific communication after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we examine eight popular books published immediately after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Our aim is to clarify the characteristics, problems in the scientific communication related to the health effects of radiation. The eight books are compared from the aspects of: 1) how units such as Bq, Gy and Sv are defined; 2) how the dose limits are explained; 3) how deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation are differentiated; 4) how LNT model is explained and evaluated; 5) how the fact that we evolved in the midst of natural background radiation is treated. The main finding of our survey is that although the authors of the examined texts start from the same 'scientific facts', in trying to make these facts easily understandable, they adopt different rhetorical strategies and eventually they end up delivering quite different and conflicting messages to the people.

Kazuhisa Todayama; Kaori Karasawa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ecological Half-Lives of Radiocesium in 16 Species in Marine Biota after the TEPCOs Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident of March 11, 2011 was the result of the Great East Japan Earthquake, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake, and the resultant tsunami, which severely damaged several reactors. ... Report of the Japanese Government to the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear SafetyThe Accident at TEPCOs Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations; NERH: Tokyo, Japan, 2011; http://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/kan/topics/201106/iaea_houkokusho_e.html ... Results of Simulation of the Atmospheric Behavior of Radioactive Materials Released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant; NIES, Tsukuba, Japan; http://www.nies.go.jp/whatsnew/2011/20110825/20110825.html ...

Kayoko Iwata; Keiko Tagami; Shigeo Uchida

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Research subjects for analytical estimation of core degradation at Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

Estimation of the accident progress and status inside the pressure vessels (RPV) and primary containment vessels (PCV) is required for appropriate conductance of decommissioning in the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP. For that, it is necessary to obtain additional experimental data and revised models for the estimation using computer codes with increased accuracies. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, considering previously obtained information, conditions specific to the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP accident, and recent progress of experimental and analytical technologies. As a result, research and development items have been picked up in terms of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the RPV and PCV, progression of fuel bundle degradation, failure of the lower head of RPV, and analysis of the accident. This paper introduces the selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, research plans and recent results from the JAEA's corresponding research programs. (authors)

Nagase, F.; Ishikawa, J.; Kurata, M.; Yoshida, H.; Kaji, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Amaya, M; Okumura, K.; Katsuyama, J. [Fukushima Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Direction on characterization of fuel debris for defueling process in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

For the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), defueling of the fuel debris in the reactor core of Units 1-3 is planned to start within 10 years. Preferential items in the characterization of the fuel debris were identified for this work, in which the procedure and handling tools were assumed on the basis of information on 1F and experience after the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The candidates for defueling tools for 1F were selected from among the TMI- 2 defueling tools. It was found that they could be categorized into six groups according to their operating principles. The important properties of the fuel debris for defueling were selected considering the effect of the target materials on the tool performance. The selected properties are shape, size, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, melting point, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness. Of these properties, the mechanical properties (hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness) were identified as preferential items, because too few data on these characteristics of fuel debris are available in past severe accident studies. (authors)

Yano, Kimihiko; Kitagaki, Toru; Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Wakui, Ryohei; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kaji, Naoya; Koizumi, Kenji; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Agricultural approaches of remediation in the outside of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines agricultural approaches of remediation activity done in contaminated areas around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. About the decontamination examination of contaminated areas, we have tried the land scale test of a rice field before and after planting by the use of currently recommended methods. Since farmers would carry out the land preparation by themselves, generation of secondary radioactive waste should be as low as possible through the decontamination works. For the radioactive nuclide migration control of rice by wet rice production, several types of decontamination methods such as zeolite addition and potassium fertilization in the soil have been examined. The results are summarized in the 4 following points. 1) Plowing and water discharge are effective for removing radioactive cesium from rice field. 2) Additional potassium fertilization is effective for reducing cesium radioactivity in the product. 3) No significant difference is observed with or without the zeolite addition. 4) Very low transfer factor of cesium from soil to brown rice has been obtained compared with literature values.

Sato, Nobuaki [Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Saso, Michitaka [Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company: 2-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 210-0862 (Japan); Umeda, Miki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-29 Muramatsu, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); Fujii, Yasuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology:2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Amemiya, Kiyoshi [Hazama Corporation: 2-2-5 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8479 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Removal of Radionuclides from Waste Water at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant: Desalination and Adsorption Methods - 13126  

SciTech Connect

Waste water containing high levels of radionuclides due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, has been treated by the adsorption removal and reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination to allow water re-use for cooling the reactors. Radionuclides in the waste water are collected in the adsorbent medium and the RO concentrate (RO brine) in the water treatment system currently operated at the Fukushima Daiichi site. In this paper, we have studied the behavior of radionuclides in the presently applied RO desalination system and the removal of radionuclides in possible additional adsorption systems for the Fukushima Daiichi waste water treatment. Regarding the RO desalination system, decontamination factors (DFs) of the elements present in the waste water were obtained by lab-scale testing using an RO unit and simulated waste water with non-radioactive elements. The results of the lab-scale testing using representative elements showed that the DF for each element depended on its hydrated ionic radius: the larger the hydrated ionic radius of the element, the higher its DF is. Thus, the DF of each element in the waste water could be estimated based on its hydrated ionic radius. For the adsorption system to remove radionuclides more effectively, we studied adsorption behavior of typical elements, such as radioactive cesium and strontium, by various kinds of adsorbents using batch and column testing. We used batch testing to measure distribution coefficients (K{sub d}s) for cesium and strontium onto adsorbents under different brine concentrations that simulated waste water conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi site. For cesium adsorbents, K{sub d}s with different dependency on the brine concentration were observed based on the mechanism of cesium adsorption. As for strontium, K{sub d}s decreased as the brine concentration increased for any adsorbents which adsorbed strontium by intercalation and by ion exchange. The adsorbent titanium oxide had higher K{sub d}s and it was used for the column testing to obtain breakthrough curves under various conditions of pH and brine concentration. The breakthrough point had a dependency on pH and the brine concentration. We found that when the pH was higher or the brine concentration was lower, the longer it took to reach the breakthrough point. The inhibition of strontium adsorption by alkali earth metals would be diminished for conditions of higher pH and lower brine concentration. (authors)

Kani, Yuko; Kamosida, Mamoru; Watanabe, Daisuke [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 (Japan)] [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 (Japan); Asano, Takashi; Tamata, Shin [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan)] [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fukushima Daiichi Accident and Its Radiological Impact on the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is a topic of current media and public interest. It provides a means to motivate students to understand the fission process and the barriers that have been designed to prevent the release of fission products to the environment following a major nuclear powerreactor accident. The Fukushima Daiichi accident further encourages a discussion of the effect of fission products upon the environment including the resulting contamination of air water soil animals fish milk and crops. Accident-generated radiation levels that caused the evacuation of people 2030 km from the facility further serve to foster student interest and desire to understand the science associated with the Fukushima Daiichi accident.

J. J. Bevelacqua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Aerial Survey Results for 131I Deposition on the Ground after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

SciTech Connect

In March 2011 the second largest accidental release of radioactivity in history occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant following a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami. Teams from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Emergency Response performed aerial surveys to provide initial maps of the dispersal of radioactive material in Japan. The initial results from the surveys did not report the concentration of 131I. This work reports on analyses performed on the initial survey data by a joint Japan-US collaboration to determine 131I ground concentration. This information is potentially useful in reconstruction of the inhalation and external exposure doses from this short-lived radionuclide. The deposited concentration of 134Cs is also reported.

Torii, Tatsuo [JAEA; Sugita, Takeshi [JAEA; Okada, Colin E. [NSTec; Reed, Michael S. [NSTec; Blumenthal, Daniel J. [NNSA

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear Crisis Communications: The Plan Worked. A Critique of NRC Communications in the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor Crisis - 12073  

SciTech Connect

'Call the AV-Photo folks and get someone in here to shoot b-roll. We'll never be able to accommodate the network cameras and the only way I can get this to the media is to produce it ourselves'. Eliot Brenner, Director NRC Office of Public Affairs, March 12, 2011. For the past four years we have been speaking to audiences at Waste Management about communications issues. Last year, though we were kept from attending because of the federal budget crisis, our surrogates described to you the lessons the nuclear industry should draw from the BP Gulf oil spill crisis. Those remarks were delivered 11 days before the Fukushima Daiichi tragedy became the nuclear landmark of a generation - an industry changing event with worldwide ramifications, both in science and regulation and in communications. Eliot Brenner cut his teeth on crisis communication in the aviation industry where tragedy unfolds rapidly. He has been a speech-writer to three cabinet secretaries, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration and now spokesman for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission since 2004. Holly Harrington manages the NRC crisis response program and has 26 years federal public affairs experience, including eight years at the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Her crisis experience includes the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, numerous hurricanes and floods, Sept 11, and, now Fukushima Daiichi. Rebecca Schmidt is a veteran government relations professional whose decades in Washington include service with the House Armed Services Committee, the House Budget Committee and the Secretary of Defense. Collectively, the Offices of Public Affairs and Congressional Affairs conducted the largest outreach for the agency since Three Mile Island. We worked with the basic rule, described to Waste Management last year just 11 days before Fukushima - communicate early, often and clearly. The response - while not without its problems and lessons - went as smoothly as a chaotic event like Fukushima could go. That was due in large measure to the fact that the NRC has a well-tested system of responding to nuclear emergencies, and we followed our plan. (authors)

Brenner, Eliot; Harrington, Holly; Schmidt, Rebecca [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Insight from Fukushima Daiichi Unit 3 Investigations using MELCOR  

SciTech Connect

During the emergency response period of the accidents that took place at Fukushima Daiichi in March of 2011, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a number of studies using the MELCOR code to help understand what was occurring and what had occurred. During the post-accident period, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly sponsored a study of the Fukushima Daiichi accident with collaboration among Oak Ridge, Sandia, and Idaho national laboratories. The purpose of the study was to compile relevant data, reconstruct the accident progression using computer codes, assess the codes predictive capabilities, and identify future data needs. The current paper summarizes some of the early MELCOR simulations and analyses conducted at ORNL of the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 3 accident. Extended analysis and discussion of the Unit 3 accident is also presented taking into account new knowledge and modeling refinements made since the joint DOE/NRC study.

Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ott, Larry J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The economics of nuclear decontamination: assessing policy options for the management of land around Fukushima dai-ichi  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the light of the Japanese government's intensive efforts to decontaminate areas affected by radioactive Caesium from Fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant, I create a framework for assessing the merits of management options. In particular I consider delayed intervention as a possible policy. Delay can be optimal because allowing the natural decay of radiation can lower significantly the costs of achieving targets for exposure. Using some benchmark data for Japan I estimate that optimal delay is positive for most reasonable parameter values. Optimal delay generally lies in the range of 310 years with a central figure of 8.8 years. There is however considerable uncertainty over some of the key parameter values, particularly with regard to the behaviour of currently evacuated inhabitants.

Alistair Munro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Multi-Phased, Post-Accident Support of the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant - 12246  

SciTech Connect

In the wake of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami and the subsequent flooding of several of the Fukushima Dai-Ichi reactors, Japan and the Japanese utility TEPCO faced a crisis situation with incredible challenges: substantial amounts of radioactive mixed seawater and freshwater accumulated in the basements of four reactor and other buildings on the site. This water held varying levels of contamination due to the fact that it had been in contact with damaged fuel elements in the cores and with other contaminated components. The overall water inventory was estimated at around 110,000 tons of water with contamination levels up to the order of 1 Ci/l. Time was of the essence to avoid overflow of this accumulated water into the ocean. AREVA proposed, designed and implemented a water treatment solution using a proven chemical coprecipitation process with ppFeNi reagent, which is currently in use for effluent treatment on several nuclear sites including AREVA sites. In addition to the extremely short schedule the other challenge was to adapt the chemical treatment process to the expected composition of the Fukushima water and, in particular, to evaluate the impact of salinity on process performance. It was also necessary to define operating conditions for the VEOLIA equipment that had been selected for implementation of the process in the future facility. The operation phase began on June 17, and by the end of July more than 30,000 tons of highly radioactive saltwater had been decontaminated - the Decontamination Factor (DF) for Cesium was ?10{sup 4}. It allowed recycling the contaminated water to cool the reactors while protecting workers and the environment. This paper focuses on the Actiflo{sup TM}-Rad water treatment unit project that was part of the TEPCO general water treatment scheme. It presents a detailed look at the principles of the Actiflo{sup TM}-Rad, related on-the-fly R and D, an explanation of system implementation challenges, and a brief summary of operation results to date. AREVA's response to the Fukushima Dai-Ichi crisis was multi-phased: emergency aid and relief supply was sent within days after the accident; AREVA-Veolia engineering teams designed and implemented a water treatment solution in record time, only 3 months; and AREVA continues to support TEPCO and propose solutions for waste management, soil remediation and decontamination of the Fukushima Dai-Ichi site. Despite the huge challenges, the Actiflo{sup TM}-Rad project has been a success: the water treatment unit started on time and performed as expected. The performance is the result of many key elements: AREVA expertise in radioactive effluents decontamination, Veolia know-how in water treatment equipments in crisis environment, and of course AREVA and Veolia teams' creativity. The project success is also due to AREVA and Veolia teams' reactivity and high level of commitment with engineering teams working 24/7 in Japan, France and Germany. AREVA and Veolia deep knowledge of the Japanese industry ensured that the multi-cultural exchanges were not an issue. Finally the excellent overall project management and execution by TEPCO and other Japanese stakeholders was very efficient. The emergency water treatment was a key step of the roadmap towards restoration from the accident at Fukushima Dai-Ichi that TEPCO designed and keeps executing with success. (authors)

Gay, Arnaud; Gillet, Philippe; Ytournel, Bertrand; Varet, Thierry; David, Laurent; Prevost, Thierry; Redonnet, Carol; Piot, Gregoire; Jouaville, Stephane; Pagis, Georges [AREVA NC (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Distribution of oceanic 137Cs from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant simulated numerically by a regional ocean model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactive materials were released to the environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant as a result of the reactor accident after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011. The measured 137Cs concentration in a seawater sample near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant site reached 68kBqL?1 (6.8נ104BqL?1) on 6 April. The two major likely pathways from the accident site to the ocean existed: direct release of high radioactive liquid wastes to the ocean and the deposition of airborne radioactivity to the ocean surface. By analysis of the 131I/137Cs activity ratio, we determined that direct release from the site contributed more to the measured 137Cs concentration than atmospheric deposition did. We then used a regional ocean model to simulate the 137Cs concentrations resulting from the direct release to the ocean off Fukushima and found that from March 26 to the end of May the total amount of 137Cs directly released was 3.50.7PBq ((3.50.7)נ1015Bq). The simulated temporal change in 137Cs concentrations near the Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant site agreed well with observations. Our simulation results showed that (1) the released 137Cs advected southward along the coast during the simulation period; (2) the eastward-flowing Kuroshio and its extension transported 137C during May 2011; and (3) 137Cs concentrations decreased to less than 10BqL?1 by the end of May 2011 in the whole simulation domain as a result of oceanic advection and diffusion. We compared the total amount and concentration of 137Cs released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors to the ocean with the 137Cs released to the ocean by global fallout. Even though the measured 137Cs concentration from the Fukushima accident was the highest recorded, the total released amount of 137Cs was not very large. Therefore, the effect of 137Cs released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors on concentration in the whole North Pacific was smaller than that of past release events such as global fallout, and the amount of 137Cs expected to reach other oceanic basins is negligible comparing with the past radioactive input.

Daisuke Tsumune; Takaki Tsubono; Michio Aoyama; Katsumi Hirose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Removal of Radiocesium from Food by Processing: Data Collected after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident - 13167  

SciTech Connect

Removal of radiocesium from food by processing is of great concern following the accident of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Foods in markets are monitored and recent monitoring results have shown that almost all food materials were under the standard limit concentration levels for radiocesium (Cs-134+137), that is, 100 Bq kg{sup -1} in raw foods, 50 Bq kg{sup -1} in baby foods, and 10 Bq kg{sup -1} in drinking water; those food materials above the limit cannot be sold. However, one of the most frequently asked questions from the public is how much radiocesium in food would be removed by processing. Hence, information about radioactivity removal by processing of food crops native to Japan is actively sought by consumers. In this study, the food processing retention factor, F{sub r}, which is expressed as total activity in processed food divided by total activity in raw food, is reported for various types of corps. For white rice at a typical polishing yield of 90-92% from brown rice, the F{sub r} value range was 0.42-0.47. For leafy vegetable (indirect contamination), the average F{sub r} values were 0.92 (range: 0.27-1.2) after washing and 0.55 (range: 0.22-0.93) after washing and boiling. The data for some fruits are also reported. (authors)

Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Shannon P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Debra C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coronado, Melissa A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dewart, Jean M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eisele, William F. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fuehne, David P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, Milan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Joan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonell, Carolyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

30

134Cs and 137Cs activities in coastal seawater along Northern Sanriku and Tsugaru Strait, northeastern Japan, after Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A total of 37 seawater samples were collected at 10 sites along the coastline of the Northern Sanriku and Tsugaru Strait, 250450km north of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in AprilDecember 2009 and MayJune 2011, and analyzed for 134Cs and 137Cs activities using low-background ?-spectrometry. The 134Cs and 137Cs activities measured in these samples in May 2011 were found to be 23mBq/L and 2.54mBq/L, respectively. By June, these values had decreased by 2545%/month and 530%/month, respectively. These results can be plausibly explained by surface infusion of these isotopes into the sea by atmospheric transport from Fukushima and their subsequent reduction by water migration to off-shore and deeper regions.

M. Inoue; H. Kofuji; Y. Hamajima; S. Nagao; K. Yoshida; M. Yamamoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Can we remove iodine-131 from tap water in Japan by boiling? Experimental testing in response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iodine-131 concentrations in tap water higher than 100BqL?1 were reported by several local governments in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Some individuals in the emergency-response community recommended the boiling of tap water to remove iodine-131. However, the tap water boiling tests in this study showed no iodine-131 loss from the tap water with either short-term boiling (110min) or prolonged boiling (up to 30min) resulting in up to 3-fold volume reductions. In this situation, boiling was shown to be not effective in removing iodine-131 from tap water; indeed even higher concentrations may result from the liquid-volume reduction accompanying this process.

K. Tagami; S. Uchida

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors. October 17, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory Muon Radiography team members stand in front of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor...

33

Source Term Estimation of Radioxenon Released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Reactors Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Systems designed to monitor airborne radionuclides released from underground nuclear explosions detected radioactive fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011. Atmospheric transport modeling (ATM) of plumes of noble gases and particulates were performed soon after the accident to determine plausible detection locations of any radioactive releases to the atmosphere. We combine sampling data from multiple International Modeling System (IMS) locations in a new way to estimate the magnitude and time sequence of the releases. Dilution factors from the modeled plume at five different detection locations were combined with 57 atmospheric concentration measurements of 133-Xe taken from March 18 to March 23 to estimate the source term. This approach estimates that 59% of the 1.241019 Bq of 133-Xe present in the reactors at the time of the earthquake was released to the atmosphere over a three day period. Source term estimates from combinations of detection sites have lower spread than estimates based on measurements at single detection sites. Sensitivity cases based on data from four or more detection locations bound the source term between 35% and 255% of available xenon inventory.

Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Biegalski, S. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooper, Matthew W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Derek A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hoffman, Ian [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Korpach, E. [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Yi, Jing [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rishel, Jeremy P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ungar, R. Kurt [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); White, Brian [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Woods, Vincent T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Our Next Two Steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography  

SciTech Connect

After the vast disasters caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan, we proposed applying our Muon Tomography (MT) technique to help and improve the emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi using cosmic-ray muons. A reactor-tomography team was formed at LANL which was supported by the Laboratory as a response to a request by the former Japanese Prime Minister, Naoto Kan. Our goal is to help the Japanese people and support remediation of the reactors. At LANL, we have carried out a proof-of-principle technical demonstration and simulation studies that established the feasibility of MT to image a reactor core. This proposal covers the next two critical steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging: (1) undertake case study mock-up experiments of Fukushima Daiichi, and (2) system optimization. We requested funding to the US and Japanese government to assess damage of reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. The two steps will bring our project to the 'ready-to-go' level.

Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings  

SciTech Connect

Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi [Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-8560 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Suggestion of typical phases of in-vessel fuel-debris by thermodynamic calculation for decommissioning technology of Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station  

SciTech Connect

For the decommissioning of the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), the characterization of fuel-debris in cores of Units 1-3 is necessary. In this study, typical phases of the in-vessel fuel-debris were estimated using a thermodynamic equilibrium (TDE) calculation. The FactSage program and NUCLEA database were applied to estimate the phase equilibria of debris. It was confirmed that the TDE calculation using the database can reproduce the phase separation behavior of debris observed in the Three Mile Island accident. In the TDE calculation of 1F, the oxygen potential [G(O{sub 2})] was assumed to be a variable. At low G(O{sub 2}) where metallic zirconium remains, (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} were found as oxides, and oxygen-dispersed Zr, Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U), and Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2} were found as metals. With an increase in zirconium oxidation, the mass of those metals, especially Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2}, decreased, but the other phases of metals hardly changed qualitatively. Consequently, (U,Zr)O{sub 2} is suggested as a typical phase of oxide, and Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U) is suggested as that of metal. However, a more detailed estimation is necessary to consider the distribution of Fe in the reactor pressure vessel through core-melt progression. (authors)

Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Yoshikazu; Noguchi, Yoshikazu [PESCO Co.Ltd. (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Lateral variation of 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations in surface seawater in and around the Japan Sea after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A total of 82 surface seawater samples was collected in the Japan Sea and the southwestern Okhotsk Sea before and after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Analysis of 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations using low-background ?-spectrometry revealed that the 137Cs concentration of the samples collected in June 2011 was 1.52.8mBq/L, which is approximately 12 times higher than the pre-accident 137Cs level, while the 134Cs concentration was less than detectable to 1mBq/L. In addition to 134Cs being clearly detected (?1mBq/L), 137Cs concentration in water samples from the northeastern Japan Sea (22.8mBq/L) was also higher than that from the coast in the southwestern Japan Sea (?1.5mBq/L). These higher concentrations in the northeastern Japan Sea could be ascribed to the atmospheric transport of nuclides from the FDNPP as aerosols and subsequent transport and dilution after delivery to the sea surface.

M. Inoue; H. Kofuji; S. Nagao; M. Yamamoto; Y. Hamajima; K. Yoshida; K. Fujimoto; T. Takada; Y. Isoda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The air dose rate around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant: its spatial characteristics and temporal changes until December 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distribution maps of air dose rates around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were constructed using the results of measurement obtained from approximately 6500 locations (at most) per measurement period. The measurements were conducted 1m above the ground using survey meters in flat and spatially open locations. Spatial distribution and temporal change of the air dose rate in the area were revealed by examining the resultant distribution maps. The observed reduction rate of the air dose rate over the 18 months between June 2011 and December 2012 was greater than that calculated from radioactive decay of radiocesium by 10% in relative percentage except decontaminated sites. This 10% difference in the reduction of the air dose rate can be explained by the mobility of radiocesium in the depth direction. In the region where the air dose rate was lower than 0.25?Svh?1 on June 2011, the reduction of the air dose rate was observed to be smaller than that of the other dose rate regions, and it was in fact smaller than the reduction rate caused by radioactive decay alone. In contrast, the reduction rate was larger in regions with higher air dose rates. In flat and spatially open locations, no significant difference in the reduction tendency of air dose rates was observed among different land use classifications (rice fields, farmland, forests, and building sites).

Satoshi Mikami; Takeshi Maeyama; Yoshifumi Hoshide; Ryuichi Sakamoto; Shoji Sato; Naotoshi Okuda; Tetsuro Sato; Hiroshi Takemiya; Kimiaki Saito

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Variations in Map Products Demonstrated During the FRMAC Fukushima Daiichi Response  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides a brief summary of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster, discussion on map uses and production, early phase maps, intermediate phase maps, and late phase maps.

Pemberton, W. J.

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

40

Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery  

SciTech Connect

Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japans Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental remediation following the Fukushima-Daiichi accident  

SciTech Connect

A wide area of Fukushima Prefecture was contaminated with radioactivity released by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The decontamination pilot projects conducted by JAEA aimed at demonstrating the applicability of different techniques to rehabilitate affected areas. As most radioactive cesium is concentrated at the top of the soil column and strongly bound to mineral surfaces, there are 3 options left to decrease the gamma dose rate (usually measured 1 m above the ground surface): the stripping of the contaminated topsoil (i.e. direct removal of cesium), the dilution by mixing and the soil profile inversion. The last two options do not generate waste. As the half-distance of {sup 137}Cs gammas in soil is in the order of 5-6 cm (depending on density and water content), the shielding by 50 cm of uncontaminated deep soil would theoretically reduce gamma doses by about 3 orders of magnitude. Which option is employed depends basically on the Cesium concentration in the topsoil, averaged over a 15-cm thickness. The JAEA's decontamination pilot projects focus on soil profile inversion and topsoil stripping. Two different techniques have been tested for the soil profile inversion: one is the reversal tillage by which surface soil of thickness of several tens of cm is reversed by using a tractor plough and the other is the complete interchanging of contaminated topsoil with uncontaminated subsoil by using a back-hoe. Reversal tillage with a tractor plough cost about 30 yen/m{sup 2}, which is an order of magnitude lower than that of topsoil-subsoil interchange (about 300 yen/m{sup 2}). Topsoil stripping is significantly more costly (between 550 yen/m{sup 2} and 690 yen/m{sup 2} according to the equipment used)

Tagawa, A.; Miyahara, K.; Nakayama, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Markov Model of Accident Progression at Fukushima Daiichi  

SciTech Connect

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake followed by a tsunami caused loss of offsite power and disabled the emergency diesel generators, leading to a prolonged station blackout at the Fukushima Daiichi site. After successful reactor trip for all operating reactors, the inability to remove decay heat over an extended period led to boil-off of the water inventory and fuel uncovery in Units 1-3. A significant amount of metal-water reaction occurred, as evidenced by the quantities of hydrogen generated that led to hydrogen explosions in the auxiliary buildings of the Units 1 & 3, and in the de-fuelled Unit 4. Although it was assumed that extensive fuel damage, including fuel melting, slumping, and relocation was likely to have occurred in the core of the affected reactors, the status of the fuel, vessel, and drywell was uncertain. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions at Fukushima Daiichi, a Markov model of the likely state of one of the reactors was constructed and executed under different assumptions regarding system performance and reliability. The Markov approach was selected for several reasons: It is a probabilistic model that provides flexibility in scenario construction and incorporates time dependence of different model states. It also readily allows for sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of different failure and repair rates of cooling systems. While the analysis was motivated by a need to gain insight on the course of events for the damaged units at Fukushima Daiichi, the work reported here provides a more general analytical basis for studying and evaluating severe accident evolution over extended periods of time. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accidents.

Cuadra A.; Bari R.; Cheng, L-Y; Ginsberg, T.; Lehner, J.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, T.; Yue, M.

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

bristol.ac.uk/cabot Implications for the UK nuclear industry of the events at the Fukushima  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bristol.ac.uk/cabot Implications for the UK nuclear industry of the events at the Fukushima Dai of the events at the Fukushima Dai- ichi nuclear power station, Japan. The report draws on expertise at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), which has recently been declared a level 7 accident within

Bristol, University of

44

Evaluation of personal dose equivalent using optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters in Marumori after the Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......luminescent dosemeters after the Fukushima nuclear accident. The cumulative...resulted in severe damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant...materials into the atmosphere. Aerial measurements carried out by...in Miyagi, a neighboring Fukushima prefecture, is located 46......

Hiroko Yoshida-Ohuchi; Noriyasu Hirasawa; Ikuo Kobayashi; Takeshi Yoshizawa

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples are suggested as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site.

Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Temporal variations in 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations in seawater along the Shimokita Peninsula and the northern Sanriku coast in northeastern Japan, one year after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ninety-six seawater samples were collected between May 2011 and March 2012 at 6 sites along the Shimokita Peninsula and the northern Sanriku coast, 250450km north of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Cesium-134 and 137Cs concentrations were determined by low-background ?-spectrometry. During MayJune 2011, 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations in surface waters decreased from 1.02.8 to 0.71.5mBq/L and from 2.13.9 to 1.93.0mBq/L, respectively. These decreases were due to diffusion and advection in the ocean after atmospheric input of the FDNPP-derived radionuclides. However, in JulyAugust 2011, the concentrations of both radionuclides in the water samples collected on the Pacificside of the Shimokita Peninsula and the northern Sanriku coast exhibited 3050-fold increases (?40mBq/L for 134Cs and ?50mBq/L for 137Cs) over concentrations observed at these sampling sites in June 2011 in contrast to the gradual decreases in the concentrations on the Tsugaru Strait side of the Shimokita Peninsula. These results suggest that radiocesium-contaminated waters offshore in the Pacific Ocean were transported to coastal regions along the Pacific side of the Shimokita Peninsula and the northern Sanriku coast by ocean currents.

Hisaki Kofuji; Mutsuo Inoue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Restoration of water environment contaminated by radioactive cesium released from Fukushima Daiichi NPP  

SciTech Connect

In the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident, large amounts of volatile radioactive nuclides, such as {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, were released to the atmosphere and huge areas surrounding the nuclear site were contaminated by the radioactive fallout. In this study, a combined process with a hydrothermal process and a coagulation settling process was proposed for the separation of radioactive Cs from contaminated soil and sewage sludge. The coagulation settling operation uses Prussian Blue (Ferric ferrocyanide) and an inorganic coagulant. The recovery of Cs from sewage sludge sampled at Fukushima city (100.000 Bq/kg) and soil at a nearby village (55.000 Bq/kg), was tested. About 96% of Cs in the sewage sludge was removed successfully by combining simple hydrothermal decomposition and coagulation settling. However, Cs in the soil was not removed sufficiently by the combined process (Cs removal is only 56%). The hydrothermal decomposition with blasting was carried out. The Cs removal from the soil was increased to 85%. When these operations were repeated twice, the Cs recovery was over 90%. The combined process with hydrothermal blasting and coagulation settling is applicable to the removal of Cs from highly contaminated soil.

Takeshita, K.; Takahashi, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 157-8550 (Japan); Jinbo, Y. [CDM Cosulting Co.Ltd., 1-13-13 Tsukiji Chuo-ku Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Ishido, A. [Radwaste and Decommissioning Center, 1-7-6 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cesium Removal at Fukushima Nuclear Plant - 13215  

SciTech Connect

The Great East Japan Earthquake that took place on March 11, 2011 created a number of technical challenges at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. One of the primary challenges involved the treatment of highly contaminated radioactive wastewater. Avantech Inc. developed a unique patent pending treatment system that addressed the numerous technical issues in an efficient and safe manner. Our paper will address the development of the process from concept through detailed design, identify the lessons learned, and provide the updated results of the project. Specific design and operational parameters/benefits discussed in the paper include: - Selection of equipment to address radionuclide issues; - Unique method of solving the additional technical issues associated with Hydrogen Generation and Residual Heat; - Operational results, including chemistry, offsite discharges and waste generation. Results show that the customized process has enabled the utility to recycle the wastewater for cooling and reuse. This technology had a direct benefit to nuclear facilities worldwide. (authors)

Braun, James L.; Barker, Tracy A. [Avantech Incorporated, 95A Sunbelt Blvd Columbia, SC 29203 (United States)] [Avantech Incorporated, 95A Sunbelt Blvd Columbia, SC 29203 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Research and development on waste management for the Fukushima Daiichi NPS by JAEA  

SciTech Connect

Technologies for waste management of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1NPS) have been investigated. It is expected that the amount of wastes will be considerable. It is considered that F1NPS wastes were contaminated with radionuclides contained in spent fuel and with activation products, therefore the number of nuclides which needs to be considered in evaluating disposal safety is high. As a result, it is possible that the technologies selected will be different from those of the current wastes from nuclear reactors and fuel cycle facilities. The secondary waste from the accumulated water treatment, contaminated rubble and trees were analyzed, and the data obtained was provided for inventory evaluation. Demand on analytical data is strong, and sampling at the site and analysis have been continued. Storage safety of the secondary waste, especially for zeolite and sludge is under investigation. Investigation on conditioning and disposal was initiated, for survey on existing disposal concept assuming that both inventory and waste classification are uncertain. Different from usual methodology, these research and development activities should be conducted side-by-side.

Koma, Yoshikazu; Ashida, Takashi; Meguro, Yoshihiro; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Toshiki; Yamagishi, Isao; Kameo, Yutaka; Terada, Atsuhiko; Hiyama, T.; Koyama, Tomozo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kaminishi, Shuji; Saito; Noriyuki; Denda, Yasutaka [Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc., Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

New Standards in Liquid Waste Treatment at Fukushima Dai-ichi - 13134  

SciTech Connect

The earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011 severely damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant leading to the most severe nuclear incident since Chernobyl. Ongoing operations to cool the damaged reactors at the site have led to the generation of highly radioactive coolant water. This is currently mainly treated to remove Cs-137 and Cs-134 and passed through a reverse osmosis (RO) unit to reduce the salinity before being cycled back to the reactors. Because only the Cs isotopes are removed, the RO reject water still contains many radioactive isotopes and this has led to the accumulation of over 200,000 cubic meters (52 million gallons) of extremely contaminated water which is currently stored on site in tanks. EnergySolutions, in partnership with Toshiba, were contracted to develop a system to reduce 62 isotopes in this waste down to allowable levels. This was a significant technical challenge given the high background salt content of the wastewater, the variation in aqueous chemistry of the radioactive isotopes and the presence of non-active competing ions (e.g. Ca and Mg) which inhibit the removal of isotopes such as Sr-89 and Sr-90. Extensive testing was performed to design a suitable system that could meet the required decontamination goals. These tests were performed over a 6 month period at facilities available in the nearby Fukushima Dai-ni laboratory using actual waste samples. This data was then utilized to design a Multi Radioactive Nuclides Removal System (MRRS) for Fukushima which is a modified version of EnergySolutions' proprietary Advanced Liquid Processing System (ALPS)'. The stored tank waste is fed into a preliminary precipitation system where iron flocculation is performed to remove a number of isotopes, including Sb-125, Ru-106, Mn-54 and Co-60. The supernatant is then fed into a second precipitation tank where the pH is adjusted and the bulk of the Mg, Ca and Sr precipitated out as carbonates and hydroxides. After passing through a cross-flow ultrafiltration membrane, the permeate then goes through a total of 14 fixed ion exchange and adsorbent columns followed by a disposable polishing column to polish the residual isotopes down to allowable levels. At the end of the system, the effluent is filtered for a final time to removal any particulates that may have been picked up from the media columns and then stored prior to analysis. (authors)

Sylvester, Paul; Milner, Tim; Ruffing, Jennifer; Poole, Scott [EnergySolutions, 100 Center Point Circle, Suite 100, Center Point II, Columbia, SC 29210 (United States)] [EnergySolutions, 100 Center Point Circle, Suite 100, Center Point II, Columbia, SC 29210 (United States); Townson, Paul; Jensen, Jesse [EnergySolutions, 2345 Stevens Drive, Suite 240, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [EnergySolutions, 2345 Stevens Drive, Suite 240, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's nuclear scar Researchers have devised a method to use cosmic rays to gather detailed information from inside the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors. October 17, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory Muon Radiography team members stand in front of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex during a visit to determine evaluate whether Los Alamos' Scattering Method for cosmic-ray radiography could be used to image the location of nuclear materials within the reactor buildings. Los Alamos National Laboratory Muon Radiography team members stand in front of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex during a visit to determine evaluate whether Los Alamos' Scattering Method for cosmic-ray

52

Fukushima Daiichi:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...management, and fundamental reactor design...backup emergency diesel generators immediately...enough to allow fire engines to inject seawater...concern once emergency diesel generators were...by using the fire engine pumps, first with...management, and fundamental reactor design...

Edward D. Blandford; Joonhong Ahn

53

Fukushima Daiichi:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cutaway view of the General Electric boiling...Source: NRC and General Electric website...of the emergency diesel generators and switchgear...enough to allow fire engines to inject seawater...concern once emergency diesel generators were started...by using the fire engine pumps, first with...

Edward D. Blandford; Joonhong Ahn

54

The effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on stock prices of electric power utilities in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, which is owned by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), on the stock prices of the other electric power utilities in Japan. Because the other utilities were not directly damaged by the Fukushima nuclear accident, their stock price responses should reflect the change in investor perceptions on risk and return associated with nuclear power generation. Our first finding is that the stock prices of utilities that own nuclear power plants declined more sharply after the accident than did the stock prices of other electric power utilities. In contrast, investors did not seem to care about the risk that may arise from the use of the same type of nuclear power reactors as those at the Fukushima Daiichi station. We also observe an increase of both systematic and total risks in the post-Fukushima period, indicating that negative market reactions are not merely caused by one-time losses but by structural changes in society and regulation that could increase the costs of operating a nuclear power plant.

Shingo Kawashima; Fumiko Takeda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on European energy policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The disaster that struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan has reignited the international debate on the future of nuclear energy. Interestingly, the incident has been used to both justify nuclear power generation and reconsider past decisions made on established or planned nuclear power sites. Geographically removed from the radioactive fallout, Europe's response to the massive nuclear accident differed greatly among the member states. The UK and Germany stand out as examples of the wide spread of policy response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. In the UK, policy makers remained firm on their decision to increase nuclear power generation in the near future, whereas in Germany, the federal government decided to at least temporarily shut down the old generation of nuclear reactors and re-examine the safety of all national nuclear power facilities. Furthermore, a regional voter backlash, fuelled by resentment of the Merkel government's previous commitment to nuclear power, dealt a serious blow to the ruling coalition parties. How can national policy responses to the same event be so divergent in two European countries? This article attempts to answer this question in five arguments. I argue that in contrast to the UK, the German public faced imminent elections, stronger media reporting, increasing trust in renewable technologies, a history of nuclear resistance and a feeling of close cultural proximity to the Japanese.

Bettina B.F. Wittneben

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Dysfunction of the regulation of nuclear power in Japan - legal analysis of the Fukushima Disaster and 2012 Reform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper will present a detailed analysis of 1) the former dysfunctional regulation and public scrutiny of nuclear power in Japan that led to the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant; 2) insufficiency of the 2012 regulatory reform and the Environmental Impact Assessment Law as compared to other countries' laws and regulations; 3) specific examination of proposed solutions: further regulatory reform and the amendment of the Environmental Impact Assessment Law.

Jotaro Yokoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

MELCOR Model of the Spent Fuel Pool of Fukushima Dai-ichi Unit 4  

SciTech Connect

Unit 4 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered a hydrogen explosion at 6:00 am on March 15, 2011, exactly 3.64 days after the earthquake hit the plant and the off-site power was lost. The earthquake occurred on March 11 at 2:47 pm. Since the reactor of this Unit 4 was defueled on November 29, 2010, and all its fuel was stored in the spent fuel pool (SFP4), it was first believed that the explosion was caused by hydrogen generated by the spent fuel, in particular, by the recently discharged core. The hypothetical scenario was: power was lost, cooling to the SFP4 water was lost, pool water heated/boiled, water level decreased, fuel was uncovered, hot Zircaloy reacted with steam, hydrogen was generated and accumulated above the pool, and the explosion occurred. Recent analyses of the radioisotopes present in the water of the SFP4 and underwater video indicated that this scenario did not occur - the fuel in this pool was not damaged and was never uncovered the hydrogen of the explosion was apparently generated in Unit 3 and transported through exhaust ducts that shared the same chimney with Unit 4. This paper will try to answer the following questions: Could that hypothetical scenario in the SFP4 had occurred? Could the spent fuel in the SPF4 generate enough hydrogen to produce the explosion that occurred 3.64 days after the earthquake? Given the magnitude of the explosion, it was estimated that at least 150 kg of hydrogen had to be generated. As part of the investigations of this accident, MELCOR models of the SFP4 were prepared and a series of calculations were completed. The latest version of MELCOR, version 2.1 (Ref. 1), was employed in these calculations. The spent fuel pool option for BWR fuel was selected in MELCOR. The MELCOR model of the SFP4 consists of a total of 1535 fuel assemblies out of which 548 assemblies are from the core defueled on Nov. 29, 2010, 783 assemblies are older assemblies, and 204 are new/fresh assemblies. The total decay heat of the fuel in the pool was, at the time of the accident, 2.284 MWt, of which 1.872 MWt were from the 548 assemblies of the last core discharged and 0.412 MWt were from the older 783 assemblies. These decay heat values were calculated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the ORIGEN2.2 code (Ref. 2) - they agree with values reported elsewhere (Ref. 3). The pool dimensions are 9.9 m x 12.2 m x 11.8 m (height), and with the water level at 11.5 m, the pool volume is 1389 m3, of which only 1240 m3 is water, as some volume is taken by the fuel and by the fuel racks. The initial water temperature of the SFP4 was assumed to be 301 K. The fuel racks are made of an aluminum alloy but are modeled in MELCOR with stainless steel and B4C. MELCOR calculations were completed for different initial water levels: 11.5 m (pool almost full, water is only 0.3 m below the top rim), 4.4577 m (top of the racks), 4.2 m, and 4.026 m (top of the active fuel). A calculation was also completed for a rapid loss of water due to a leak at the bottom of the pool, with the fuel rapidly uncovered and oxidized in air. Results of these calculations are shown in the enclosed Table I. The calculation with the initial water level at 11.5 m (full pool) takes 11 days for the water to boil down to the top of the fuel racks, 11.5 days for the fuel to be uncovered, 14.65 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen and 19 days for the pool to be completely dry. The calculation with the initial water level at 4.4577 m, takes 1.1 days to uncover the fuel and 4.17 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen. The calculation with the initial water level at 4.02 m takes 3.63 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen this is exactly the time when the actual explosion occurred in Unit 4. Finally, fuel oxidation in air after the pool drained the water in 20 minutes, generates only 10 kg of hydrogen this is because very little steam is available and Zircaloy (Zr) oxidation with the oxygen of the air does not generate hydrogen. MELCOR calculated water levels and hydrogen generated in the SFP4 as a function of time for initial water le

Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Self-powered Thermoacoustic Sensor for In-pile Nuclear Reactor Monitoring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inspired by the unfortunate events of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan, 2011, the Pennsylvania State University began a collaboration with Idaho National Laboratories (more)

Ali, Randall

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the ocean and biota off Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and other soluble Fukushima isotopes, providing...integrated vs. depth, aerial inventories of 137 Cs at different...highest estimated aerial burdens on land...discharges from the Fukushima NPPs. Total atmospheric...relationship and the better aerial coverage provided...discharged from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power...

Ken O. Buesseler; Steven R. Jayne; Nicholas S. Fisher; Irina I. Rypina; Hannes Baumann; Zofia Baumann; Crystaline F. Breier; Elizabeth M. Douglass; Jennifer George; Alison M. Macdonald; Hiroomi Miyamoto; Jun Nishikawa; Steven M. Pike; Sashiko Yoshida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Role of Nuclear Energy in Japan PostFukushima.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper, Role of Nuclear Energy in Japan Post Fukushima: Alternatives and their Impact onJapans GHG Emission Targets, is to (more)

Niazi, Zarrar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessing the Impact of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster on Policy Dynamics and the Public Sphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Social and political fallout following the March 2011 Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear disaster permanently altered the zeitgeist of global public attitude towards nuclear power and towards energy technology in general. This area of public policy, which in Japan is particularly opaque and stagnant, was forced into a period of energy sector review amid domestic and worldwide debate. This study explores novel methodologies for measuring these developments, covering the 1) framing effects of traditional media and the 2) user-sourced content of social media. This quantitative approach yielded the following hypothesis verifications; 1) in an AHP-style online survey, exposure to real and simulated nuclear-related disaster headlines reduced collective partiality towards nuclear power by 3% and 4% respectively, and 2) retrospective opinion mining of Twitter procured an relative increase in negative nuclear-related posts of 38% and 134% in Japanese and English respectively, from the pre to post-Fukushima world. Using nuclear power and Fukushima as a case study, this paper attempts to elucidate both the influence of media on the public sphere, and the influence of the public sphere on policy and policymakers. From the results it is possible to make the conjecture that a lack of scientific education with regard to energy issues increases the former influence, and similarly reduces the latter.

Harry A. Hassard; Joshua K.Y. Swee; Moustafa Ghanem; Hironobu Unesaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fukushima fallout: Gauging the change in Japanese nuclear energy policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fukushima nuclear disaster is a special case: a major ... technological disaster, which resulted in a serious nuclear accident. Because the various costs are so ... of life in Japan. This article describes nuclear

Elena Shadrina

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nuclear energy policy in Belgium after Fukushima  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Belgian nuclear phase-out law imposes closing down in the 20152025 period seven nuclear power plants (NPPs) producing more than 50% of the domestic electricity. This creates an urgent problem in the country because of the absence of well-defined capacity-replacement plans. Though a safety-of-supply provision in the law allows for a delayed phase-out, hopes for a technically acceptable schedule have reduced after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011. In this article policy investigations are made with system dynamics. A significant finding from such modelling is that, in contrast to common expectations, a too early nuclear phase-out will not serve the deployment of renewable energy sources and rational use of energy. It is indeed found to primarily benefit to fossil fuel, creating unwanted drawbacks regarding safety of supply, dependency on foreign suppliers, price volatility, and increased use of non-renewable and CO2-emitting fossil fuels.

Pierre L. Kunsch; Jean Friesewinkel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima Plant Cleanup Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima Plant Cleanup January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima Plant Cleanup TEPCO officials tour the Hanford site to learn about cleanup technologies that could be used in the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred in 2011. TEPCO officials tour the Hanford site to learn about cleanup technologies that could be used in the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred in 2011. Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima Plant Cleanup

65

Fukushima-derived radionuclides in ground-level air of Central Europe: a comparison with simulated forward and backward trajectories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of forward and backward modeling of air mass transport from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant to Slovakia were...131I, 134Cs and 137Cs) were observed in the Bratislava ground-level air in MarchApril ...

P. P. Povinec; I. Skora; M. Gera; K. Hol

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to test global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in litre-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results provide proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume at high altitude over Germany occurred several days before the ground level plume.

Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

67

Elevated Radioxenon Detected Remotely Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident  

SciTech Connect

We report on the first measurements of short-lived gaseous fission products detected outside of Japan following the Fukushima nuclear releases, which occurred after a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011.

Bowyer, Ted W.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Miley, Harry S.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woods, Vincent T.

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Radioactive contamination of fishes in lake and streams impacted by the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 emitted radioactive substances into the environment, contaminating a wide array of organisms including fishes. We found higher concentrations of radioactive cesium (137Cs) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) than in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus nerka), and 137Cs concentrations in brown trout were higher in a lake than in a stream. Our analyses indicated that these differences were primarily due to differences in diet, but that habitat also had an effect. Radiocesium concentrations (137Cs) in stream charr (Salvelinus leucomaenis) were higher in regions with more concentrated aerial activity and in older fish. These results were also attributed to dietary and habitat differences. Preserving uncontaminated areas by remediating soils and releasing uncontaminated fish would help restore this popular fishing area but would require a significant effort, followed by a waiting period to allow activity concentrations to fall below the threshold limits for consumption.

Mayumi Yoshimura; Tetsuya Yokoduka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

JAPANS NUCLEAR CRISIS CONTINUES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

JAPANS NUCLEAR CRISIS CONTINUES ... IT WILL TAKE UP TO nine months before the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan is stabilized, facility owner Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) said last week. ...

GLENN HESS

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

70

Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints September 19, 2012 Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company Topics Covered: How Tsunami Struck Fukushima Sites Tsunami Height Estimation How we responded in the Recovery Process Safety Improvement and Further Enhancement of Nuclear Safety Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints More Documents & Publications January2005 NNSANews Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011

71

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that devastated the Fuku- shima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant resulted in the largest accidental release of cesium and following Tsunami off the east coast of Japan on March 11, 2011 severely damaged three nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant (NPP). The total direct release of 137 Cs to the marine environment

Buesseler, Ken

72

The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Re-examination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely, particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

Golay, Michael (MIT) [MIT

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima  

SciTech Connect

Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

A regional simulation study on dispersion of nuclear pollution from the damaged Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nuclear accident involving the leaking of radioactive pollutants occurred at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, following an earthquake and subsequent tsunami on ... accident, this study simulates the ...

JianFang Fei; PengFei Wang; XiaoPing Cheng; XiaoGang Huang

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90} Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ~0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA. Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid techniques published previously. The r

Maxwell, S.

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Rapid Radiochemical Analyses in Support of Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 13196  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples [1, 2]. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90}Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation [3, 4]. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ?0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA [5, 6, 7] Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples [8]. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. [9, 10] Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid te

Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results September 19-20, 2012 - Bethesda North Marriott TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 - Grand Ballroom, Salons F/G/H 1 9/14/12 6:00 - 8:00 pm Registration WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 - Grand Ballroom, Salons F/G/H 7:00 - 8:00 am Registration 8:00 - 8:05 am Logistics Stephen A. Kirchhoff, Office of Health, Safety and Security US Department of Energy 8:05 - 8:15 am Welcoming Remarks and Workshop Objectives Glenn S. Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer US Department of Energy 8:15 - 8:45 am Maintaining Our Focus on Nuclear Safety Daniel B. Poneman, Deputy Secretary US Department of Energy 8:45 - 9:30 am Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - the

79

Impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants on Marine Radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants on Marine Radioactivity ... Discussion of these data has involved many of our colleagues in Japan, including M. Uematsu (Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo), M. Honda and T. Kawano (Research Institute for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine Earth Science and Technology) and D. Tsumune (Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry). ...

Ken Buesseler; Michio Aoyama; Masao Fukasawa

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Radiological protection issues arising during and after the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following the Fukushima accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) convened a task group to compile lessons learned from the nuclear reactor accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, with respect to the ICRP system of radiological protection. In this memorandum the members of the task group express their personal views on issues arising during and after the accident, without explicit endorsement of or approval by the ICRP.While the affected people were largely protected against radiation exposure and no one incurred a lethal dose of radiation (or a dose sufficiently large to cause radiation sickness), many radiological protection questions were raised. The following issues were identified: inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients); attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures; quantifying radiation exposure; assessing the importance of internal exposures; managing emergency crises; protecting rescuers and volunteers; responding with medical aid; justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions; transiting from an emergency to an existing situation; rehabilitating evacuated areas; restricting individual doses of members of the public; caring for infants and children; categorising public exposures due to an accident; considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos; monitoring public protection; dealing with 'contamination' of territories, rubble and residues and consumer products; recognising the importance of psychological consequences; and fostering the sharing of information.Relevant ICRP Recommendations were scrutinised, lessons were collected and suggestions were compiled.It was concluded that the radiological protection community has an ethical duty to learn from the lessons of Fukushima and resolve any identified challenges. Before another large accident occurs, it should be ensured that inter alia: radiation risk coefficients of potential health effects are properly interpreted; the limitations of epidemiological studies for attributing radiation effects following low exposures are understood; any confusion on protection quantities and units is resolved; the potential hazard from the intake of radionuclides into the body is elucidated; rescuers and volunteers are protected with an ad hoc system; clear recommendations on crisis management and medical care and on recovery and rehabilitation are available; recommendations on public protection levels (including infant, children and pregnant women and their expected offspring) and associated issues are consistent and understandable; updated recommendations on public monitoring policy are available; acceptable (or tolerable) 'contamination' levels are clearly stated and defined; strategies for mitigating the serious psychological consequences arising from radiological accidents are sought; and, last but not least, failures in fostering information sharing on radiological protection policy after an accident need to be addressed with recommendations to minimise such lapses in communication.

Abel J Gonzlez; Makoto Akashi; John D Boice Jr; Masamichi Chino; Toshimitsu Homma; Nobuhito Ishigure; Michiaki Kai; Shizuyo Kusumi; Jai-Ki Lee; Hans-Georg Menzel; Ohtsura Niwa; Kazuo Sakai; Wolfgang Weiss; Shunichi Yamashita; Yoshiharu Yonekura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Atmospheric Fallout of 129I in Japan before the Fukushima Accident: Regional and Global Contributions (19632005)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032, Japan ... This 13 mBq/m2 value is within the range of 129I deposition density (539 mBq/m2), which was estimated from the concentrations of 129I in soils collected in different locations in Japan,(24, 46) except for the Tokai area, before the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. ... In March 2011, there was an accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and a discharge of radionuclides resulting from a powerful earthquake. ...

Chiaki Toyama; Yasuyuki Muramatsu; Yasuhito Igarashi; Michio Aoyama; Hiroyuki Matsuzaki

2013-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

82

The policy responses to the Fukushima nuclear accident and their effect on Japanese energy security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station received worldwide attention in March 2011; since then, much of the reporting has been limited to stories such as the state of the reactor, the trans-Pacific movement of flotsam caused by the tsunami, and the effect of the tsunami and accident on Japanese communities. Other than the closure of Japan's last operating reactor in May 2012, little has been discussed outside of Japan regarding the policies introduced in response by the Japanese government in its effort to maintain Japanese energy security and the effects on Japan's electricity suppliers and the Japanese people. This paper presents a detailed examination of the crisis-driven changes to policy and regulations instituted by the Japanese government and electricity suppliers in the immediate aftermath of the accident up to May 2012. The disruption to Japan's long-term energy policies is discussed in terms of the country's need to maintain its energy security. The paper also considers a number of different energy futures for Japan in light of the accident and how they could improve energy security in terms of availability, affordability, and acceptability.

Masatsugu Hayashi; Larry Hughes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Post-Fukushima Japan: The continuing nuclear controversy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Fukushima disaster was a wake-up call for the nuclear industry as well as a shocking revelation of the inner workings of the Japanese power sector. The political fallout from the event was far-reaching, pushing governments into abandoning nuclear expansion, turning instead to fossil fuels and renewable energy alternatives. While the move away from nuclear energy was deemed a move critical to political survival in Europe, we find that political candidates running on anti-nuclear platforms did not win elections, while the pro-nuclear Liberal Democratic Party won government in the 2012 elections. Against this backdrop, we analyse the energy conflict in Japan using a framework of values versus interests and consider the regulatory and cultural conditions that contributed to the disaster. A number of considerations lie in the way of an organised phase-out of nuclear power in Japan. We also consider the possible policy paths Japan may take.

Shun Deng Fam; Jieru Xiong; Gordon Xiong; Ding Li Yong; Daniel Ng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

SPOTLIGHT ON NUCLEAR POWER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SPOTLIGHT ON NUCLEAR POWER ... TOUGHER RULES are needed to improve the safety of U.S. nuclear power facilities and to better protect the public from the type of disaster that occurred this spring at Japans Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy plant, says a preliminary report released by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on July 12. ...

GLENN HESS

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Perspective on Long-Term Recovery Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 12075  

SciTech Connect

The tragic events at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station began occurring on March 11, 2011, following Japan's unprecedented earthquake and tsunami. The subsequent loss of external power and on-site cooling capacity severely compromised the plant's safety systems, and subsequently, led to core melt in the affected reactors and damage to spent nuclear fuel in the storage pools. Together with hydrogen explosions, this resulted in a substantial release of radioactive material to the environment (mostly Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137), prompting an extensive evacuation effort. The latest release estimate places the event at the highest severity level (Level 7) on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the same as the Chernobyl accident of 1986. As the utility owner endeavored to stabilize the damaged facility, environmental contamination continued to propagate and affect every aspect of daily life in the affected region of Japan. Elevated levels of radioactivity (mostly dominated by Cs-137 with the passage of time) were found in soil, drinking water, vegetation, produce, seafood, and other foodstuffs. An estimated 80,000 to 90,000 people were evacuated; more evacuations are being contemplated months after the accident, and a vast amount of land has become contaminated. Early actions were taken to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated food and drinking water, followed by later actions to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated beef, mushrooms, and seafood. As the event continues to evolve toward stabilization, the long-term recovery effort needs to commence - a process that doubtless will involve rather complex decision-making interactions between various stakeholders. Key issues that may be encountered and considered in such a process include (1) socio-political factors, (2) local economic considerations, (3) land use options, (4) remediation approaches, (5) decontamination methods, (6) radioactive waste management, (7) cleanup levels and options, and (8) government policies, among others. This paper offers a perspective on this likely long and arduous journey toward establishing a 'new normal' that will ultimately take shape. Toward this end, it is important to evaluate the 'optimization' process advocated by the international community in achieving long-term recovery from this particularly fateful event in Fukushima. In the process, experience and lessons learned from past events will be fully evaluated and considered. (author)

Chen, S.Y. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

"Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima?", Dr. Alexander...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 21, 2012, 9:30am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium "Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima?", Dr. Alexander Glaser, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and...

87

Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup August 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis TOKYO - An EM-led U.S. delegation conducted its third workshop last month to provide expertise to Japanese officials leading the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant site and surrounding area, this time addressing priorities identified by Japan's government agencies. At the request of the Japanese Ministry of Environment (MOE) and Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), the delegation's technical experts discussed their experience related to the behavior of radioactive cesium in the environment and other topics. The delegation included representatives from Savannah River, Pacific Northwest, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence

89

Economic and environmental analysis of power generation expansion in Japan considering Fukushima nuclear accident using a multi-objective optimization model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power has long been a cornerstone of energy policy in Japan, a country with few natural resources of its own. However, following on from the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the Japanese government is now in the throes of reviewing its nuclear power policy. On the other hand, under continuing policies of greenhouse gas reduction, it is crucial to consider scenarios for the country to realize an economic, safe and low-carbon power generation system in the future. Therefore, in the present study, economic and environmental analysis was conducted on the power generation system in Japan up to 2030 using a multi-objective optimization methodology. Four nuclear power scenarios were proposed in light of the nuclear accident: (1) actively anti-nuclear; (2) passively negative towards nuclear; (3) conservative towards nuclear; and (4) active expansion of nuclear power. The obtained capacity mix, generation mix, generation cost, CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of the scenarios were compared and analysed. The obtained results show that the large scale penetration of PV (photovoltaic), wind and LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) power can partly replace nuclear power, however, removing nuclear power entirely was not suggested from economic, environmental and energy security perspectives.

Qi Zhang; Benjamin C. Mclellan; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi N. Ishihara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

137Cs in irrigation water and its effect on paddy fields in Japan after the Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There is concern that radiocesium deposited in the environment after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in March 2011 will migrate to paddy fields through hydrological pathways and cause serious and long-lasting damage to the agricultural activities. This study was conducted in the Towa region of Nihonmatsu in the northern part of Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, (1) to quantify 137Cs in stream water used to irrigate paddy fields by separating the dissolved and particulate components in water samples and then fractionating the particulate components bonded in different ways using a sequential extraction procedure, and (2) to determine the amounts of radiocesium newly added to paddy fields in irrigation water relative to the amounts of radiocesium already present in the fields from the deposition of atmospheric fallout immediately after the FDNPP accident. Three catchments were studied, and the 137Cs activity concentrations in stream water samples were 79198mBqL?1 under stable runoff conditions and 70213,400BqL?1 under storm runoff conditions. The residual fraction (F4, considered to be non-bioavailable) was dominant, accounting for 59.582.6% of the total 137Cs activity under stable runoff conditions and 69.495.1% under storm runoff conditions. The 137Cs newly added to paddy fields in irrigation water only contributed 0.030.05% of the amount already present in the soil (201348kBqm?2). This indicates that the 137Cs inflow load in irrigation water is negligible compared with that already in the soil. However, the contribution from the potentially bioavailable fractions (F1+F2+F3) was one order of magnitude larger, accounting for 0.200.59%. The increase in the dissolved and soluble radiocesium fraction (F1) was especially large (3.0% to infinity), suggesting that radiocesium migration in irrigation water is increasing the accumulation of radiocesium in rice.

Natsuki Yoshikawa; Hitomi Obara; Marie Ogasa; Susumu Miyazu; Naoki Harada; Masanori Nonaka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Assessment of Fukushima-Derived Radiation Doses and Effects on Wildlife in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following releases from the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), contention has arisen over the potential radiological impact on wildlife. ... This work was conducted under the auspices of the UNSCEAR, and a more comprehensive version of the assessment presented here is reported within the UN publication Levels and effects of radiation exposure due to the nuclear accident after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and Tsunami. ...

P. Strand; T. Aono; J. E. Brown; J. Garnier-Laplace; A. Hosseini; T. Sazykina; F. Steenhuisen; J. Vives i Batlle

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

92

Safety regulations of food and water implemented in the first year following the Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......help improve the nuclear or radiological emergency...Here we describe the policy carried out for the...Measures Concerning Nuclear Emergency Preparedness...2.7. Rice The policy indicated by the...at the Fukushima nuclear power plants 1 and...Japanese). 22 MHLW. Policy on the monitoring......

Nobuyuki Hamada; Haruyuki Ogino; Yuki Fujimichi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

5 - Fukushima Radioactivity Impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Huge amounts of radioactivity have been released to the environment because of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. In order to implement adequate protective actions and to assess the impact of the Fukushima radioactivity on the environment, an environmental monitoring has been conducted by national and local governments, research institutes and universities in Japan and over the world. The environmental monitoring revealed that heavy radioactivity-contaminated areas appeared within about 50 km of the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP, controlled by land topography as do meteorological factors. The Fukushima-derived radionuclides, in which dominant nuclides were 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs, contaminated food stuffs. The radionuclide levels exceeded the regulation values in a part of food stuffs produced within about 500 km off Fukushima. Based on the comprehensive monitoring data, we describe here levels of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides in terrestrial and marine environments and in food products in Japan and over the globe. Temporal and spatial distributions of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in aerosols revealed the presence of two dominant radionuclide maxima which were observed throughout the Europe with decreasing amplitudes from the North to the South, which were associated with different air masses present in the European air. Modeled forward and backward trajectories indicated a preferential transport of air masses between Fukushima and Europe at 500 hPa (5000 m a. s. l.) air heights. The Lagrangian dispersion modeling showed that the horizontal dispersion in the Europe reached about 4000-km-wide belt, however, the entire world has been labeled with the Fukushima radionuclides, although at very low levels. A typical travel time between Fukushima and Europe has been estimated to be of 1015 days, with an average speed of the plume of 5070 km/h. An average 131I concentration, which was measured over the Europe (?1 mBq/m3), would result in the total amount of dispersed 131I of about 1 PBq. Although this represents a high release rate (almost 1% of the total amount of 131I released from the Fukushima NPP), as it was distributed over a huge area, it has not been of any radiological significance for European citizens. 134Cs and 137Cs were released to the North Pacific Ocean by two major likely pathways, direct discharge from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP site and atmospheric deposition off Honshu Islands of Japan, east and northeast of the site. High-density observations of 134Cs and 137Cs in the surface water were carried out by 17 cruises of cargo ships and several research-vessel cruises since March 2011 till March 2012. Main body of radioactive surface plume whose activity exceeded 10 Bq/m3 had been traveling along 40 N, and reached International Date Line on March 2012, 1 year after the accident. A zonal speed of the radioactive plume was estimated to be about 8 cm/s which was consistent with the zonal speed derived by Argo floats and satellite observations at the region. The dispersion of Fukushima-derived 137Cs in surface seawater of the North Pacific Ocean was carried out using an ocean global circulation model. The traveling time from the Fukushima coast to the US west coast was estimated to be 45 years, and the predicted 137Cs levels will reach ?3 Bq/m3, which are by about a factor of three higher than the present global fallout background levels. After 10 years, the 137Cs in the North Pacific Ocean will not be distinguishable over the global fallout background of 1 Bq/m3. The maximum predicted 137Cs activity concentrations in 2012 in the open western North Pacific Ocean will be around 20 Bq/m3, which will be comparable to that observed during the early 1960s after atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. However, after 10 years this concentration will be similar to that from global fallout. The open Pacific Ocean radionuclide concentrations will not pose therefore any radiation risk to the world population from consumption of seafood collected in this region.

Pavel P. Povinec; Katsumi Hirose; Michio Aoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident April 12, 2013 - 3:09pm Addthis An LM scientist points to star reindeer lichen on Adak Island, Alaska. An LM scientist points to star reindeer lichen on Adak Island, Alaska. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The U.S. Department of Energy Office Legacy Management (LM) has a long-term stewardship mission to protect human health and the environment from the legacy of underground nuclear testing conducted at Amchitka Island, Alaska, from 1965 to 1971. As part of its mission, LM collected biological and seawater samples from Amchitka and Adak Islands, for background comparison,

95

The Accident at Fukushima: What Happened?  

SciTech Connect

At 2:46 PM, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in eastern Japan, people were spending an ordinary afternoon. The earthquake had a magnitude of 9.0, the fourth largest ever recorded in the world. Avery large number of aftershocks were felt after the initial earthquake. More than 100 of them had a magnitude of over 6.0. There were very few injured or dead at this point. The large earthquake caused by this enormous crustal deformation spawned a rare and enormous tsunami that crashed down 30-40 minutes later. It easily cleared the high levees, washing away cars and houses and swallowing buildings of up to three stories in height. The largest tsunami reading taken from all regions was 40 meters in height. This tsunami reached the West Coast of the United States and the Pacific coast of South America, with wave heights of over two meters. It was due to this tsunami that the disaster became one of a not imaginable scale, which saw the number of dead or missing reach about 20,000 persons. The enormous tsunami headed for 15 nuclear power plants on the Pacific coast, but 11 power plants withstood the tsunami and attained cold shutdown. The flood height of the tsunami that struck each power station ranged to a maximum of 15 meters. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units experienced the largest and the cores of three reactors suffered meltdown. As a result, more than 160,000 residents were forced to evacuate, and are still living in temporary accommodation. The main focus of this presentation is on what happened at the Fukushima Daiichi, and how station personnel responded to the accident, with considerable international support. A year after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, Japan is in the process of leveraging the lessons learned from the accident to further improve the safety of nuclear power facilities and regain the trust of society. In this connection, not only international organizations, including IAEA, and WANO, but also governmental organizations and nuclear industry representatives from various countries, have been evaluating what happened at Fukushima Daiichi. Support from many countries has contributed to successfully stabilizing the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. International cooperation is required as Japan started along the long road to decommissioning the reactors. Such cooperation with the international community would achieve the decommissioning of the damaged reactors. Finally, recovery plans by the Japanese government to decontaminate surrounding regions have been started in order to get residents back to their homes as early as possible. Looking at the world's nuclear power industry, there are currently approximately 440 reactors in operation and 60 under construction. Despite the dramatic consequences of the Fukushima Daiichi catastrophe it is expected that the importance of nuclear power generation will not change in the years to come. Newly accumulated knowledge and capabilities must be passed on to the next generation. This is the duty put upon us and which is one that we must embrace.

Fujie, Takao [Japan Nuclear Technology Institute - JANTI (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

ESTIMATION OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF SHORT-LIVED RADIOIODINES TO THE THYROID DOSE FOR THE PUBLIC IN CASE OF INHALATION INTAKE FOLLOWING THE FUKUSHIMA ACCIDENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......m3). The time-integrated air concentration of the considered...s1). The time-integrated air concentration of 132Te at the...radioactivity concentration in the air and radioactivity concentration...S., Yamada M. Radioactive pollution from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear......

S. M. Shinkarev; K. V. Kotenko; E. O. Granovskaya; V. N. Yatsenko; T. Imanaka; M. Hoshi

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Decontamination of Radioactive Cesium Released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant - 13277  

SciTech Connect

Peculiar binding of Cesium to the soil clay minerals remained the major obstacle for the immediate Cs-decontamination of soil and materials containing clay minerals like sludge. Experiments for the removal of Cesium from soil and ash samples from different materials were performed in the lab scale. For soil and sludge ash formed by the incineration of municipal sewage sludge, acid treatment at high temperature is effective while washing with water removed Cesium from ashes of plants or burnable garbage. Though total removal seems a difficult task, water-washing of wood-ash or garbage-ash at 40 deg. C removes >90% radiocesium, while >60% activity can be removed from soil and sludge-ash by acid washing at 95 deg. C. (authors)

Parajuli, Durga; Minami, Kimitaka; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kawamoto, Tohru [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology - AIST (Japan)] [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology - AIST (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Recovery: A Modular Water Treatment System Deployed in Seven Weeks - 12489  

SciTech Connect

On March 11, 2011, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. This was one of the most powerful earthquakes in recorded history and the most powerful one known to have hit Japan. The ensuing tsunami devastated a huge area resulting in some 25,000 persons confirmed dead or missing. The perfect storm was complete when the tsunami then found the four reactor, Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Station directly in its destructive path. While recovery systems admirably survived the powerful earthquake, the seawater from the tsunami knocked the emergency cooling systems out and did extensive damage to the plant and site. Subsequent hydrogen generation caused explosions which extended this damage to a new level and further flooded the buildings with highly contaminated water. Some 2 million people were evacuated from a fifty mile radius of the area and evaluation and cleanup began. Teams were assembled in Tokyo the first week of April to lay out potential plans for the immediate treatment of some 63 million gallons (a number which later exceeded 110 million gallons) of highly contaminated water to avoid overflow from the buildings as well as supply the desperately needed clean cooling water for the reactors. A system had to be deployed with a very brief cold shake down and hot startup before the rainy season started in early June. Joined by team members Toshiba (oil removal system), AREVA (chemical precipitation system) and Hitachi-GE (RO system), Kurion (cesium removal system following the oil separator) proposed, designed, fabricated, delivered and started up a one of a kind treatment skid and over 100 metric tons of specially engineered and modified Ion Specific Media (ISM) customized for this very challenging seawater/oil application, all in seven weeks. After a very short cold shake down, the system went into operation on June 17, 2011 on actual waste waters far exceeding 1 million Bq/mL in cesium and many other isotopes. One must remember that, in addition to attempting to do isotope removal in the competition of seawater (as high as 18,000 ppm sodium due to concentration), some 350,000 gallons of turbine oil was dispersed into the flooded buildings as well. The proposed system consisted of a 4 guard vessel skid for the oil and debris, 4 skids containing 16 cesium towers in a lead-lag layout with removable vessels (sent to an interim storage facility), and a 4 polishing vessel skid for iodine removal and trace cesium levels. At a flow rate of at least 220 gallons per minute, the system has routinely removed over 99% of the cesium, the main component of the activity, since going on line. To date, some 50% of the original activity has been removed and stabilized and cold shutdown of the plant was announced on December 10, 2011. In March and April alone, 10 cubic feet of Engineered Herschelite was shipped to Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, NPP, to support the April 1, 2011 outage cleanup; 400 cubic feet was shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for strontium (Sr-90) ground water remediation; and 6000 cubic feet (100 metric tons, MT, or 220,400 pounds) was readied for the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station with an additional 100 MT on standby for replacement vessels. This experience and accelerated media production in the U.S. bore direct application to what was to soon be used in Fukushima. How such a sophisticated and totally unique system and huge amount of media could be deployable in such a challenging and changing matrix, and in only seven weeks, is outlined in this paper as well as the system and operation itself. As demonstrated herein, all ten major steps leading up to the readiness and acceptance of a modular emergency technology recovery system were met and in a very short period of time, thus utilizing three decades of experience to produce and deliver such a system literally in seven weeks: - EPRI - U.S. Testing and Experience Leading to Introduction to EPRI - Japan and Subsequently TEPCO Emergency Meetings - Three Mile Island (TMI) Media and Vitrification Experience

Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc., P.O. Box 5901, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bostick, William D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCL) ETTP, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Japan considers nuclear-free future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Its official: nuclear power will have a much smaller role in Japans energy future than was once thought. Since the meltdowns and gas explosions at ... and gas explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in March 2011, all of Japans remaining reactors have been shut down for inspections and maintenance. Last week the ...

David Cyranoski

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

100

FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT: PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE RISKS TO NON-HUMAN BIOTA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......provided in the Tool as look-up effects tables for different wildlife groups. The basic equations for Tier 2 assessment are presented...released during the Fukushima nuclear accident were transported by wind over the ocean, towards the west coast of the USA(1, 6......

Abubakar Sadiq Aliyu; Ahmad Termizi Ramli; Nuraddeen Nasiru Garba; Muneer Aziz Saleh; Hamman Tukur Gabdo; Muhammad Sanusi Liman

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

Sugiyama, K.; Ayame, J.; Takashita, H.; Yamamoto, R. [Risk Communication Study Office Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI, 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Historical and Projected Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the aftermath of the March 2011 accident at Japans Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the future contribution of nuclear power to the global energy supply has become somewhat uncertain. ... It seems that, except possibly for Japan, the top five CO2-emitting countries are not planning a phase-down of pre-Fukushima plans for future nuclear power. ... In Japan, the future of nuclear power now seems unclear; in the fiscal year following the Fukushima accident, nuclear power generation in Japan decreased by 63%, while fossil fuel power generation increased by 26% (ref 15), thereby almost certainly increasing Japans CO2 emissions. ...

Pushker A. Kharecha; James E. Hansen

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made.

104

Perceived environmental and health risks of nuclear energy in Taiwan after Fukushima nuclear disaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in Japan in 2011, a nation-wide survey using a standardized self-administered questionnaire was conducted in Taiwan, with a sample size of 2,742 individuals including the residents who live within and beyond 30km from a nuclear power plant (NPP), to evaluate the participants perceived nuclear risk in comparison with their perceived risks from selected environmental hazards and human behaviors. The three leading concerns of nuclear energy were nuclear accidents (82.2%), radioactive nuclear waste disposal (76.9%) and potential health effects (73.3%). Respondents (77.6%) perceived a higher relative risk of cancer incidence for those who live within 30km from an NPP than those who live outside 30km from an NPP. All the participants had a higher risk perception of death related to nuclear power operation and nuclear waste than cigarette smoking, motorcycling, food poisoning, plasticizer poisoning and traveling by air. Moreover, the residents in Gongliao where the planned fourth NPP is located had a significantly higher perceived risk ratio (PRR) of cancer incidence (adjusted odd ratio (aOR)=1.84, p value=0.017) and perceived risk of death (aOR=4.03, p valuenuclear energy. The other factors such as female gender (aOR/p value, 1.25/0.026 and 1.34/0.001 respectively), lower education levels (aOR/p value: 1.31/0.032; 2.03/nuclear accidents (aOR/p value: 1.33/0.022; 1.51/nuclear energy, respectively. In addition, the respondents concerns about nuclear waste disposal and possible eco-environmental damage made significant contributions (aOR/ p value: 1.39/ 0.001; 1.40/nuclear power. These factors are considered as important indicators and they can be used for suggesting future policy amendments and public referendum on the decision of the operation of the planned NPP.

Jung-Chun Ho; Chiao-Tzu Patricia Lee; Shu-Fen Kao; Ruey-Yu Chen; Marco C.F. Ieong; Hung-Lun Chang; Wan-Hua Hsieh; Chun-Chiao Tzeng; Cheng-Fung Lu; Suei-Loong Lin; Peter Wushou Chang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Notes On Nuclear Energy Regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Notes On Nuclear Energy Regulation ... Geology matters is a key lesson from the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that hit the coast of Japan, resulting in the meltdown of three nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant complex, said Allison M. Macfarlane, new head of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, at her first press briefing last week. ... In her address to energy reporters, she focused on her top priorities for the commission. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

24 - Fukushima: The current situation and future plans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter describes the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident starting with the reactors location and sequence of events which caused the accident. The amount of radioactive materials released and its composition, dispersion of radioactive materials over land and sea, contamination effects on food and the environment and radiation effects on human health are all addressed along with the current clean-up programme and future plans. However, it is expected that it will take 3040years to decommission the damaged facilities.

O. Farid; K. Shih; W.E. Lee; H. Yamana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Remembering Fukushima: PNNL Monitors Radiation from Nuclear Disaster  

SciTech Connect

Senior Scientist Harry Miley describes how his work in ultra-trace, nuclear detection technology picked up the first reading of radiological materials over the U.S. following the nuclear power plant explosion in Japan.

Miley, Harry

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Remembering Fukushima: PNNL Monitors Radiation from Nuclear Disaster  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Senior Scientist Harry Miley describes how his work in ultra-trace, nuclear detection technology picked up the first reading of radiological materials over the U.S. following the nuclear power plant explosion in Japan.

Miley, Harry

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima November 1, 2013 - 11:19am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Editors Note: This statement has been updated as of 12:55 PM on November 1, 2013 "On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is stunning that one can see firsthand the destructive force of the tsunami even more than two and a half years after the tragic events. The words of President Obama following the incident still hold true today: 'The Japanese people are not alone in this time of great trial and sorrow. Across the Pacific, they will find a hand of support extended from the United States as they get back on their feet.' My colleagues from the

110

A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima November 1, 2013 - 11:19am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Editors Note: This statement has been updated as of 12:55 PM on November 1, 2013 "On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is stunning that one can see firsthand the destructive force of the tsunami even more than two and a half years after the tragic events. The words of President Obama following the incident still hold true today: 'The Japanese people are not alone in this time of great trial and sorrow. Across the Pacific, they will find a hand of support extended from the United States as they get back on their feet.' My colleagues from the

111

Size Distributions of Airborne Radionuclides from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident at Several Places in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Size Distributions of Airborne Radionuclides from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident at Several Places in Europe ... (8) After about 10 days following the beginning of the releases, contaminated air masses reached Europe and yielded to an unusual airborne concentration for 23 weeks,(8) even if this was of no concern for public health thanks to atmospheric dispersion and deposition along the route from Japan. ... (35) In our opinion this gas-to-particle conversion results mainly from the adsorption of gas on particles. ...

Olivier Masson; Wolfgang Ringer; Helena Mal; Petr Rulik; Magdalena Dlugosz-Lisiecka; Konstantinos Eleftheriadis; Olivier Meisenberg; Anne De Vismes-Ott; Franois Gensdarmes

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Power ... THIS WEEKS issue contains six letters on nuclear power, a representative sample of the letters C&EN received in response to the editorial, Resist Hysteria, I wrote shortly after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan devastated the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (C&EN, March 21, page 5). ... Four of the six letters take sharp issue with the primary point I made in the editorial, which was that, despite the severity of the situation in Japan, nuclear power remains an essential component of our overall energy mix for the near to mid-term because it will help us avert the worst impacts of global climate disruption. ...

RUDY M. BAUM

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

113

Traces of fission products in southeast Spain after the Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traces of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs were measured after the Fukushima nuclear accident between 23 March and 13 April 2011 in southeast Spain. The movement of the radioactive cloud toward southeast Spain was reconstructed based on the backward and forward trajectory cluster analyses. Polar maritime air masses which had originated over North America transported the radioactive plume toward the southeast Spain. Aerosols, rainwater, vegetables and cheese were analyzed to determine the radioactive risk. The highest concentrations of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs in air samples were 2.630.12mBq/m3; 0.100.03mBq/m3; 0.090.02mBq/m3, respectively. After precipitation on April 3rd, the maximum concentrations of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs were detected in rainwater samples, 1.100.16mBq/L; 0.0220.003mBq/L; 0.050.03mBq/L, respectively. As a consequence, 131I was transferred to the human food chain, and found in chard and goat cheese, 0.970.20Bq/kg and 0.520.08Bq/kg, respectively. The traces of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs detected in the different samples were so low, that there is no impact on human health or the environment in Spain after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

F. Piero Garca; M.A. Ferro Garca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A comparative institutional analysis of the Fukushima nuclear disaster: Lessons and policy implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the causes, responses, and consequences of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident (March 2011) by comparing these with Three Mile Island (March 1979) and Chernobyl (April 1986). We identify three generic modes of organizational coordination: modular, vertical, and horizontal. By relying on comparative institutional analysis, we compare the modes' performance characteristics in terms of short-term and long-term coordination, preparedness for shocks, and responsiveness to shocks. We derive general lessons, including the identification of three shortcomings of integrated Japanese electric utilities: (1) decision instability that can lead to system failure after a large shock, (2) poor incentives to innovate, and (3) the lack of defense-in-depth strategies for accidents. Our suggested policy response is to introduce an independent Nuclear Safety Commission, and an Independent System Operator to coordinate buyers and sellers on publicly owned transmission grids. Without an independent safety regulator, or a very well established safety culture, profit-maximizing behavior by an entrenched electricity monopoly will not necessarily lead to a social optimum with regard to nuclear power plant safety. All countries considering continued operation or expansion of their nuclear power industries must strive to establish independent, competent, and respected safety regulators, or prepare for nuclear power plant accidents.

Masahiko Aoki; Geoffrey Rothwell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Radiation dose rates now and in the future for residents neighboring restricted areas of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...began food monitoring on March 16, 2011 and set provisional regulation values for contaminated food and water on March 17, 2011 (14). Except for the early stage of the accident, such food sources have been screened, and those containing more...

Kouji H. Harada; Tamon Niisoe; Mie Imanaka; Tomoyuki Takahashi; Katsumi Amako; Yukiko Fujii; Masatoshi Kanameishi; Kenji Ohse; Yasumichi Nakai; Tamami Nishikawa; Yuuichi Saito; Hiroko Sakamoto; Keiko Ueyama; Kumiko Hisaki; Eiji Ohara; Tokiko Inoue; Kanako Yamamoto; Yukiyo Matsuoka; Hitomi Ohata; Kazue Toshima; Ayumi Okada; Hitomi Sato; Toyomi Kuwamori; Hiroko Tani; Reiko Suzuki; Mai Kashikura; Michiko Nezu; Yoko Miyachi; Fusako Arai; Masanori Kuwamori; Sumiko Harada; Akira Ohmori; Hirohiko Ishikawa; Akio Koizumi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Development of prediction models for radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......rates through vehicle-borne surveys...found that the ecological half-lives...first- and third vehicle-borne surveys. Ecological half-life of...first- and third vehicle-borne surveys...summarises the ecological half-life of......

Sakae Kinase; Tomoyuki Takahashi; Satoshi Sato; Ryuichi Sakamoto; Kimiaki Saito

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radiation dose rates now and in the future for residents neighboring restricted areas of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...background radiation doses in Japan. Finally, health risk...recruited from 63 of 151 households (42%). In Minamisomas Haramachi...radon concentration in Japan . J Environ Radioact 65...indoor Rn concentration in Japan . J Environ Radioact 45...International Atomic Energy Agency (2011) Radiation...

Kouji H. Harada; Tamon Niisoe; Mie Imanaka; Tomoyuki Takahashi; Katsumi Amako; Yukiko Fujii; Masatoshi Kanameishi; Kenji Ohse; Yasumichi Nakai; Tamami Nishikawa; Yuuichi Saito; Hiroko Sakamoto; Keiko Ueyama; Kumiko Hisaki; Eiji Ohara; Tokiko Inoue; Kanako Yamamoto; Yukiyo Matsuoka; Hitomi Ohata; Kazue Toshima; Ayumi Okada; Hitomi Sato; Toyomi Kuwamori; Hiroko Tani; Reiko Suzuki; Mai Kashikura; Michiko Nezu; Yoko Miyachi; Fusako Arai; Masanori Kuwamori; Sumiko Harada; Akira Ohmori; Hirohiko Ishikawa; Akio Koizumi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Multi-Objective Optimization Analysis of Post-Fukushima Power Generation Planning in Japan with Considering Nuclear Powers Risk Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, multi-objective optimization analysis was conducted on the post-Fukushima power generation planning in Japan up to 2030 from economic and environmental perspectives with considering nuclear

Qi Zhang; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi Ishihara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Operation Tomodachi: Answers, Data Products,and Lessons Learned from the U.S. Department of Energy's Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to the Fukushima-Daiichi Reactor Accident  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show presents the DOE response to the Fukushima Diaiichi disaster, including aerial and ground monitoring, issues for which the team had not trained or planned for, and questions from decision makers.

Hopkins, R.

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

120

Decontamination of Nuclear Liquid Wastes Status of CEA and AREVA R and D: Application to Fukushima Waste Waters - 12312  

SciTech Connect

Liquid wastes decontamination processes are mainly based on two techniques: Bulk processes and the so called Cartridges processes. The first technique has been developed for the French nuclear fuel reprocessing industry since the 60's in Marcoule and La Hague. It is a proven and mature technology which has been successfully and quickly implemented by AREVA at Fukushima site for the processing of contaminated waters. The second technique, involving cartridges processes, offers new opportunities for the use of innovative adsorbents. The AREVA process developed for Fukushima and some results obtained on site will be presented as well as laboratory scale results obtained in CEA laboratories. Examples of new adsorbents development for liquid wastes decontamination are also given. A chemical process unit based on co-precipitation technique has been successfully and quickly implemented by AREVA at Fukushima site for the processing of contaminated waters. The asset of this technique is its ability to process large volumes in a continuous mode. Several chemical products can be used to address specific radioelements such as: Cs, Sr, Ru. Its drawback is the production of sludge (about 1% in volume of initial liquid volume). CEA developed strategies to model the co-precipitation phenomena in order to firstly minimize the quantity of added chemical reactants and secondly, minimize the size of co-precipitation units. We are on the way to design compact units that could be mobilized very quickly and efficiently in case of an accidental situation. Addressing the problem of sludge conditioning, cementation appears to be a very attractive solution. Fukushima accident has focused attention on optimizations that should be taken into account in future studies: - To better take account for non-typical aqueous matrixes like seawater; - To enlarge the spectrum of radioelements that can be efficiently processed and especially short lives radioelements that are usually less present in standard effluents resulting from nuclear activities; - To develop reversible solid adsorbents for cartridge-type applications in order to minimize wastes. (authors)

Fournel, B.; Barre, Y.; Lepeytre, C.; Peycelon, H. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Grandjean, A. [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257 CEA-CNRS-UM2-ENSCM, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Prevost, T.; Valery, J.F. [AREVA NC, Paris La Defense (France); Shilova, E.; Viel, P. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events.

122

SPD SEIS References for Appendix I | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Accident, July 12. 448 ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), 2012, Core Average (MOXLEU) Nuclide Ratios for Sequoyah...

123

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. , & Kitazawa, K. (2012). Fukushima in review: A complexin new nuclear power stations after Fukushima. The Guardian.nuclear-power- stations-fukushima Hvistendahl, M. (2007,

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Reactor Design and Decommissioning - An Overview of International Activities in Post Fukushima Era1 - 12396  

SciTech Connect

Accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors as a result of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have not only dampened the nuclear renaissance but have also initiated a re-examination of the design and safety features for the existing and planned nuclear reactors. Even though failures of some of the key site features at Fukushima can be attributed to events that in the past would have been considered as beyond the design basis, the industry as well as the regulatory authorities are analyzing what features, especially passive features, should be designed into the new reactor designs to minimize the potential for catastrophic failures. It is also recognized that since the design of the Fukushima BWR reactors which were commissioned in 1971, many advanced safety features are now a part of the newer reactor designs. As the recovery efforts at the Fukushima site are still underway, decisions with respect to the dismantlement and decommissioning of the damaged reactors and structures have not yet been finalized. As it was with Three Mile Island, it could take several decades for dismantlement, decommissioning and clean up, and the project poses especially tough challenges. Near-term assessments have been issued by several organizations, including the IAEA, the USNRC and others. Results of such investigations will lead to additional improvements in system and site design measures including strengthening of the anti-tsunami defenses, more defense-in-depth features in reactor design, and better response planning and preparation involving reactor sites. The question also arises what would the effect be on the decommissioning scene worldwide, and what would the effect be on the new reactors when they are eventually retired and dismantled. This paper provides an overview of the US and international activities related to recovery and decommissioning including the decommissioning features in the reactor design process and examines these from a new perspective in the post Fukushima -accident era. Accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have slowed down the nuclear renaissance world-wide and may have accelerated decommissioning either because some countries have decided to halt or reduce nuclear, or because the new safety requirements may reduce life-time extensions. Even in countries such as the UK and France that favor nuclear energy production existing nuclear sites are more likely to be chosen as sites for future NPPs. Even as the site recovery efforts continue at Fukushima and any decommissioning decisions are farther into the future, the accidents have focused attention on the reactor designs in general and specifically on the Fukushima type BWRs. The regulatory authorities in many countries have initiated a re-examination of the design of the systems, structures and components and considerations of the capability of the station to cope with beyond-design basis events. Enhancements to SSCs and site features for the existing reactors and the reactors that will be built will also impact the decommissioning phase activities. The newer reactor designs of today not only have enhanced safety features but also take into consideration the features that will facilitate future decommissioning. Lessons learned from past management and operation of reactors as well as the lessons from decommissioning are incorporated into the new designs. However, in the post-Fukushima era, the emphasis on beyond-design-basis capability may lead to significant changes in SSCs, which eventually will also have impact on the decommissioning phase. Additionally, where some countries decide to phase out the nuclear power, many reactors may enter the decommissioning phase in the coming decade. While the formal updating and expanding of existing guidance documents for accident cleanup and decommissioning would benefit by waiting until the Fukushima project has progressed sufficiently for that experience to be reliably interpreted, the development of structured on-li

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Laraia, Michele [private consultant, formerly from IAEA, Kolonitzgasse 10/2, 1030, Vienna (Austria); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris (France); Dinner, Paul [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Calculation of the far range atmospheric transport of radionuclides after the Fukushima accident with the atmospheric dispersion model MATCH of the JRODOS system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents estimates of the far-range atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), obtained using the long-range atmospheric dispersion model MATCH. Software tools were developed to run MATCH in the EU nuclear emergency response system JRODOS using freely available numerical weather prediction (NWP) data of the Global Forecasting System (GFS) operated by the United States National Center of Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Comparisons are made of results with JRODOS/MATCH and a standalone MATCH operated by Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) driven by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) NWP data.

Ivan V. Kovalets; Lennart Robertson; Christer Persson; Svitlana N. Didkivska; Ievgen A. Ievdin; Dmytro Trybushnyi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

This Week's Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...present results by December. Fukushima, Japan 2 U.S. Scientists...living near Japan's ailing Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. DOE-sponsored aerial surveys began measuring...First Year Dose (mrem) FUKUSHIMA Niigata Fukushima Daiichi...

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

A view of treatment process of melted nuclear fuel on a severe accident plant using a molten salt system  

SciTech Connect

At severe accident such as Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, the nuclear fuels in the reactor would melt and form debris which contains stable UO2-ZrO2 mixture corium and parts of vessel such as zircaloy and iron component. The requirements for solution of issues are below; -) the reasonable treatment process of the debris should be simple and in-situ in Fukushima Daiichi power plant, -) the desirable treatment process is to take out UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} or metallic U and TRU metal, and dispose other fission products as high level radioactive waste; and -) the candidate of treatment process should generate the smallest secondary waste. Pyro-process has advantages to treat the debris because of the high solubility of the debris and its total process feasibility. Toshiba proposes a new pyro-process in molten salts using electrolysing Zr before debris fuel being treated.

Fujita, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Mizuguchi, K. [Power and Industrial Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan); Oomori, T. [Chemical System Design and Engineering Department, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Memories of War: Exploring Victim-Victimizer Perspectives in Critical Content-Based Instruction in Japanese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a catastrophic nuclear accident. It appears that Japanprevent the Fukushima nuclear accident? 7 In reality, Japanrecent accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant,

Kubota, Ryuko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Spatial variations of low levels of 134Cs and 137Cs in seawaters within the Sea of Japan after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Our method based on low background ?-spectrometry enabled the measurement of low radiocesium concentrations in only 20L of seawater. In May 2011 after deposition of radiocesium, 134Cs concentration in surface water within the Sea of Japan was confirmed to be significantly small (Japan without advection to below the thermocline.

Mutsuo Inoue; Hisaki Kofuji; Shinji Oikawa; Takuma Murakami; Masayoshi Yamamoto; Seiya Nagao; Yasunori Hamajima; Jun Misonoo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A study of transport and impact strength of Fukushima nuclear pollutants in the north pacific surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the statistics of surface drifter data of 19792011 and the simulation of nuclear pollutant particulate movements simulated using high quality ocean reanalysis surface current dataset, the transport path...

Hongli Fu; Wei Li; Xuefeng Zhang; Guijun Han

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT: PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE RISKS TO NON-HUMAN BIOTA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......leakages from the large storage tanks containing radioactive...Saetre P. Assessment of long-term radiological effects...Authority. 25 Torudd J. Long term radiological effects...Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company......

Abubakar Sadiq Aliyu; Ahmad Termizi Ramli; Nuraddeen Nasiru Garba; Muneer Aziz Saleh; Hamman Tukur Gabdo; Muhammad Sanusi Liman

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality; leading experts discuss facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fukushima accident > Fukushima and Fukushima accident > Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality Welcome Organization Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality Bookmark and Share Want to bypass the popular press myths and gain a true understanding of the radiation releases at Fukushima? In "Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality", leading experts from several international organizations, including the United Nations, discuss the facts. Credits: World Nuclear Association (WNA) ast Modified: Thu, October 10, 2013 7:35 PM Related Resources

133

Effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the risk perception of residents near a nuclear power plant in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...political anchoring: The case of nuclear power in the United Kingdom . Risk Anal...social-cognitive perspective of terrorism risk perception and individual...just global warming and fear of a nuclear power plant accident? Risk Anal 31 ( 5...

Lei Huang; Ying Zhou; Yuting Han; James K. Hammitt; Jun Bi; Yang Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the risk perception of residents near a nuclear power plant in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...favored the use of nuclear energy (21). A 2009 research...nuclear power is a viable energy option again...nuclear power plant. In Japan, Katsuya (25) found...residential communities. Households within each community...Forty-three percent had a household income between 2,000...

Lei Huang; Ying Zhou; Yuting Han; James K. Hammitt; Jun Bi; Yang Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Fukushima Disaster and Japans Nuclear Plant Vulnerability in Comparative Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Off-site power can be severed by a variety of events, such as terrorism, tornadoes, hurricanes, and other disasters. ... Figure 1 plots base plant elevation, seawall height, emergency power system elevation, and waterproofing of backup power systems for nuclear plants according to country. ...

Phillip Y. Lipscy; Kenji E. Kushida; Trevor Incerti

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

136

Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

Morris, Christopher

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

137

Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

Morris, Christopher

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the risk perception of residents near a nuclear power plant in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Societal risk as seen by the French public . Risk Anal 13 ( 3 ): 253 258...electricity supply. Perspective on public opinion (May). Nuclear Energy Institute...1168 1169 . 24 Renn O ( 1990 ) Public response to the Chernobyl accident...

Lei Huang; Ying Zhou; Yuting Han; James K. Hammitt; Jun Bi; Yang Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Estimate of the Potential Amount of Low-Level Waste from the Fukushima Prefecture - 12370  

SciTech Connect

The amount of waste generated by the cleanup of the Fukushima Prefecture (Fukushima-ken) following the releases from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident (March 2011) is dependent on many factors, including: - Contamination amounts; - Cleanup levels determined for the radioisotopes contaminating the area; - Future land use expectations and human exposure scenarios; - Groundwater contamination considerations; - Costs and availability of storage areas, and eventually disposal areas for the waste; and - Decontamination and volume reduction techniques and technologies used. For the purposes of estimating these waste volumes, Fukushima-ken is segregated into zones of similar contamination level and expected future use. Techniques for selecting the appropriate cleanup methods for each area are shown in a decision tree format. This approach is broadly applied to the 20 km evacuation zone and the total amounts and types of waste are estimated; waste resulting from cleanup efforts outside of the evacuation zone is not considered. Some of the limits of future use and potential zones where residents must be excluded within the prefecture are also described. The size and design of the proposed intermediate storage facility is also discussed and the current situation, cleanup, waste handling, and waste storage issues in Japan are described. The method for estimating waste amounts outlined above illustrates the large amount of waste that could potentially be generated by remediation of the 20 km evacuation zone (619 km{sup 2} total) if the currently proposed cleanup goals are uniformly applied. The Japanese environment ministry estimated in early October that the 1 mSv/year exposure goal would make the government responsible for decontaminating about 8,000 km{sup 2} within Fukushima-ken and roughly 4,900 km{sup 2} in areas outside the prefecture. The described waste volume estimation method also does not give any consideration to areas with localized hot spots. Land use and area dose rate estimates for the 20 km evacuation zone indicate there are large areas where doses to the public can be mitigated through methods other than removal and disposal of soil and other wastes. Several additional options for waste reduction can also be considered, including: - Recycling/reusing or disposing of as municipal waste material that can be unconditionally cleared; - Establishing additional precautionary (e.g., liners) and monitoring requirements for municipal landfills to dispose of some conditionally-cleared material; and - Using slightly-contaminated material in construction of reclamations, banks and roads. Waste estimates for cleanup will continue to evolve as decontamination plans are drafted and finalized. (authors)

Hill, Carolyn; Olson, Eric A.J.; Elmer, John [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Broomfield, Colorado 80021 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Task 6 - Subtask 1: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Evaluate the Feasibility of the FLESCOT Code for the Future JAEA Use for the Fukushima Surface Water Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Four Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) researchers visited Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for seven working days and have evaluated the suitability and adaptability of FLESCOT to a JAEAs supercomputer system to effectively simulate cesium behavior in dam reservoirs, river mouths, and coastal areas in Fukushima contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. PNNL showed the following to JAEA visitors during the seven-working day period: FLESCOT source code Users manual FLESCOT description Program structure Algorism Solver Boundary condition handling Data definition Input and output methods How to run. During the visit, JAEA had access to FLESCOT to run with an input data set to evaluate the capacity and feasibility of adapting it to a JAEA super computer with massive parallel processors. As a part of this evaluation, PNNL ran FLESCOT for sample cases of the contaminant migration simulation to further describe FLESCOT in action. JAEA and PNNL researchers also evaluated time spent for each subroutine of FLESCOT, and the JAEA researcher implemented some initial parallelization schemes to FLESCOT. Based on this code evaluation, JAEA and PNNL determined that FLESCOT is applicable to Fukushima lakes/dam reservoirs, river mouth areas, and coastal water feasible to implement parallelization for the JAEA supercomputer. In addition, PNNL and JAEA researchers discussed molecular modeling approaches on cesium adsorption mechanisms to enhance the JAEA molecular modeling activities. PNNL and JAEA also discussed specific collaboration of molecular and computational modeling activities.

Onishi, Yasuo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Model simulations on the long-term dispersal of 137Cs released into the Pacific Ocean off Fukushima  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sequence of global ocean circulation models, with horizontal mesh sizes of 0.5, 0.25and 0.1, are used to estimate the long-term dispersion by ocean currents and mesoscale eddies of a slowly decaying tracer (half-life of 30years, comparable to that of 137Cs) from the local waters off the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plants. The tracer was continuously injected into the coastal waters over some weeks; its subsequent spreading and dilution in the Pacific Ocean was then simulated for 10years. The simulations do not include any data assimilation, and thus, do not account for the actual state of the local ocean currents during the release of highly contaminated water from the damaged plants in MarchApril 2011. An ensemble differing in initial current distributions illustrates their importance for the tracer patterns evolving during the first months, but suggests a minor relevance for the large-scale tracer distributions after 23years. By then the tracer cloud has penetrated to depths of more than 400m, spanning the western and central North Pacific between 25N and 55N, leading to a rapid dilution of concentrations. The rate of dilution declines in the following years, while the main tracer patch propagates eastward across the Pacific Ocean, reaching the coastal waters of North America after about 56years. Tentatively assuming a value of 10PBq for the net 137Cs input during the first weeks after the Fukushima incident, the simulation suggests a rapid dilution of peak radioactivity values to about 10Bqm?3 during the first two years, followed by a gradual decline to 12Bqm?3 over the next 47 years. The total peak radioactivity levels would then still be about twice the pre-Fukushima values.

Erik Behrens; Franziska U Schwarzkopf; Joke F Lbbecke; Claus W Bning

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

This Week's Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Tokyo 2 Government to Fund Fukushima Health Studies Japan's...radiation from the devastated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Fukushima Medical University, which...been rely- ing mainly on aerial observations to pinpoint...

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

INL Director Discusses Lessons Learned from TMI, Fukushima  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains how the U.S. nuclear industry has boosted its safety procedures as a result of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident in 1979 and how the industry plans to use current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plants to further enhance safety. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Grossenbacher, John

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

144

Microsoft Word - INL-EXT-14-33302 - Advanced Seismic Probabilistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

along the coastline of Japan, including the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility. The Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission (NAIIC) concluded: "- the direct...

145

Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, September 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities.

146

Atmospheric deposition of radionuclides (7Be, 210Pb, 134Cs, 137Cs and 40K) during 20002012 at Rokkasho, Japan, and impact of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We measured the concentrations of several radionuclides in atmospheric deposition samples collected in the period from 2000 to 2012 at Rokkasho, Japan. Monthly 7Be deposition rates were higher in winter/spring an...

Naofumi Akata; Hidenao Hasegawa

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material ... Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima Posted By Office of Public Affairs

148

LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability  

SciTech Connect

Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K. [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Takano, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Sato, S. [Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Shimazu, Y. [Fukui University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Use of GIS software to map contaminant distributions and determine integrated dose for purposes of assessing impact to biota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this research was to estimate the radiological impact on various non-human biotas by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power plant radiation release resulting (more)

Myers, Margaret C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

COGS 300 Notes March 11, 2014 Today's "Fun" Example: Honda's ASIMO Robot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. NHK, Japan's national public broadcasting organization, produced) -- kinematics (forward and inverse), statics, dynamics -- position control (path, velocity, acceleration

Woodham, Robert J.

151

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 1106511092, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/11065/2014/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 137Cs during and after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident (March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) on 11 March 2011. Later, the Japanese of radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident X. Hu1,2,3, D. Li4, H. Huang2, S. Shen2, and E. Bou-Zeid3 1

Pierce, Jeffrey

152

Nuclear power plants and biocultural renaissance: A case study of Iwaishima Island in the Seto Inland Sea of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For three decades, Iwaishima Islanders have rejected the proposal for a nuclear power plant to be built 3.5km from their home. Located in the Suo-nada Inland Sea, which has miraculously escaped contamination, dredging of sand, or reclamation that damaged the Seto Inland Sea after WWII, the islanders maintain their livelihood by marketing fresh fish and organic produce. Based on studies on the biodiversity and recent interviews, some underlying reasons for their unyielding struggle have come to light: (1) some worked in Fukushima Daiichi NPP, and knew its damaging effects on human health and the bioregion; (2) islanders exchange goods and services, with minimal dependence on cash; and (3) they have revived the 10-century-old Kanmai (divine dance) festival held every 4years.

Yuji Ankei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Biogeosciences, 10, 54395449, 2013 www.biogeosciences.net/10/5439/2013/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ichi Nuclear Power Plant over the Japan continental shelf: a study using a high-resolution, global destroyed facili- ties at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) leading to a significant long previous earthquake-induced tsunami events, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) was seriously

Chen, Changsheng

154

MELCOR Applications to SOARCA and Fukushima  

SciTech Connect

This PowerPoint presentation was organized as follows: Background; Overview of Fukushima Accidents; Comparisons of SOARCA Study with Fukushima accidents; Equipment functioning in real?world accidents; and, Conclusions.

Gauntt, Randall O.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Recovery and Resilience After a Nuclear Power Plant Disaster: A Medical Decision model for Managing an Effective, Timely, and Balanced Response  

SciTech Connect

Based on experiences in Tokyo responding to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant crisis, a real-time, medical decision model is presented by which to make key health-related decisions given the central role of health and medical issues in such disasters. Focus is on response and recovery activities that are safe, timely, effective, and well-organized. This approach empowers on-site decision makers to make interim decisions without undue delay using readily available and high-level scientific, medical, communication, and policy expertise. Key features of this approach include ongoing assessment, consultation, information, and adaption to the changing conditions. This medical decision model presented is compatible with the existing US National Response Framework structure.

Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, NIH; Blumenthal, Daniel J. [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Department of Energy

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Analysis of Radionuclide Deposition Ratios from the Fukushima-Daiichi Incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Analysis ............................................................................... 23 METHODS AND MATERIALS ..................................................................................... 33 DOE/NNSA CMRT Data .................................................................................. 33 JAEA 134Cs and 137Cs... Variation Data ................................................................ 37 RESULTS ......................................................................................................................... 39 DOE/NNSA CMRT Data...

Smith, Micheal Rashaun

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Not in our backyard : the dangers of nuclear energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite seeing the destruction caused by nuclear accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima, many people still believe that nuclear energy is necessary to (more)

McGeown, Emily Elizabeth, 1990-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work August 3, 2012 - 1:30pm Addthis Scientists from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). | Photo from the Office of Public Affairs, NNSA Scientists from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). | Photo from the Office of Public Affairs, NNSA Robert Middaugh Communications Coordinator at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Scientists from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) met with colleagues from National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to work on on-going aerial and ground monitoring efforts following the accident at the

159

Blue Ribbon Commission, Yucca Mountain Closure, Court Actions - Future of Decommissioned Reactors, Operating Reactors and Nuclear Power - 13249  

SciTech Connect

Issues related to back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle continue to be difficult for the commercial nuclear power industry and for the decision makers at the national and international level. In the US, the 1982 NWPA required DOE to develop geological repositories for SNF and HLW but in spite of extensive site characterization efforts and over ten billion dollars spent, a repository opening is nowhere in sight. There has been constant litigation against the DOE by the nuclear utilities for breach of the 'standard contract' they signed with the DOE under the NWPA. The SNF inventory continues to rise both in the US and globally and the nuclear industry has turned to dry storage facilities at reactor locations. In US, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future issued its report in January 2012 and among other items, it recommends a new, consent-based approach to siting of facilities, prompt efforts to develop one or more geologic disposal facilities, and prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. In addition, the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident had a severe impact on the future growth of nuclear power. The nuclear industry is focusing on mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events and in the US, the industry is in the process of implementing the recommendations from NRC's Near Term Task Force. (authors)

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A long shadow over Fukushima  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Three weeks after the Fukushima accident, a clearer picture is beginning to emerge of possible long-term environmental consequences. ... to emerge of possible long-term environmental consequences. The US Department of Energy (DOE) aerial survey of radiation doses was a crucial development. A clear trace reaching out 30 ...

Jim Smith

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

eFRMAC Overview: Data Management and Enabling Technologies for Characterization of a Radiological Release A Case Study: The Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Incident  

SciTech Connect

The eFRMAC enterprise is a suite of technologies and software developed by the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administrations Office of Emergency Response to coordinate the rapid data collection, management, and analysis required during a radiological emergency. This enables the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center assets to evaluate a radiological or nuclear incident efficiently to facilitate protective actions to protect public health and the environment. This document identifies and describes eFRMAC methods including (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data analysis, (4) product creation, (5) quality control, and (6) dissemination.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [NNSA; Clark, Harvey W. [NSTec; Essex, James J. [NSTec; Wagner, Eric C. [NSTec

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermoacoustic device for nuclear fuel monitoring and heat transfer enhancement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster of 2011 exposed the need for self-powered sensors that could transmit the status of the fuel rods within the reactor and in spent fuel ponds that was not dependent upon availability of external electrical power for either sensing or telemetry. One possible solution is the use of a thermoacoustic standing wave engine incorporated within a fuel rod which is heated by the nuclear fuel. The engines resonance frequency is correlated to the fuel rod temperature and will be transmitted by sound radiation through the reactor's or storage ponds surrounding water. In addition to acting as a passive temperature sensor the thermoacoustic device will serve to enhance heat transfer from the fuel to the surrounding heat transfer fluid. When activated the acoustically-driven streaming flow of the gas within the fuel rod will circulate gas away from the nuclear fuel and convectively enhance heat transfer to the surrounding coolant. We will present results for a thermoacousticresonator built into a Nitonic 60 (stainless steel) fuel rod that can be substituted for conventional fuel rods in the Idaho National Laboratorys Advanced Test Reactor. This laboratory version is heated electrically. [Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Randall A. Ali; Steven L. Garrett; James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup of damaged plant The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the...

164

Fukushima, Mexico and Slovenia: Free Electric Power Recordings for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fukushima, Mexico and Slovenia: Free Electric Power Recordings for Fukushima, Mexico and Slovenia: Free Electric Power Recordings for Researchers Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: May 20, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Girish Ghatikar You can learn a lot of really interesting stuff by studying time-series recordings of electric power parameters, especially frequency, power, and power factor. Depending on the time scale of the recordings, you can detect everything from design flaws in electronic inverters to battery back-up time at remote nuclear power plants. This informal lunch-time discussion will use public data available from worldwide PQube power monitoring instruments, freely available at http://map.PQube.com , a resource for researchers who want minute-by-minute power quantity and power quality data

165

Fukushima Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fukushima, Japan Exploration Region: Northeast Honshu Arc GEA Development Phase: Coordinates:...

166

Impacts of Radioactive 137Cs on Marine Bacterioplankton: Effects of the Fukushima Disaster on Hawaii's Kaneohe Bay Bacterial Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to emit 10 PBq of radiation2 , the largest ever release of anthropogenic radionuclides into the ocean4 . The main pollutant, 137 Cs, has a half-life of 30 years and will first hit the US territories

Heller, Paul

167

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economist (2012). Nuclear power: The 30-year itch. Thesince the Cold War, nuclear power plants are being plannedDramatic fall in new nuclear power stations after Fukushima.

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

CCS, Nuclear Power and Biomass An Assessment of Option Triangle under Global Warming Mitigation Policy by an Integrated Assessment Model MARIA-23  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It is well understood that the global climate change caused by the increase of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission would be a serious barrier towards the sustainable development. Nuclear power, CCS and biomass have been regarded as the major options in the GHG mitigation policy. However, since the social acceptance of nuclear power expansion has seriously been changed after the gigantic earthquake on March 11, 2011 followed by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident, the energy policy makers are forced to consider both the global warming and the decline of nuclear power simultaneously. This study attempts to address the following key questions: (1) how much additional costs or decline of production will be needed when nuclear power expansion is limited under the GHG emission control policies and (2) to what extent the potential of the biomass and CCS could compensate for the nuclear power reductions. We expand an integrated assessment model, MARIA-23 (Multiregional Approach for Resource and Industry Allocation) to deal with the CCS options and biomass options taking into account the additional carbon emission by cultivation. The simulation results show the interrelationships of the carbon mitigation contributions of the above three major options under various scenarios.

Shunsuke Mori; Keisuke Miyaji; Kazuhisa Kamegai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Paris, le 7 aot 2014 Analyse de traces de plutonium dans les rivires ctires de  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, S. (accepted). Novel insights into Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident from isotopic Environmental Science & Technology. Lancé six mois après l'accident de Fukushima de mars 2011 et initié dans le dû à l'accident. L'accident qui s'est produit à la centrale de Fukushima Daiichi a en effet entraîné

Pouyanne, Nicolas

170

Nuclear Engineering Division: interviews on Situation at Japan's nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interviews on Situation at Japan's Interviews on Situation at Japan's nuclear reactors Welcome Organization Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Nuclear Engineering Division: interviews on Situation at Japan's nuclear reactors Bookmark and Share Fukushima Update "Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality" Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality Want to bypass the popular press myths and gain a true understanding of the radiation releases at Fukushima? Watch this video » Several experts from the Nuclear Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory have been interviewed on the situation at Japan's nuclear

171

Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to enhance core and spent fuel pool cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, and containment integrity. (authors)

McConnell, M. W. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop: 012-H2, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations Wednesday, September 19 - Plenary Session September 19, 2012 Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company September 19, 2012 A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Presenter: Honorable William C. Ostendorff, Commissioner US Nuclear Regulatory Commission September 19, 2012 International Perspective on Fukushima Accident Presenter: Miroslav Lipár, Head, Operational Safety Section, Department of

173

KERENA safety concept in the context of the Fukushima accident  

SciTech Connect

Within the last three years AREVA NP and E.On KK finalized the basic design of KERENA which is a medium sized innovative boiling water reactor, based on the operational experience of German BWR nuclear power plants (NPPs). It is a generation III reactor design with a net electrical output of about 1250 MW. It combines active safety equipment of service-proven designs with new passive safety components, both safety classified. The passive systems utilize basic laws of physics, such as gravity and natural convection, enabling them to function without electric power. Even actuation of these systems is performed thanks to basic physic laws. The degree of diversity in component and system design, achieved by combining active and passive equipment, results in a very low core damage frequency. The Fukushima accident enhanced the world wide discussion about the safety of operating nuclear power plants. World wide stress tests for operating nuclear power plants are being performed embracing both natural and man made hazards. Beside the assessment of existing power plants, also new designs are analyzed regarding the system response to beyond design base accidents. KERENA's optimal combination of diversified cooling systems (active and passive) allows passing efficiently such tests, with a high level of confidence. This paper describes the passive safety components and the KERENA reactor behavior after a Fukushima like accident. (authors)

Zacharias, T.; Novotny, C.; Bielor, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen-Strasse 100, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Around the World  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NorwayExploring the Darkening Arctic 2 - Fukushima, JapanU.S. Scientists Map...present results by December. Fukushima, Japan U.S. Scientists...living near Japan's ailing Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. CREDIT...DOE/NNSA DOE-sponsored aerial surveys began measuring...

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

175

Around the World  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Tokyo Government to Fund Fukushima Health Studies 3 - New Delhi...has been relying mainly on aerial observations to pinpoint areas...Tokyo Government to Fund Fukushima Health Studies Japan's cabinet...radiation from the devastated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant...

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

25 years after Chernobyl the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R&D activities. On the positive side the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids which have recently been proposed for energy production is critically reviewed. There are major challenges remaining that are shortly outlined. Scientific/technical achievements that are required in the light of the Fukushima accident are highlighted.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?  

SciTech Connect

25 years after Chernobyl, the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence, reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that, in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan, the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population, Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R and D activities. On the positive side, the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids, which have recently been proposed for energy production, is critically reviewed. There are major challenges remaining that are shortly outlined. Scientific/technical achievements that are required in the light of the Fukushima accident are highlighted.

Schenkel, Roland [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1,76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Risk Informing the Commercial Nuclear Enterprise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Events V. The Path Forward #12;3 I. Managing Risk to the Business Each CENG nuclear plant Post-Fukushima Response New NRC Regulations EPA Cooling Water Intake regulation GSI 191 4 Cyber Level of Control Mitigation Fukushima Response High cost of studies, modifications, uncertainty

Bernstein, Joseph B.

179

JAPANS STRUGGLES CONTINUE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

JAPAN EXPERIENCED progress and setbacks last week in its continuing struggle to recover from the devastating March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Frontline workers at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station again risked their lives to tame ...

BRITT ERICKSON; JEFF JOHNSON; JEAN-FRANOIS TREMBLAY

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fractal behavior of accidents like the Fukushima dai-ichi disaster gives scientists a tool ... by the projection of nuclear power incidents going forward, in Fig.1.4c. The likelihood of a reportable incident...

Ted G. Lewis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Developing Infrastructure & Community Resilience to Natural & Human-Caused Disasters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to move forward resilience efforts in the tri-state/DC region, (4) roles of the National Science Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and when there is a focus on dealing with such disasters, now is the time

Aydilek, Ahmet

182

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 8 | FEBRUARY 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 101 The hands of the Doomsday Clock have  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Cold War had come to an end, the clock hands have mostly crept forward. The board of directors. The earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in March 2011 caused meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power

Loss, Daniel

183

2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Eos, Vol. 94, No. 32, 6 August 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a Lagrangian model tracks a parcel of air as it flows through the atmosphere. Whether running forward at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The Eyjafjallaj�kull eruption of course shut down European airspace. The other example was the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster and the release of radionuclides

Lin, John Chun-Han

184

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident. Dr. Sonja Haber 6 of 13

185

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area U.S. Department of Energy Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area March 22, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Today the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. The information has also been shared with the government of Japan as part of the United States' ongoing efforts to support Japan with the recovery and response effort. On March 15, 33 experts from the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) arrived in Japan along with more than 17,200 pounds of equipment. After initial deployments at U.S. consulates and military installations in Japan, these teams have utilized their unique skills,

186

Energy market impacts of nuclear power phase-out policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the Fukushima disaster in Japan in March 2011, safety concerns have escalated and policies toward nuclear power are being reconsidered in several countries. ... the upward pressure on regional electricity p...

Solveig Glomsrd; Taoyuan Wei

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nuclear Waste Management: Building a Foundation to Enhance Trust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reading and listening to journalists and advocacy group questioning of nuclear experts post-Fukushima, watching news shows, and reading articles ... the grounds that they have failed to move forward on a permane...

Michael R. Greenberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Whole body counter surveys of Miharu-town school children for four consecutive years after the Fukushima NPP accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comprehensive whole-body counter surveys of Miharu town school children have been conducted for four consecutive years, in 2011-2014. This represents the only long-term sampling-bias-free study of its type conducted after the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident. For the first time in 2014, a new device called the Babyscan, which has a low $^{134/137}$Cs MDA of $< 50$ Bq/body, was used to screen the children shorter than 130 cm. No child in this group was found to have detectable level of radiocesium. Using the MDAs, upper limits of daily intake of radiocesium were estimated for each child. For those screened with the Babyscan, the upper intake limits were found to be <1 Bq/day for $^{137}$Cs. Analysis of a questionnaire filled out by the children's parents regarding their food and water consumption shows that the majority of Miharu children regularly consume local and/or home-grown rice and vegetables. This however does not increase the body burden.

Hayano, Ryugo S; Miyazaki, Makoto; Satou, Hideo; Sato, Katsumi; Masaki, Shin; Sakuma, Yu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Current Designs Address Safety Problems in Fukushima Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...supply, that might mean having more than one connection to the grid, an oversupply of diesel generators in different places, and batteries as a backup, along with possibly a flywheel system. Loss of power, the main ongoing problem in Fukushima...

Daniel Clery

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

190

Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Japanese ratification of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) marks an important milestone towards creating a global nuclear liability regime that will assure prompt and meaningful compensation in the event of a nuclear accident and will facilitate international cooperation on nuclear projects such as ongoing clean-up work at the Fukushima site."

191

Gender difference in the health risk perception of radiation from Fukushima in Japan: The role of hegemonic masculinity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the preliminary findings of gender difference in the perception of radiation risk in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan. In-depth interviews were conducted with the residents of Fukushima and other parts of Japan in November 2011 and July 2012. Compared to mothers, fathers in general expressed less concern for radiation. Fathers prioritized their responsibilities as the breadwinner for their families and saw radiation risk as a threat to economic stability and masculine identity. As a result, mothers' health concerns were dismissed, and they were prevented from taking preventive actions. The social norms in the dominant institutions such as corporations and the government influenced men's perception of radiation risk. The findings illustrate the importance of sociocultural context in which meanings of health risk are constructed.

Rika Morioka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Analysis of muon radiography of the Toshiba nuclear critical assembly reactor  

SciTech Connect

A 1.2??1.2 m{sup 2} muon tracker was moved from Los Alamos to the Toshiba facility at Kawasaki, Japan, where it was used to take ?4 weeks of data radiographing the Toshiba Critical Assembly Reactor with cosmic ray muons. In this paper, we describe the analysis procedure, show results of this experiment, and compare the results to Monte Carlo predictions. The results validate the concept of using cosmic rays to image the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors.

Morris, C. L.; Bacon, Jeffery; Borozdin, Konstantin; Fabritius, J. M.; Perry, John; Ramsey, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ban, Yuichiro; Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Yoshida, Noriyuki [Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Mizokami, Shinya; Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Daichi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sugita, Tsukasa; Yoshioka, Kenichi [Toshiba Corporation, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

Development of pyro-processing technology at CRIEPI for carving out the future of nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

Pyro-processing has been attracting increasing attention as a promising candidate as an advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology. It provides economic advantage as well as reduction in proliferation risk and burden of long live radioactive waste, especially when it is combined with advanced fuels such as metallic or nitride fuel which gives excellent burning efficiency of minor actinides (MA). CRIEPI has been developing pyro-processing technology since late eighties with both domestic and international collaborations. In the early stage, electrochemical and thermodynamic properties in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt, and fundamental feasibility of core technology like electrorefining were chiefly investigated. Currently, stress in the process chemistry development is also placed on supporting technologies, such as treatment of anode residue and high temperature distillation for cathode product from electrorefining, and so on. Waste treatment process development, such as studies on adsorption behavior of various FP elements into zeolite and conditions for the fabrication of glass-bonded sodalite waste form, are steadily improved as well. In parallel, dedicated pyro-processing equipment such as zeolite column for treatment of spent electro-refiner salt is currently in progress. Recently, an integrated engineering-scale fuel cycle tests were performed funded by Japanese government (MEXT) as an important step before proceeding to large scale hot demonstration of pyro-processing. Oxide fuels can be readily introduced into the pyro-processing by reducing them to metals by adoption of electrochemical reduction technique. Making use of this advantage, the pyro-processing is currently under preliminary evaluation for its applicability to the treatment of the corium, mainly consisting of (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, formed in different composition during the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. (authors)

Iizuka, M.; Koyama, T.; Sakamura, Y.; Uozumi, K.; Fujihata, K.; Kato, T.; Murakami, T.; Tsukada, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

CSU -Fall 2013 ART 496H: ART HISTORY SEMINAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear testing and radiation related disasters? Why is the Nuclear Age still hotly contested in the firstCSU - Fall 2013 ART 496H: ART HISTORY SEMINAR Representing the Nuclear Age (3 Course Description: The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan has once again reignited

Stephens, Graeme L.

195

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos Addthis Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

196

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Nuclear Power in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Nuclear Power in a Post-Fukushima World generated by nuclear power. What will the U.S. energy portfolio look like, and how will the energy demand is focused on longer- term operation of nuclear power plants, including measurements to detect

197

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that was collected and analyzed jointly with the Government of Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). 051311jointdoegojamstraindatafinalv2-110516163951-phpapp01.pptx 050611jointdoegojamsdatav3-110506164802-phpapp02.pptx 042111amsdataapril21v1-110422102404-phpapp02.pptx 041811amsdataapril18v1-110418170107-phpapp02.pptx 040711amsdataapril7v3-110407170243-phpapp02.pptx

198

Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima The enclosed package represents radiation data collected over the ocean with the fixed-wing aircraft (C-12) on April 5th, April 18th, and May 9th. The data were collected with an array of large thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(T)) crystals and associated readout electronics to produce time and location referenced measurements. These results represent raw data that have been validated. They do not include any further evaluation. AMS C12 Sea Data.csv AMS C12 Sea Data Dictionary.pdf AMS C12 Sea Data.kmz More Documents & Publications Social Security Number Reduction Project 2011 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports Appendices for the Basis Document

199

A Book of Condolences for Fukushima | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Book of Condolences for Fukushima A Book of Condolences for Fukushima A Book of Condolences for Fukushima Addthis 1 of 6 Japanese Ambassador to the United States, Ichiro Fujisaki greet Secretary Steven Chu outside the entrance to the Japanese Embassy in Washington, DC. Image: Energy Department Image | Photo by Quentin Kruger, Contractor 2 of 6 Secretary Chu signing the book of condolences. Image: Energy Department Image | Photo by Quentin Kruger, Contractor 3 of 6 Ichiro Fujisaki, Japanese Ambassador to the United States, bows his head in mourning during the signing. Image: Energy Department Image | Photo by Quentin Kruger, Contractor 4 of 6 Flowers on this table and throughout the embassy have been sent to the people of Japan from heads of state of many federal agencies. Image: Energy Department Image | Photo by Quentin Kruger, Contractor

200

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that was collected and analyzed jointly with the Government of Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). 051311jointdoegojamstraindatafinalv2-110516163951-phpapp01.pptx 050611jointdoegojamsdatav3-110506164802-phpapp02.pptx 042111amsdataapril21v1-110422102404-phpapp02.pptx 041811amsdataapril18v1-110418170107-phpapp02.pptx 040711amsdataapril7v3-110407170243-phpapp02.pptx

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

JAPANESE REACTOR SAGA CONTINUES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NUCLEAR POWER: Japanese engineers fight to regain control; Congress reviews U.S. nuclear plant practices ... RADIATION CONCERNS continued to heighten last week at Japans Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, which suffered catastrophic damage from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

202

Knowledge, risk, and policy support: Public perceptions of nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nuclear energy was becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to air polluting fossil fuel technologies through the latter half of the 2000s. The tragic events of March 11, 2011 in Fukushima, Japan appear to have instantly killed any momentum the nuclear industry had gained. While unfortunate, many argue that nuclear power is still a safe alternative and that the Fukushima disaster resulted from insufficient safety regulations in Japan, a problem that does not exist in the United States. This project examines U.S. public support for nuclear energy one year after the Fukushima tragedy, seeking to understand the influence of knowledge and risk perceptions on policy support. We evaluate public support for nuclear energy policy from several perspectives using risk and attitudinal measurements that are more specific than often found in the literature to obtain a greater understanding of the connection between policy and risk.

James W. Stoutenborough; Shelbi G. Sturgess; Arnold Vedlitz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Aerial measurement of radioxenon concentration off the west coast of Vancouver Island following the Fukushima reactor accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In response to the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident, on March 20th, 2011, Natural Resources Canada conducted aerial radiation surveys over water just off the west coast of Vancouver Island. Doserate levels were found to be consistent with background radiation, however a clear signal due to 133Xe was observed. Methods to extract 133Xe count rates from the measured spectra, and to determine the corresponding 133Xe activity concentration, were developed. The measurements indicate that 133Xe concentrations on average lie in the range of 3070Bq/m3.

L.E. Sinclair; H.C.J. Seywerd; R. Fortin; J.M. Carson; P.R.B. Saull; M.J. Coyle; R.A. Van Brabant; J.L. Buckle; S.M. Desjardins; R.M. Hall

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Parallel Radioisotope Collection and Analysis in Response to the Fukushima Release  

SciTech Connect

Two independent air samplers were operated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in parallel during the collection of samples from the Fukushima reactor releases. One system is an automated aerosol collection and analysis unit, while the other was a manual sampler of higher daily air volume. The samples collected each day showed excellent correlation in radionuclide activity, although some variations were seen. These variations illustrate the reproducibility of the air sample radionuclide measurements made by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty International Monitoring System (IMS) and show a simple way to acquire useful parallel samples for scientific purposes. In particular, a party wishing to have a copy of a sample acquired by the verification regime of the treaty could employ this method and have results similar to the IMS station at low cost and even higher sensitivity.

Woods, Vincent T.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Biegalski, S.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Miley, Harry S.; Morris, Scott J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Disaster Waste Characteristics and Radiation Distribution as a Result of the Great East Japan Earthquake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disaster Waste Characteristics and Radiation Distribution as a Result of the Great East Japan Earthquake ... (3) Due to loss of power, the tsunami-impacted Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (Fukushima-1 NPP) overheated with explosions starting on March 12, 2011 that released approximately 630?000770?000 terabecquerel of radiation, which is equivalent to 1215% of the radiation released during the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in the Ukraine (former Soviet Union) in 1985. ...

Tomoyuki Shibata; Helena Solo-Gabriele; Toshimitsu Hata

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

Public participation and trust in nuclear power development in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid expansion of nuclear power in China requires not only increasing institutional capacity to prevent and adequately cope with nuclear risks, but also increasing public trust in governmental agencies and nuclear enterprises managing nuclear risks. Using a case study on Haiyang nuclear power plant in Shandong province, public participation, communication, information disclosure and trust regarding nuclear policy and industry are investigated among Chinese citizens living close to nuclear facilities. The results show that development and decision-making on nuclear power are dominated by an iron nuclear triangle of national governmental agencies, nuclear industries, and research organizations. The public, media and \\{NGOs\\} are neither informed nor involved. In contrast to low levels of public trust in governmental authorities advocating nuclear energy in western countries after Fukushima (Japan), Chinese respondents have still high levels of trust in governmental authorities (but not in state-owned nuclear power companies) regarding nuclear information provision, emergency response to nuclear accidents, and decision making on the country's nuclear future. A proven record in risk management and lack of alternative information sources explains this trust. As overall trust and credibility in China's governmental authorities is waning, and absence of transparency and public scrutiny proved fatal in Fukushima, the Chinese government has to develop a strategy for public involvement and information disclosure in nuclear power development in the post-Fukushima era.

Guizhen He; Arthur P.J. Mol; Lei Zhang; Yonglong Lu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Health Risks of Accidents at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To the Editor: Christodouleas et al. (June 16 issue) discuss the health risks of nuclear accidents but do not include the psychological and social effects of such events. Such casualties in Fukushima will far exceed any cases of physical illness. Having just returned from the region to assess mental... To the Editor: Christodouleas et al. (June 16 issue)1 discuss the health risks of nuclear accidents but do not include the psychological and social effects of such events. Such casualties in Fukushima will far exceed any cases of physical illness. Having ...

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

Another Nuclear Plant To Close  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Vernon, Vt., will permanently shut down in 2014, according to plant owner Entergy. ... In the Vermont Yankee case, Entergys announcement ends a long-simmering dispute between the utility and state officials and residents over the continued operation of the 620-MW plant. ... The Vermont Yankee plant design nearly mirrors that of the Fukushima reactor facility. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Exploring Humanoid Robots Locomotion Capabilities in Virtual Disaster Response Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident that followed the 2011 Great East JapanExploring Humanoid Robots Locomotion Capabilities in Virtual Disaster Response Scenarios Karim-like motor skills to be achieved. We use virtual scenes under the fully- 3D-modeled-environment assumption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Introduction to the Special Issue on the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the backup power systems at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, which precipitated a reactor under northeastern Honshu, Japan. It was the fourth-largest recorded earthquake, with seismic the entire width of the seismogenic zone from the Japan trench to below the Honshu coastline

211

JAPAN TO DEVELOP RENEWABLE ENERGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY will play a larger role in Japan, government officials say. The energy policy shift comes in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami that led to the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.The current basic energy policy ...

GLENN HESS

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

This Week's Section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...government policy, the radiation release from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has turned many politicians and...engineered "blue" roses in the United States took a big step forward last week. The U.S. Department of Agriculture won't regulate...

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

POLICYProfessional Perspectives on Energy Security, Economics,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline prices, America's growing capacity to develop oil and natural gas resources, etc. ­ have grabbed-Macondo oil spill, the disaster at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility, the Solyndra bankruptcy, high for the first time in the poll's history. Subsequent Gallup polls indicate this preference remains, though

214

Chapter 7 - Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nuclear energy grew rapidly during the 19601975 period in countries such as France, the United States, and Norway. But nuclear energy ran into problems in the 1970s because of public concern over the radioactive waste it generates, and this concern suppressed the further expansion of nuclear power. The public perception had begun to change in recent years, as concern about atmospheric carbon dioxide levels led to a renewed interest in energy sources not reliant on hydrocarbons. But, in 2010, a tsunami in Japan led to an accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, and the ensuing release of radioactive materials once again raised concerns about safety. At the same time, limited supplies of uranium have caused the price of that fuel material to go up. The solution to the shortage and resulting price increase is fast breeder reactors that use both uranium and thorium fuels. Unfortunately, this technology has not yet been perfected and commercialized.

Brian F. Towler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

INL Director Discusses the Future for Nuclear Energy in the United States  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains that the United States should develop its energy policies based on an assessment of the current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactors and the costs and benefits of providing electricity through various energy sources. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Grossenbacher, John

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

AP1000{sup R} severe accident features and post-Fukushima considerations  

SciTech Connect

The AP1000{sup R} passive nuclear power plant is uniquely equipped to withstand an extended station blackout scenario such as the events following the earthquake and tsunami at Fukushima without compromising core and containment integrity. The AP1000 plant shuts down the reactor, cools the core, containment and spent fuel pool for more than 3 days using passive systems that do not require AC or DC power or operator actions. Following this passive coping period, minimal operator actions are needed to extend the operation of the passive features to 7 days using installed equipment. To provide defense-in-depth for design extension conditions, the AP1000 plant has engineered features that mitigate the effects of core damage. Engineered features retain damaged core debris within the reactor vessel as a key feature. Other aspects of the design protect containment integrity during severe accidents, including unique features of the AP1000 design relative to passive containment cooling with water and air, and hydrogen management. (authors)

Scobel, J. H.; Schulz, T. L.; Williams, M. G. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Dr., Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Role of mesoscale eddies in transport of Fukushima-derived cesium isotopes in the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of in-situ measurements of $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs released from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) collected at surface and different depths in the western North Pacific in June and July 2012. It was found that 15 month after the incident concentrations of radiocesium in the Japan and Okhotsk seas were at background or slightly increased level, while they had increased values in the subarctic front area east of Japan. The highest concentrations of $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs up to 13.5 ${\\pm}$ 0.9 and 22.7 ${\\pm}$ 1.5 Bq m$^{-3}$ have been found to exceed ten times the background levels before the accident. Maximal content of radiocesium was observed within subsurface and intermediate water layers inside the cores of anticyclonic eddies (100 - 500 m). Even slightly increased content of radiocesium was found at some eddies at depth of 1000 m. It is expected that convergence and subduction of surface water inside eddies are main mechanisms of downward transport of radionuclides. In...

Budyansky, M V; Kaplunenko, D D; Lobanov, V B; Prants, S V; Sergeev, A F; Shlyk, N V; Uleysky, M Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japanese Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011 has ledthe Japanese Fukushima nuclear accident. In response, expert

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established a rigorous nuclear safety regulatory infrastructure for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Part of this infrastructure includes processes for evaluating events to foster continuous improvement. In this spirit, DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration) took actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify opportunities for improvement in light of the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

220

Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety » Nuclear Security & Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration’s effort to assist Japanese personnel with nuclear issues related to the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Above, scientists, technicians and engineers from the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office board an Air Force C-17. | Photo courtesy of NNSA. Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Challenges of Nuclear Safety to Sustainable Development of Chinese Nuclear Energy in Post-Fukushima Era  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sustainable development of Chinese economy in twenty-first century will mainly rely on self-supply of clean energy with indigenous natural resources. The burden of current coal-dominant energy mix and the stress ...

Zhiwei Zhou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

223

Department of Energy - Emergency Response & Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67 en A Statement from U.S. Secretary of 67 en A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima http://energy.gov/articles/statement-us-secretary-energy-ernest-moniz-regarding-fukushima fukushima" class="title-link">A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima

224

Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis PURPOSE This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the subsequent tsunami. While there is still a lot to be learned from the accident · about the adequacy of design specifications and the equipment failure modes, reports from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have identified some key aspects of the operational emergency at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.

225

Safety Bulletin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulletin Bulletin Offtce 01 Health. Safety and Sa<:urtty Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis No. 2011-01 PURPOSE This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the subsequent tsunami. While there is still a lot to be learned from the accident · about the adequacy of design specifications and the equipment failure modes, reports from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have identified some key aspects of the operational emergency at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.

226

Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

Denning, R. S. [Ohio State Univ., 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Analysis of the effect of radiation criteria for population evacuation on the socioeconomic consequences of the npp accident in fukushima prefecture (japan)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The social and economic consequences of the March 11, 2011 radiation accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP in Japan are analyzed. Data on the contamination of...

D. V. Aron; R. V. Arutyunyan; L. A. Bolshov; S. V. Panchenko

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process September 19, 2012 Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Purpose of the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP) ROP Framework Safety Culture within the ROP Safety Culture Assessments Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process More Documents & Publications A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

229

Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Did you miss this event? Watch recording of "Lessons from Fukushima" The event's webcast is over, but you can still watch and/or download the

230

Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Summary Workshop Summary Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary September 19-20, 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary On September 19-20, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a second Nuclear Safety Workshop covering the results of the Department's actions to improve its posture for analyzing and responding to severe accidents in light of lessons learned from the March 2011 nuclear accident in Japan. Sponsored by DOE and championed by Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman, the two-day workshop discussed the lessons learned in a national and international context. The workshop's theme was Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results, and included technical breakout sessions focused on beyond design basis events (BDBEs) analysis and response, safety culture, and risk assessment and management.

231

Safety regulations of food and water implemented in the first year following the Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ordered. So far, tap water, raw milk, vegetables...the emergency diesel generators successfully started...afterwards, and the generators became inoperable...outflow of contaminated water into the open sea as...and large-scale atmospheric radionuclide releases......

Nobuyuki Hamada; Haruyuki Ogino; Yuki Fujimichi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Safety regulations of food and water implemented in the first year following the Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......horizontally in the rice field since rice crops...conducted to minimize production of radioactively...used to extract oil or to pickle vegetables...that a lifetime cumulative effective dose of...that exposure to a cumulative dose of 500-mGy...To minimize the production of contaminated......

Nobuyuki Hamada; Haruyuki Ogino; Yuki Fujimichi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Safety regulations of food and water implemented in the first year following the Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fresh mushroom Shii-take (shiitake mushroom, Lentinula edodes) cultivated...26.2012) 3.26.2012 1 Shiitake mushroom cultivated on mushroom beds...2011 1 Dried mushroom Dried shiitake mushroom Shizuokag 3 n.e. 10.7......

Nobuyuki Hamada; Haruyuki Ogino; Yuki Fujimichi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Plume from Fukushima: Is There a Correlation?France due to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Journal ofGreece due to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Journal of

Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-003.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-003 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-003 SECTION A. Project Title: Auxiliary Canal Fill Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 SECTION B. Project Description: Although the ATR canal meets all design basis criteria, lessons learned following the earthquake and tsunami events at the Fukushima- Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March of 2011 indicate that an auxiliary water supply to the fuel storage canal with a fill connection located outside of the facility would have been valuable following the beyond design basis event. As a result of these lessons learned, the Department of Energy (DOE) has allocated additional funding to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to mitigate beyond design basis events similar to the Fukushima-Daiichi disaster. The Auxiliary Canal Fill Project is one of the projects being funded from this

236

The struggle for safe nuclear expansion in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract After a temporary halt following the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011, China resumed its fast, yet cautious, expansion of nuclear energy programme. Nuclear energy is considered as part of the general strategy to deal with the challenges of energy security and climate change and to advance with state of the art technology in its development. This article briefly discusses recent development in and driving forces behind nuclear industry in China, and several challenges it has been facing: how to adopt, adapt, standardise and indigenise whose technologies, and how to address the shortage of qualified nuclear engineers, scientists, skilled labour force and qualified regulators. More importantly, it argues that safe and secure nuclear development requires consistent policies and effective regulations. Therefore, it is crucial to build policy and regulatory capacities based on coordination, planning and management of government agencies and the industry.

Y.C. Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Needs for Robotic Assessments of Nuclear Disasters  

SciTech Connect

Following the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima nuclear reactor plant in Japan, the need for systems which can assist in dynamic high-radiation environments such as nuclear incidents has become more apparent. The INL participated in delivering robotic technologies to Japan and has identified key components which are needed for success and obstacles to their deployment. In addition, we are proposing new work and methods to improve assessments and reactions to such events in the future. Robotics needs in disaster situations include phases such as: Assessment, Remediation, and Recovery Our particular interest is in the initial assessment activities. In assessment we need collection of environmental parameters, determination of conditions, and physical sample collection. Each phase would require key tools and efforts to develop. This includes study of necessary sensors and their deployment methods, the effects of radiation on sensors and deployment, and the development of training and execution systems.

Victor Walker; Derek Wadsworth

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy ... A brief summary of the history and key concepts of nuclear energy. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Charles D. Mickey

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear batteries ... Describes the structure, operation, and application of nuclear batteries. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Deputy Secretary Poneman Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA Deputy Secretary Poneman Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA June 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman today addressed the plenary session at the International Atomic Energy Agency's Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety. Deputy Secretary Poneman emphasized the importance of international cooperation and information sharing for developing lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. The IAEA is leading the process to develop these international best practices, which will help strengthen the international nuclear regulatory regime. Remarks as prepared for delivery are below. Thank you, Mr. Ambassador, for your work in organizing this important Conference and to Director General Amano and his staff for convening it.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear Forensics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear...

242

UNITS RELATED TO RADIATION EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVITY IN MASS MEDIA: THE FUKUSHIMA CASE STUDY IN EUROPE AND RUSSIA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......people are interested in how dangerous something is for them. Since...related to the estimation of health effects, they are therefore...people who want to know what is dangerous for them. Besides, these...often compared Fukushima with dangerous and non-dangerous levels......

T. Perko; Y. Tomkiv; D. H. Oughton; M. C. Cantone; E. Gallego; I. Prezelj; E. Byrkina

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima  

SciTech Connect

Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: TODAM and FLESCOTs theories and mathematical formulations TODAM and FLESCOT model structures Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment EMSL tour Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

Onishi, Yasuo

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan December 15, 2011 - 4:14pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman spoke at the Tokyo American Center today about nuclear power after Fukushima. Excerpts and full text of remarks, as prepared for delivery, are below: "As two of the nations responsible for pioneering the peaceful use of atomic energy, the United States and Japan share an opportunity - and a responsibility - to safely speed that transition. In fact, next week in the United States we will celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 1 in Idaho, which marked the first time that peaceful atomic energy was used to generate electricity. Our two nations

245

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 22710 of 28,905 results. 01 - 22710 of 28,905 results. Article EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup TOKYO - An EM-led U.S. delegation conducted its third workshop last month to provide expertise to Japanese officials leading the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant site and surrounding area, this time addressing priorities identified by Japan's government agencies. http://energy.gov/em/articles/em-leads-successful-workshop-supporting-fukushima-cleanup Page Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability is seeking public input on a draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process. The proposed IIP Process is intended to improve interagency and intergovernmental coordination focused

246

Potential of taxonomy to preserve and disseminate Fukushima accident information implemented by JAEA library  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regarding Fukushima accident, it would be true that the relevant information has not been provided well enough for the affected people in and over Japan, for instance, as often being mixed, confused, too difficult to access or disappearing through the internet or websites. In this regard, it is necessary be to terminologically develop ways to access such affected information, like a taxonomy, composed of semantically controlled terms on the related events forming lineage-like hierarchical structures. To come up with a potential taxonomy to preserve and disseminate the affected information, this paper describes a preliminary view on the terminological aspects and availability of IAEA/INIS for the information implemented by JAEA Library. It is necessary to make new aspects and terms derived from the affected information, such as 'beyond design basis', more detailed, scrutinised and involved in the schemes, terminological aspects and IAEA/INIS, in order to improve the taxonomic potential.

Katsuhiko Kunii; Keizo Itabashi; Shun Nagaya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the worlds electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel cycles. In March of 2011, an unprecedented earthquake of 9 magnitude and ensuing tsunami off the east coast of Japan caused a severe nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan (Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 2011). The severity of the nuclear accident in Japan has brought about a reinvestigation of nuclear energy policy and deployment activities for many nations around the world, most notably in Japan and Germany (BBC, 2011; Reuter, 2011). The response to the accident has been mixed and its full impact may not be realized for many years to come. The nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan has not directly affected the significant on-going nuclear deployment activities in many countries. China, Russia, India, and South Korea, as well as others, are continuing with their deployment plans. As of October 2011, China had the most reactors under construction at 27, while Russia, India, and South Korea had 11, 6, and 5 reactors under construction, respectively (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Ten other nations have one or two reactors currently under construction. Many more reactors are planned for future deployment in China, Russia, and India, as well as in the US. Based on the World Nuclear Associations data, the realization of Chinas deployment plan implies that China will surpass the US in total nuclear capacity some time in the future.

Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

248

ORISE: DOE Secretary Chu honors ORAU employees for Japan crisis response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Secretary Chu honors ORAU employees for Japan crisis response DOE Secretary Chu honors ORAU employees for Japan crisis response FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 7, 2011 FY12-08 Sixteen ORAU employees received U.S. Department of Energy Secretarial Honor Awards for their work supporting the agency in responding to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor crisis in Japan. The awards were presented in Washington, D.C., by Energy Secretary Steven Chu. ORAU's team was honored alongside National Nuclear Security Administration employees and contractors who made up the Nuclear Incident Team that was activated as the Fukushima reactor crisis began. In response to a radiological or nuclear incident, the NIT's mission is to coordinate NNSA assets for deployment, continually monitor deployment activities and provide NNSA management with the latest available information. It is

249

Revue de presse ANGLAIS Semaine du 23 au 29 mai 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fukushima (by Andy Coghlan) : Why did one nuclear site in Fukushima escape damage from the earthquake? Mike

Rennes, Université de

250

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 News Updates The final ruling on the design certification for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries' APWR has been revised until 2015. Structural changes were made to the design by vendor, which requires a new seismic analysis to be performed. Because of this, the review schedule for the COL applications for Comanche Peak and North Anna has been delayed by approximately 18 months. The final ruling on Areva's EPR design certification has been revised from June 2013 until the end of 2014. The change is to allow Areva to respond to outstanding technical issues and provide additional information related to post-Fukushima requirements. DOE released a funding opportunity announcement on March, 22 2012 to

251

Nuclear Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs >> Nuclear Energy Error Error Nuclear Energy Home - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Energy Home - RCC * Increasing...

252

China's approach to nuclear safety From the perspective of policy and institutional system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nuclear energy plays an important role in the energy sector in the world. It has achieved a rapid development during the past six decades and contributes to over 11% of the world's electricity supply. On the other side, nuclear accidents have triggered substantial debates with a growing public concern on nuclear facilities. Followed by the Fukushima nuclear accident, some developed countries decided to shut down the existing nuclear power plants or to abandon plans to build new ones. Given this background, accelerating the development of nuclear power on the basis of safety in China will make it a bellwether for other countries. China assigns the top priority to the nuclear safety in nuclear energy development and has maintained a good record in this field. The policy and institutional system provide the necessary guarantee for the nuclear energy development and safety management. Furthermore, China's approach to nuclear safety provides a benchmark for the safe development and utilization of nuclear power. This research draws an overall picture of the nuclear energy development and nuclear safety in China from the policy and institutional perspective.

Ruimin Mu; Jian Zuo; Xueliang Yuan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consistent ones and nuclear accidents are the least frequentto the Fukushima nuclear accident. Journal of Environmentalto the Fukushima nuclear accident. Journal of Environmental

Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Nuclear Debate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Debate ... This month, the Senate will consider the nominations of two women to serve on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ... Svinicki is a nuclear engineer with experience in the Department of Energys nuclear energy programs. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

255

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 28090 of 28,904 results. 81 - 28090 of 28,904 results. Download Privacy Impact Assessment Template and Guidance Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting an... http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/privacy-impact-assessment-template-and-guidance Article U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference Dr. Steven Chu Praises IAEA for Work in Nuclear Energy and Safety at Annual Conference http://energy.gov/articles/us-energy-secretary-addresses-international-atomic-energy-agency-general-conference Download Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima

256

2012 Annual Report: Simulate and Evaluate the Cesium Transport and Accumulation in Fukushima-Area Rivers by the TODAM Code  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the application of the time-varying, one-dimensional sediment-contaminant transport code, TODAM (Time-dependent, One-dimensional, Degradation, And Migration) to simulate the cesium migration and accumulation in the Ukedo River in Fukushima. This report describes the preliminary TODAM simulation results of the Ukedo River model from the location below the Ougaki Dam to the river mouth at the Pacific Ocean. The major findings of the 100-hour TODAM simulation of the preliminary Ukedo River modeling are summarized as follows:

Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

Evaluation of radiation doses and associated risk from the Fukushima nuclear accident to marine biota and human consumers of seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to marine biota and human consumers of seafood 10.1073/pnas.1221834110 Nicholas...radionuclides are in human food items such as seafood. Although statements were released by...or for human consumers of contaminated seafood. We have therefore calculated the radiation doses absorbed by diverse marine...

Nicholas S. Fisher; Karine Beaugelin-Seiller; Thomas G. Hinton; Zofia Baumann; Daniel J. Madigan; Jacqueline Garnier-Laplace

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Report urges more planning to cope with Fukushima-like event  

SciTech Connect

Industry and the NRC maintain that US reactor safety has greatly improved in the three years since Japans nuclear catastrophe.

Kramer, David

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nuclear Returns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Returns ... For the first time since 1978, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given the green light for a new U.S. nuclear power plant. ... NRC granted a license to Southern Co. to build and operate twin 1,100-MW reactors adjacent to two operating nuclear power plants at its Vogtle nuclear facility, near Waynesboro, Ga. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

PERSPECTIVES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...5 and #6 at Fukushima Daiichi. One of the three emergency diesel generators installed at Unit 6 remained available, and operators...underscores the inherently fragile nature of the international oil market, which can potentially affect the world economy. Naturally...

263

Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although not yet developed at the commercial stage, nuclear fusion technology is still being considered as a ... used in nuclear warfare. Since research in nuclear fusion for the production of energy started abou...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; Jos Manuel Martnez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation As more countries embrace nuclear power as a cost-effective and clean alternative to fossil fuels, the need exists to ensure that the nuclear fuel cycle is...

265

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decades

Kemner, Ken

266

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a complex atomic apparatus used to obtain energy from nuclear fission chain reaction. Used to produce nuclear energy, radioactive isotopes, and artificial elements.... atomic pile ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nuclear Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Idaho National Laboratory is the Department of Energy's lead nuclear energy research and development facility. Building upon its legacy responsibilities,...

269

Nuclear Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Error Error Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC * Increasing your portlet timeout setting. *...

270

Nuclear Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

271

Emergency Response & Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Security + Safety » Emergency Response & Procedures National Security + Safety » Emergency Response & Procedures Emergency Response & Procedures November 1, 2013 A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is stunning that one can see firsthand the destructive force of the tsunami even more than two and a half years after the tragic events October 29, 2013 Workers repair power lines in the Mid-Atlantic shortly after Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Communities The Energy Department continues to take actions to protect our energy infrastructure, adapt to climate change and build partnerships to make

272

ANNUAL REPORT FY2011 I N D U S T R I A L S A N D I A N A T I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 I N D U S T R I A L S A N D I A N A T I O N A L L A B O R A T O R I E S Radiation Cleanup in Fukushima n About the cover: Patented crystalline silico-titanate (CST) technology, licensed from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by UOP, a Honeywell Company, is being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. See story on page 18. These partnerships embody the innovation, productivity, and entrepreneurialism that enable our nation to maintain leadership in science and engineering - ultimately strengthening our nation's security. Dan Sanchez DOE Technology Partnerships Manager NNSA Sandia Site Office Sandia's Industrial Partnerships Program not only supports innovation, but also accelerates its transfer to the private sector.

273

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

Study of feasible and sustainable multilateral approach on nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

Despite the Fukushima accident it is undeniable that nuclear power remains one of the most important methods to handle global growth of economic/energy consumption and issues with greenhouse gases. If the demand for nuclear power increases, the demand for not only the generation of power but also for refining uranium (U), conversion, enrichment, re-conversion, and fuel manufacturing should increase. In addition, concerns for the proliferation of 'Sensitive Nuclear Technologies' (SNT) should also increase. We propose a demand-side approach, where nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) activities would be implemented among multiple states. With this approach, NFC services, in particular those using SNTs, are multilaterally executed and controlled, thereby preventing unnecessary proliferation of SNTs, and enabling safe and appropriate control of nuclear technologies and nuclear materials. This proposal would implement nuclear safety and security at an international level and solve transport issues for nuclear fuels. This proposal is based on 3 types of cooperation for each element of NFC: type A: cooperation for 3S only, services received; Type B: cooperation for 3S, MNA (Multilateral Nuclear Activities) without transfer of ownership to MNA; and Type C cooperation for 3S, MNA holding ownership rights. States involved in the 3 types of activity should be referred to as partner states, host states, and site states respectively. The feasibility of the proposal is discussed for the Asian region.

Kuno, Y.; Tazaki, M. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); Akiba, M.; Takashima, R.; Izumi, Y.; Tanaka, S. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nuclear choices  

SciTech Connect

This book contains part of the series New Liberal Arts, which is intended to make science and technology more accessible to students of the liberal arts. Volume in hand provides a comprehensive, multifaceted examination of nuclear energy, in nontechnical terms. Wolfson explains the basics of nuclear energy and radiation, nuclear power..., and nuclear weapons..., and he invites readers to make their own judgments on controversial nuclear issues. Illustrated with photos and diagrams. Each chapter contains suggestions for additional reading and a glossary. For policy, science, and general collections in all libraries. (ES) Topics contained include Atoms and nuclei. Effects and uses of radiation. Energy and People. Reactor safety. Nuclear strategy. Defense in the nuclear age. Nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and nuclear futures.

Wolfson, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, July 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2012 July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, July 2012 July 30, 2012 - 3:27pm Addthis Quarterly News The final ruling on the design certification for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries' APWR has been revised until 2015. Structural changes were made to the design by vendor, which requires a new seismic analysis to be performed. Because of this, the review schedule for the COL applications for Comanche Peak and North Anna has been delayed by approximately 18 months. The final ruling on Areva's EPR design certification has been revised from June 2013 until the end of 2014. The change is to allow Areva to respond to outstanding technical issues and provide additional information related to post-Fukushima requirements. DOE released a funding opportunity announcement on March, 22 2012 to

277

defense nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

278

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

279

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

280

Beyond Design Basis Events | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to beyond design basis events (BDBEs). These initiatives included issuing Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, and conducting two DOE nuclear safety workshops. DOE also issued two reports documenting the results of these initiatives: Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to BDBEs, August 2011, and Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Beyond Design Basis Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to beyond design basis events (BDBEs). These initiatives included issuing Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, and conducting two DOE nuclear safety workshops. DOE also issued two reports documenting the results of these initiatives: Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to BDBEs, August 2011, and Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013.

282

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

283

Nuclear reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much reference has been made in the last chapter to nuclear energy levels and their various properties (e.g ... ways of doing this the use of nuclear reactions, and studies of how excited nuclei...

R. J. Blin-Stoyle FRS

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

nuclear security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3%2A en Shaping the future of nuclear detection http:nnsa.energy.govblogshaping-future-nuclear-detection

285

Nuclear Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR - Your article (Nature 365, 599; 1993) on the US-Ukraine stalemate over nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake ... nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake in not recognizing Ukraine as a legitimate successor state to the Soviet nuclear arsenal and is still insisting that ...

Arno Arrak

1994-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear Engineer (Nuclear Safety Specialist)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate of this position will serve as a Nuclear Engineer (Nuclear Safety Specialist) responsible for day-to-day technical monitoring, and evaluation of aspects of authorization...

287

Nuclear Deterrence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

288

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities, January 2013 Facilities, January 2013 Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013 In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. BDBE_Report_final.pdf More Documents & Publications Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot

289

MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION - Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 16, 2011 September 16, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: SUBJECT: DANIEL B. PONEMA Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities. These actions focused on learning how DOE can better prepare to manage potential beyond design basis events. A summary of these actions and the resulting insights, and recommended opportunities and actions to improve nuclear safety at DOE> are included in the attached report. I have directed the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) to work with DOE's Nuclear Safety and Security Coordinating Council, and the Program and Field Offices of

290

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Facilities Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. Based on recommendations in the August 2011 report, DOE embarked on a project to develop and refine guidance that supports improvements in DOE's processes for analyzing and

291

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Facilities Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. Based on recommendations in the August 2011 report, DOE embarked on a project to develop and refine guidance that supports improvements in DOE's processes for analyzing and

292

MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION - Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 16, 2011 September 16, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: SUBJECT: DANIEL B. PONEMA Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities. These actions focused on learning how DOE can better prepare to manage potential beyond design basis events. A summary of these actions and the resulting insights, and recommended opportunities and actions to improve nuclear safety at DOE> are included in the attached report. I have directed the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) to work with DOE's Nuclear Safety and Security Coordinating Council, and the Program and Field Offices of

293

Building upon Historical Competencies: Next-generation Clean-up Technologies for World-Wide Application - 13368  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has a 60-year history of successfully operating nuclear facilities and cleaning up the nuclear legacy of the Cold War era through the processing of radioactive and otherwise hazardous wastes, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, management of nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning of excess facilities. SRS recently unveiled its Enterprise.SRS (E.SRS) strategic vision to identify and facilitate application of the historical competencies of the site to current and future national and global challenges. E.SRS initiatives such as the initiative to Develop and Demonstrate Next generation Clean-up Technologies seek timely and mutually beneficial engagements with entities around the country and the world. One such ongoing engagement is with government and industry in Japan in the recovery from the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

Guevara, K.C. [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Fellinger, A.P.; Aylward, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Hyatt, J.E.; Bush, S.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 13940 of 28,905 results. 31 - 13940 of 28,905 results. Download Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013 In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/report-secretary-energy-beyond-design-basis-event-pilot-evaluations-results-and-0

295

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities, January 2013 Facilities, January 2013 Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013 In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. BDBE_Report_final.pdf More Documents & Publications Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot

296

A Safer Nuclear Enterprise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2012 at the Nuclear Security...leadership in nuclear enterprise...multinational assessment of emerging risks and consequences...to assess nuclear risks in...or nuclear terrorism. States...and nuclear power. Since 1945...nuclear power plant can mean...

Sidney D. Drell; George P. Shultz; Steven P. Andreasen

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

Haxton, W.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

Haxton, W.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nuclear Counterterrorism  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Cancels DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

300

NUCLEAR STUDIES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japanese nuclear power plant crisis sparks examination of U.S. REACTORS ... Calls are particularly zeroing in on reactors similar in location and design to those in Japan. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Political Economy of Wind Power in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan could shiftnuclear power. 21 In the wake of the Fukushima meltdown, The Guardian also published an article titled ?Japan

Swanson, Ryan Landon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nuclear Weapons Journal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal x The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2,...

304

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

305

OECD/NEA Ongoing activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering all aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Activities related to fuels, materials, physics, separation chemistry, and fuel cycles scenarios are being undertaken. By publishing state-of-the-art reports and organizing workshops, the groups are able to disseminate recent research advancements to the international community. Current activities mainly focus on advanced nuclear systems, and experts are working on analyzing results and establishing challenges associated to the adoption of new materials and fuels. By comparing different codes, the Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios is aiming at gaining further understanding of the scientific issues and specific national needs associated with the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. At the back end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical processing) are being assessed. Current and future activities comprise studies on minor actinides separation and post Fukushima studies. Regular workshops are also organized to discuss recent developments on Partitioning and Transmutation. In addition, the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC) focuses on the analysis of the economics of nuclear power across the fuel cycle in the context of changes of electricity markets, social acceptance and technological advances and assesses the availability of the nuclear fuel and infrastructure required for the deployment of existing and future nuclear power. The Expert Group on the Economics of the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (EBENFC), in particular, is looking at assessing economic and financial issues related to the long term management of spent nuclear fuel. (authors)

Cornet, S.M. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12 Boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); McCarthy, K. [Idaho Nat. Lab. - P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Chauvin, N. [CEA Saclay, Nuclear Energy Division, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

307

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

308

Nuclear options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... sad if transient commercial expediency led the country to take risks now by adopting nuclear reactor designs from abroad which are in some respects technically less sound than those produced at ... much lower priority. It can be anticipated, however; that although the types of nuclear reactor selected as the best that Britain could build next may be suitable for unit designs ...

G. R. Bainbridge

1974-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

Utilization of Recently Enhanced Simulation Tools and Empirical Ground Motion Databases to Improve Ground Motion Prediction Capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. Irikura, H.K. Thio, P.G. Somerville, Y. Fukushima, and Y.Fukushima. Attenuation relations of strong ground motion incatastrophic damage at the Fukushima nuclear power plant,

Khodavirdi, Khatereh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor materials and fuels can be classified into six categories: Nuclear fuel materials Nuclear clad materials Nuclear coolant materials Nuclear poison materials Nuclear moderator materials

Dr. James S. Tulenko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Super cpRad: 1663 Science and Technology Magazine | Los National Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dial μ for Assistance Dial μ for Assistance This past March, a 23-foot-high tsunami struck the Tohoku region of Japan and destroyed the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. It is still uncertain as to the status of the reactor core-the large, tower-like assembly of fuel rods that contains not only the uranium and plutonium fuel, but also the extremely radioactive waste products of nuclear fission. If the core remains intact and standing, it should be possible to remove the assembly as a unit, and execute some strategy to mitigate its hazards. But if the core melted and nuclear fuel spilled from the fuel rods, suffice it to say there are no easy solutions. Los Alamos might be able to assess the status of the core by scaling up a demonstration muon tomography system so that it's capable of imaging the

312

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events PURPOSE: The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to (1) provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, initiatives related to beyond design basis events (BDBEs), and (2) provide direction for enhancing capabilities for mitigating BDBEs at DOE sites. BACKGROUND: After the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to BDBEs. These initiatives

313

Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, September 2011 Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, September 2011 Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities. These actions focused on learning how DOE can better prepare to manage potential beyond design basis events. A summary of these actions and the resulting insights, and recommended opportunities and actions to improve nuclear safety at DOE> are included in the attached report. I have directed

314

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events, April 2013 Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events, April 2013 PURPOSE: The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to (1) provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, initiatives related to beyond design basis events (BDBEs), and (2) provide direction for enhancing capabilities for mitigating BDBEs at DOE sites. BACKGROUND: After the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to BDBEs. These initiatives

315

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

security | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

318

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing...

319

nuclear navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

navy | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

320

nuclear threat science | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

threat science | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nuclear Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

322

Nuclear Radius and Nuclear Forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The difference between the radius of the nuclear matter distribution and the nuclear force radius, RN?1.4A1310-13 cm, for heavy nuclei (A>100) is interpreted as a consequence of the finite range of nuclear forces. Assuming that the nuclear matter distribution coincides with the charge distribution as determined at Stanford (RC=1.12A1310-13 cm is the distance at which the charge density falls to one half value) we sum up the nuclear interactions of an incident nucleon for various proposed internucleon potentials, V(r). We also evaluate contributions from the spin, charge, and matter polarizations induced in the nuclear distributions by the incident nucleon as a test of the convergence of these calculations. The aim here is to infer some features of nuclear forces which satisfy saturation requirements and at the same time give rise to an appreciable nuclear attraction for an incident nucleon at RN. Analyses of the scattering of neutrons and protons by heavy nuclei suggest a nuclear attraction ?14 Mev at a distance RN.These considerations are primarily sensitive to the long range behavior of the direct, central part of V(r). The key point which emerges from them is that the nuclear forces must contain long range (~ meson Compton wavelength) direct, central attractions which will be felt by an incident nucleon at RN before the shorter range repulsions (hard cores, many-body forces, or exchange interactions), which are responsible for saturation, become effective. Such interactions can be constructed phenomenologically, but are not found in recent meson-theoretically deduced potentials.

S. D. Drell

1955-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Nuclear condensation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work draws an analogy between a heated nucleus breaking up into clusters and a liquid undergoing a phase transition to a gas in which droplets appear. The critical temperature and density in the nucleus are investigated using a Skyrme effective interaction and finite temperature Hartree-Fock theory. The energy and pressure as a function of density are calculated. The effects of compressibility, effective mass, and binding energy per particle on the critical temperature and critical density of nuclear systems is developed. In some cases, analytic expressions for these quantities can be obtained.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Phase transitions in hot nuclear matter.

H. Jaqaman; A. Z. Mekjian; L. Zamick

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nuclear War  

SciTech Connect

Several chapters in Last Aid warrant the attention of the medical profession. What is known and not known about acute biologic effects following a nuclear explosion is described. The social, physical, and environmental impact of nuclear war on urban population centers is described. How nuclear weapons could affect the composition of the ozone layer and the effects this could have on human survival, including possible interruption of the aquatic ecosystem to produce single-cell organisms for the food cycle, especially seafood is noted.

MacLeod, G.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

326

Nuclear Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear medicine is the branch of medicine that is concerned with the use of in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of disease. It usually uses small amounts of radioactive materials or , substances th...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nuclear viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The decay rate of momentum in a nuclear reaction is given by an exact formula expressed in terms of the T matrix. A special case, where a viscosity coefficient can be estimated, is considered.

B. Giraud; J. Le Tourneux; E. Osnes

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nuclear Golf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadcast Transcript: Pay no attention to that nuclear warhead behind the 18th hole; just shout "Fore!" and drive your Titleist down the fairway. In a development that is bizarre even by North Korean standards, the country ...

Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

330

Nuclear Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The core of a nuclear reactor is composed of a controlled critical configuration of a fissile material, which in strict a sense is the fuel. This fissile material is contained in a matrix, normally a ceramic c...

Rudy J. M. Konings; Thierry Wiss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Nuclear Energy!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

driver, see the Nuclear Clean Air Energy race car and receive a special clean energy patch on October 21 from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Space is limited RSVP by October 4 Hands-on...

332

Nuclear forces  

SciTech Connect

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

Machleidt, R. [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

333

Causal relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in G6 countries: Evidence from panel Granger causality tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Looking at the recent nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, the consequences were not just environmental or economic. The accident was a big hit to the reputation and trust in nuclear power generation making a number of countries reconsider the nuclear energy as an option. The recent financial crisis might have limited even more the developed countries from the necessary capital to invest in expensive power options but this might change in the future if the positive environmental effects of the nuclear power can be proven substantial. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the causal link between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth for six developed countries over the period from 1971 to 2011. Granger causality procedure based on Meta-analysis in heterogeneous mixed panels is used to allow for cross-sectional dependency and heterogeneity across countries. The empirical findings for the overall panel support the presence of unidirectional causality running from economic growth to nuclear energy consumption across the G-6 countries. However, in the case of UK we find a bidirectional causality running from nuclear energy consumption to economic growth; while the results for Germany confirm the growth hypothesis and for the rest of the countries the neutrality hypothesis.

T. Chang; F. Gatwabuyege; R. Gupta; R. Inglesi-Lotz; N.C. Manjezi; B.D. Simo-Kengne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nuclear Physics for Nuclear Fusion  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear fusion data for deuteron-triton resonance near 100 keV are found to be consistent with the selective resonant tunneling model. The feature of this selective resonant tunneling is the selectivity. It selects not only the energy level, but also the damping rate (nuclear reaction rate). When the Coulomb barrier is thin and low, the resonance selects the fast reaction channel; however, when the Coulomb barrier is thick and high, the resonance selects the slow reaction channel. This mechanism might open an approach toward fusion energy with no strong nuclear radiation.

Li Xingzhong [Tsinghua University (China)

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism Home > Our Mission > Countering Nuclear Terrorism Countering Nuclear Terrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy

336

Nuclear Induction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic moments of nuclei in normal matter will result in a nuclear paramagnetic polarization upon establishment of equilibrium in a constant magnetic field. It is shown that a radiofrequency field at right angles to the constant field causes a forced precession of the total polarization around the constant field with decreasing latitude as the Larmor frequency approaches adiabatically the frequency of the r-f field. Thus there results a component of the nuclear polarization at right angles to both the constant and the r-f field and it is shown that under normal laboratory conditions this component can induce observable voltages. In Section 3 we discuss this nuclear induction, considering the effect of external fields only, while in Section 4 those modifications are described which originate from internal fields and finite relaxation times.

F. Bloch

1946-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Collaborating Organizations - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborating Organizations Collaborating Organizations Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program Collaborating Organizations Bookmark and Share National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network, coordinated by IAEA, Vienna, Austria Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Group, Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. Nuclear Spectroscopy Group, Department of Nuclear Physics,

338

Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Program Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program We contribute to the development of comprehensive nuclear reactions and nuclear structure databases, including nuclear data measurement, analysis, modeling and evaluation methodologies, that are implemented in basic science research and advanced nuclear technologies. Bookmark and Share Recent Events Nuclear Structure 2012 Conference Argonne National Laboratory hosted the

339

The IAEA international conference on fast reactors and related fuel cycles: highlights and main outcomes  

SciTech Connect

The 'International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles', which is regularly held every four years, represents the main international event dealing with fast reactors technology and related fuel cycles options. Main topics of the conference were new fast reactor concepts, design and simulation capabilities, safety of fast reactors, fast reactor fuels and innovative fuel cycles, analysis of past experience, fast reactor knowledge management. Particular emphasis was put on safety aspects, considering the current need of developing and harmonizing safety standards for fast reactors at the international level, taking also into account the lessons learned from the accident occurred at the Fukushima- Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. Main advances in the several key areas of technological development were presented through 208 oral presentations during 41 technical sessions which shows the importance taken by fast reactors in the future of nuclear energy.

Monti, S.; Toti, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuclear Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs SHARE Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs image Oak Ridge National Laboratory covers the entire spectrum of nuclear nonproliferation work, from...

343

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For...

344

Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Facilities Locator Map Numerical map data points indicate two or more nuclear facilities in the same geographic location. Nuclear...

345

Nuclear waffles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and inside neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases, often referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts.

A. S. Schneider; D. K. Berry; C. M. Briggs; M. E. Caplan; C. J. Horowitz

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nuclear cheap?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... account of the fact that if there had been no nuclear contribution the additional fossil fuel supplies would have had to come from expanded output at the marginal and most expensive ... a perfectly proper accountancy basis, including allowance for costs yet to be incurred, the price we would be paying for electricity would be higher now had fossil stations been preferred ...

P.M.S. JONES

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

Nuclear electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... p.344-6) and referred to in my letter of 23 October. The retail price index (RPI) has been used to correct for inflation and a uniform interest rate ... as given by historic costs, and if a previously unconsidered effect of inflation on nuclear fuel costs is included, the margin becomes 34 per cent above that for coal.

J.W. JEFFERY

1981-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculations for them.

H. Ejiri; A. I. Titov; M. Boswell; A. Young

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Heat pipe based passive emergency core cooling system for safe shutdown of nuclear power reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract On March 11th, 2011, a natural disaster created by earthquakes and Tsunami caused a serious potential of nuclear reactor meltdown in Fukushima due to the failure of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) powered by diesel generators. In this paper, heat pipe based ECCS has been proposed for nuclear power plants. The designed loop type heat pipe ECCS is composed of cylindrical evaporator with 62 vertical tubes, each 150mm diameter and 6m length, mounted around the circumference of nuclear fuel assembly and 21mנ10mנ5m naturally cooled finned condenser installed outside the primary containment. Heat pipe with overall thermal resistance of 1.44נ10?5C/W will be able to reduce reactor temperature from initial working temperature of 282C to below 250C within 7h. The overall ECCS also includes feed water flooding of the core using elevated water tank for initial 10min which will accelerate cooling of the core, replenish core coolant during loss of coolant accident and avoids heat transfer crisis phenomena during heat pipe start-up process. The proposed heat pipe system will operate in fully passive mode with high runtime reliability and therefore provide safer environment to nuclear power plants.

Masataka Mochizuki; Randeep Singh; Thang Nguyen; Tien Nguyen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use Level 2 proficiency in performing and interpreting cardiac nuclear imaging tests. Progression

Ford, James

351

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Forensics Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security

352

Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the production Automatic Dynamic Load Balancing (ADLB) library on the BGP. Steve Pieper, Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions PI Name: James Vary PI...

353

Audit Report National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Systems Configuration Management DOEIG-0902 March 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of...

354

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to learn MCNPX and nuclear safeguards, Bill B. , Steve K. ,Introduction 1.1 Nuclear Safeguards . . . . . . . . . . . .Programme to IAEA Safeguards. STUK-YTO-TR 170. Helsinki

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

356

Theory of nuclear reactions  

SciTech Connect

The book presents a theory of nuclear reaction. An account is given of the nonrelativistic nuclear reaction theory. The R - matrix description of nuclear reactions is considered and the dispersion method is formulated. Mechanisms of nuclear reactions and their relationship are studied in detail. Attention is paid to nuclear reactions involving the compound nuclear formation and to direct nuclear processes. The optical model the diffraction approach and high - energy diffraction nuclear processes involving composite particles are discussed.

Sitenko, A.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear photonics  

SciTech Connect

With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

359

Advanced nuclear reactors and tritium impacts. Modeling the aquatic pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective contribution of nuclear energy will depend on various factors related to economics, safety, public acceptance and sustainability. To assure, however, the nuclear energy development, reactor accident impacts, as Fukushima, must be evaluated in a predictive way. Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of potential releases of radionuclides from nuclear reactors to the environment. It is important to evaluate, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models, by comparing with measured values in the environment or by comparing with the predictions of other models. Tritium has a complex environmental behavior once released into the environment. It is essential to establish reference scenarios to allow the simulation of tritium aquatic pathway subsequent to accidental releases. For this purpose, two scenarios for seawater circulation were analyzed by hydrodynamic modeling. An inverse modeling procedure was successfully applied to estimate tide elevations on the borders, which are based on applying the harmonic constants and using the same overestimation percentage produced by model results to correct the border values. Simulations of validated model for postulated accidental releases of tritium inventory from heavy water reactors, whose doses could be relevant, were presented here. It was observed differences between the two scenarios for the transport modeling that were caused by the removal of large volume of polluted waters from the accident site and its dilution in the discharge area, which has minor tritium concentrations. Moreover, the processes involved in the dynamic transfer of tritium in the environment were analyzed in dependence on the environmental conditions of tropical coastal ecosystem.

Francisco Fernando Lamego Simes Filho; Abner Duarte Soares; Andr da Silva Aguiar; Celso Marcelo Franklin Lapa; Antonio Carlos Ferreira Guimares

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

362

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

363

Nuclear Systems Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Criticality Safety Irradiation Experiment Development and Execution Robotics & Remote Systems Engineering and Applications Thermal & Hydraulic Experiments & Analysis Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Nuclear Systems Technology SHARE Nuclear Systems Technology Nuclear Systems Technology Image 2 ORNL has had historic involvement in a broad set of nuclear research areas: irradiated materials and isotopes R&D, fission and fusion reactors development, neutron scattering, fuel enrichment, used fuel recycling and disposal, etc. The skills and knowledge required to succeed in these research areas often cultivated core areas of expertise in which ORNL is

364

Nuclear power, nuclear eapons link argued  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power, nuclear eapons link argued ... The problem of the spread of nuclear weapons to nations not currently possessing themso-called horizontal proliferationoften is linked to development of commercial nuclear power. ... However, John P. Holdren, professor of energy and resources at the University of California, Berkeley, maintains that commercial nuclear power is linked intimately to horizontal proliferation and that the development of alternative energy technologies is crucial to prevent the spread. ...

1982-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

international nuclear assistance dataset, this article findsinternational nuclear assistance dataset. Table 2 presentsinternational nuclear assistance dataset. Table 3 presents

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nuclear Forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One-meson-exchange Feynman diagrams are nonrelativistically reduced and unitarized via Schrdinger's equation. Properties of nucleon-nucleon scattering are calculated at incident laboratory energies of 25-310 MeV. Bound-state properties of the deuteron and of nuclear matter are also calculated. Mesons included are the ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, and ?. Very good over-all agreement with the experimental data is obtained. Important features of this "potential" include its momentum dependence, properly treated, and the contribution of the ? "meson," which qualitatively changes the central/tensor force ratio from that of previous phenomenological potentials.

Lester Ingber

1968-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nuclear Waffles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with $51200$ and $409600$ nucleons of nuclear pasta. From the output of the MD simulations we characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function $g(r)$ and the structure factor $S(q)$, for systems with proton fractions $Y_p=0.10, 0.20, 0.30$ and $0.40$ at about one third of nuclear saturation density and temperatures near $1.0$ MeV. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, $Y_p=0.10$ and $0.20$, equilibrate quickly and form liquid-like structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, $Y_p=0.30$ and $0.40$, take a longer time to equilibrate and organize themselves in solid-like periodic structures. Furthermore, the $Y_p=0.40$ system is made up of slabs, lasagna phase, interconnected by defects while the $Y_p=0.30$ systems consist of a stack of perforated plates, the nuclear waffle phase. The periodic configurations observed in our MD simulations for proton fractions $Y_p\\ge0.30$ have important consequences for the structure factors $S(q)$ of protons and neutrons, which relate to many transport properties of supernovae and neutron star crust. A detailed study of the waffle phase and how its structure depends on temperature, size of the simulation and the screening length showed that finite-size effects appear to be under control and, also, that the plates in the waffle phase merge at temperatures slightly above $1.0$ MeV and the holes in the plates form an hexagonal lattice at temperatures slightly lower than $1.0$ MeV.

A. S. Schneider; D. K. Berry; C. M. Briggs; M. E. Caplan; C. J. Horowitz

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

368

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimize Nuclear Waste Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP will increase the efficiency in the management of used nuclear fuel, also known as...

369

Assessment of the environmental footprint of nuclear energy systems. Comparison between closed and open fuel cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy perspectives for the current century are dominated by the anticipated significant increase of energy needs. Particularly, electricity consumption is anticipated to increase by a factor higher than two before 2050. Energy choices are considered as structuring political choices that implies a long-standing and stable policy based on objective criteria. LCA (life cycle analysis) is a structured basis for deriving relevant indicators which can allow the comparison of a wide range of impacts of different energy sources. Among the energy-mix, nuclear power is anticipated to have very low GHG-emissions. However, its viability is severely addressed by the public opinion after the Fukushima accident. Therefore, a global LCA of the French nuclear fuel cycle was performed as a reference model. Results were compared in terms of impact with other energy sources. It emphasized that the French nuclear energy is one of the less impacting energy, comparable with renewable energy. In a second, part, the French scenario was compared with an equivalent open fuel cycle scenario. It demonstrates that an open fuel cycle would require about 16% more natural uranium, would have a bigger environmental footprint on the non radioactive indicators and would produce a higher volume of high level radioactive waste.

Ch. Poinssot; S. Bourg; N. Ouvrier; N. Combernoux; C. Rostaing; M. Vargas-Gonzalez; J. Bruno

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Powering Africa?s sustainable development: The potential role of nuclear energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The electricity deficit is one of the most serious contemporary issues facing sub-Saharan Africa. Many countries in the region have insufficient generation capacity to meet rapidly rising demand. Electricity shortages have become a binding and powerful constraint on the continent?s sustainable development. Their resolution will require coordinated effort to improve the effectiveness and governance of the region?s utilities and to significantly scale-up generation capacity. A broad portfolio of low carbon (low-C) technologies needs to be deployed in order to address the electricity deficit in a cost-effective way and not be disruptive to economic growth. Since nuclear power can deliver low-C electricity in bulk, reliably and without intermittency, it could make a significant contribution towards resolving Africa?s power crisis. However, the post-Fukushima safety concerns related to large nuclear plants with substantial radioactive inventories will be especially pronounced in Africa. Moreover, large scale reactors with huge upfront investment requirements are likely to be unsuitable for capital-constrained African countries with small electricity grids. One promising direction for nuclear development in Africa might be to downsize reactors from the gigawatt scale to less-complex smaller units (with substantially smaller radioactive inventory) that are more affordable.

Ioannis N. Kessides

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued) ... Examines nuclear instrumentation available from several major U.S. manufacturers. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

373

Reconversion of nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

Kapitza, Sergei P

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Enterprise Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Nuclear Security Enterprise Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) mission is to ensure the Nation sustains a safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent through the

375

National Nuclear Data Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Radiation Dose Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data File Experimental nuclear reaction data Sigma Retrieval & Plotting Nuclear structure & decay Data Nuclear Science References Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File NNDC databases Ground and isomeric states properties Nuclear structure & decay data journal Nuclear reaction model code Tools and Publications US Nuclear Data Program Cross Section Evaluation Working Group Nuclear data networks Basic properties of atomic nuclei Parameters & thermal values Basic properties of atomic nuclei Internal Radiation Dose Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data File Experimental nuclear reaction data Sigma Retrieval & Plotting Nuclear structure & decay Data Nuclear Science References Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File NNDC databases Ground and isomeric states properties Nuclear structure & decay data journal Nuclear reaction model code Tools and Publications US Nuclear Data Program Cross Section Evaluation Working Group Nuclear data networks Basic properties of atomic nuclei Parameters & thermal values Basic properties of atomic nuclei Homepage BNL Home Site Index - Go USDNP and CSEWG November 18-22! USNDP CSEWG Agenda Thanks for attending! EXFOR 20,000 Milestone EXFOR Milestone 20,000 experimental works are now in the EXFOR database!

376

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste management proceedings. Keywords Nuclear, nuclear power plant, spent fuel, nuclear waste, dataCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT-RELATED DATA of Submitted Data 3 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DATA REQUESTS 6 A. Environmental Impacts 6 B. Spent Fuel Generation 8 C

377

If Terrorists Go Nuclear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...officials, two nuclear indus-try...urging the nuclear nations to...a terrorist attack is increasing...in the same risk category as...Prevention ofNuclear Terrorism," by the...to protect nuclear weapons against...security at civil plants. * As civil...The nuclear power industry should...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1986-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

If Terrorists Go Nuclear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...officials, two nuclear indus-try...urging the nuclear nations to...terrorist attack is increasing...the same risk category...ofNuclear Terrorism," by the...to protect nuclear weapons against...aid U.S. security, O'Keefe...at civil plants. * As civil...The nuclear power industry...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1986-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

379

Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications...

380

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Energetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both a static and a momentum-dependent potential are derived from one-meson-exchange Born amplitudes, and are adjusted to fit (i) the deuteron binding energy and quadrupole moment, (ii) S, P, and D partial waves from 25 to 310 MeV, and (iii) the binding energy and saturation property of nuclear matter. This is possible through a different form of the central and tensor potentials which has not been used previously to calculate problems (i), (ii), and (iii) above. We find the ? meson unsuitable to describe the two-pion-exchange region in that a potential with meson parameters common to all partial waves is not achieved.

Lester Ingber

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 15, 2011 June 15, 2011 Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Quorum Room, 1st Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 Meeting Minutes - June 15 2011.pdf Meeting Agenda - June 15 2011.pdf Presentation - DOE Quadrennial Technology Review.pdf Presentation - NE FY 2011 Budget and Status of NE New Starts.pdf Presentation - NGNP Phase 1 Review.pdf Presentation - Report to NEAC of Fuel Cycle Subcommittee.pdf Presentation - NEUP Fiscal Year FY2011 Status.pdf Presentation - DOE Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident.pdf Additional Material - NGNP Phase 1 Review Final Draft - NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee.pdf Additional Material - Report of Fuel Cycle Subcommittee - NEAC Report.pdf More Documents & Publications Meeting Materials: December 9, 2010 Meeting Materials: December 6, 2012

382

EM News Flashes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2011 November 9, 2011 The U.S. delegation of DOE representatives, including DOE national laboratory and contractor staff, are pictured, front row, left to right, Doug Akers, Steve Schneider, Robert Montgomery, Dan McCabe, Steve Herring, Paul Bredt, Rich Abitz; back row, left to right, Jeff Miller, Jeff Griffin, Bob Sindelar, Reid Peterson, Chuck Negin, and Wayne Johnson. EM-Led Delegation Offers Expertise in Workshop in Japan TOKYO - When Japanese officials began cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred this year, they called on the DOE to provide expertise and experience. November 9, 2011 Lawrence Livermore Site Office Manager Joins EM's Senior Leadership Team WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Acting Assistant Secretary Dave Huizenga announced

383

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 17580 of 26,764 results. 71 - 17580 of 26,764 results. Article Energy Department's Fossil Energy Chief to Tour Western Michigan University's Clean Coal Research Facilities, Host Business Roundtable WASHINGTON - Tomorrow, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, Assistant Energy Secretary for Fossil Energy Charles McConnell will join Western Michigan University President John M. Dunn and Core Energy CEO Bob... http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-s-fossil-energy-chief-tour-western-michigan-university-s-clean-coal Article EM-Led Delegation Offers Expertise in Workshop in Japan TOKYO - When Japanese officials began cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred this year, they called on the DOE to provide expertise and experience. http://energy.gov/em/articles/em-led-delegation-offers-expertise-workshop-japan

384

Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2011 15, 2011 Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Quorum Room, 1st Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 Meeting Minutes - June 15 2011.pdf Meeting Agenda - June 15 2011.pdf Presentation - DOE Quadrennial Technology Review.pdf Presentation - NE FY 2011 Budget and Status of NE New Starts.pdf Presentation - NGNP Phase 1 Review.pdf Presentation - Report to NEAC of Fuel Cycle Subcommittee.pdf Presentation - NEUP Fiscal Year FY2011 Status.pdf Presentation - DOE Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident.pdf Additional Material - NGNP Phase 1 Review Final Draft - NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee.pdf Additional Material - Report of Fuel Cycle Subcommittee - NEAC Report.pdf More Documents & Publications Meeting Materials: December 6, 2012 Meeting Materials: June 12, 2012

385

EM News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2011 November 9, 2011 Lawrence Livermore Site Office Manager Joins EM's Senior Leadership Team WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Acting Assistant Secretary Dave Huizenga announced today that Alice Williams, manager of the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Lawrence Livermore Site Office has joined the EM senior leadership team. November 9, 2011 The U.S. delegation of DOE representatives, including DOE national laboratory and contractor staff, are pictured, front row, left to right, Doug Akers, Steve Schneider, Robert Montgomery, Dan McCabe, Steve Herring, Paul Bredt, Rich Abitz; back row, left to right, Jeff Miller, Jeff Griffin, Bob Sindelar, Reid Peterson, Chuck Negin, and Wayne Johnson. EM-Led Delegation Offers Expertise in Workshop in Japan TOKYO - When Japanese officials began cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi

386

2011 IAEA General Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 IAEA General Conference 2011 IAEA General Conference Remarks as Prepared for Delivery Secretary Steven Chu Monday, September 19, 2011 Thank you, Ambassador Feruta. Congratulations on your election as President of this Conference. I also want to thank Director General Amano for his outstanding leadership. I am honored to represent the United States today, and I want to share a message from President Barack Obama: "On behalf of the United States, please accept my best wishes for a successful International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference. This year's meeting takes place against the backdrop of the severe earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March and the devastating accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station that followed. Along with

387

Nuclear power: an outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power: an outlook ... For nuclear power to regain public acceptance and investor confidence, the nation's nuclear plants must sustain an unblemished safety record, reflecting an industrywide commitment to the highest professional standards. ...

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

388

Press Release: Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two nuclear physicists, a nuclear engineer, and an economistmmembers of the Union of Concerned Scientists--released a report today that examined a new problem with nuclear reactor safety. According to the repo...

Henry W. Kendall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear Data Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links to Other Useful Sites Online Journals Institutions and Programs Related to Nuclear Physics U.S. Nuclear Data Program: All evaluated nuclear data supported by the U.S....

390

Nuclear functions of prefoldin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original author and source are credited. Nuclear functions of prefoldin Gonzalo Millan-Zambrano...and are functionally connected with nuclear processes in yeast and metazoa. Plant...available on the involvement of prefoldin in nuclear phenomena, place special emphasis on...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear Workforce Initiative - SRSCRO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear Nuclear Workforce Initiative The United States stands on the brink of a nuclear renaissance - a resurging confidence in the power of the clean, safe atom to finally conquer...

392

Nuclear chemistry at Harvard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear chemistry at Harvard ... This article points out the potential of the chemistry department at Harvard University for research in nuclear chemistry for students who wish to do work in the field for the Ph.D. degree. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Geoffrey Wilkinson; Richard M. Diamond; Eugene G. Rochow

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

High Energy Nuclear Events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles High Energy Nuclear Events Enrico Fermi Institute...Distribution of Pions produced in High Energy Nuclear Collisions Yoshihiro Yamamoto...Possible Interpretation of High Energy Nuclear Events Nobuo Yajima, Shuji Takagi......

Enrico Fermi

1950-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities  

SciTech Connect

The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

101 | National Nuclear Security Administration 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Nuclear Security 101 Fact Sheet Nuclear Security 101 Mar 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material,

398

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

399

Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

101 | National Nuclear Security Administration 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Nuclear Security 101 Fact Sheet Nuclear Security 101 Mar 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material,

400

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ab initio no-core full configuration approach," Phys. Rev. C 86, 034325 (2012) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu...

402

Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

value of 92.16 MeV and the point rms radius is 2.35 fm vs 2.33 from experiment. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu...

403

Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

1950-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

International Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

405

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

406

6 Nuclear Fuel Designs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Message from the Director 2 Nuclear Power & Researrh Reactors 3 Discovery of Promethium 4 Nuclear Isotopes 4 Nuclear Medicine 5 Nuclear Fuel Processes & Software 6 Nuclear Fuel Designs 6 Nuclear Safety 7 Nuclear Desalination 7 Nuclear Nonproliferation 8 Neutron Scattering 9 Semiconductors & Superconductors 10 lon-Implanted Joints 10 Environmental Impact Analyses 11 Environmental Quality 12 Space Exploration 12 Graphite & Carbon Products 13 Advanced Materials: Alloys 14 Advanced Materials: Ceramics 15 Biological Systems 16 Biological Systems 17 Computational Biology 18 Biomedical Technologies 19 Intelligent Machines 20 Health Physics & Radiation Dosimetry 21 Radiation Shielding 21 Information Centers 22 Energy Efficiency: Cooling & Heating

407

LANL | Physics | Nuclear Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leaders in nuclear physics Physics Division scientists and engineers play an important role in the Laboratory's Nuclear Physics program, funded by the Department of Energy's Office...

408

Nuclear and Particle Futures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear and Particle Futures Nuclear and Particle Futures The Lab's four Science Pillars harness capabilities for solutions to threats- on national and global scales. Contacts...

409

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC), formerly the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was established on October 1, 1998, to provide independent advice to the Office of...

410

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946...

411

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, USof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Office of Nuclear Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home » Directives » Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules » Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program » Search » Approved Standards » Recently Approved » RevCom for TSP » Monthly Status Reports » Archive » Feedback DOE Nuclear Safety Research & Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design (HS-31) Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design - About Us » Nuclear Policy Technical Positions/Interpretations » Risk Assessment Working Group » Criticality Safety » DOE O 420.1C Facility Safety » Beyond Design Basis Events Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs (HS-32) Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs - About Us

413

The Joys of Nuclear Engineering  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

Jon Carmack

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Bacterial stress response to environmental radiation relating to the Fukushima radiation discharge event, Japan: Will environmental bacteria alter their antibiotic susceptibility profile?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Antibiotic resistance in clinical pathogens in humans may be traced back to resistance mechanisms in environmental bacteria and any factors, which are likely to alter (upregulate) resistance in environmental organisms, is of potential and eventual consequence to human pathogens. Furthermore, sublethal doses of gamma radiation to environmental organisms may cause sublethal stress and a selective pressure, which may lead to mutational events that alter the bacterium's susceptibility profile. A gamma (?) radiation simulation experiment was performed to emulate the exposure of four environmental bacteria, including Listeria innocua, Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to levels of radiation in and around Fukushima, Japan, equating to 1, 10 and 100 years equivalence exposure. Alteration to susceptibility to 14 antibiotics was measured as the primary endpoint. There was no significant alteration in the susceptibility of the Gram-positive organisms, whereas both Gram-negative organisms became slightly more susceptible to the antibiotics tested over time. These data indicate that such radiation exposure will not increase the antibiotic resistance profile of these organisms and hence not add to the global public health burden of increased antibiotic resistance in human bacterial pathogens.

Shigeyuki Nakanishi; John E. Moore; Motoo Matsuda; Colin E. Goldsmith; Wilson A. Coulter; Juluri R. Rao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures of fuel containing materials can be fairly useful for the entire world's nuclear community and can help make nuclear energy safer.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Advanced nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

Terrani, Kurt

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

TVA chooses nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TVA chooses nuclear power ... In giving the nod to a nuclear (over a coal) power generating station 10 days ago, TVA probably gave nuclear power its biggest boost to date. ... The $247 million nuclear power planta dual boiling-water reactor unit with a total capacity of 2.2 million kw(e).will ...

1966-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

TERRORISM AND NUCLEAR POWER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TERRORISM AND NUCLEAR POWER ... The attacks of Sept. 11 raise fear that U.S. nuclear power plants may be vulnerable ... THE TERRORIST ATTACKS ON THE World Trade Center and Pentagon are forcing a reexamination of the security of the nation's 103 nuclear power plants by nuclear's advocates and foes alike. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2001-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nuclear Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1 Nuclear Science & Engineering Nuclear Energy Present and Future Ian H. Hutchinson Head, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering CoPrincipal, Alcator Tokamak Project, Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology Outline: Nuclear Power in the US and the World Limitations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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421

Advanced nuclear fuel  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

Terrani, Kurt

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

423

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP will help prevent misuse of civilian nuclear facilities for nonpeaceful purposes by developing enhanced safeguards programs and technologies. International nuclear safeguards are integral to implementing the GNEP vision of a peaceful expansion of nuclear energy and demonstration of more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle technologies. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale

424

LESSONS LEARNED IN AEROSOL MONITORING WITH THE RASA  

SciTech Connect

The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) is an automated aerosol collection and analysis system designed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the 1990's and is deployed in several locations around the world as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) required under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The RASA operates unattended, save for regularly scheduled maintenance, iterating samples through a three-step process on a 24-hour interval. In its 15-year history, much has been learned from the operation and maintenance of the RASA that can benefit engineering updates or future aerosol systems. On 11 March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami rocked the eastern coast of Japan, resulting in power loss and cooling failures at the Daiichi nuclear power plants in Fukushima Prefecture. Aerosol collections were conducted with the RASA in Richland, WA. We present a summary of the lessons learned over the history of the RASA, including lessons taken from the Fukushima incident, regarding the RASA IMS stations operated by the United States.

Forrester, Joel B.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Carty, Fitz; Comes, Laura; Eslinger, Paul W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Litke, Kevin E.; Miley, Harry S.; Morris, Scott J.; Schrom, Brian T.; Van Davelaar, Peter; Woods, Vincent T.

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT Form used to support nuclear materials accountability and control. NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT More...

426

Nuclear Science and Engineering | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supporting Organizations Nuclear Science Engineering Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Supporting Organizations | Nuclear Science Engineering SHARE...

427

Nuclear Structure Aspects in Nuclear Astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Astrophysics as a broad and diverse field of study can be viewed as a magnifier of the impact of microscopic processes on the evolution of macroscopic events. One of the primary goals in Nuclear Astrophysics is the understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes that take place in the cosmos and the simulation of the correlated stellar and explosive burning scenarios. These simulations are strongly dependent on the input from Nuclear Physics which sets the time scale for all stellar dynamic processes--from giga-years of stellar evolution to milliseconds of stellar explosions--and provides the basis for most of the signatures that we have for the interpretation of these events--from stellar luminosities, elemental and isotopic abundances to neutrino flux from distant supernovae. The Nuclear Physics input comes through nuclear structure, low energy reaction rates, nuclear masses, and decay rates. There is a common perception that low energy reaction rates are the most important component of the required nuclear physics input; however, in this article we take a broader approach and present an overview of the close correlation between various nuclear structure aspects and their impact on nuclear astrophysics. We discuss the interplay between the weak and the strong forces on stellar time scales due to the limitations they provide for the evolution of slow and rapid burning processes. The effects of shell structure in nuclei on stellar burning processes as well as the impact of clustering in nuclei is outlined. Furthermore we illustrate the effects of the various nuclear structure aspects on the major nucleosynthesis processes that have been identified in the last few decades. We summarize and provide a coherent overview of the impact of all aspects of nuclear structure on nuclear astrophysics.

Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations, accidents, and nuclear weapons. Princeton,the likelihood of a nuclear accident (Sagan 1993, 1995). potential for a nuclear accident. Yet it seems implausible

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Belgium Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

430

Italy Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

431

COLLOQUIUM: Nuclear Famine: The Threat to Humanity from Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Nuclear Famine: The Threat to Humanity from Nuclear Weapons Dr. Alan Robock Rutgers University A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with...

432

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nature of the nuclear recipients security environment. ThisKeywords: Nuclear weapons proliferation; security; securitynature of the nuclear recipients security environment. This

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

434

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

435

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

436

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

437

Nuclear Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Science Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of matter. This includes discovering the origins of nuclei and identifying the forces that transform matter. Specific topics include: Nuclear astrophysics and the synthesis of nuclei in stars and elsewhere in the cosmos; Nuclear forces and quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field

438

Radiation Survivors: Understanding and Exploiting the Phenotype following Fractionated Radiation Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...release from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant disaster (3, 4 ). On...distributions from the Fukushima nuclear accident covering central-east Japan.Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2011...Japanese soils due to the Fukushima nuclear accident.Proc Natl Acad Sci...

Adeola Y. Makinde; Molykutty John-Aryankalayil; Sanjeewani T. Palayoor; David Cerna; and C. Norman Coleman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Radiation Survivors: Understanding and Exploiting the Phenotype following Fractionated Radiation Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radionuclide release from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant disaster...radiation-induced stress, we put forward and tested a hypothesis that...radionuclide distributions from the Fukushima nuclear accident covering...Japanese soils due to the Fukushima nuclear accident.Proc Natl...

Adeola Y. Makinde; Molykutty John-Aryankalayil; Sanjeewani T. Palayoor; David Cerna; and C. Norman Coleman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Neutron and Nuclear Science News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Nuclear science observations and opportunities at the Los Alamos...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC) Where nuclear research and deployment capabilities come together to solve nuclear nonproliferation challenges. Skip Navigation Links...

442

NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1975  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gove and A. H. Wapstra, Nuclear Data Tables 11, 127 (1972).P. Jackson, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Report (1975)national Conference on Nuclear Structure and Spec troscopy,

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE-NE Fosters Novel International Investments in U.S. Nuclear Energy Research October 14, 2014 Nuclear energy is an international industry, but nuclear research and development...

444

Counterterrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

a unique Counterterrorism Counterterrorism Policy and CooperationNuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science The Office of Nuclear Threat Science is responsible...

445

Supporting Organizations | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards Supporting Organizations Nuclear Science Engineering Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Nuclear Science Home |...

446

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Nuclear Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 15, 2002 April 15, 2002 NERAC Spring 2002 Meeting Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (2) 2002 Will Be A Transition Year 2002 Will Be A Transition Year 6 Nuclear Power 2010 6 Major Program Developments 6 FY 2003 Budget Request Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (3) Nuclear Power 2010 Nuclear Power 2010 Nuclear Power 2010 is a new R&D initiative announced by Secretary Abraham on February 14, 2002. This initiative is designed to clear the way for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2010. Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (4) Can We Build New U.S. Reactors By 2010? Yes! Can We Build New U.S. Reactors By 2010? Yes! Can Be Deployed by 2010

448

Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nuclear energy in Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After early interest in the possible uses of uranium in 1937, Argentina's scientists and politicians showed an inclination to support nuclear development that has kept quite steady compared with other areas. The Argentinean government prohibited the export of uranium in 1945, because of the emerging possibility of producing nuclear energy. The creation of the Atomic Energy Commission soon followed, and the first experimental reactor was set critical in 1958. Since then, nuclear development has allowed the successful operation of two nuclear power reactors, a quite integrated nuclear fuel cycle, and sustained activity in the development, production and use of radioisotopes. Nowadays an Argentinean company competes with success in the experimental nuclear reactor market. After a period in which the nuclear sector has been largely ignored in the official interest, Argentina's authorities have launched a comprehensive plan intended to rehabilitate all aspects of nuclear activity.

Gabriel N. Barcelo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nuclear Energy Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We shall limit ourselves here to a very rough summary of the most important features of nuclear reactions in stars. This will suffice completely ... , while the study of particular aspects of nuclear astrophysics...

Professor Dr. Rudolf Kippenhahn

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Marine Nuclear Propulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... June 30 about 95 qualified scientists and engineers were engaged on research and development on marine nuclear ... nuclear propulsion within his Department, including the Atomic Energy Authority and the Ship Research Association. This ...

1965-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A third issue related to the production, use and transportation of nuclear materials is the safety issue associated with ... an act of war or an act of terrorism. While the containment buildings of typical nuclear

Efstathios E. (Stathis) Michaelides

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear Engineer (Criticality Safety)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This position is located in the Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) which has specific responsibility for managing the development, analysis, review, and approval of non-reactor nuclear facility safety...

454

Nuclear Energy & Energy Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Safety issues related to use of nuclear energy and secure operation of nuclear installations are mail stones of great importance. Although none of technologies producing energy are absolutely safe it is obvious t...

Jumber Mamasakhlisi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

On Nuclear Energy Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article On Nuclear Energy Levels K. M. Guggenheimer The formula for the energy levels of the rigid rotator...nuclei. Two kinds of nuclear rotation are discussed...an A relation for the energy levels of different nuclei...

1942-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

General Engineer (Nuclear Safety)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) reports the US/M&P; in serving as the Central Technical Authority (CTA) for M&P; activities, ensuring the Departments nuclear safety policies and...

458

NNSA: Working to Prevent Nuclear Proliferation | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to Prevent Nuclear Proliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

459

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

460

Nuclear power browning out  

SciTech Connect

When the sad history of nuclear power is written, April 26, 1986, will be recorded as the day the dream died. The explosion at the Chernobyl plant was a terrible human tragedy- and it delivered a stark verdict on the hope that nuclear power will one day replace fossil fuel-based energy systems. Nuclear advocates may soldier on, but a decade after Chernobyl it is clear that nuclear power is no longer a viable energy option for the twenty-first century.

Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

462

3D NUCLEAR SEGMENTAT  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003029WKSTN00 Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems https://vision.lbl.gov/Software/3DMorphometry/

463

Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field Elizabeth K. Ervin The University. An understanding of power generation is important for all modern-day engineers, and nuclear energy serves as a good-four universities have nuclear- related programs, including Nuclear or Radiological Engineering, Nuclear Science

Ervin, Elizabeth K.

464

Nuclear Eclectic Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...much higher future costs for oil and natural gas. However, the...ELECTRICITY GENERATION FROM COAL, OIL, AND NUCLEAR FUEL, NUCLEAR...electricity generation from coal, oil, and nuclear fuel, cite about...possibility that stimu-lated a marathon debate between the Union of...

David J. Rose

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

465

Nuclear Power for Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ITALY HAS DECIDED to use British know-how to build its first big nuclear power plant. A.G.I.P. Nucleare, a subsidiary of the Italian government-owned petroleum organization, E.N.I., and Britain's Nuclear Power Plant Co. will sign final agreement next ...

1957-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

466

Catechism for nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... doses of radiation exposure are potentially harmful to people, and should be avoided. -"Nuclear power stations, and the nuclear industry in general, are sources of artificial radiation to which ... general, are sources of artificial radiation to which people may be exposed." Therefore nuclear power stations should not be built."Hither explain in no more than 250 words which ...

1986-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Nuclear Physics with trapped  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Physics with trapped atoms and ions #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian Outline · Scope and applications of nuclear physics precision frontier compliments LHC properties and aquifers in the Sahara #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian What is Nuclear Physics? · Began with the study

Boas, Harold P.

468

NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners

469

Nuclear Lamins and Neurobiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...August 2014 review-article Minireview Nuclear Lamins and Neurobiology Stephen G. Young...California, USA Much of the work on nuclear lamins during the past 15 years has focused...papers have identified important roles for nuclear lamins in the central nervous system...

Stephen G. Young; Hea-Jin Jung; John M. Lee; Loren G. Fong

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

470

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

471

NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital, the missiles, and the digital protection systems embed- ded in nuclear power plants. Obviously, safety

472

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nuclear Research Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... their countries for the advent of nuclear power. A few countries had built large research reactors for the production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but ... production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but the small training reactor had not been developed. Since then, research ...

T. E. ALLIBONE

1963-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nuclear Energy Institutes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy Institutes ... The Atomic Energy Commission and the American Society for Engineering Education offer their nuclear energy courses for engineering and science teachers again in the summer of 1960. ... At least 160 college and university teachers will study nuclear science in the seven institutes scheduled. ...

1960-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

475

ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION The Department of Nuclear Engineering undergraduate and graduate courses in general nuclear engineering. The Knoxville campus of the University, Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering; The University of Tennessee; 312 Pasqua Engineering Bldg

Tennessee, University of

476

Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and Counterproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

477

Relativistic nuclear structure. I. Nuclear matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The formalism for the Dirac-Brueckner approach to the nuclear many-body problem is described including its basis in relativistic two-nucleon scattering. A family of relativistic meson-exchange potentials is constructed which (apart from the usual coupling terms for heavy mesons) apply the pseudovector (gradient) coupling for the interaction of pseudoscalar mesons (?,?) with nucleons. These potentials describe low-energy two-nucleon scattering and the deuteron data accurately. Using these potentials, the properties of nuclear matter are calculated in the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation, in which the empirical nuclear matter saturation is explained quantitatively. The effective two-body interaction in the nuclear matter medium (G matrix) is calculated directly in the nuclear matter rest frame. Thus, cumbersome transformations between the two-nucleon center-of-mass frame and the nuclear matter rest frame are avoided. Size and nature of relativistic effects included in the present approach are examined in detail. The formalism, the potentials, and the results of this paper may also serve as a basis and a realistic starting point for systematic relativistic nuclear structure studies as well as for the investigation of further relativistic many-body corrections and of contributions of higher order.

R. Brockmann and R. Machleidt

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting DOE Directives & Manuals DOE Standards Central Technical Authorities (CTA) Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) Line Management SSO/ FAC Reps 48 CFR 970 48 CFR 952 Federal Acquisition Regulations External Oversight *Defense Nuclear Facility

479

Nuclear spirals in galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent high-resolution observations indicate that nuclear spirals are often present in the innermost few hundred parsecs of disc galaxies. My models show that nuclear spirals form naturally as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the gravitational potential. Some nuclear spirals take the form of spiral shocks, resulting in streaming motions in the gas, and in inflow comparable to the accretion rates needed to power local Active Galactic Nuclei. Recently streaming motions of amplitude expected from the models have been observed in nuclear spirals, confirming the role of nuclear spirals in feeding of the central massive black holes.

Witold Maciejewski

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radiocesium Concentration Change in Game Animals: Use of Food Monitoring Data - 13168  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclides were released into the environment in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Radiocesium (Cs-134+137) concentrations in most agricultural products became lower than the detection limit (?10 Bq kg{sup -1}) from June 2011, and the concentrations have remained low. However, some wild food materials such as meat of game animals (e.g., bear and wild boar) caught in Fukushima and surrounding areas some times showed higher values than the detection limits. In this study, monitoring data on game animal meat were summarized to understand the amount of activities found in wild animals and the activity distribution in the contaminated areas. Concentration data are available from monthly reports issued by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Data were collected on wild boar (Sus scrofa), deer (Cervus nippon), Asian black bear (Ursus thibetanus), Japanese pheasant (Phasianus versicolor), and duck (e.g. Anas poecilorhynch). There is a tendency that the concentration decreases with distance from the FDNPP; in order to compare the Cs-137 concentrations among animals, one collection site was selected. The results showed that the concentration was in the following order within one year: Asian black bear>wild boar> deer >duck and Japanese pheasant. Bear and boar are omnivorous animals and their feeding pattern would affect the concentrations in their meats. (authors)

Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Estimated environmental radionuclide transfer and deposition into outdoor swimming pools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In 2011, a large radioactive discharge occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This plant is located within a climatically temperate region where outdoor swimming pools are popular. Although it is relatively easy to decontaminate pools by refilling them with fresh water, it is difficult to maintain safe conditions given highly contaminated diurnal dust falls from the surrounding contaminated ground. Our objectives in this paper were to conduct daily radioactivity measurements, to determine the quantity of radioactive contaminants from the surrounding environment that invade outdoor pools, and to investigate the efficacy of traditional pool cleaners in removing radioactive contaminants. The depositions in the paper filterable particulates ranged from 0 to62,5 Bq/m2/day, with the highest levels found in the southern Tohoku District containing Fukushima Prefecture and in the Kanto District containing Tokyo Metro. They were approximately correlated with the ground contamination. Traditional pool cleaners eliminated 99% of contaminants at the bottom of the pool, reducing the concentration to 41Bq/m2 after cleaning. Authors recommended the deposition or the blown radionuclides into outdoor swimming pools must be considered into pool regulations when the environments exactly polluted with radionuclides.

Kazumi Tagami; Izumi Nagata; Keisuke Sueki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Office of Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nuclear Threat Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation > Office of Nuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science

483

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors Simulated three-dimensional fission power distribution of a single 17x17 rod PWR fuel assembly. | Photo courtesy