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1

Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

2

SRNL - Embassy Fellows Report - Fukushima Daiichi  

... status of decontamination activities, and recommendations for remediation of land contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant ...

3

Office of Nuclear Energy Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident John E. Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Office of Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy June 15, 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors Earthquake 3/11 14:36 JST Earthquake 15:41 JST Tsunami Magnitude: 9.0 Generated a 14m Tsunami Many thousands perished More that 100 thousand people were homeless without food, water, or heat 5 Accident Sequence for Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors  Grid power lost due to the earthquake  Plant experienced station blackout after emergency diesels were damaged by the tsunami (nearly 1 hour later)  Eventual loss of batteries and cooling to control steam driven emergency pumps  Core overheats, cladding oxidizes and melts producing hydrogen

4

Worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study quantifies worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March 2011. Effects are quantified with a 3-D global atmospheric model driven by emission estimates and evaluated against daily worldwide Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) measurements and observed deposition rates. Inhalation exposure, ground-level external exposure, and atmospheric external exposure pathways of radioactive iodine-131, cesium-137, and cesium-134 released from Fukushima are accounted for using a linear no-threshold (LNT) model of human exposure. Exposure due to ingestion of contaminated food and water is estimated by extrapolation. We estimate an additional 130 (151100) cancer-related mortalities and 180 (241800) cancer-related morbidities incorporating uncertainties associated with the exposuredose and doseresponse models used in the study. We also discuss the LNT models uncertainty at low doses. Sensitivities to emission rates, gas to particulate I-131 partitioning, and the mandatory evacuation radius around the plant are also explored, and may increase upper bound mortalities and morbidities in the ranges above to 1300 and 2500, respectively. Radiation exposure to workers at the plant is projected to result in 2 to 12 morbidities. An additional 600 mortalities have been reported due to non-radiological causes such as mandatory evacuations. Lastly, a hypothetical accident at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant in

John E. Ten Hoeve A; Mark Z. Jacobson B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

SRNL - Embassy Fellows Report - Fukushima Daiichi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and recommendations for remediation of land contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. In March, 2011, a major earthquake and subsequent tsunami...

6

Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

SciTech Connect

This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

Guss, P. P.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Office of Nuclear Energy Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

have been examined in the open literature Fukushima-Daiichi plants utilize A533B steel for the pressure vessel (likely based on industry standards, but not confirmed) ...

8

Fukushima Daiichi Accident -- Technical Causal Factor Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant experienced a seismic event and subsequent tsunami. The accident and the ensuing mitigation and recovery activities occurred over several days, involved a number of incidents, and might provide several opportunities for lessons learned. The objective of this report is to determine the fundamental causative factors for the loss of critical systems at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors that resulted in core damage and subsequent radioactive release. ...

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a description of The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal. The Information Portal was created by the Idaho National Laboratory as part of joint NRC and DOE project to assess the severe accident modeling capability of the MELCOR analysis code. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal was created to collect, store, retrieve and validate information and data for use in reconstructing the Fukushima Daiichi accident. In addition to supporting the MELCOR simulations, the Portal will be the main DOE repository for all data, studies and reports related to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. The data is stored in a secured (password protected and encrypted) repository that is searchable and accessible to researchers at diverse locations.

Shawn St. Germain; Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence of the release Pu from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station to the local environment and surrounding communities and estimates on fraction of total fuel inventory released

Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff members, supplemented by other LLNL scientists, invested over 5000 person-hours of time and generated over 300 analyses and predictions.

Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fukushima Daiichi Unit 3 MELCOR Investigation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy sponsored a Fukushima Daiichi accident study as a collaboration between Sandia, Oak Ridge (ORNL), and Idaho National Laboratories. The purpose of the effort was to compile relevant data, reconstruct the accident progression using computer codes, assess the codes predictive capabilities, and to identify future data needs. The following summarizes MELCOR simulations performed at ORNL on Fukushima Daiichi Unit 3.

Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Francis, Matthew W [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Challenges in Determining the Isotopic Mixture for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

As part of the United States response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant emergency, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Consequence Management (CM) Teams were activated with elements deploying to Japan. The NNSA CM teams faced the urgent need for information regarding the potential radiological doses that citizens of might experience. This paper discusses the challenges and lessons learned associated with the analysis of field collected samples and gamma spectra in an attempt to determine the isotopic mixture present on the ground around the Plant. There were several interesting and surprising lessons to be learned from the sample analysis portion of the response. The paper discusses several elements of the response that were unique to the event occurring in Japan, as well as several elements that would have occurred in a U.S. nuclear reactor event. Sections of this paper address details of the specific analytical challenges faced during the efforts to analyze samples and try to understand the overall release source term.

Shanks, Arthur [Sandia National Laboratories; Fournier, Sean [Sandia National Laboratories; Shanks, Sonoya [Sandia National Laboratories

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

As officials in Japan deal with the accumulation of radioactive seawater near the devastated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the wake of last month's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the wake of last month's earthquake and tsunami, the U.S. Department of Energy is investing in fundamental research it hopes can be used to build safer nuclear reactors and avoid reactor emergencies. The department's Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP

Danon, Yaron

15

Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Shannon P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Debra C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coronado, Melissa A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dewart, Jean M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eisele, William F. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fuehne, David P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, Milan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Joan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonell, Carolyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Our Next Two Steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography  

SciTech Connect

After the vast disasters caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan, we proposed applying our Muon Tomography (MT) technique to help and improve the emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi using cosmic-ray muons. A reactor-tomography team was formed at LANL which was supported by the Laboratory as a response to a request by the former Japanese Prime Minister, Naoto Kan. Our goal is to help the Japanese people and support remediation of the reactors. At LANL, we have carried out a proof-of-principle technical demonstration and simulation studies that established the feasibility of MT to image a reactor core. This proposal covers the next two critical steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging: (1) undertake case study mock-up experiments of Fukushima Daiichi, and (2) system optimization. We requested funding to the US and Japanese government to assess damage of reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. The two steps will bring our project to the 'ready-to-go' level.

Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

Variations in Map Products Demonstrated During the FRMAC Fukushima Daiichi Response  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides a brief summary of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster, discussion on map uses and production, early phase maps, intermediate phase maps, and late phase maps.

Pemberton, W. J.

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Role of the Consequence Management Home Team in the Fukushima Daiichi Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT) is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration asset and played an important role in the U.S. response effort to the Fukushima Daiichi accident, ranging from the early days of the response to a continued involvement in supporting late phase efforts. Each stage of their work had distinct characteristics in terms of management of incoming data streams and creation of products. The CMHT assisted a variety of response organizations with modeling; radiological operations planning; field monitoring techniques; and the analysis, interpretation, and distribution of radiological data. In the Fukushima Daiichi response, the CMHT grew to include a broader range of support than was historically planned. Through their work, the social and economic impacts of a nuclear or radiological incident were minimized. The CMHT was an integral component of the response in Japan and acted as the central point from which all of the data and products flowed.

Pemberton, Wendy [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Nellis; Mena, RaJah [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Role of the Consequence Management Home Team in the Fukushima Daiichi Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consequence Management Home Team is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration asset. It assists a variety of response organizations with modeling; radiological operations planning; field monitoring techniques; and the analysis, interpretation, and distribution of radiological data. These reach-back capabilities are activated quickly to support public safety and minimize the social and economic impact of a nuclear or radiological incident. In the Fukushima Daiichi response, the Consequence Management Home Team grew to include a more broad range of support than was historically planned. From the early days of the response to the continuing involvement in supporting late phase efforts, each stage of the Consequence Management Home Team support had distinct characteristics in terms of management of incoming data streams as well as creation of products. Regardless of stage, the Consequence Management Home Team played a critical role in the Fukushima Daiichi response effort.

Pemberton, W., Mena, R., Beal, W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Discussion - Next Step for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specification of Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography (FMT): (1) 18-feet (5.5-m) drift tube, 2-inch (5-cm) diameter; (2) 108 tubes per layer; (3) Unit layer = 2 layer (detection efficiency: 0.96 x 0.96 = 92%); (4) 12 or 16 layer per module; (5) 16 layers allows momentum analysis at 30% level; (6) 2 module per super module (5.5 x 11 m{sup 2}); and (7) FMT = 2 super module. By deploying MMT next to a research reactor, we will be able to measure the impact of low level radiation fields on muon tomography and reconstruction processes. Radiation level during reactor operation is {approx}50 {micro}Sv/h which provides similar radiation environment of inside the FMT radiation shield at Fukushima Daiichi. We will implement coincidence algorithm on the FPGA board.

Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARACs preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery  

SciTech Connect

Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japans Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Markov Model of Accident Progression at Fukushima Daiichi  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake followed by a tsunami caused loss of offsite power and disabled the emergency diesel generators, leading to a prolonged station blackout at the Fukushima Daiichi site. After successful reactor trip for all operating reactors, the inability to remove decay heat over an extended period led to boil-off of the water inventory and fuel uncovery in Units 1-3. A significant amount of metal-water reaction occurred, as evidenced by the quantities of hydrogen generated that led to hydrogen explosions in the auxiliary buildings of the Units 1 & 3, and in the de-fuelled Unit 4. Although it was assumed that extensive fuel damage, including fuel melting, slumping, and relocation was likely to have occurred in the core of the affected reactors, the status of the fuel, vessel, and drywell was uncertain. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions at Fukushima Daiichi, a Markov model of the likely state of one of the reactors was constructed and executed under different assumptions regarding system performance and reliability. The Markov approach was selected for several reasons: It is a probabilistic model that provides flexibility in scenario construction and incorporates time dependence of different model states. It also readily allows for sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of different failure and repair rates of cooling systems. While the analysis was motivated by a need to gain insight on the course of events for the damaged units at Fukushima Daiichi, the work reported here provides a more general analytical basis for studying and evaluating severe accident evolution over extended periods of time. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accidents.

Cuadra A.; Bari R.; Cheng, L-Y; Ginsberg, T.; Lehner, J.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, T.; Yue, M.

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Measuring Radioactivity from Fukushima Daiichi in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was damaged by the tsunami that followed the 'Great East Japan Earthquake,' and the reactor subsequently leaked radioactive material. In response, LANL augmented the routine ambient (AIRNET) and stack (Rad-NESHAP) measurements with three high-volume samplers: No.167 at the Old White Rock Fire Station; No.173 at the TA-49 gate, and No.211 at the Los Alamos Medical Center. Previous accidents, such as the Three-Mile-Island accident in 1979 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986, indicated that the most likely releases were (a) the noble gases: krypton and xenon; and (b) the volatile elements: cesium, tellurium, and iodine. At the latitude of Fukushima, the predominant winds across the Pacific Ocean are from west to east, and models predicted that the plume would arrive in the western US on about March 18. By this time the shorter-lived isotopes would have decayed. Therefore, the expected radionuclides were xenon-133, cesium-134, cesium-136, cesium-137, tellurium-132, iodine-131, and iodine-132. As expected, cesium-134, cesium-136, cesium-137, tellurium-132, iodine-131, and iodine-132 were all detected by all three high-volume samplers during March 17-21. The concentrations peaked during the March 24-28 period. After this, concentrations of all nuclides declined. In general, the concentrations were consistent with those measured by the EPA RadNet system and many other monitoring systems throughout the world. At the time of writing, preliminary results from the AIRNET and Rad-NESHAP systems are being reported. More detailed results are described in LA-UR-11-10304 and will be reported in full in the annual environmental report for 2011. All previous releases from nuclear reactors have been dominated by noble gases, primarily krypton and xenon, which are not measured by the high-volume samplers or the AIRNET system. However, in sufficient concentrations these and other fission products would be detected by NEWNET. Consistent with this possibility, all NEWNET detectors recorded an increase of 0.2 {micro}R/h from March 19-1, followed by an additional increase of 0.1 {micro}R/h on March 24 (Figure 1). The consistency of the NEWNET stations is indicated by the error bars, which represent the standard error of the mean of the individual stations. Over the next 10 days, the NEWNET readings declined with approximately the 5-day half life of xenon-133, returning to near normal levels on April 2. After this, any further decrease was masked by high radon concentrations on April 3, by a weather system that moved into New Mexico on April 4, and by rainfall on April 6-9. Furthermore, it is likely that all NEWNET detectors responded to a gradually increasing trend in terrestrial radiation during the month of March as the ground dried out. It is difficult to distinguish the hypothetical effects of xenon-133 from the fluctuations of radon decay products. However, at present we do not have an alternative hypothesis for the sharp increase that was observed in all NEWNET stations from March 19-21. Perhaps some of the increase was caused by radon or terrestrial radiation, in which case the observed increase is an upper limit to that caused by releases from Fukushima. LANL data are consistent with those of the EPA RadNet monitoring system. The EPA has repeatedly stated that 'The levels detected are far below levels of concern.'

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal Quality Assurance Review: Pre-Public Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This design review compared the current product with the original intent set forth in the initial internet portal design found in the document: Fukushima Daiichi Database Design, Revision 5. The current revision of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal (FDASIP) is 1.0.21. This revision is one that restricts access for each user based on roles granted by the project administrator. The public access revision is currently on the test server and will be considered in this review as well.

Kurt G. Vedros

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples are suggested as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site.

Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

27

MAAP5 Simulation of Accidents at Fukushima Dai-ichi Units 1, 2, and 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original MAAP4 code functional design specification (circa 1989) was defined to address the full extent of degraded core accidents with the potential for reflooding of a badly damaged core. It was intended to support probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and severe accident management guideline (SAMG) applications that previously were limited by the relatively rudimentary design for MAAP3.0B, the predecessor code.The accidents at Fukushima Dai-ichi Units 1, 2, and 3 prompted a ...

2013-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

28

Summary of the EPRI Early Event Analysis of the Fukushima Daiichi Spent Fuel Pools Following the March 11, 2011 Earthquake and Tsuna mi in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 4 reactor building observed on March 15, 2011, initially generated confusion and concern throughout the nuclear industry. The reactor had been defueled approximately 100 days prior to the March 11 earthquake and tsunami; therefore, any explosion in Unit 4 could not be linked to a recently operating reactor within that unit. With the full core in the spent fuel pool, suspicions immediately turned to hydrogen generated by oxidation of overheating spent fuel cladding fol...

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Materials Science Expertise Rallied to Assist with Fukushima  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2011 ... Unlike Chernobyl, though, the events that continue to unfold at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station have been recorded for the world...

30

Reaction to Fukushima: 1663 Science and Technology Magazine ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

destruction, including major damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The aging plant consisted of six boiling-water reactors powering electrical generators. The...

31

Los Alamos Air Monitoring Data Related to the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is collecting air data and analyzing the data for fission products. At present, we report preliminary data from three high-volume air samplers and one stack sampler. Iodine-131 (I-131) is not optimally measured by our standard polypropylene filters. In addition to the filter data, we have one measurement obtained from a charcoal cartridge. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides are adequate for a preliminary assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi do not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Measurement of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present measurements of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA, from 62 days following the March 11, 2011, accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Airborne particle samples were collected daily in air filters and radio-assayed with two high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The fission products I-131 and Cs-137 were measured with maximum activities of 4.2 +/- 0.6 mBq/m^3 and 0.42 +/- 0.07 mBq/m^3 respectively. Additional activity from I-131, I-132, Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137 and Te-132 were measured in the same air filters using a low-background HPGe detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF).

S. MacMullin; G. K. Giovanetti; M. P. Green; R. Henning; R. Holmes; K. Vorren; J. F. Wilkerson

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

33

Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's nuclear scar Researchers have devised a method to use cosmic rays to gather detailed information from inside the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors. October 17, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory Muon Radiography team members stand in front of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex during a visit to determine evaluate whether Los Alamos' Scattering Method for cosmic-ray radiography could be used to image the location of nuclear materials within the reactor buildings. Los Alamos National Laboratory Muon Radiography team members stand in front of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi reactor complex during a visit to determine evaluate whether Los Alamos' Scattering Method for cosmic-ray

34

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation How did Fukushima-Daiichi core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactors can successfully face extreme conditions and conclude that the probability of a nuclear accident event per 50.000 reactor years. As of today, one accounts 14500 operating years of nuclear reactors. PRA models describe how nuclear reactor systems will respond to different initiating events that can

35

Estimation of average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors by using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors is estimated, using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method for measured radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs in contaminated soils within the range of 100 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. As a result, the measured {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio from the contaminated soil is 0.996{+-}0.07 as of March 11, 2011. Based on the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method, the estimated burnup of damaged fuels is approximately 17.2{+-}1.5 [GWd/tHM]. It is noted that the numerical results of various calculation codes (SRAC2006/PIJ, SCALE6.0/TRITON, and MVP-BURN) are almost the same evaluation values of {sup 134}Cs/ {sup 137}Cs ratio with same evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF-B/VII.0). The void fraction effect in depletion calculation has a major impact on {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio compared with the differences between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF-B/VII.0. (authors)

Endo, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, A. [Dept. of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya-shi, 464-8603 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermo-fluid-dynamics analysis of the unit 3 Fukushima Daiichi Accident with the RELAP5\\SCDAP code.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is the analysis of the physical phenomena involved in the nuclear accident at Fukushima NPP. This study has been articulated (more)

VENTURI, FRANCESCO LINO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Fukushima Accident Peter Bernard Ladkin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

destroyed numbers of towns and devasted cities such as Sendai. http Daiichi ("Fukushima Number One") nuclear plant, located at the edge of the ocean in Fukushima province. (This figure is also used on p12 of the UK Office of Nuclear Regulation Interim Report http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear

Ladkin, Peter B.

38

A Look Back at the Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nuclear facilities. That is why, in response to the March accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex, the Department hosted a Nuclear Safety Workshop to bring...

39

Revisiting Insights from Three Mile Island Unit 2 Postaccident Examinations and Evaluations in View of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979, led industry and regulators to enhance strategies to protect against severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants. Investigations in the years after the accident concluded that at least 45% of the core had melted and that nearly 19 tonnes of the core material had relocated to the lower head. Postaccident examinations indicate that about half of that material formed a solid layer near the lower head and above it was a layer of fragmented rubble. As discussed in this paper, numerous insights related to pressurized water reactor accident progression were gained from postaccident evaluations of debris, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) specimens, and nozzles taken from the RPV. In addition, information gleaned from TMI-2 specimen evaluations and available data from plant instrumentation were used to improve severe accident simulation models that form the technical basis for reactor safety evaluations. Finally, the TMI-2 accident led the nuclear community to dedicate considerable effort toward understanding severe accident phenomenology as well as the potential for containment failure. Because available data suggest that significant amounts of fuel heated to temperatures near melting, the events at Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 offer an unexpected opportunity to gain similar understanding about boiling water reactor accident progression. To increase the international benefit from such an endeavor, we recommend that an international effort be initiated to (a) prioritize data needs; (b) identify techniques, samples, and sample evaluations needed to address each information need; and (c) help finance acquisition of the required data and conduct of the analyses.

Joy Rempe; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Corradini; Larry Ott; Randall Gauntt; Dana Powers

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

U.S. DOE's Response to the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor Accident: Answers and Data Products for Decision Makers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fukushima Daiichi response posed a plethora of scientific questions to the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) radiological emergency response community. As concerns arose for decision makers, the DOE leveraged a community of scientists well-versed in the tenants of emergency situations to provide answers to time-sensitive questions from different parts of the world. A chronology of the scientific Q and A that occurred is presented along with descriptions of the challenges that were faced and how new methods were employed throughout the course of the response.

Reed, A. L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MELCOR Model of the Spent Fuel Pool of Fukushima Dai-ichi Unit 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unit 4 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered a hydrogen explosion at 6:00 am on March 15, 2011, exactly 3.64 days after the earthquake hit the plant and the off-site power was lost. The earthquake occurred on March 11 at 2:47 pm. Since the reactor of this Unit 4 was defueled on November 29, 2010, and all its fuel was stored in the spent fuel pool (SFP4), it was first believed that the explosion was caused by hydrogen generated by the spent fuel, in particular, by the recently discharged core. The hypothetical scenario was: power was lost, cooling to the SFP4 water was lost, pool water heated/boiled, water level decreased, fuel was uncovered, hot Zircaloy reacted with steam, hydrogen was generated and accumulated above the pool, and the explosion occurred. Recent analyses of the radioisotopes present in the water of the SFP4 and underwater video indicated that this scenario did not occur - the fuel in this pool was not damaged and was never uncovered the hydrogen of the explosion was apparently generated in Unit 3 and transported through exhaust ducts that shared the same chimney with Unit 4. This paper will try to answer the following questions: Could that hypothetical scenario in the SFP4 had occurred? Could the spent fuel in the SPF4 generate enough hydrogen to produce the explosion that occurred 3.64 days after the earthquake? Given the magnitude of the explosion, it was estimated that at least 150 kg of hydrogen had to be generated. As part of the investigations of this accident, MELCOR models of the SFP4 were prepared and a series of calculations were completed. The latest version of MELCOR, version 2.1 (Ref. 1), was employed in these calculations. The spent fuel pool option for BWR fuel was selected in MELCOR. The MELCOR model of the SFP4 consists of a total of 1535 fuel assemblies out of which 548 assemblies are from the core defueled on Nov. 29, 2010, 783 assemblies are older assemblies, and 204 are new/fresh assemblies. The total decay heat of the fuel in the pool was, at the time of the accident, 2.284 MWt, of which 1.872 MWt were from the 548 assemblies of the last core discharged and 0.412 MWt were from the older 783 assemblies. These decay heat values were calculated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the ORIGEN2.2 code (Ref. 2) - they agree with values reported elsewhere (Ref. 3). The pool dimensions are 9.9 m x 12.2 m x 11.8 m (height), and with the water level at 11.5 m, the pool volume is 1389 m3, of which only 1240 m3 is water, as some volume is taken by the fuel and by the fuel racks. The initial water temperature of the SFP4 was assumed to be 301 K. The fuel racks are made of an aluminum alloy but are modeled in MELCOR with stainless steel and B4C. MELCOR calculations were completed for different initial water levels: 11.5 m (pool almost full, water is only 0.3 m below the top rim), 4.4577 m (top of the racks), 4.2 m, and 4.026 m (top of the active fuel). A calculation was also completed for a rapid loss of water due to a leak at the bottom of the pool, with the fuel rapidly uncovered and oxidized in air. Results of these calculations are shown in the enclosed Table I. The calculation with the initial water level at 11.5 m (full pool) takes 11 days for the water to boil down to the top of the fuel racks, 11.5 days for the fuel to be uncovered, 14.65 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen and 19 days for the pool to be completely dry. The calculation with the initial water level at 4.4577 m, takes 1.1 days to uncover the fuel and 4.17 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen. The calculation with the initial water level at 4.02 m takes 3.63 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen this is exactly the time when the actual explosion occurred in Unit 4. Finally, fuel oxidation in air after the pool drained the water in 20 minutes, generates only 10 kg of hydrogen this is because very little steam is available and Zircaloy (Zr) oxidation with the oxygen of the air does not generate hydrogen. MELCOR calculated water levels and hydrogen generated in the SFP4 as a function of time for initial water le

Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

AirSea Transport, Dispersion, and Fate Modeling in the Vicinity of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant: A Special Conference Session Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The March 2011 tragedy at the coastal Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant created a contaminant release that was transported and dispersed in both the air and the sea. Two months after the event, the authors began planning for a special July 2011 conference ...

Julie Pullen; Joseph Chang; Steven Hanna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool: Benchmarking Radiological Assessment and Dose Models using Fukushima Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing the Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool (FRAT), a comprehensive database and software application for accessing, analyzing, and interpreting data related to radiological releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). This report documents the development of the FRAT to support the benchmarking of emergency response and dose modeling codes used by nuclear power plants, using radiological data from the Fukushima ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Role of Nuclear Energy in Japan PostFukushima.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper, Role of Nuclear Energy in Japan Post Fukushima: Alternatives and their Impact onJapans GHG Emission Targets, is to (more)

Niazi, Zarrar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima Plant Cleanup Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima Plant Cleanup January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima Plant Cleanup TEPCO officials tour the Hanford site to learn about cleanup technologies that could be used in the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred in 2011. TEPCO officials tour the Hanford site to learn about cleanup technologies that could be used in the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred in 2011. Japanese Officials Draw on Expertise of National Laboratories for Fukushima Plant Cleanup

46

Radiation Measurements at the Campus of Fukushima Medical University through the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake and Subsequent Nuclear Power Plant crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An earthquake, Tohoku region Pacific Coast earthquake, occurred on the 11th of March, 2011, and subsequent Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents have been stirring natural radiation around the author's office in Fukushima Medical University (FMU). FMU is located in Fukushima city, and is 57 km (35 miles) away from northwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This paper presents three types of radiation survey undertaken through the unprecedented accidents at the campus and the hospital of FMU. First, a group of interested people immediately began radiation surveillance; the group members were assembled from the faculty members of "Life Sciences and Social Medicine" and "Human and Natural Sciences". Second, the present author, regardless of the earthquake, had serially observed natural radiations such as gamma radiation in air with NaI scintillation counter, atmospheric radon with Lucas cell, and second cosmic rays with NaI scintillation. Gamma radiation indicated most drastic change, i.e., peak v...

Kobayashi, Tsuneo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ANS Special Committee on Fukushima  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the news of the historic March 11, 2011, Tohoku earthquake reached the United States, the nuclear community was relieved to hear that the reactors at several locations along the Japanese coast appeared to be undamaged. However, as pictures of the devastation from the subsequent tsunami began to appear, such relief was short-lived. It became clear that the events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station would mark a significant time in the history of nuclear technology. As nuclear scientists and engineers and as members of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), we knew that we were obliged to present our collective understanding of the facts and to present them in context, without bias. Hence, the ANS Special Committee on Fukushima was organized to do exactly that, in this Fukushima Daiichi: ANS Committee Report. We thank the many nuclear professionals, the ANS leadership, and staff, who willingly gave their time to the project. This report would not have been possible without their hard work and dedication. We thank all of them for stepping forward, together, to carry the light of science and truth in a time of crisis to combat fear, uncertainty, and misinformation. The Fukushima Daiichi accident will be a subject of intense scrutiny and study for years to come. However, the bravery and the courage of the people of Japan and the extraordinary efforts made by brilliant engineers, operators, and technicians who recovered a six-reactor site from one of the worst natural disasters ever seen

Dale Klein; Michael Corradini

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in Germany in high altitude is several days earlier than on ground.

Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ~0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA. Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid techniques published previously. The r

Maxwell, S.

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Elevated Radioxenon Detected Remotely Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the first measurements of short-lived gaseous fission products detected outside of Japan following the Fukushima nuclear releases, which occurred after a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011.

Bowyer, Ted W.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Miley, Harry S.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woods, Vincent T.

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Comparative analysis of nuclear crisis communication: 2011 Fukushima nuclear crisis and 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear crisis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper examines the crisis management of two prominent nuclear crises - 2011 Fukushima Nuclear Crisis in Japan and 1979 Three Mile Island Nuclear Crisis (more)

Lu, Yang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints September 19, 2012 Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company Topics Covered: How Tsunami Struck Fukushima Sites Tsunami Height Estimation How we responded in the Recovery Process Safety Improvement and Further Enhancement of Nuclear Safety Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints More Documents & Publications January2005 NNSANews Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011

53

The Future of Nuclear Power After Fukushima 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of the Fukushima accident on the future of nuclear power around the world. We begin with a discussion of the but for baseline and the much discussed nuclear renaissance. Our pre-Fukushima benchmark for growth in nuclear generation in the U.S. and other developed countries is much more modest than many bullish forecasts of a big renaissance in new capacity may have suggested. For at least the next decade in developed countries, it is composed primarily of life extensions for many existing reactors, modest uprates of existing reactors as their licenses are extended, and modest levels of new construction. The majority of forecasted new

Paul L. Joskow; John E. Parsons; Paul L. Joskow; Alfred P. Sloan Foundation; John E. Parsons

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Re-examination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely, particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

Golay, Michael (MIT)

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90} Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ~0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA. Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid techniques published previously. The r

Maxwell, S.

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

Matsui, T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

T. Matsui

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

58

Prospects for U.S. Nuclear Power After Fukushima  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prospects for a revival of U.S. nuclear power were dim even before the tragic events at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Nuclear power has long been controversial because of concerns about nuclear accidents, proliferation risk, and the storage of spent fuel. These concerns are real and important. In the end, however, the key challenge for U.S. nuclear power is the high cost of construction for nuclear reactors. This article reviews the historical record of reactor orders and construction costs in the United States, highlighting some of the insights from the cancellations and cost overruns that have characterized the industry.

Lucas W. Davis; Lucas W. Davis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results September 19-20, 2012 - Bethesda North Marriott TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 - Grand Ballroom, Salons F/G/H 1 9/14/12 6:00 - 8:00 pm Registration WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 - Grand Ballroom, Salons F/G/H 7:00 - 8:00 am Registration 8:00 - 8:05 am Logistics Stephen A. Kirchhoff, Office of Health, Safety and Security US Department of Energy 8:05 - 8:15 am Welcoming Remarks and Workshop Objectives Glenn S. Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer US Department of Energy 8:15 - 8:45 am Maintaining Our Focus on Nuclear Safety Daniel B. Poneman, Deputy Secretary US Department of Energy 8:45 - 9:30 am Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - the

60

Advanced Nuclear Technology: EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) Fukushima Lessons-Learned Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fukushima accident of March 2011 resulted in critical lessons learned for both current and future nuclear plants. As part of an ongoing review and update of the EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) for New Nuclear Plants, a specific review of Fukushima lessons learned was undertaken.This report provides background information on the process for accomplishing the Fukushima review. It also provides the unique changes that were made to the EPRI URD along with specific linkage back ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Measurement of airborne radioactivity from the Fukushima reactor accident in Tokushima, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The airborne radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant was measured in Tokushima, western Japan. The continuous monitoring has been carried out in Tokushima. From March 23, 2011 the fission product $^{131}$I was observed. The radioisotopes $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs were also observed in the beginning of April. However the densities were extremely smaller than the Japanese regulation of radioisotopes.

Fushimi, K; Sakama, M; Sakaguchi, Y

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Measurement of airborne radioactivity from the Fukushima reactor accident in Tokushima, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The airborne radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plan t was measured in Tokushima, western Japan. The continuous monitoring has been carried out in Tokushima. From March 23, 2011 the fission product $^{131}$I was observed. The radioisotopes $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs were also observed in the beginning of April. However the densities were extremely smaller than the Japanese regulation of radioisotopes.

K. Fushimi; S. Nakayama; M. Sakama; Y. Sakaguchi

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

Taming Nuclear Power. What have we learned from the Fukushima disaster?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the main causes and consequences of the Fukushima nuclear disaster, in comparison with the previous major accidents of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl (among a total of 30 civilian nuclear accidents).

CERN. Geneva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup August 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis TOKYO - An EM-led U.S. delegation conducted its third workshop last month to provide expertise to Japanese officials leading the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant site and surrounding area, this time addressing priorities identified by Japan's government agencies. At the request of the Japanese Ministry of Environment (MOE) and Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), the delegation's technical experts discussed their experience related to the behavior of radioactive cesium in the environment and other topics. The delegation included representatives from Savannah River, Pacific Northwest, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence

65

Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

66

"Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima?", Dr. Alexander...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9:30am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium "Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima?", Dr. Alexander Glaser, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs...

67

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident April 12, 2013 - 3:09pm Addthis An LM scientist points to star reindeer lichen on Adak Island, Alaska. An LM scientist points to star reindeer lichen on Adak Island, Alaska. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The U.S. Department of Energy Office Legacy Management (LM) has a long-term stewardship mission to protect human health and the environment from the legacy of underground nuclear testing conducted at Amchitka Island, Alaska, from 1965 to 1971. As part of its mission, LM collected biological and seawater samples from Amchitka and Adak Islands, for background comparison,

68

Seismic Evaluation Guidance: Augmented Approach for the Resolution of Fukushima Near-Term Task Force Recommendation 2.1 Seismic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant resulting from the March 11, 2011, Great Tohoku Earthquake and subsequent tsunami, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) to conduct a systematic review of NRC processes and regulations. The NTTF was also tasked with determining if the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system.BackgroundThe NTTF developed a set of ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

WHEN MODEL MEETS REALITY A REVIEW OF SPAR LEVEL 2 MODEL AGAINST FUKUSHIMA ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models are a set of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate the risk of operations at U.S. nuclear power plants and provide inputs to risk informed regulatory process. A small number of SPAR Level 2 models have been developed mostly for feasibility study purpose. They extend the Level 1 models to include containment systems, group plant damage states, and model containment phenomenology and accident progression in containment event trees. A severe earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan in March 2011 and caused significant damages on the reactors in Fukushima Daiichi site. Station blackout (SBO), core damage, containment damage, hydrogen explosion, and intensive radioactivity release, which have been previous analyzed and assumed as postulated accident progression in PRA models, now occurred with various degrees in the multi-units Fukushima Daiichi site. This paper reviews and compares a typical BWR SPAR Level 2 model with the real accident progressions and sequences occurred in Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3. It shows that the SPAR Level 2 model is a robust PRA model that could very reasonably describe the accident progression for a real and complicated nuclear accident in the world. On the other hand, the comparison shows that the SPAR model could be enhanced by incorporating some accident characteristics for better representation of severe accident progression.

Zhegang Ma

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fukushima Technical Evaluation: Phase 1 -- MAAP5 Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the initial phase of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Fukushima Dai-ichi technical event evaluation. It focuses on gaining greater insight through Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) analyses of the severe accidents that occurred at Fukushima Dai-ichi Units 1F1, 1F2, and 1F3. A study conducted by TEPCO, the operators of the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant, provides the most complete assessment of the sequence of events that led to multiple core meltdowns at the ...

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Seismic Evaluation Guidance: Screening, Prioritization and Implementation Details (SPID) for the Resolution of Fukushima Near-Term Task Force Recommendation 2.1: Seismic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant resulting from the March 11, 2011, Great Tohoku Earthquake and subsequent tsunami, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near Term Task Force (NTTF) to conduct a systematic review of NRC processes and regulations. The NTTF was also tasked with determining if the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system.BackgroundThe NTTF developed a set of ...

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima November 1, 2013 - 11:19am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Editors Note: This statement has been updated as of 12:55 PM on November 1, 2013 "On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is stunning that one can see firsthand the destructive force of the tsunami even more than two and a half years after the tragic events. The words of President Obama following the incident still hold true today: 'The Japanese people are not alone in this time of great trial and sorrow. Across the Pacific, they will find a hand of support extended from the United States as they get back on their feet.' My colleagues from the

73

A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima November 1, 2013 - 11:19am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Editors Note: This statement has been updated as of 12:55 PM on November 1, 2013 "On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is stunning that one can see firsthand the destructive force of the tsunami even more than two and a half years after the tragic events. The words of President Obama following the incident still hold true today: 'The Japanese people are not alone in this time of great trial and sorrow. Across the Pacific, they will find a hand of support extended from the United States as they get back on their feet.' My colleagues from the

74

Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio [Nuclear and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl.Ganesha 10, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Introduction to the Special Issue on the U.S. Response to the Fukushima Accident  

SciTech Connect

Provides an introduction to the May 2012 issue of Health Physics, based on a special session at the 2011 Health Physics Society (HPS) annual meeting that focused on the United States' radiological response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This introduction outlines the papers in this important issue and describes the activities of the U.S. response participants, including the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Department of Defense, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations. Observations are provided and the stage is set for the articles in this issue which document many of the activities undertaken during the Fukushima accident and which describe challenges faced and valuable lessons learned.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Operation Tomodachi: Answers, Data Products,and Lessons Learned from the U.S. Department of Energy's Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to the Fukushima-Daiichi Reactor Accident  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show presents the DOE response to the Fukushima Diaiichi disaster, including aerial and ground monitoring, issues for which the team had not trained or planned for, and questions from decision makers.

Hopkins, R.

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

Summary of EPRI Research Applicable to Nuclear Accident Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The events at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant following the March 11, 2011, earthquake and the subsequent tsunami have heightened the need for widespread dissemination of information available within the nuclear industry that addresses subjects pertinent to the on-going situation at the plant. These subjects include, but are not necessarily limited to: Hydrogen generation Loss of off-site power Reactor core performance following a loss of coolant Iodine removal Emergency response planning Emergency...

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

Seismic Walkdown Guidance: For Resolution of Fukushima Near-Term Task Force Recommendation 2.3: Seismic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant resulting from the March 11, 2011, Great Tohoku Earthquake and subsequent tsunami, the NRC established the Near Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction. The NTTF issued a report that made a series of recommendations, some of which were to be acted upon "without unnecessary delay." Subsequently, the NRC issued a 50.54(f) Letter that requests information to assure that these recommendations are addressed by all U.S. nucl...

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. , & Kitazawa, K. (2012). Fukushima in review: A complexin new nuclear power stations after Fukushima. The Guardian.nuclear-power- stations-fukushima Hvistendahl, M. (2007,

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Impacts Associated with Transfer of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Spent Fuel Storage Pools to Dry Storage After Five Years of Cooling, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2010, EPRI performed a study of the accelerated transfer of spent fuel from pools to dry storage in response to the threat of terrorist activities at nuclear power plants (report 1021049). Following the March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, some organizations issued a renewed call for accelerated transfer of used fuel from spent fuel ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Measurement of Airborne Fission Products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA from the Kukushima Dai-ichi Reactor Accident  

SciTech Connect

We present measurement results of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA, from 62 d following the March 11, 2011, accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Airborne particle samples were collected daily in air filters and radio-assayed with two high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The fission products 131I and 137Cs were measured with maximum activity concentrations of 4.2 0.6 mBq/m3 and 0.42 0.07 mBq/m3 respectively. Additional activity from 131,132I, 134,136,137Cs and 132Te were measured in the same air filters using a low-background HPGe detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF).

MacMullin, S. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Giovanetti, G. K. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Green, M. P. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Henning, R. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Holmes, R. [Univ. North Carolina-Chapel & Univ. of Illinois-Urbana; Vorren, K. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Wilkerson, J. F. [UNC/Triangle Univ. Nucl. Lab, Durham, NC/ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality; leading experts discuss facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fukushima accident > Fukushima and Fukushima accident > Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality Welcome Organization Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality Bookmark and Share Want to bypass the popular press myths and gain a true understanding of the radiation releases at Fukushima? In "Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality", leading experts from several international organizations, including the United Nations, discuss the facts. Credits: World Nuclear Association (WNA) ast Modified: Thu, October 10, 2013 7:35 PM Related Resources

84

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

85

Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. We measured the evolution of the activities over a period of 23 days at the end of which the activities had mostly fallen below our detection limit. The highest detected activity amounted to 4.4 +/- 1.3 mBq/m^3 of 131-I on 19-20 March.

J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

86

HEARING ON NUCLEAR ENERGY RISK MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

am pleased to discuss the possible health implications of radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan. Just a few days before the natural disasters struck on March 11, 2011, I was in Hiroshima, Japan as a member of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation's Science Council, reviewing the study of atomic bomb survivors. I would like to begin by expressing my heartfelt sympathy for the families of the tens of thousands who lost their lives as a result of the tsunami and earthquake and for the hundreds of thousands who have been displaced from their homes and livelihoods. The health consequences associated with the radiation exposures emanating from the Fukushima Daiichi plant pale in comparison. As background, I am a radiation epidemiologist and Professor in the Department of Medicine at Vanderbilt University and Scientific Director of the International Epidemiology Institute. I have spent my career studying human populations exposed to radiation, including Chernobyl clean-up workers, patients receiving diagnostic and therapeutic radiation, underground miners exposed to radon, nuclear energy workers, atomic veterans, persons living in areas of high background radiation and U.S. populations living near nuclear power plants and other facilities. I am also a commissioner of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, an emeritus member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and

John D. Boice; Sc. D; Good Morning; Mr. Chairmen; Ranking Members

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Assessing Nuclear Risk : A case study of the Nordic embassies in Tokyo and their responses to the Fukushima nuclear crisis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is a study of the Nordic embassies in Tokyo and the different ways in which theym chose to respond to the nuclear crisis (more)

Talleraas, Tina Naomi Sugahara

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Observations of Fallout from the Fukushima Reactor Accident in San Francisco Bay Area Rainwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed fallout from the recent Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident in samples of rainwater collected in the San Francisco Bay area. Gamma ray spectra measured from these samples show clear evidence of fission products - 131,132I, 132Te, and 134,137Cs. The activity levels we have measured for these isotopes are very low and pose no health risk to the public.

Norman, Eric B; Chodash, Perry A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Observations of Fallout from the Fukushima Reactor Accident in San Francisco Bay Area Rainwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed fallout from the recent Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident in samples of rainwater collected in the San Francisco Bay area. Gamma ray spectra measured from these samples show clear evidence of fission products 131,132 I, 132 Te, and 134,137 Cs. The activity levels we have measured for these isotopes are very low and pose no health risk to the public.

Eric B. Norman; Christopher T. Angell; Perry A. Chodash

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Observations of Fallout from the Fukushima Reactor Accident in San Francisco Bay Area Rainwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed fallout from the recent Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident in samples of rainwater collected in the San Francisco Bay area. Gamma ray spectra measured from these samples show clear evidence of fission products - 131,132I, 132Te, and 134,137Cs. The activity levels we have measured for these isotopes are very low and pose no health risk to the public.

Eric B. Norman; Christopher T. Angell; Perry A. Chodash

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Letter of Appreciation from DOE to Argonne Employees for their...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for their services and expertise during the nuclear situation at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Sal Golub, deputy assistant secretary for Nuclear Reactor...

92

A win-win situation | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

responses to nuclear crises, like the disaster that occurred at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. The initial assessment of an event's severity - of how...

93

Japan - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Japan was the world's third largest producer of nuclear power after the United States and France before the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant ...

94

Multilayer ALD Coating of Light Water Reactor Zirconium Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant raised concerns about nuclear reactors safety. The plant experienced an accident in...

95

2012 DOE Facility Representatives Workshop Lessons Learned Presentatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Accident Prepared by Kevin T. Gray, National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Site Office, May 2012. Presentation Outline I. Brief review of...

96

EPRI Fukushima Daini Independent Review and Walkdown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On Friday March 11, 2011, the powerful earthquake that struck off northeast Japan generated large tsunami waves that drove seawater into seven of the Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station's eight heat exchanger buildings and one of the reactor buildings. Although the station's four reactors tripped as a result of the earthquake, water damage in the heat exchanger buildings resulted in the loss of cooling capability to remove decay heat in three of the reactors. In responding to the tsunami, the reactor ...

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material ... Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima Posted By Office of Public Affairs

98

US, Japan Develop a New Method for Radiological Dose Assessment...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

were employed in the region surrounding the stricken Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to cover the area impacted by the accident quickly, thoroughly and safely. This new...

99

US, Japan Develop a New Method for Radiological Dose Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial surveys were employed in the region surrounding the stricken Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to cover the area impacted by the accident quickly, thoroughly and...

100

Review of Requirements and Capabilities For Analyzing and Responding...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for improvement in light of the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant: Issued Safety Bulletin 2011-01, * Events Beyond Design Safety Basis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION - Report on Review of Requirements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the...

102

Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basis Events, September 2011 Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the...

103

Session 13B: Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant raised concerns about ... but also strongly boosts the statistic verification for properties of mechanically...

104

Factsheet: Second Meeting of the United States-Japan Bilateral...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

response to the accident at the Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS), including decommissioning and decontamination. The first...

105

Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

TALON robots from the Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory are helping the Government of Japan monitor radioactivity levels at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

106

Japanese power companies using more LNG to generate electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... which led to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and subsequent outages at other plants.

107

Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman's Remarks at the Tokyo American...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

before March 11th - when the earthquake and then the tsunami struck and crippled the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant - the tradition of cooperation between our two countries...

108

DOE-Japan Collaboration Expands with U.S. Embassy Fellows | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

advising the Ministry of Environment and other agencies as they clean up from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011. The fellowships mark new efforts to...

109

EM News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expertise in Workshop in Japan TOKYO - When Japanese officials began cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred this year, they called on the DOE...

110

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moniz Regarding Fukushima On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is stunning that one can see firsthand the destructive force of...

111

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Article A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It...

112

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 1, 2013 A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It...

113

Recovery and Resilience After a Nuclear Power Plant Disaster: A Medical Decision model for Managing an Effective, Timely, and Balanced Response  

SciTech Connect

Based on experiences in Tokyo responding to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant crisis, a real-time, medical decision model is presented by which to make key health-related decisions given the central role of health and medical issues in such disasters. Focus is on response and recovery activities that are safe, timely, effective, and well-organized. This approach empowers on-site decision makers to make interim decisions without undue delay using readily available and high-level scientific, medical, communication, and policy expertise. Key features of this approach include ongoing assessment, consultation, information, and adaption to the changing conditions. This medical decision model presented is compatible with the existing US National Response Framework structure.

Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, NIH; Blumenthal, Daniel J. [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Department of Energy

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work August 3, 2012 - 1:30pm Addthis Scientists from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). | Photo from the Office of Public Affairs, NNSA Scientists from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). | Photo from the Office of Public Affairs, NNSA Robert Middaugh Communications Coordinator at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Scientists from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) met with colleagues from National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to work on on-going aerial and ground monitoring efforts following the accident at the

115

Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman spoke at the Tokyo American Center today about nuclear power after Fukushima.

116

www.crs.gov R42853 Nuclear Energy: Overview of Congressional Issues Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The policy debate over the role of nuclear power in the nations energy mix is rooted in the technologys fundamental characteristics. Nuclear reactors can produce potentially vast amounts of energy with relatively low consumption of natural resources and emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. However, facilities that produce nuclear fuel for civilian power reactors can also produce materials for nuclear weapons. The process of nuclear fission (splitting of atomic nuclei) to generate power also results in the production of radioactive material that must be contained in the reactor and can remain hazardous for thousands of years. How to manage the weapons proliferation and safety risks of nuclear power, or whether nuclear power is worth those risks, are issues that have long been debated in Congress. The 104 licensed nuclear power reactors at 65 sites in the United States generate about 20 % of the nations electricity. Five new reactors are currently licensed for construction. About a dozen more are planned, but whether they move forward will depend largely on their economic competitiveness with natural gas and coal plants. Throughout the world, 436 reactors are currently in service, and 62 more are under construction. The March 2011 disaster at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan increased

Mark Holt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Book of Condolences for Fukushima | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home A Book of Condolences for Fukushima A Book of Condolences for Fukushima Addthis 1 of 6...

118

Fukushima, Mexico and Slovenia: Free Electric Power Recordings for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fukushima, Mexico and Slovenia: Free Electric Power Recordings for Fukushima, Mexico and Slovenia: Free Electric Power Recordings for Researchers Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: May 20, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Girish Ghatikar You can learn a lot of really interesting stuff by studying time-series recordings of electric power parameters, especially frequency, power, and power factor. Depending on the time scale of the recordings, you can detect everything from design flaws in electronic inverters to battery back-up time at remote nuclear power plants. This informal lunch-time discussion will use public data available from worldwide PQube power monitoring instruments, freely available at http://map.PQube.com , a resource for researchers who want minute-by-minute power quantity and power quality data

119

Not in our backyard : the dangers of nuclear energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite seeing the destruction caused by nuclear accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima, many people still believe that nuclear energy is necessary to (more)

McGeown, Emily Elizabeth, 1990-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at TERI - As Prepared for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in nuclear energy if we do it safely. In the wake of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Plant in Japan, President Obama asked the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Lab Advancements: Rapid assessment for crisis response | Y-12...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11, 2013 - 3:19pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 A proper and effective response to a nuclear disaster, like the one at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power...

122

Subsurface mass transport affects the radioxenon signatures that are used to identify clandestine nuclear tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detail. In nuclear accidents such as that in Fukushima, a high radiation dose of a few Gy can be absorbed reconstruction for the Fukushima event carried out by Garnier-Laplace et al.,1 the maxi- mum dose rates for 131 I-Seiller, K.; Hinton, T. G. Fukushima wildlife dose reconstruction signals ecological consequen- ces. Environ

Deinert, Mark

123

Fukushima's decomposition for diffusions associated with semi-Dirichlet forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we give Fukushima's decomposition for diffusions associated with semi-Dirichlet forms and discuss some related topics.

Ma, Li; Sun, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Use of Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) in Support of Post-Fukushima Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the aftermath of the Fukushima accident, improvements have been made to virtually all plants, both voluntarily and as a result of regulatory actions. In many countries, plant enhancements were undertaken to address the findings of stress tests. In the U.S., the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Commission Order EA-12-049, Mitigation Strategies for Beyond-Design-Basis External Events, on March 12, 2012. This order required that the U.S. nuclear industry develop ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

125

A study on media discourse on nuclear energy in China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???The purpose of this paper was to study how the meaning of nuclear power was constructed in pre- and post-Fukushima media discourse in China, and (more)

Chan, Ching-wah.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Executive Director for Operations CONSIDERATION OF ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES WITHIN THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSIONS REGULATORY FRAMEWORK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this Commission paper (SECY) is to provide the Commission with information and options to address to what extent, if any, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRCs) regulatory framework should be modified regarding its consideration of the economic consequences of an unintended release of licensed nuclear materials to the environment. SUMMARY: The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan initiated discussion of how the NRCs regulatory framework considers offsite property damage and other economic consequences caused by a significant radiological release from an NRC-licensed facility and licensed material. In response to this discussion, on April 6, 2012, the Office of the Executive Director for Operations (OEDO) directed the staff (see Enclosure 1, Tasking for RES) to provide a notation vote paper to the Commission on how the NRCs regulatory framework currently considers the economic consequences associated with the unintended 1 release of licensed nuclear material to the environment and alternatives for Commission consideration. CONTACT:

R. W. Borchardt; Alysia Bone Res/dra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Individual Radiation Exposure Dose Due to Support Activities at Safe Shelters in Fukushima Prefecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immediately after the accidents in the nuclear power stations in Fukushima on March 11, the Japanese Government ordered the evacuation of the residents within a 20-km radius from the station on March 12, and asked various institutions to monitor the contamination levels of the residents. Hirosaki University, which is located 355 km north of Fukushima City, decided to send support staff to Fukushima. This report summarizes the results of the exposure of 13 individual teams from March 15 to June 20. The support teams surveyed more than 5,000 people during this period. Almost all subjects had external contamination levels of less than 13 kcpm on Geiger-Mller (GM) survey meter, which is categorized as no contamination level. The 1 st team showed the highest external exposure dose, but the 4 th team onward showed no significant change. Subsequently, the internal radiation exposure was measured using a whole body counter that indicated undetectable levels in all staff members. Although the measured external radiation exposure dose cannot have serious biological effects on the health of an individual, a follow-up study of the residents in Fukushima and other regions where

Satoru Monzen; Masahiro Hosoda; Shinji Tokonami; Minoru Osanai; Hironori Yoshino; Mitsuaki A. Yoshida; Masatoshi Yamada; Yasushi Asari; Kei Satoh; Ikuo Kashiwakura

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

2011 March NNSA News Viewable.pmd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the coast of Japan, causing significant damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. First and foremost, our thoughts and prayers go out to the people of Japan during...

129

FINAL DRAFT 2011 March NNSA NEWS 2011.pmd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the coast of Japan, causing significant damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. First and foremost, our thoughts and prayers go out to the people of Japan during...

130

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony before the Senate Armed Services...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Japan on March 11, 2011 caused significant damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Some radioactive materials have been released as a result of the damage. First and...

131

FINAL DRAFT 2011 March NNSA NEWS 2011.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tsunami struck the coast of Japan, causing significant damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. First and foremost, our thoughts and prayers go out to the people of...

132

2011 March NNSA News Viewable.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tsunami struck the coast of Japan, causing significant damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. First and foremost, our thoughts and prayers go out to the people of...

133

Safety Bulletin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and...

134

Nuclear Engineering Division: interviews on Situation at Japan's nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interviews on Situation at Japan's Interviews on Situation at Japan's nuclear reactors Welcome Organization Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Nuclear Engineering Division: interviews on Situation at Japan's nuclear reactors Bookmark and Share Fukushima Update "Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality" Fukushima and Chernobyl: Myth versus Reality Want to bypass the popular press myths and gain a true understanding of the radiation releases at Fukushima? Watch this video » Several experts from the Nuclear Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory have been interviewed on the situation at Japan's nuclear

135

Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?  

SciTech Connect

25 years after Chernobyl, the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence, reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that, in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan, the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population, Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R and D activities. On the positive side, the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids, which have recently been proposed for energy production, is critically reviewed. There are major challenges remaining that are shortly outlined. Scientific/technical achievements that are required in the light of the Fukushima accident are highlighted.

Schenkel, Roland [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1,76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations Wednesday, September 19 - Plenary Session September 19, 2012 Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company September 19, 2012 A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Presenter: Honorable William C. Ostendorff, Commissioner US Nuclear Regulatory Commission September 19, 2012 International Perspective on Fukushima Accident Presenter: Miroslav Lipár, Head, Operational Safety Section, Department of

137

Modeling of Some Physical Properties of Zirconium Alloys for Nuclear Applications in Support of UFD Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Zirconium-based alloys Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 are widely used in the nuclear industry as cladding materials for light water reactor (LWR) fuels. These materials display a very good combination of properties such as low neutron absorption, creep behavior, stress-corrosion cracking resistance, reduced hydrogen uptake, corrosion and/or oxidation, especially in the case of Zircaloy-4. However, over the last couple of years, in the post-Fukushima Daiichi world, energetic efforts have been undertaken to improve fuel clad oxidation resistance during off-normal temperature excursions. Efforts have also been made to improve upon the already achieved levels of mechanical behavior and reduce hydrogen uptake. In order to facilitate the development of such novel materials, it is very important to achieve not only engineering control, but also a scientific understanding of the underlying material degradation mechanisms, both in working conditions and in storage of used nuclear fuel. This report strives to contribute to these efforts by constructing the thermodynamic models of both alloys; constructing of the respective phase diagrams, and oxidation mechanisms. A special emphasis was placed upon the role of zirconium suboxides in hydrogen uptake reduction and the atomic mechanisms of oxidation. To that end, computational thermodynamics calculations were conducted concurrently with first-principles atomistic modeling.

Michael V. Glazoff

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

US DOE/NNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation NNSADataRepositoryGuide.pdf...

139

Latest Research, Response to Fukushima, Integrating Low Dose...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Latest Research, Response to Fukushima, Integrating Low Dose into Policy-All Featured at Annual Investigators' Workshop The 10th DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program...

140

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area U.S. Department of Energy Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area March 22, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Today the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. The information has also been shared with the government of Japan as part of the United States' ongoing efforts to support Japan with the recovery and response effort. On March 15, 33 experts from the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) arrived in Japan along with more than 17,200 pounds of equipment. After initial deployments at U.S. consulates and military installations in Japan, these teams have utilized their unique skills,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident. Dr. Sonja Haber 6 of 13

142

Fundamentals of Nuclear Safety and Their Application in Design...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The success or failure of these measures can be assessed with reference to the Three-mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents. Rev 1, 25 May 2011...

143

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that was collected and analyzed jointly with the Government of Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). 051311jointdoegojamstraindatafinalv2-110516163951-phpapp01.pptx 050611jointdoegojamsdatav3-110506164802-phpapp02.pptx 042111amsdataapril21v1-110422102404-phpapp02.pptx 041811amsdataapril18v1-110418170107-phpapp02.pptx 040711amsdataapril7v3-110407170243-phpapp02.pptx

144

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that was collected and analyzed jointly with the Government of Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). 051311jointdoegojamstraindatafinalv2-110516163951-phpapp01.pptx 050611jointdoegojamsdatav3-110506164802-phpapp02.pptx 042111amsdataapril21v1-110422102404-phpapp02.pptx 041811amsdataapril18v1-110418170107-phpapp02.pptx 040711amsdataapril7v3-110407170243-phpapp02.pptx

145

Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima The enclosed package represents radiation data collected over the ocean with the fixed-wing aircraft (C-12) on April 5th, April 18th, and May 9th. The data were collected with an array of large thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(T)) crystals and associated readout electronics to produce time and location referenced measurements. These results represent raw data that have been validated. They do not include any further evaluation. AMS C12 Sea Data.csv AMS C12 Sea Data Dictionary.pdf AMS C12 Sea Data.kmz More Documents & Publications Social Security Number Reduction Project 2011 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports Appendices for the Basis Document

146

A Book of Condolences for Fukushima | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Book of Condolences for Fukushima A Book of Condolences for Fukushima A Book of Condolences for Fukushima Addthis 1 of 6 Japanese Ambassador to the United States, Ichiro Fujisaki greet Secretary Steven Chu outside the entrance to the Japanese Embassy in Washington, DC. Image: Energy Department Image | Photo by Quentin Kruger, Contractor 2 of 6 Secretary Chu signing the book of condolences. Image: Energy Department Image | Photo by Quentin Kruger, Contractor 3 of 6 Ichiro Fujisaki, Japanese Ambassador to the United States, bows his head in mourning during the signing. Image: Energy Department Image | Photo by Quentin Kruger, Contractor 4 of 6 Flowers on this table and throughout the embassy have been sent to the people of Japan from heads of state of many federal agencies. Image: Energy Department Image | Photo by Quentin Kruger, Contractor

147

Aerial Measurement of Radioxenon Concentration off the West Coast of Vancouver Island following the Fukushima Reactor Accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident, on March 20th, 2011, Natural Resources Canada conducted aerial radiation surveys over water just off of the west coast of Vancouver Island. Dose-rate levels were found to be consistent with background radiation, however a clear signal due to Xe-133 was observed. Methods to extract Xe-133 count rates from the measured spectra, and to determine the corresponding Xe-133 volumetric concentration, were developed. The measurements indicate that Xe-133 concentrations on average lie in the range of 30 to 70 Bq/m3.

L. E. Sinclair; H. C. J. Seywerd; R. Fortin; J. M. Carson; P. R. B. Saull; M. J. Coyle; R. A. Van Brabant; J. L. Buckle; S. M. Desjardins; R. M. Hall

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/22/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2211 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 42211 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

149

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/18/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41811 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 41811 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

150

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 3/22/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

211 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 32211 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

151

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/4/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

411 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4411 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

152

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/7/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

711 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4711 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

153

ORISE: REAC/TS Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDIA ADVISORY: REACTS International Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima crisis FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 31, 2011 FY11-42 Who: Radiation Emergency Assistance Center...

154

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos Addthis Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

155

Environmental Remediation Strategic Planning of Fukushima Nuclear Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmntal Remediation Assessment and other respons decision making on Environmental monitoring, experiments and assessment. Preliminary assessment to grasp the overall picture and determine critical locations, phenomena, people, etc. Using simple methods and models.

Onishi, Yasuo

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Non-nuclear, low-carbon, or both? The case of Taiwan*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-nuclear, low-carbon, or both? The case of Taiwan* Yen-Heng Henry Chen *Reprinted from Energy-7492 Fax: (617) 253-9845 Email: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Non-nuclear43 Q54 Keywords: Economy-wide analysis Non-nuclear policy CO2 reduction The Fukushima nuclear

157

Current Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of DiscussionCurrent Status of Discussion on Roadmap of Fusion Energyon Roadmap of Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Basic research of plasma science (small & med exp theory) acad Basic research of reactor eng. (advanced of fusion has dramatically changed since the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power stationnuclear energy of fast breeder reactor and fusion highnew energy, atomic energy of fast breeder reactor

158

US DOE/NNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOENNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological Soil Samples BusinessUSA DataTools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov ...

159

Department of Energy - Emergency Response & Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67 en A Statement from U.S. Secretary of 67 en A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima http://energy.gov/articles/statement-us-secretary-energy-ernest-moniz-regarding-fukushima fukushima" class="title-link">A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima

160

High Frequency Program: Phase 1 Seismic Test Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant resulting from the March 11, 2011, Great Tohoku Earthquake and subsequent tsunami, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) to conduct a systematic review of NRC processes and regulations. The NTTF was also tasked with determining if the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system.BackgroundThe NTTF developed a set of ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Non-Nuclear, Low-Carbon, or Both? The Case of Taiwan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-Nuclear, Low-Carbon, or Both? The Case of Taiwan Y.H. Henry Chen Report No. 235 December 2012://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Non-Nuclear, Low-Carbon, or Both? The Case of Taiwan Y.-H. Henry Chen* Abstract The Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan has renewed debates on the safety of nuclear power

162

UC Regents Visit Lawrence Livermore  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a regional-scale earthquake simulation at TSF and were briefed on the Lab's response to the Fukushima Daiichi power plant disaster in Japan. Livermore Mayor John...

163

JOM: The Member Journal of TMS - JOM Monthly - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 29, 2011 ... A number of responses drew from general media coverage, while others ... The disaster at Fukushima Daiichi following the Japanese...

164

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima...

165

DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Adak Island, Alaska. Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident Energy Department Makes 2.5 Million Available for Native American...

166

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead to Electrical Shock, Michael Hanson, BHSO Lessons and Recommendations from the Fukushima Daiichi Event, Kevin Gray, SSO References Separations Process Research Unit Spill,...

167

Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis PURPOSE This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the subsequent tsunami. While there is still a lot to be learned from the accident · about the adequacy of design specifications and the equipment failure modes, reports from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have identified some key aspects of the operational emergency at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.

168

Safety Bulletin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulletin Bulletin Offtce 01 Health. Safety and Sa<:urtty Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis No. 2011-01 PURPOSE This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the subsequent tsunami. While there is still a lot to be learned from the accident · about the adequacy of design specifications and the equipment failure modes, reports from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have identified some key aspects of the operational emergency at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.

169

Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety » Nuclear Security & Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration’s effort to assist Japanese personnel with nuclear issues related to the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Above, scientists, technicians and engineers from the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office board an Air Force C-17. | Photo courtesy of NNSA. Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy

170

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

171

Applications Center: Preventive Maintenance Basis for FLEX EquipmentProject Overview Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the EPRI Preventive Maintenance Basis Database (PMBD) and recent modifications that will assist nuclear power plant management in responding to new U.S. federal regulatory requirements known as the Flexible Response (FLEX) program. The FLEX program stems from lessons learned about emergency response to disaster scenarios from the Fukushima Dai-ichi earthquake and related tsunami events in Japan. It requires additional equipment to be stored for long periods to ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Trees as Filters of Radioactive Fallout from the Chernobyl Accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a copy of an unpublished study of the filtering effect of red maple trees (acer rubrum) on fission product fallout near Binghamton, NY, USA following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The conclusions of this work may offer some insight into what is happening in the forests exposed to fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident. This posting is in memory of Noel K. Yeh.

Brownridge, James D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-003.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-003 EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-003 SECTION A. Project Title: Auxiliary Canal Fill Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 SECTION B. Project Description: Although the ATR canal meets all design basis criteria, lessons learned following the earthquake and tsunami events at the Fukushima- Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March of 2011 indicate that an auxiliary water supply to the fuel storage canal with a fill connection located outside of the facility would have been valuable following the beyond design basis event. As a result of these lessons learned, the Department of Energy (DOE) has allocated additional funding to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to mitigate beyond design basis events similar to the Fukushima-Daiichi disaster. The Auxiliary Canal Fill Project is one of the projects being funded from this

174

Cosmic Ray Radiography of the Damaged Cores of the Fukushima Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei. The interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The interaction with nuclei leads to angle diffusion. Two muon imaging methods that use flux attenuation and multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons are being studied as tools for diagnosing the damaged cores of the Fukushima reactors. Here we compare these two methods. We conclude that the scattering method can provide detailed information about the core. Attenuation has low contrast and little sensitivity to the core.

Konstantin Borozdin; Steven Greene; Zarija Luki?; Edward Cas Milner; Haruo Miyadera; Christopher Morris; John Perry

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

COMPARISON OF DYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTAINMENT BUILDING DETERMINED FROM TESTS AND EARTHQUAKES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under Interagency Agreement DOE 4055075Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities In the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States government, and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of

M. G. Srinivasan; C. A. Kot; B. J. Hsieh; M. G. Srinivasan; C. A. Kot; B. J. Hsieh

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima  

SciTech Connect

Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: TODAM and FLESCOTs theories and mathematical formulations TODAM and FLESCOT model structures Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment EMSL tour Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

Onishi, Yasuo

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima  

SciTech Connect

Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: TODAM and FLESCOTs theories and mathematical formulations TODAM and FLESCOT model structures Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment EMSL tour Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

Onishi, Yasuo

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 22710 of 28,905 results. 01 - 22710 of 28,905 results. Article EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup TOKYO - An EM-led U.S. delegation conducted its third workshop last month to provide expertise to Japanese officials leading the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant site and surrounding area, this time addressing priorities identified by Japan's government agencies. http://energy.gov/em/articles/em-leads-successful-workshop-supporting-fukushima-cleanup Page Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability is seeking public input on a draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process. The proposed IIP Process is intended to improve interagency and intergovernmental coordination focused

179

Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Did you miss this event? Watch recording of "Lessons from Fukushima" The event's webcast is over, but you can still watch and/or download the

180

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process September 19, 2012 Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Purpose of the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP) ROP Framework Safety Culture within the ROP Safety Culture Assessments Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process More Documents & Publications A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Summary Workshop Summary Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary September 19-20, 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary On September 19-20, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a second Nuclear Safety Workshop covering the results of the Department's actions to improve its posture for analyzing and responding to severe accidents in light of lessons learned from the March 2011 nuclear accident in Japan. Sponsored by DOE and championed by Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman, the two-day workshop discussed the lessons learned in a national and international context. The workshop's theme was Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results, and included technical breakout sessions focused on beyond design basis events (BDBEs) analysis and response, safety culture, and risk assessment and management.

182

Assessment of DC Backup Power Technology Options for Nuclear Power Generation Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The March 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in Japan created a renewed industry interest in examining potential improvements for backup power options to support plant accident scenarios in both near-term and long-term implementation time periods. This report assesses technology options that can be considered in improving DC backup power. Options with near-term applicability were considered and reviewed. Certain energy storage systems and hydrogen power fuel cells were identified that could ...

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

ORISE: DOE Secretary Chu honors ORAU employees for Japan crisis response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Secretary Chu honors ORAU employees for Japan crisis response DOE Secretary Chu honors ORAU employees for Japan crisis response FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 7, 2011 FY12-08 Sixteen ORAU employees received U.S. Department of Energy Secretarial Honor Awards for their work supporting the agency in responding to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor crisis in Japan. The awards were presented in Washington, D.C., by Energy Secretary Steven Chu. ORAU's team was honored alongside National Nuclear Security Administration employees and contractors who made up the Nuclear Incident Team that was activated as the Fukushima reactor crisis began. In response to a radiological or nuclear incident, the NIT's mission is to coordinate NNSA assets for deployment, continually monitor deployment activities and provide NNSA management with the latest available information. It is

184

Needs for Robotic Assessments of Nuclear Disasters  

SciTech Connect

Following the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima nuclear reactor plant in Japan, the need for systems which can assist in dynamic high-radiation environments such as nuclear incidents has become more apparent. The INL participated in delivering robotic technologies to Japan and has identified key components which are needed for success and obstacles to their deployment. In addition, we are proposing new work and methods to improve assessments and reactions to such events in the future. Robotics needs in disaster situations include phases such as: Assessment, Remediation, and Recovery Our particular interest is in the initial assessment activities. In assessment we need collection of environmental parameters, determination of conditions, and physical sample collection. Each phase would require key tools and efforts to develop. This includes study of necessary sensors and their deployment methods, the effects of radiation on sensors and deployment, and the development of training and execution systems.

Victor Walker; Derek Wadsworth

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project, which developed an updated GMM for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) for use by licensees of nuclear generating plants to respond to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRCs) Request for Information to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations 50.54(f), Recommendation 2.1 of the Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi ...

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

Deputy Secretary Poneman Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA Deputy Secretary Poneman Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA June 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman today addressed the plenary session at the International Atomic Energy Agency's Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety. Deputy Secretary Poneman emphasized the importance of international cooperation and information sharing for developing lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. The IAEA is leading the process to develop these international best practices, which will help strengthen the international nuclear regulatory regime. Remarks as prepared for delivery are below. Thank you, Mr. Ambassador, for your work in organizing this important Conference and to Director General Amano and his staff for convening it.

187

2012 Annual Report: Simulate and Evaluate the Cesium Transport and Accumulation in Fukushima-Area Rivers by the TODAM Code  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the application of the time-varying, one-dimensional sediment-contaminant transport code, TODAM (Time-dependent, One-dimensional, Degradation, And Migration) to simulate the cesium migration and accumulation in the Ukedo River in Fukushima. This report describes the preliminary TODAM simulation results of the Ukedo River model from the location below the Ougaki Dam to the river mouth at the Pacific Ocean. The major findings of the 100-hour TODAM simulation of the preliminary Ukedo River modeling are summarized as follows:

Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 28090 of 28,904 results. 81 - 28090 of 28,904 results. Download Privacy Impact Assessment Template and Guidance Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting an... http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/privacy-impact-assessment-template-and-guidance Article U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference Dr. Steven Chu Praises IAEA for Work in Nuclear Energy and Safety at Annual Conference http://energy.gov/articles/us-energy-secretary-addresses-international-atomic-energy-agency-general-conference Download Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima

189

Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSAs role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan December 15, 2011 - 4:14pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman spoke at the Tokyo American Center today about nuclear power after Fukushima. Excerpts and full text of remarks, as prepared for delivery, are below: "As two of the nations responsible for pioneering the peaceful use of atomic energy, the United States and Japan share an opportunity - and a responsibility - to safely speed that transition. In fact, next week in the United States we will celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 1 in Idaho, which marked the first time that peaceful atomic energy was used to generate electricity. Our two nations

191

DOE Response to Japan  

SciTech Connect

DOE/NNSA NA?40 was requested to provide support with consequence management activities following the incident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The response involved the deployment of several DOE/NNSA NA?40 assets to provide specialized capabilities analysts, scientists, doctors, nurses, specialized equipment and systems to characterize the deposition for the protection of the public and the environment. General response activities revolved around the concepts of: predictive modeling; monitoring and data collection from the air and on the ground; assessing the collected data and other relevant information; interpreting the data; and coordinating the communication of the interpreted data to the appropriate stakeholders.

Wendy Pemberton and RaJah Mena

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model Review Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project, which will provide industry with information necessary to respond to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Request for Information to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations 50.54(f), Recommendation 2.1 of the Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Accident, dated March 12, 2012. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the EPRI (2004, 2006)...

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Online Condition Monitoring to Enable Extended Operation of Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Safe, secure, and economic operation of nuclear power plants will remain of strategic significance. New and improved monitoring will likely have increased significance in the post-Fukushima world. Prior to Fukushima, many activities were already underway globally to facilitate operation of nuclear power plants beyond their initial licensing periods. Decisions to shut down a nuclear power plant are mostly driven by economic considerations. Online condition monitoring is a means to improve both the safety and economics of extending the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants, enabling adoption of proactive aging management. With regard to active components (e.g., pumps, valves, motors, etc.), significant experience in other industries has been leveraged to build the science base to support adoption for online condition-based maintenance and proactive aging management in the nuclear industry. Many of the research needs are associated with enabling proactive management of aging in passive components (e.g., pipes, vessels, cables, containment structures, etc.). This paper provides an overview of online condition monitoring for the nuclear power industry with an emphasis on passive components. Following the overview, several technology/knowledge gaps are identified, which require addressing to facilitate widespread online condition monitoring of passive components.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 News Updates The final ruling on the design certification for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries' APWR has been revised until 2015. Structural changes were made to the design by vendor, which requires a new seismic analysis to be performed. Because of this, the review schedule for the COL applications for Comanche Peak and North Anna has been delayed by approximately 18 months. The final ruling on Areva's EPR design certification has been revised from June 2013 until the end of 2014. The change is to allow Areva to respond to outstanding technical issues and provide additional information related to post-Fukushima requirements. DOE released a funding opportunity announcement on March, 22 2012 to

195

ANNUAL REPORT FY2011 I N D U S T R I A L S A N D I A N A T I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 I N D U S T R I A L S A N D I A N A T I O N A L L A B O R A T O R I E S Radiation Cleanup in Fukushima n About the cover: Patented crystalline silico-titanate (CST) technology, licensed from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by UOP, a Honeywell Company, is being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. See story on page 18. These partnerships embody the innovation, productivity, and entrepreneurialism that enable our nation to maintain leadership in science and engineering - ultimately strengthening our nation's security. Dan Sanchez DOE Technology Partnerships Manager NNSA Sandia Site Office Sandia's Industrial Partnerships Program not only supports innovation, but also accelerates its transfer to the private sector.

196

Emergency Response & Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Security + Safety » Emergency Response & Procedures National Security + Safety » Emergency Response & Procedures Emergency Response & Procedures November 1, 2013 A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is stunning that one can see firsthand the destructive force of the tsunami even more than two and a half years after the tragic events October 29, 2013 Workers repair power lines in the Mid-Atlantic shortly after Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Communities The Energy Department continues to take actions to protect our energy infrastructure, adapt to climate change and build partnerships to make

197

Beyond Design Basis Events | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to beyond design basis events (BDBEs). These initiatives included issuing Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, and conducting two DOE nuclear safety workshops. DOE also issued two reports documenting the results of these initiatives: Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to BDBEs, August 2011, and Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities,

198

Beyond Design Basis Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to beyond design basis events (BDBEs). These initiatives included issuing Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, and conducting two DOE nuclear safety workshops. DOE also issued two reports documenting the results of these initiatives: Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to BDBEs, August 2011, and Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013.

199

Fukushima plutonium effect and blow-up regimes in neutron-multiplying media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the capture and fission cross-sections of 238U and 239Pu increase with temperature within 1000-3000 K range, in contrast to those of 235U, that under certain conditions may lead to the so-called blow-up modes, stimulating the anomalous neutron flux and nuclear fuel temperature growth. Some features of the blow-up regimes in neutron-multiplying media are discussed.

V. D. Rusov; V. A. Tarasov; V. M. Vaschenko; E. P. Linnik; T. N. Zelentsova; M. E. Beglaryan; S. A. Chernegenko; S. I. Kosenko; P. A. Molchinikolov; V. P. Smolyar; E. V. Grechan

2012-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fukushima plutonium effect and blow-up regimes in neutron-multiplying media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the capture and fission cross-sections of 238U and 239Pu increase with temperature within 1000-3000K range, in contrast to those of 235U, that under certain conditions may lead to the so-called blow-up modes, stimulating the anomalous neutron flux and nuclear fuel temperature growth. Some features of the blow-up regimes in neutron-multiplying media are discussed.

Rusov, V D; Vaschenko, V M; Linnik, E P; Zelentsova, T N; Beglaryan, M E; Chernegenko, S A; Kosenko, S I; Molchinikolov, P A; Smolyar, V P; Grechan, E V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Recovery of radioisotopes from nuclear waste for radio-scintillator-luminescence energy applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extraction of the light weight radioisotopes (LWR) 89Sr/90Sr, from the expended nuclear bars in the Fukushima reactor, should have decreased the extent of contamination during the course of the accident. 89Sr applications could pay for the extraction of 89Sr/90Sr from nuclear residues. Added value could be obtained by using 89Sr for cancer treatments. Known technologies could be used to relate into innovative ways LWR, to obtain nuclear energy at battery scale. LWR interact by contact with scintillators converting \\beta-radiation into light-energy. This would lead to manufacturing scintillator lamps which operate independently of other source of energy. These lamps could be used to generate photoelectric energy. Engineering of radioisotopes scintillator photovoltaic cells, would lead to devices without moving parts.

Alfred Bennun

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Facilities Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. Based on recommendations in the August 2011 report, DOE embarked on a project to develop and refine guidance that supports improvements in DOE's processes for analyzing and

204

MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION - Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 16, 2011 September 16, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: SUBJECT: DANIEL B. PONEMA Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities. These actions focused on learning how DOE can better prepare to manage potential beyond design basis events. A summary of these actions and the resulting insights, and recommended opportunities and actions to improve nuclear safety at DOE> are included in the attached report. I have directed the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) to work with DOE's Nuclear Safety and Security Coordinating Council, and the Program and Field Offices of

205

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 13940 of 28,905 results. 31 - 13940 of 28,905 results. Download Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013 In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/report-secretary-energy-beyond-design-basis-event-pilot-evaluations-results-and-0

206

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities, January 2013 Facilities, January 2013 Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013 In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. BDBE_Report_final.pdf More Documents & Publications Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot

207

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities, January 2013 Facilities, January 2013 Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013 In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. BDBE_Report_final.pdf More Documents & Publications Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot

208

MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION - Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 16, 2011 September 16, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: SUBJECT: DANIEL B. PONEMA Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities. These actions focused on learning how DOE can better prepare to manage potential beyond design basis events. A summary of these actions and the resulting insights, and recommended opportunities and actions to improve nuclear safety at DOE> are included in the attached report. I have directed the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) to work with DOE's Nuclear Safety and Security Coordinating Council, and the Program and Field Offices of

209

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Facilities Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. Based on recommendations in the August 2011 report, DOE embarked on a project to develop and refine guidance that supports improvements in DOE's processes for analyzing and

210

The Political Economy of Wind Power in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disastrous meltdown of the Fukushima nuclear power plant in21 In the wake of the Fukushima meltdown, The Guardian alsoit would seem that the Fukushima meltdown would have a

Swanson, Ryan Landon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed

Hideo Harada

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, July 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2012 July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, July 2012 July 30, 2012 - 3:27pm Addthis Quarterly News The final ruling on the design certification for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries' APWR has been revised until 2015. Structural changes were made to the design by vendor, which requires a new seismic analysis to be performed. Because of this, the review schedule for the COL applications for Comanche Peak and North Anna has been delayed by approximately 18 months. The final ruling on Areva's EPR design certification has been revised from June 2013 until the end of 2014. The change is to allow Areva to respond to outstanding technical issues and provide additional information related to post-Fukushima requirements. DOE released a funding opportunity announcement on March, 22 2012 to

213

Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been engaged in an effort to develop and qualify next generation LWR fuel with enhanced performance and safety and reduced waste generation since 2010. This program, which has emphasized collaboration between the DOE, U.S. national laboratories and nuclear industry, was refocused from enhanced performance to enhanced accident tolerance following the events at Fukushima in 2011. Accident tolerant fuels have been specifically described as fuels that, in comparison with standard UO2-Zircaloy, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The program maintains an ambitious goal to insert a lead test assembly (LTA) of the new design into a commercial power reactor by 2022 .

Daniel M. Wachs

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events, April 2013 Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events, April 2013 PURPOSE: The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to (1) provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, initiatives related to beyond design basis events (BDBEs), and (2) provide direction for enhancing capabilities for mitigating BDBEs at DOE sites. BACKGROUND: After the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to BDBEs. These initiatives

216

Super cpRad: 1663 Science and Technology Magazine | Los National Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dial μ for Assistance Dial μ for Assistance This past March, a 23-foot-high tsunami struck the Tohoku region of Japan and destroyed the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. It is still uncertain as to the status of the reactor core-the large, tower-like assembly of fuel rods that contains not only the uranium and plutonium fuel, but also the extremely radioactive waste products of nuclear fission. If the core remains intact and standing, it should be possible to remove the assembly as a unit, and execute some strategy to mitigate its hazards. But if the core melted and nuclear fuel spilled from the fuel rods, suffice it to say there are no easy solutions. Los Alamos might be able to assess the status of the core by scaling up a demonstration muon tomography system so that it's capable of imaging the

217

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Operating Experience Level 1: Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events PURPOSE: The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to (1) provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, initiatives related to beyond design basis events (BDBEs), and (2) provide direction for enhancing capabilities for mitigating BDBEs at DOE sites. BACKGROUND: After the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to BDBEs. These initiatives

218

Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, September 2011 Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, September 2011 Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities. These actions focused on learning how DOE can better prepare to manage potential beyond design basis events. A summary of these actions and the resulting insights, and recommended opportunities and actions to improve nuclear safety at DOE> are included in the attached report. I have directed

219

Deputy Secretary Poneman Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cooperation and information sharing for developing lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. The IAEA is leading the process to develop these international best...

220

Panel Discussion on The Future of Nuclear Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This event focused on important questions including: how can the lessons from the Fukushima disaster be used to contribute to convincingly safer construction and operation of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

222

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

224

Publications: Other Resources - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

225

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

226

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

227

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

228

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

229

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

230

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

231

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

232

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

233

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

234

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

235

Evaluation of a Method for Remote Detection of Fuel Relocation Outside the Original Core Volumes of Fukushima Reactor Units 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study to evaluate the feasibility of remotely detecting and quantifying fuel relocation from the core to the lower head, and to regions outside the reactor vessel primary containment of the Fukushima 1-3 reactors. The goals of this study were to determine measurement conditions and requirements, and to perform initial radiation transport sensitivity analyses for several potential measurement locations inside the reactor building. The radiation transport sensitivity analyses were performed based on reactor design information for boiling water reactors (BWRs) similar to the Fukushima reactors, ORIGEN2 analyses of 3-cycle BWR fuel inventories, and data on previously molten fuel characteristics from TMI- 2. A 100 kg mass of previously molten fuel material located on the lower head of the reactor vessel was chosen as a fuel interrogation sensitivity target. Two measurement locations were chosen for the transport analyses, one inside the drywell and one outside the concrete biological shield surrounding the drywell. Results of these initial radiation transport analyses indicate that the 100 kg of previously molten fuel material may be detectable at the measurement location inside the drywell, but that it is highly unlikely that any amount of fuel material inside the RPV will be detectable from a location outside the concrete biological shield surrounding the drywell. Three additional fuel relocation scenarios were also analyzed to assess detection sensitivity for varying amount of relocated material in the lower head of the reactor vessel, in the control rods perpendicular to the detector system, and on the lower head of the drywell. Results of these analyses along with an assessment of background radiation effects and a discussion of measurement issues, such as the detector/collimator design, are included in the paper.

Douglas W. Akers; Edwin A. Harvego

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Investigation of Strategies for Mitigating Radiological Releases in Severe Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fukushima Dai-ichi accident highlights the need to reduce the magnitude of radioactive fission product releases from BWR Mark I and II containments following beyond-design-basis events. There is no evidence that this accident has a long-term effect on public health and safety; however, the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident did result in widespread contamination of surrounding areas, both on-site and off-site. This report assesses various strategies that can be used to maintain BWR Mark I and II ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nuclear Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used to measure the properties of nuclei. Reactions that exchange energy or nucleons can be used to measure the energies of...

239

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

240

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

243

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 17580 of 26,764 results. 71 - 17580 of 26,764 results. Article Energy Department's Fossil Energy Chief to Tour Western Michigan University's Clean Coal Research Facilities, Host Business Roundtable WASHINGTON - Tomorrow, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, Assistant Energy Secretary for Fossil Energy Charles McConnell will join Western Michigan University President John M. Dunn and Core Energy CEO Bob... http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-s-fossil-energy-chief-tour-western-michigan-university-s-clean-coal Article EM-Led Delegation Offers Expertise in Workshop in Japan TOKYO - When Japanese officials began cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred this year, they called on the DOE to provide expertise and experience. http://energy.gov/em/articles/em-led-delegation-offers-expertise-workshop-japan

244

Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2011 15, 2011 Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Quorum Room, 1st Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 Meeting Minutes - June 15 2011.pdf Meeting Agenda - June 15 2011.pdf Presentation - DOE Quadrennial Technology Review.pdf Presentation - NE FY 2011 Budget and Status of NE New Starts.pdf Presentation - NGNP Phase 1 Review.pdf Presentation - Report to NEAC of Fuel Cycle Subcommittee.pdf Presentation - NEUP Fiscal Year FY2011 Status.pdf Presentation - DOE Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident.pdf Additional Material - NGNP Phase 1 Review Final Draft - NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee.pdf Additional Material - Report of Fuel Cycle Subcommittee - NEAC Report.pdf More Documents & Publications Meeting Materials: December 6, 2012 Meeting Materials: June 12, 2012

245

EM News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2011 November 9, 2011 Lawrence Livermore Site Office Manager Joins EM's Senior Leadership Team WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Acting Assistant Secretary Dave Huizenga announced today that Alice Williams, manager of the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Lawrence Livermore Site Office has joined the EM senior leadership team. November 9, 2011 The U.S. delegation of DOE representatives, including DOE national laboratory and contractor staff, are pictured, front row, left to right, Doug Akers, Steve Schneider, Robert Montgomery, Dan McCabe, Steve Herring, Paul Bredt, Rich Abitz; back row, left to right, Jeff Miller, Jeff Griffin, Bob Sindelar, Reid Peterson, Chuck Negin, and Wayne Johnson. EM-Led Delegation Offers Expertise in Workshop in Japan TOKYO - When Japanese officials began cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi

246

2011 IAEA General Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 IAEA General Conference 2011 IAEA General Conference Remarks as Prepared for Delivery Secretary Steven Chu Monday, September 19, 2011 Thank you, Ambassador Feruta. Congratulations on your election as President of this Conference. I also want to thank Director General Amano for his outstanding leadership. I am honored to represent the United States today, and I want to share a message from President Barack Obama: "On behalf of the United States, please accept my best wishes for a successful International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference. This year's meeting takes place against the backdrop of the severe earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March and the devastating accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station that followed. Along with

247

Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 15, 2011 June 15, 2011 Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Quorum Room, 1st Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 Meeting Minutes - June 15 2011.pdf Meeting Agenda - June 15 2011.pdf Presentation - DOE Quadrennial Technology Review.pdf Presentation - NE FY 2011 Budget and Status of NE New Starts.pdf Presentation - NGNP Phase 1 Review.pdf Presentation - Report to NEAC of Fuel Cycle Subcommittee.pdf Presentation - NEUP Fiscal Year FY2011 Status.pdf Presentation - DOE Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident.pdf Additional Material - NGNP Phase 1 Review Final Draft - NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee.pdf Additional Material - Report of Fuel Cycle Subcommittee - NEAC Report.pdf More Documents & Publications Meeting Materials: December 9, 2010 Meeting Materials: December 6, 2012

248

EM News Flashes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2011 November 9, 2011 The U.S. delegation of DOE representatives, including DOE national laboratory and contractor staff, are pictured, front row, left to right, Doug Akers, Steve Schneider, Robert Montgomery, Dan McCabe, Steve Herring, Paul Bredt, Rich Abitz; back row, left to right, Jeff Miller, Jeff Griffin, Bob Sindelar, Reid Peterson, Chuck Negin, and Wayne Johnson. EM-Led Delegation Offers Expertise in Workshop in Japan TOKYO - When Japanese officials began cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred this year, they called on the DOE to provide expertise and experience. November 9, 2011 Lawrence Livermore Site Office Manager Joins EM's Senior Leadership Team WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Acting Assistant Secretary Dave Huizenga announced

249

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

250

Future of Nuclear Data for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear astrophysics is an exciting growth area in nuclear science. Because of the enormous nuclear data needs of this field

Michael S. Smith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

252

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of Nonproliferation Research & Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection Develop, Demonstrate, and...

253

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

254

Transmutation of Nuclear Waste and the future MYRRHA Demonstrator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While a considerable and world-wide growth of the nuclear share in the global energy mix is desirable for many reasons, there are also, in particular in the "old world" major objections. These are both concerns about safety, in particular in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident and concerns about the long-term burden that is constituted by the radiotoxic waste from the spent fuel. With regard to the second topic, the present contribution will outline the concept of Partitioning & Transmutation (P&T), as scientific and technological answer. Deployment of P&T may use dedicated "Transmuter" or "Burner" reactors, using a fast neutron spectrum. For the transmutation of waste with a large content (up to 50%) of (very long-lived) Minor Actinides, a sub-critical reactor, using an external neutron source is a most attractive solution. It is constituted by coupling a proton accelerator, a spallation target and a subcritical core. This promising new technology is named ADS, for accelerator-driven syste...

Mueller, Alex C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Transmutation of Nuclear Waste and the future MYRRHA Demonstrator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While a considerable and world-wide growth of the nuclear share in the global energy mix is desirable for many reasons, there are also, in particular in the "old world" major objections. These are both concerns about safety, in particular in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident and concerns about the long-term burden that is constituted by the radiotoxic waste from the spent fuel. With regard to the second topic, the present contribution will outline the concept of Partitioning & Transmutation (P&T), as scientific and technological answer. Deployment of P&T may use dedicated "Transmuter" or "Burner" reactors, using a fast neutron spectrum. For the transmutation of waste with a large content (up to 50%) of (very long-lived) Minor Actinides, a sub-critical reactor, using an external neutron source is a most attractive solution. It is constituted by coupling a proton accelerator, a spallation target and a subcritical core. This promising new technology is named ADS, for accelerator-driven system. The present paper aims at a short introduction into the field that has been characterized by a high collaborative activity during the last decade in Europe, in order to focus, in its later part, on the MYRRHA project as the European ADS technology demonstrator.

Alex C. Mueller

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

257

Nuclear forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

Bing, G.F.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear Deterrence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

260

LESSONS LEARNED IN AEROSOL MONITORING WITH THE RASA  

SciTech Connect

The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) is an automated aerosol collection and analysis system designed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the 1990's and is deployed in several locations around the world as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) required under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The RASA operates unattended, save for regularly scheduled maintenance, iterating samples through a three-step process on a 24-hour interval. In its 15-year history, much has been learned from the operation and maintenance of the RASA that can benefit engineering updates or future aerosol systems. On 11 March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami rocked the eastern coast of Japan, resulting in power loss and cooling failures at the Daiichi nuclear power plants in Fukushima Prefecture. Aerosol collections were conducted with the RASA in Richland, WA. We present a summary of the lessons learned over the history of the RASA, including lessons taken from the Fukushima incident, regarding the RASA IMS stations operated by the United States.

Forrester, Joel B.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Carty, Fitz; Comes, Laura; Eslinger, Paul W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Litke, Kevin E.; Miley, Harry S.; Morris, Scott J.; Schrom, Brian T.; Van Davelaar, Peter; Woods, Vincent T.

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Aerial Measuring System in Japan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agencys Aerial Measuring System deployed personnel and equipment to partner with the U.S. Air Force in Japan to conduct multiple aerial radiological surveys. These were the first and most comprehensive sources of actionable information for U.S. interests in Japan and provided early confirmation to the government of Japan as to the extent of the release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Generation Station. Many challenges were overcome quickly during the first 48 hours; including installation and operation of Aerial Measuring System equipment on multiple U.S. Air Force Japan aircraft, flying over difficult terrain, and flying with talented pilots who were unfamiliar with the Aerial Measuring System flight patterns. These all combined to make for a dynamic and non-textbook situation. In addition, the data challenges of the multiple and on-going releases, and integration with the Japanese government to provide valid aerial radiological survey products that both military and civilian customers could use to make informed decisions, was extremely complicated. The Aerial Measuring System Fukushima response provided insight in addressing these challenges and gave way to an opportunity for the expansion of the Aerial Measuring Systems mission beyond the borders of the US.

Lyons, C., Colton, D. P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental Measurements in an Emergency: This is not a Drill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-world event such as the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant presented unique challenges in data collection, analysis, and assessment. While emergency responders from the Department of Energy (DOE) are trained regularly to assess the environmental consequences of a radiological or nuclear incident, real-world complexities are difficult or impossible to simulate in such training. The Japan event sharply deviated in several ways and in the very early stages, accurate plume and deposition model predictions were difficult to produce due to the lack of field monitoring data and other information. In addition, there was much less plant monitoring data, essentially no reactor state information, and the meteorological conditions and releases were much more complex. Inevitably, the measurements in Japan presented technical challenges to assessors tasked with ensuring the quality of the finished assessments and data products for government officials, the responder community, and the public. This paper addresses some of the operational real-world complexities; procedures, measurements, or radiological assessments from the Fukushima response are not in the purview of this paper.

Musolino, Stephen V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Clark, Harvey [Remote Sensing Laboratory; McCullough, Thomas [Remote Sensing Laboratory; Pemberton, Wendy [Remote Sensing Laboratory

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

DOE/NNSA Aerial Measuring System (AMS): Flying the 'Real' Thing  

SciTech Connect

This slide show documents aerial radiation surveys over Japan. Map product is a compilation of daily aerial measuring system missions from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant to 80 km radius. In addition, other flights were conducted over US military bases and the US embassy.

Craig Lyons

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nuclear Energy  

Nuclear Energy Environmental Mgmt. Study Objectives: Respond to the pressing need to refine existing corrosion models: Predict performance in wide range of environments

265

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

266

Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I review progress that has been made in nuclear astrophysics over the past few years and summarize some of the questions that remain. Topics selected include solar neutrinos

W. C. Haxton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 17. Purchases of enrichment services by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type in delivery year, 2012

268

Nuclear Weapons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear science that has had a significant global influence. Following the observation of fission products of uranium by Hahn and Strassmann in 1938, a uranium fission weapon...

269

NUCLEAR ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

could improve the economic and safety performance of these advanced reactors. Nuclear power can reduce GHG emissions from electricity production and possibly in co-generation...

270

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

271

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue...

272

Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role in developing science and technology for nuclear power programs, nuclear propulsion, nuclear medicine, and the nation's nuclear weapon program among others. Many...

273

Nuclear hadrodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of hadron dynamics in the nucleus is illustrated to show the importance of nuclear medium effects in hadron interactions. The low lying hadron spectrum is considered to provide the natural collective variable for nuclear systems. Recent studies of nucleon?nucleon and delta?nucleon interactions are reviewed

D. F. Geesaman

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

Stocker, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials...

276

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management &...

277

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are of interest for nuclear security applications. Theof interest to nuclear security. To either make theseother targets of nuclear security interest, such kilogram-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diablo Canyon 2 nuclear reactors. Data were taken fromCapacity Operation of nuclear reactors for power generationby the operation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, ap-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System...

280

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transmission say for Nuclear Fuel Assemblies 4.1Facilities Spent nuclear fuel is another example wherein intact spent nuclear fuel would be a technological

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nuclear Halos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s?wave neutrons (or single s?wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the thickness of the nuclear surface in the mean?free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are

Erich Vogt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Lawrence Livermore celebrates 25 years of carbon dating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectrometer for use in the biology field to tracking radionuclides from the Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, the Laboratory's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry...

286

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

287

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

288

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

289

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

290

Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

291

Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

292

Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

293

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

294

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

295

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Nuclear Chirality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear chirality is a novel manifestation of spontaneous symmetry breaking resulting from an orthogonal coupling of angular momentum vectors in triaxial nuclei. Three perpendicular angular momenta can form two systems of opposite handedness; the time reversal operator

Krzysztof Starosta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the Thermal Stability of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Nuclear Waste Applications by K. Hildal, J.H. Perepezko, and L. Kaufman, $10.00 ($10.00), $25.00.

299

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 21. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2008-2012

300

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

Atkins-Duffin, C E

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

302

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

303

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 161-180 - Nuclear Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

304

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

305

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism Home > Our Mission > Countering Nuclear Terrorism Countering Nuclear Terrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy

306

Organization - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

307

Achievements: Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

308

SRNL Recognition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 to Present 10 to Present Dr. Robert Sindelar Dr. Robert Sindelar has begun a two month assignment in Japan as a U.S. Embassy Science Fellow. Dr. Sindelar will be hosted by the Japan Ministry of Environment as part of the Japan-U.S. cooperation framework for decontamination efforts in the Fukushima region. As an Embassy Science Fellow, he will provide technical expertise and suggestions to Japanese counterparts based on U.S. experience and collective SRS and SRNL expertise, and will interact with other scientists working in the field. He has previously participated in a National Laboratory expert team workshop with Japanese organizations to discuss high priority tasks for cleanup of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi plant, delivering presentations on relevant experience in water decontamination, corrosion control and leak repair technologies. Dr. Sindelar has 28 years of research and development experience in nuclear science. He is internationally recognized for his work in areas such as spent nuclear fuel management, water decontamination, aging effects and aging management of structures, and materials in nuclear systems. He has a B.S. in Physics and Mathematics from the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire, and both a M.S. and Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The Embassy Science Fellows program offers U.S. Embassies an opportunity to host a working scientist for a one to three month stay. Begun in 2001 as a State Department - National Science Foundation partnership, the program places U.S. scientists at posts to provide expertise, advice and assistance with science and technology-related issues. SRNL is DOE's applied research and development national laboratory at SRS. SRNL puts science to work to support DOE and the nation in the areas of environmental stewardship, national security, and clean energy. SRNL is operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, a Fluor-led company whose members are Fluor Federal Services, Newport News Nuclear and Honeywell.

309

Nuclear scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactions generate energy in nuclear reactors, in stars, and are responsible for the existence of all elements heavier than hydrogen in the universe. Nuclear reactions denote reactions between nuclei, and between nuclei and other fundamental particles, such as electrons and photons. A short description of the conservation laws and the definition of basic physical quantities is presented, followed by a more detailed account of specific cases: (a) formation and decay of compound nuclei; (b)direct reactions; (c) photon and electron scattering; (d) heavy ion collisions; (e) formation of a quark-gluon plasma; (f) thermonuclear reactions; (g) and reactions with radioactive beams. Whenever necessary, basic equations are introduced to help understand general properties of these reactions. Published in Wiley Encyclopedia of Physics, ISBN-13: 978-3-527-40691-3 - Wiley-VCH, Berlin, 2009.

C. A. Bertulani

2009-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nuclear Models  

SciTech Connect

The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

Collaborating Organizations - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborating Organizations Collaborating Organizations Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program Collaborating Organizations Bookmark and Share National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network, coordinated by IAEA, Vienna, Austria Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Group, Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. Nuclear Spectroscopy Group, Department of Nuclear Physics,

314

Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Program Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program We contribute to the development of comprehensive nuclear reactions and nuclear structure databases, including nuclear data measurement, analysis, modeling and evaluation methodologies, that are implemented in basic science research and advanced nuclear technologies. Bookmark and Share Recent Events Nuclear Structure 2012 Conference Argonne National Laboratory hosted the

315

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program...

316

National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Nuclear Data Center and Nuclear Energy Pavel Oblozinsky National Nuclear Data Center;National Nuclear Data Center Probably the oldest active organization at BNL History · Founded in 1952 as Sigma Center, neutron cross sections · Changed to National Nuclear Data Center in 1977 · 40 staff

317

Midwest Nuclear Compact (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Midwest Nuclear Compact establishes a Midwest Nuclear Board to cooperatively evaluate and make recommendations regarding the development of nuclear technology, distribute information about...

318

Nuclear Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

319

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space...

320

Brookhaven Nuclear Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Nuclear Physics Historically, nuclear physicists have studied the structure, characteristics, and behavior of the atomic nucleus and the nature of the nuclear force....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Energy Sources Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has...

323

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures of fuel containing materials can be fairly useful for the entire world's nuclear community and can help make nuclear energy safer.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nuclear explosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the physics of a nuclear bomb explosion and its effects on human beings is presented at the level of a sophomore general physics course without calculus. It is designed to supplement a standard text for such a course and problems are included.

A. A. Broyles

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nuclear ferromagnetism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of producing ordered states of nuclear spins by DNP followed by ADRF was first demonstrated in 1969. The spins of 19F in a crystal of CaF2 were cooled below one microdegree (with the applied field along the [100] axis) and their antiferromagnetic ordering was exhibited through the characteristic behaviour of their transverse and (later) longitudinal susceptibilities.

A. Abragam

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nuclear Terrorism.  

SciTech Connect

As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

Hecker, Siegfried S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculation...

Ejiri, H; Boswell, M; Young, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculations for them.

H. Ejiri; A. I. Titov; M. Boswell; A. Young

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Forensics Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security

333

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research and Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection NNSA builds the nation's operational sensors that monitor the entire planet from space to...

334

Why Nuclear Energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear Why nuclear energy? energy? Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the world world' 's energy needs s...

335

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

336

ANS Nuclear Historic Landmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NCNR declared a Nuclear Historic Landmark by the American Nuclear Society. The NIST Center for Neutron Research ...

337

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. Wilets, "Theories of Nuclear Fission", Clarendon Press,of the nuclear force, result in lower calculated fission

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

339

Nuclear Analytical Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Analytical Methods. Research activities in the Nuclear Analytical Methods Group are focused on the science that ...

340

doi: 10.2349/biij.7.4.e29 biij Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal EDITORIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The widespread damage and loss of life caused by the March 11th earthquake-generated tsunami in Japan, and the resulting emergency at the FukushimaDaiichi nuclear power facility, raise once again the question of the role of knowledgeable civilians in responding to public health emergencies. In the case of a radiological emergency, medical physicists are among the more knowledgeable individuals in the private sector with regard to several relevant issues including radiation exposures and risks, radioactive contamination, and the fear of radiation that make management of a radiological emergency so difficult. The challenges for medical physicists are to know the consequences of radiation exposure and radioactive contamination, to separate fantasy from fact in dealing with these consequences, and to address the consequences in a manner that instils confidence rather than fear in those who are less knowledgeable. All medical physicists should be knowledgeable about radiological emergencies and prepared to respond to an emergency if one occurs in their vicinity. Four types of radiological emergency would potentially expose large numbers of people to high amounts of radiation and require an emergency response that involves medical physicists. These types of events are (1) the detonation of a nuclear weapon or improvised nuclear de- vice, with an impact on the order of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki nuclear bombs, or possibly larger; (2) a crisis at a nuclear power plant, including a

Radiological Emergencies; Hendee W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear rockets  

SciTech Connect

A systems analysis is made of a class of nuclear-propelled rockets in combination with chemical boosters. Various missions are considered including the delivery of 5000-lb payload 5500 nautical miles, the placement of a satellite in an orbit about the earth and the delivery of a payload to escape velocity. The reactors considered are of the heterogeneous type utilizing graphite fuel elements in a matrix of Be or hydrogenous moderator. Liquid hydrogen and ammonia are considered as propellants. Graphical results are presented which show the characteristics and performance of the nuclear rockets as the design parameters are varied. It should be emphasized that this report is not in any sense intended as a handbook of rocket parameters; it is intended only as a guide for determining areas of interest.

York, H.F.; Biehl, A.T.

1955-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bekymren med krnkraftverket i Fukushima".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Genom att ta hjlp av retorikvetenskapliga teorier och metoder presenteras en retorisk utveckling av framingteorin. Diskurser om krnkraft p Dagens Nyheters (DN) och Aftonbladets (more)

Johansson, Hanna K. E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

345

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

346

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

347

Nuclear Systems Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Criticality Safety Irradiation Experiment Development and Execution Robotics & Remote Systems Engineering and Applications Thermal & Hydraulic Experiments & Analysis Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Nuclear Systems Technology SHARE Nuclear Systems Technology Nuclear Systems Technology Image 2 ORNL has had historic involvement in a broad set of nuclear research areas: irradiated materials and isotopes R&D, fission and fusion reactors development, neutron scattering, fuel enrichment, used fuel recycling and disposal, etc. The skills and knowledge required to succeed in these research areas often cultivated core areas of expertise in which ORNL is

348

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

349

Radioactive Waste Management Approaches for Developed Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the recent Fukushima accident, nuclear power remains one of the solutions to the world's energy concerns. Unfortunately, nuclear energy generates...

350

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... trailing only China. This follows the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, after which Japan suspended operations at all of its nuclear power ...

351

Christian Lobscheid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an American Nuclear Society Committee on an upcoming standard for sodium-cooled nuclear power plants. This Speaker's Seminars What Happened in Fukushima - a Technical Perspective...

352

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear Photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With new gamma-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest with 10^13 g/s and a bandwidth of Delta E_g/E_g ~10^-3, a new era of g-beams with energies Duke Univ., USA) with 10^8 g/s and Delta E_g/E_g~0.03. Even a seeded quantum FEL for g-beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused g-beams. We describe a new experiment at the g-beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for g-beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for g-beams are being developed. Thus we have to optimize the system of the g-beam facility, the g-beam optics and g-detectors. We can trade g-intensity for band width, going down to Delta E_g/E_g ~ 10^-6 and address individual nuclear levels. 'Nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with g-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, g-beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to micron resolution using Nucl. Reson. Fluorescence for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

D. Habs; M. M. Guenther; M. Jentschel; P. G. Thirolf

2012-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

355

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP will increase the efficiency in the...

356

National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety Study Program, IG-0581 National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety Study Program, IG-0581 To...

357

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes September 01, 1961 Washington, DC Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test...

358

Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed January 07, 1983 Washington, DC Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed President Reagan signs the Nuclear Waste...

359

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Fuel/Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science...

360

Regulation of nuclear envelope breakdown by the nuclear pore complex;.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In higher eukaryotes, each time a cell divides dramatic changes occur at the nuclear periphery. The nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear lamina must (more)

Prunuske, Amy Jeanette

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Enterprise Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Nuclear Security Enterprise Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) mission is to ensure the Nation sustains a safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent through the

362

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

363

Reconversion of nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

Kapitza, Sergei P

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Capabilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis System Process Monitoring,...

365

National Nuclear Data Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Radiation Dose Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data File Experimental nuclear reaction data Sigma Retrieval & Plotting Nuclear structure & decay Data Nuclear Science References Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File NNDC databases Ground and isomeric states properties Nuclear structure & decay data journal Nuclear reaction model code Tools and Publications US Nuclear Data Program Cross Section Evaluation Working Group Nuclear data networks Basic properties of atomic nuclei Parameters & thermal values Basic properties of atomic nuclei Internal Radiation Dose Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data File Experimental nuclear reaction data Sigma Retrieval & Plotting Nuclear structure & decay Data Nuclear Science References Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File NNDC databases Ground and isomeric states properties Nuclear structure & decay data journal Nuclear reaction model code Tools and Publications US Nuclear Data Program Cross Section Evaluation Working Group Nuclear data networks Basic properties of atomic nuclei Parameters & thermal values Basic properties of atomic nuclei Homepage BNL Home Site Index - Go USDNP and CSEWG November 18-22! USNDP CSEWG Agenda Thanks for attending! EXFOR 20,000 Milestone EXFOR Milestone 20,000 experimental works are now in the EXFOR database!

366

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For more...

367

Nuclear Power and the Environment  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Nuclear Issue Paper discusses Nuclear Plant Wastes, Interactions of Fossil Fuel and Nuclear Power Waste Decisions, and the Environmental Position of Nuclear Power.

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.R. Nix, Theory of Nuclear Fission and Superheavy Nuclei,energy maps relevant for nuclear fission and nucleus-nucleusin connection with nuclear fission. The need for a better

Blocki, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B.IS UNLfflfTEO LBL-11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B.and E. Browne June 1980 Nuclear Science Division University

Firestone, R.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics ofPhysics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics ofPhysics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete Events in Medium-Energy Nuclear Collisions" C-Y.+ corrections. (A) The nuclear potential-energy problem isquantum dynamics in high-energy nuclear collisions. We have

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THEORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions", Preprint LBL-Pion Interferometry of Nuclear Collisions. 18.1 M.Gyulassy,was supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

Gyulassy, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Asians Resist Nuclear Threat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midway carries soma 100 nuclear weapons and the missiles onthe removal of U. S. nuclear weapons from Asia. It is ti-aeof U. S. tactical nuclear weapons This set the figure for

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

376

Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

101 | National Nuclear Security Administration 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Nuclear Security 101 Fact Sheet Nuclear Security 101 Mar 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material,

377

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

378

Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

101 | National Nuclear Security Administration 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Nuclear Security 101 Fact Sheet Nuclear Security 101 Mar 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material,

379

Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

value of 92.16 MeV and the point rms radius is 2.35 fm vs 2.33 from experiment. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu...

380

Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ab initio no-core full configuration approach," Phys. Rev. C 86, 034325 (2012) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Nuclear power and nuclear-weapons proliferation  

SciTech Connect

The danger that fissile isotopes may be diverted from nuclear power production to the construction of nuclear weapons would be aggravated by a switch to the plutonium breeder: but future uranium supplies are uncertain.

Moniz, E.J.; Neff, T.L.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

1950-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

384

Nuclear Systems Technologies - Nuclear Engineering Division ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Departments involved: Research & Test Reactor | Engineering Development and Applications "Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities" training courses Argonne Decommissioning Training...

385

Publications 2000 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Publications 2011 Publications 2010 Publications 2009...

386

Nuclear Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

387

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theory describing the structure of the nuclear surface region, so that one may take two flat nuclear surfaces and calculate their interaction energy

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Sustainable Nuclear Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Enabling a Sustainable Nuclear Energy Future Since its inception, Argonne R&D has supported U.S. Department of Energy nuclear programs and initiatives, including today's...

389

6 Nuclear Fuel Designs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Message from the Director 2 Nuclear Power & Researrh Reactors 3 Discovery of Promethium 4 Nuclear Isotopes 4 Nuclear Medicine 5 Nuclear Fuel Processes & Software 6 Nuclear Fuel Designs 6 Nuclear Safety 7 Nuclear Desalination 7 Nuclear Nonproliferation 8 Neutron Scattering 9 Semiconductors & Superconductors 10 lon-Implanted Joints 10 Environmental Impact Analyses 11 Environmental Quality 12 Space Exploration 12 Graphite & Carbon Products 13 Advanced Materials: Alloys 14 Advanced Materials: Ceramics 15 Biological Systems 16 Biological Systems 17 Computational Biology 18 Biomedical Technologies 19 Intelligent Machines 20 Health Physics & Radiation Dosimetry 21 Radiation Shielding 21 Information Centers 22 Energy Efficiency: Cooling & Heating

390

Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate Nuclear and Particle Physics (NPP) at BNL comprises the Collider-Accelerator Department (including the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory,...

391

Nuclear Sites Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactor operations, nuclear research, weapons disassembly, maintenance and testing, hot cell operations, nuclear material storage and processing and waste disposal. Each...

392

Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management's Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) programs. Efforts...

393

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and development to 'boots-on-the-ground' implementation. This work ranges from uranium fuel cycle research to detection technologies and nuclear forensics. The nuclear...

394

Nuclear Safety Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program Search Approved Standards Recently Approved RevCom...

395

Nuclear Fuels - Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012... for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Nuclear Fuels - Modeling .... Using density functional theory (DFT), we have predicted that...

396

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, USof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the National Nuclear Security Administration, US Departmentof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Office of Nuclear Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home » Directives » Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules » Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program » Search » Approved Standards » Recently Approved » RevCom for TSP » Monthly Status Reports » Archive » Feedback DOE Nuclear Safety Research & Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design (HS-31) Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design - About Us » Nuclear Policy Technical Positions/Interpretations » Risk Assessment Working Group » Criticality Safety » DOE O 420.1C Facility Safety » Beyond Design Basis Events Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs (HS-32) Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs - About Us

399

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Focus Article Nuclear winter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Article Nuclear winter Alan Robock Nuclear winter is the term for a theory describing the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black, sooty smoke from cities and industrial facilities, would be heated by the Sun, lofted into the upper

Robock, Alan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Nuclear Security & Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department is working to enhance nuclear security through defense, nonproliferation, and environmental efforts.

402

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SE- 10658 Stockholm, Sweden. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 131 AUG. 2000 239 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, contract 14.5-980942-98242. REFERENCES 1. A. M. WEINBERG and H. C

Pázsit, Imre

403

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use patient and learn the importance of physical and pharmacologic stress in nuclear cardiology 3. Interpret

Ford, James

404

Availability and Nuclear Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Availability and Nuclear Properties The first six transplutonium metals, americium (Am), curium (Cm), berkelium

405

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP will help prevent misuse of civilian nuclear facilities for nonpeaceful purposes by developing enhanced safeguards programs and technologies. International nuclear safeguards are integral to implementing the GNEP vision of a peaceful expansion of nuclear energy and demonstration of more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle technologies. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale

406

Nuclear Deployment Scorecards | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiatives Nuclear Reactor Technologies Nuclear Deployment Scorecards Nuclear Deployment Scorecards January 1, 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 The...

407

Major Programs - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Program International Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form...

408

Executive Bios: Christopher Grandy - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

409

Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

410

Fuel Cycle Technologies Program - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

411

International Safety Projects - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

412

The Dawn of the Nuclear Age  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

413

Facility Safety Assessment - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

414

Computer Facilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

415

Advanced Computation & Visualization - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

416

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Facilities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

417

Safety - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

418

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear Power ... Nuclear Power Background, Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle...

419

Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Enabling Technologies Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation Nuclear...

420

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to intensive site security efforts, NNSA is also working to build international standards and criteria for nuclear and radiological security. This includes NNSA's work to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety Overview Experience Analysis Tools Current NCS Activities Current R&D Activities DOE Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG) Other...

422

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

423

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

424

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

425

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

426

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA...

427

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nature of the nuclear recipients security environment. ThisKeywords: Nuclear weapons proliferation; security; securitynature of the nuclear recipients security environment. This

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Dynamics of nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limited expression of nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210suggests cell-type specific nuclear pores in metazoans. Expand Dultz, E. (2008). Nuclear pore complex assembly through

Anderson, Daniel J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. The nuclear fuel cycle: A challenge forhave mastered parts of the nuclear fuel cycle, but have notprovision of fuel-cycle services, in which nuclear capable

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ground-Based Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Ground-Based Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

431

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

432

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear proliferation: a quantitative test. Journal ofINTERNATIONAL NUCLEAR ASSISTANCE DATA To test this strategictheory of nuclear proliferation faces a difficult test in

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nuclear Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Science Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of matter. This includes discovering the origins of nuclei and identifying the forces that transform matter. Specific topics include: Nuclear astrophysics and the synthesis of nuclei in stars and elsewhere in the cosmos; Nuclear forces and quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field

436

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clear; second, nuclear power plants are stated terroristinvesting in new nuclear power plants because they do notas things stand, new nuclear power plants will not be cost

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

nuclear energy legislation on track  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

07/8 - NUCLEAR ENERGY LEGISLATION ON TRACK ... the safety and economic viability of nuclear power, the management of nuclear waste, the advancement...

439

Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

440

NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1975  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gove and A. H. Wapstra, Nuclear Data Tables 11, 127 (1972).P. Jackson, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Report (1975)national Conference on Nuclear Structure and Spec troscopy,

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radioactive spent nuclear fuel is stored at commercialmost polluting part of the nuclear fuel cycle. It would notthe reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel will face technical,

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America's nuclear agenda, which affirms the central importance of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty." - President Obama on the Nuclear Posture Review, April 6, 2010 "The...

443

Peace, Stability, and Nuclear Weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in South Asia, Pakistans nuclear military capability, alongof the nuclear club: India, Pakistan, and North Korea. Ifand then India became nuclear powers, and Pakistan naturally

Waltz, Kenneth N.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [June 28, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partial contents include: Nuclear Power; Qinshan Plant; Nuclear Weapons; Nuclear Power Plants; Nuclear Waste; Nuclear Policy; Decontamination Devices; and Environmental Protection.

NONE

1989-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

445

Nuclear Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 15, 2002 April 15, 2002 NERAC Spring 2002 Meeting Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (2) 2002 Will Be A Transition Year 2002 Will Be A Transition Year 6 Nuclear Power 2010 6 Major Program Developments 6 FY 2003 Budget Request Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (3) Nuclear Power 2010 Nuclear Power 2010 Nuclear Power 2010 is a new R&D initiative announced by Secretary Abraham on February 14, 2002. This initiative is designed to clear the way for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2010. Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (4) Can We Build New U.S. Reactors By 2010? Yes! Can We Build New U.S. Reactors By 2010? Yes! Can Be Deployed by 2010

446

Guidebook to nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Semipalatinsk Nuclear Tests - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3.1 Tower used for measurements of nuclear weapon effects near ground zero. 3.1 A Brief ... atomic bomb. This output is 6% of all the nuclear explosions in.

448

Nuclear Imaging instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Imaging instrumentation Advances in gamma-ray detection and imaging have increased the pace of discovery in a broad cross-section of the sciences ranging from nuclear...

449

Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Nuclear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2014. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Nuclear. Sponsorship. Organizer(s)...

450

NIST Nuclear Physics Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Physics Data. Radionuclide Half-Life Measurements Made at NIST; Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions. ... Physical Reference Data. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

451

Idaho Site Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Nuclear Facilities Idaho Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Idaho Closure Project (ICP) This page was last updated on May 16...

452

WIPP Nuclear Facilities Transparency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transparency Technologies Other Transparency Activities Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) in conjunction with WIPP is providing this Nuclear...

453

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coupled and complex systems like nuclear weapons arsenals.The complex technology required to build nuclear weapons is

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management, Tucson, AZ,Assay, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 51st Annual

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

NNSA: Working To Prevent Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

456

Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

457

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

458

The Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection (NDD) | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Detonation Detection (NDD) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

459

Nuclear Safeguards and Security | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

460

Nuclear Shadowing and Diffraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relation between diffraction in lepton-proton collisions and shadowing of nuclear structure functions which arises from Gribov inelastic shadowing, is described. A model realizing such relation, which produces a parameter-free description of experimental data on nuclear structure functions at small $x$, is presented. The application to the description of multiplicities in nuclear collisions is discussed and related to other approaches.

J. L. Albacete; N. Armesto; A. Capella; A. B. Kaidalov; C. A. Salgado

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant, this measurement is car a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

462

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed reactivity effects--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring- hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

463

Nuclear Physics with trapped  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Physics with trapped atoms and ions #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian Outline · Scope and applications of nuclear physics precision frontier compliments LHC properties and aquifers in the Sahara #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian What is Nuclear Physics? · Began with the study

Boas, Harold P.

464

NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

National Security & Safety | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work Scientists from the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). | Photo from...

466

Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman's Remarks at the Tokyo American...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

risks. And though the Fukushima accident has heightened awareness about the risks of nuclear energy, we must recognize that the larger energy challenges we faced before the...

467

Health Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to Fukushima accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

468

The South China Sea is an important world energy trade route ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... years. Moreover, Japan has increased its LNG imports to replace the energy lost from nuclear power outages following the Fukushima crisis.

469

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and China The timing of Japans full recovery from the impacts of the 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima Social unrest in the Middle East and ...

470

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Japan ranked as the second largest net importer of fossil fuels in the world in 2012, trailing only China. This follows the Fukushima nuclear disaster ...

471

Robert Middaugh | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Communications Coordinator at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Most Recent NNSA Meets with Japanese Scientists to Discuss On-Going Fukushima Work August 3...

472

On evacuation assisting vehicular ad hoc networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent natural and man-made disasters such as Sandy (2012) and Fukushima nuclear power plant (2011) make efficient evacuation route planning and routing more important than (more)

Pu, Cong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Japan is the second largest net importer of fossil fuels in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Japan ranked as the second largest net importer of fossil fuels in the world in 2012, trailing only China. This follows the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, after ...

474

Japans use of thermal generation is up since March 2011 due ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, ... Total post-Fukushima fossil fuel consumption peaked at about 500 trillion British thermal units in January 2012 ...

475

FOIA | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

476

NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE, IG-0556 NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE, IG-0556 The Department of Energy (Department),...

477

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear...

478

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of...

479

Pollux | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollux | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

480

Testimonials | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testimonials | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fukushima daiichi nuclear" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Training | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

482

Engineering Development & Applications - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies (FCT) Generation IV (Gen IV) Nuclear Energy Program Decontamination and Decommissioning Nuclear Regulatory Research Facilities Environmentally Assisted Cracking...

483

Counterterrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

484

Vocabulary | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

485

Pantex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

486

Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

487

Policy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

488

Supercomputers | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

489

Engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

490

Contacts | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

491

Accomplishments | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

492

Preparedness | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

493

Public | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

494

Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

495

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

496

Overview | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

497

Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

498

Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

499

Conferences | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

500

Planning | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...