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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

A model of the Capital Cost of a natural gas-fired fuel cell based Central Utilities Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model defines the methods used to estimate the cost associated with acquisition and installation of capital equipment of the fuel cell systems defined by the central utility plant model. The capital cost model estimates the cost of acquiring and installing the fuel cell unit, and all auxiliary equipment such as a boiler, air conditioning, hot water storage, and pumps. The model provides a means to adjust initial cost estimates to consider learning associated with the projected level of production and installation of fuel cell systems. The capital cost estimate is an input to the cost of ownership analysis where it is combined with operating cost and revenue model estimates.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING: HIGHER CAPITAL COSTS AND REDUCED FLEXIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The paper discusses some main economic characteristics of fuel cell power production technology applied to shipping. Whenever competitive fuel cell systems enter the market, they are likely to have higher capital costs and lower operating costs than systems based on traditional combustion technology. Implications of the difference are investigated with respect to investment flexibility by the use of a real options model of ship investment, lay-up and scrapping decisions under freight rate uncertainty. A higher capital share of total expected costs can represent a significant opportunity cost in uncertain markets. The paper highlights the significance of accounting properly for value of flexibility prior to investment in new technology.

Sigbjørn Sødal

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Fuel costs and the retirement of capital goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the effect that energy prices and market conditions have on the retirement rates of capital goods using new micro data on aircraft lifetimes and fuel costs. The oil shocks of the 1970s made fuel intensive ...

Goolsbee, Austan Dean

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Capital requirements and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of potential PNGV fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our study reveals that supplying gasoline-equivalent demand for the low-market-share scenario requires a capital investment of less than $40 billion for all fuels except H{sub 2}, which will require a total cumulative investment of $150 billion. By contrast, cumulative capital investments under the high-market-share scenario are $50 billion for LNG, $90 billion for ethanol, $100 billion for methanol, $160 billion for CNG and DME, and $560 billion for H{sub 2}. Although these substantial capital requirements are spread over many years, their magnitude could pose a challenge to the widespread introduction of 3X vehicles. Fossil fuel use by US light-duty vehicles declines significantly with introduction of 3X vehicles because of fuel-efficiency improvements for 3X vehicles and because of fuel substitution (which applies to the nonpetroleum-fueled alternatives). Petroleum use for light-duty vehicles in 2030 is reduced by as much as 45% relative to the reference scenario. GHG emissions follow a similar pattern. Total GHG emissions decline by 25-30% with most of the propulsion system/fuel alternatives. For those using renewable fuels (i.e., ethanol and H{sub 2} from solar energy), GHG emissions drop by 33% (H{sub 2}) and 45% (ethanol). Among urban air pollutants, urban NOX emissions decline slightly for 3X vehicles using CIDI and SIDI engines and drop substantially for fuel-cell vehicles. Urban CO emissions decline for CIDI and FCV alternatives, while VOC emissions drop significantly for all alternatives except RFG-, methanol-, and ethanol-fueled SIDI engines. With the exception of CIDI engines fueled by RFD, FT50, or B20 (which increase urban PM{sub 10} emissions by over 30%), all propulsion system/fuel alternatives reduce urban PM{sub 10} emissions. Reductions are approximately 15-20% for fuel cells and for methanol-, ethanol-, CNG-, or LPG-fueled SIDI engines. Table 3 qualitatively summarizes impacts of the 13 alternatives on capital requirements and on energy use and emissions relative to the reference scenario. The table clearly shows the trade-off between costs and benefits. For example, while H{sub 2} FCVs have the greatest incremental capital needs, they offer the largest energy and emissions benefits. On the basis of the cost and benefit changes shown, methanol and gasoline FCVs appear to have particularly promising benefits-to-costs ratios.

Johnson, L.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Wang, M.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Assessment of capital requirements for alternative fuels infrastructure under the PNGV program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an assessment of the capital requirements of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a new Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels include two petroleum-based fuels (reformulated gasoline and low-sulfur diesel) and four alternative fuels (methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen). This study develops estimates of cumulative capital needs for establishing fuels production and distribution infrastructure to accommodate 3X vehicle fuel needs. Two levels of fuel volume-70,000 barrels per day and 1.6 million barrels per day-were established for meeting 3X-vehicle fuel demand. As expected, infrastructure capital needs for the high fuel demand level are much higher than for the low fuel demand level. Between fuel production infrastructure and distribution infrastructure, capital needs for the former far exceed those for the latter. Among the four alternative fuels, hydrogen bears the largest capital needs for production and distribution infrastructure.

Stork, K.; Singh, M.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Effect of Energy Prices on Operation and Investment in OECD Countries: Evidence from the Vintage Capital Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capital stock may reduce future energy (including fossil fuel) input consumption. To illustrate the outcome of such policies we use the vintage capital model predictions to evaluate the e¤ect of a greenhouse emissions tax on energy consumption. Because... (agriculture, commerce, manufacturing, and transport) between 1990 and 2005. Compared to earlier studies, our analysis relies on more accurate energy prices in different sectors and countries based on the end-use fuel prices and sector-specific energy mix...

Steinbuks, J; Meshreky, A; Neuhoff, Karsten

7

Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fuel Modeling I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Integrated Computational Modeling of Materials for Nuclear Energy: Fuel ... in the incorporation of rare gas fission products such as Kr and Xe.

9

Modeling & Simulation - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCTool Computer Model Helps Focus Fuel Cell Vehicle Research Somewhere near Detroit, an automotive engineer stares at the ceiling, wondering how to squeeze 1% more efficiency out...

10

Nuclear Fuels - Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012... for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Nuclear Fuels - Modeling .... Using density functional theory (DFT), we have predicted that ...

11

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Comparative economics for DUCRETE spent fuel storage cask handling, transportation, and capital requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes economic differences between a DUCRETE spent nuclear fuel storage cask and a conventional concrete storage cask in the areas of handling, transportation, and capital requirements. The DUCRETE cask is under evaluation as a new technology that could substantially reduce the overall costs of spent fuel and depleted U disposal. DUCRETE incorporates depleted U in a Portland cement mixture and functions as the cask`s primary radiation barrier. The cask system design includes insertion of the US DOE Multi-Purpose Canister inside the DUCRETE cask. The economic comparison is from the time a cask is loaded in a spent fuel pool until it is placed in the repository and includes the utility and overall US system perspectives.

Powell, F.P. [Sierra Nuclear Corp., Roswell, GA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Fueling Station Economics Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fueling Station Economics Model Fueling Station Economics Model Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Fueling Station Economics Model Project ID: 193 Principal Investigator: Bill Liss Brief Description: The Gas Technology Institute developed a hydrogen fueling station economics model as part of their project to develop a natural gas to hydrogen fuel station. Keywords: Compressed gas; vehicle; refueling station; cost; natural gas Purpose Calculate hydrogen fueling station costs, including capital, operating, and maintenance costs. Performer Principal Investigator: Bill Liss Organization: Gas Technology Institute Address: 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plains, IL 60018-1804 Telephone: 847-768-0530 Email: william.liss@gastechnology.org Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

14

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer...

15

Parametrical Regulation of Economic Growth Based on the Lucas Endogenous Model with Human Capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of application of the parametrical regulation theory for economic growth of Kazakhstan national economy on the basis of the Lucas endogenous model with a personalized human capital. The parameters of the considered model ... Keywords: Human capital, growth, identification, parametrical regulation, endogenous model

Abdykappar A. Ashimov; Bahyt T. Sultanov; Zheksenbek M. Adilov; Yuriy V. Borovskiy; Aliya S. Azhibekova

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fuel Reliability Program: BWR Fuel Crud Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of BWR reactor system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance limiting conditions in a limited number of cases. The operational impact can include unplanned, or increased frequency of fuel inspections, fuel failure and associated radiological consequences, operational restrictions including core power derate and/or forced shutdowns to remove failed fuel, premature discharge of individual bundles or entire reloads, and undesirable core design restrictions. T...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fuel Modeling II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Integrated Computational Modeling of Materials for Nuclear Energy: ... Continuum Theory of Defects and Materials Response to Irradiation: ...

18

Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production costs, carbon dioxide emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL) and coal (coal to liquid, or CTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion efficiency, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the preliminary results from the model. For the base cases, CTL and cellulosic ethanol are the least cost fuel options, at $1.60 and $1.71 per gallon, respectively. Base case assumptions do not include tax or other credits. This compares to a $2.35/gallon production cost of gasoline at September, 2007 crude oil prices ($80.57/barrel). On an energy content basis, the CTL is the low cost alternative, at $12.90/MMBtu, compared to $22.47/MMBtu for cellulosic ethanol. In terms of carbon dioxide emissions, a typical vehicle fueled with cellulosic ethanol will release 0.48 tons CO{sub 2} per year, compared to 13.23 tons per year for coal to liquid.

Baker, Arnold Barry; Williams, Ryan (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Drennen, Thomas E.; Klotz, Richard (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Model Year 1999 Fuel Economy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL FUEL ECONOMY GUIDE MODEL YEAR 1999 DOE/EE-0178 Fuel Economy Estimates October 1998 1 CONTENTS PAGE Purpose of the Guide ..................................................... 1 Interior Volume ................................................................ 1 How the Fuel Economy Estimates are Obtained ........... 1 Factors Affecting MPG .................................................... 2 Fuel Economy and Climate Change ............................... 2 Gas Guzzler Tax ............................................................. 2 Vehicle Classes Used in This Guide. .............................. 2 Annuel Fuel Costs .......................................................... 3 How to Use the Guide .................................................... 4 Where to Re-order Guides

20

Alternative fuels and vehicles choice model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the theory and implementation of a model of alternative fuel and vehicle choice (AFVC), designed for use with the US Department of Energy`s Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). The AFTM is a static equilibrium model of the world supply and demand for liquid fuels, encompassing resource production, conversion processes, transportation, and consumption. The AFTM also includes fuel-switching behavior by incorporating multinomial logit-type equations for choice of alternative fuel vehicles and alternative fuels. This allows the model to solve for market shares of vehicles and fuels, as well as for fuel prices and quantities. The AFVC model includes fuel-flexible, bi-fuel, and dedicated fuel vehicles. For multi-fuel vehicles, the choice of fuel is subsumed within the vehicle choice framework, resulting in a nested multinomial logit design. The nesting is shown to be required by the different price elasticities of fuel and vehicle choice. A unique feature of the AFVC is that its parameters are derived directly from the characteristics of alternative fuels and vehicle technologies, together with a few key assumptions about consumer behavior. This not only establishes a direct link between assumptions and model predictions, but facilitates sensitivity testing, as well. The implementation of the AFVC model as a spreadsheet is also described.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Transportation Analysis

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Metallic Fuel: Modeling and Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Thermophyical Properties of Thoria and ThO2-UO2 Mixed Oxide Fuels ... Thorium-based nuclear fuel cycles are promising for their intrinsic ...

23

Methanol fuel cell model: Anode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An isothermal, steady-state model of an anode in a direct methanol feed, polymer electrolyte fuel cell is presented. The anode is considered to be a porous electrode consisting of an electronically conducting catalyst structure that is thinly coated with an ion-selective polymer electrolyte. The pores are filled with a feed solution of 2 M methanol in water. Four species are transported in the anode: water, methanol, hydrogen ions, and carbon dioxide. All four species are allowed to transport in the x-direction through the depth of the electrode. Species movement in the pseudo y-direction is taken into account for water, methanol, and carbon dioxide by use of an effective mass-transfer coefficient. Butler-Volmer kinetics are observed for the methanol oxidation reaction. Predictions of the model have been fitted with kinetic parameters from experimental data, and a sensitivity analysis was performed to identify critical parameters affecting the anode`s performance. Kinetic limitations are a dominant factor in the performance of the system. At higher currents, the polymer electrolyte`s conductivity and the anode`s thickness were also found to be important parameters to the prediction of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell anode`s behavior in the methanol oxidation region 0.5--0.6 V vs. a reversible hydrogen electrode.

Baxter, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Battaglia, V.S.; White, R.E. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Used Fuel Degradation: Experimental and Modeling Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The report describes the strategy for coupling process level models to produce an integrated Used Fuel Degradation Model (FDM), and addresses fractional degradation rate, instant release fractions, other continuum modeling approaches, and experimental support.

26

Interaction model of private equity and venture capital developing factors in Chile and Latin America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private equity and venture capital (PE/VC) are efficient resource allocation systems that provide equity capital to selected entrepreneurs, industries or firms that contribute to advance the economic welfare of society. ...

Sevil Esteban, Ángel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Liquid Fuels Market Model (LFMM) Unveiling LFMM  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Implementation of the Renewable Fuel Implementation of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in the Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) of NEMS Michael H. Cole, PhD, PE michael.cole@eia.gov August 1, 2012 | Washington, DC LFMM / NEMS overview 2 M. Cole, EIA Advanced Biofuels Workshop August 1, 2012 | Washington, DC * LFMM is a mathematical representation of the U.S. liquid fuels market (motor gasoline, diesel, biofuels, etc.). EIA analysts use LFMM to project motor fuel prices and production approaches through 2040. * LFMM is a cost-minimization linear program (LP). For a given set of fuel demands, LFMM will find the least-cost means of satisfying those demands, subject to various constraints (such as the RFS). * LFMM is part of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which is a computer model of the U.S. energy economy. EIA uses

28

Industrial fuel choice analysis model. Volume II. Appendices to model documentation  

SciTech Connect

Descriptions, documentation, and other information are included in these appendices dealing with industrial fuel choices: Energy Consumption Data Base; Major Fuel Burning Installation Survey; American Boiler Manufacturers Association Data File; Midrange Energy Forecasting System; Projection Method; Capacity Utilization Rates; Nonboiler Characteristics; Boiler Capital and O and M Cost Data; Nonboiler Capital and O and M Cost Data; Approach to Estimating Energy Impacts of the Coal Conversion Regulatory Program; Index or Acronyms.

1979-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

29

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: DOE H2A Production Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

filling-station) facilities. Required input to the models includes capital and operating costs for the hydrogen production process, fuel type and use, and financial parameters...

30

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that work together in unison. In order to support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; Gretchen Matthern; Steven Piet; David Shropshire; Tyler Schweitzer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection i...

Donald Greer Research; Donald Greer

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Modeling of solid oxide fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) model of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)s is developed to investigate the effect of various design and operating conditions on the cell performance and to examine the underlying ...

Lee, Won Yong, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fuel Conditioning Facility Electrorefiner Process Model  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory processes spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II using electro-metallurgical treatment. To process fuel without waiting for periodic sample analyses to assess process conditions, an electrorefiner process model predicts the composition of the electrorefiner inventory and effluent streams. For the chemical equilibrium portion of the model, the two common methods for solving chemical equilibrium problems, stoichiometric and non stoichiometric, were investigated. In conclusion, the stoichiometric method produced equilibrium compositions close to the measured results whereas the non stoichiometric method did not.

DeeEarl Vaden

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Equity Investment Provider Missouri Department of Economic Development Certified Capital Companies (CAPCO), the creation of the Department of Economic Development (DED,) are venture capital firms which have certain requirements to make equity investments in eligible businesses in Missouri. To qualify for CAPCO funding, businesses must be independently owned, headquartered in Missouri and employ less than 200 persons before the

35

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Transport Modeling Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

36

Computational Fuel Cell Research and SOFC Modeling at Penn State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Fuel Cell Research and SOFC Modeling at Penn State Chao-Yang Wang Professor of PEM Fuel Cells SOFC Modeling & Simulation Fuel Cell Controls Summary #12;ECEC Overview Vision: provide, DMFC, and SOFC #12;ECEC Facilities (>5,000 sq ft) Fuel Cell/Battery Experimental Labs Fuel Cell

37

Residential on site solar heating systems: a project evaluation using the capital asset pricing model  

SciTech Connect

An energy source ready for immediate use on a commercial scale is solar energy in the form of On Site Solar Heating (OSSH) systems. These systems collect solar energy with rooftop panels, store excess energy in water storage tanks and can, in certain circumstances, provide 100% of the space heating and hot water required by the occupants of the residential or commercial structure on which the system is located. Such systems would take advantage of a free and inexhaustible energy source--sunlight. The principal drawback of such systems is the high initial capital cost. The solution would normally be a carefully worked out corporate financing plan. However, at the moment it is individual homeowners and not corporations who are attempting to finance these systems. As a result, the terms of finance are excessively stringent and constitute the main obstacle to the large scale market penetration of OSSH. This study analyzes the feasibility of OSSH as a private utility investment. Such systems would be installed and owned by private utilities and would displace other investment projects, principally electric generating plants. The return on OSSH is calculated on the basis of the cost to the consumer of the equivalent amount of electrical energy that is displaced by the OSSH system. The hurdle rate for investment in OSSH is calculated using the Sharpe--Lintner Capital Asset Pricing Model. The results of this study indicate that OSSH is a low risk investment having an appropriate hurdle rate of 7.9%. At this rate, OSSH investment appears marginally acceptable in northern California and unambiguously acceptable in southern California. The results also suggest that utility investment in OSSH should lead to a higher degree of financial leverage for utility companies without a concurrent deterioration in the risk class of utility equity.

Schutz, S.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1995 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO95) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources--wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. The RFM also reads in hydroelectric facility capacities and capacity factors from a data file for use by the NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM). The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological, cost and resource size characteristics of renewable energy technologies. These characteristics are used to compute a levelized cost to be competed against other similarly derived costs from other energy sources and technologies. The competition of these energy sources over the NEMS time horizon determines the market penetration of these renewable energy technologies. The characteristics include available energy capacity, capital costs, fixed operating costs, variable operating costs, capacity factor, heat rate, construction lead time, and fuel product price.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells using hydrocarbon fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency conversion devices that use hydrogen or light hydrocarbon (HC) fuels in stationary applications to produce quiet and clean power. While successful, HC-fueled SOFCs face ...

Lee, Won Yong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Essays in capital markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays in capital markets. The first essay presents a dynamic asset pricing model with heterogeneously informed agents. Unlike previous research, the general case where differential information ...

Makarov, Igor, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Health Capital and Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coefficient on capital intensity is positive andby total assets Capital Intensity Capital stock scaled by0.858 ??? 4.804 ??? Capital Intensity Free Cash Flow

Holland, Sara Bryant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Rethinking hydrogen fueling insights from delivery modeling.  

SciTech Connect

Over the past century gasoline fueling has evolved from being performed by a variety of informal, diverse methods to being performed through the use of a standardized, highly automated system that exploits the fuel's benefits and mitigates its hazards. Any effort to transition to another fuel with different properties--with both advantages and disadvantages--must make similar adjustments. This paper discusses the existing gasoline refueling infrastructure and its evolution. It then describes the hydrogen delivery scenario analysis model, an Excel-based tool that calculates the levelized cost of delivering hydrogen from a central production facility to a vehicle by the use of currently available technologies and a typical profile of vehicle use and fueling demand. The results are shown for a status quo, or gasoline-centric case, in which demand reflects the current gasoline-based system and supply responds accordingly, and a hydrogen-centric case, in which some of those patterns are altered. The paper highlights fueling requirements that are particularly problematic for hydrogen and concludes with a discussion of alternative fueling paradigms.

Mintz, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Gardiner, M.; Energy Systems; U. S. DOE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Hydrogen Topics: Finance Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.hydrogen.energy.gov/fc_power_analysis.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Screenshot References: DOE Fuel Cell Power Analysis[1] Logo: Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model The Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model is a financial tool for analyzing high-temperature, fuel cell-based tri-generation systems. "The Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model is a financial tool for analyzing

44

Progress in Chemical Kinetic Modeling for Surrogate Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasoline, diesel, and other alternative transportation fuels contain hundreds to thousands of compounds. It is currently not possible to represent all these compounds in detailed chemical kinetic models. Instead, these fuels are represented by surrogate fuel models which contain a limited number of representative compounds. We have been extending the list of compounds for detailed chemical models that are available for use in fuel surrogate models. Detailed models for components with larger and more complicated fuel molecular structures are now available. These advancements are allowing a more accurate representation of practical and alternative fuels. We have developed detailed chemical kinetic models for fuels with higher molecular weight fuel molecules such as n-hexadecane (C16). Also, we can consider more complicated fuel molecular structures like cyclic alkanes and aromatics that are found in practical fuels. For alternative fuels, the capability to model large biodiesel fuels that have ester structures is becoming available. These newly addressed cyclic and ester structures in fuels profoundly affect the reaction rate of the fuel predicted by the model. Finally, these surrogate fuel models contain large numbers of species and reactions and must be reduced for use in multi-dimensional models for spark-ignition, HCCI and diesel engines.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

AN EVALUATION OF SELECT PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEM MODELS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EVALUATING PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEM MODELS EVALUATING PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEM MODELS Kristina Haraldsson, Keith Wipke National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 1617 Cole Boulevard, MS 1633 Golden, Colorado, 80401 ABSTRACT Many proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell models have been reported in publications, and some are available commercially. This paper helps users match their modeling needs with specific fuel cell models. The paper has three parts. First, it describes the model selection criteria for choosing a fuel cell model. Second, it applies these criteria to select state- of-the-art fuel cell models available in literature and commercially. The advantages and disadvantages of commercial models are discussed. Third, the paper illustrates the process of choosing a fuel cell model with an

46

Study on Real Options Model of Operating Capital Value of Generator for Spinning Reserve and Risk Assessment Based on Monte Carlo Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity market has complex market rules, and its operation with great uncertainty. In this paper, the real options model of operating capital value of generator for spinning reserve is constructed under uncertainty market conditions including uncertainty ...

Xin Ma

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Design optimization and analysis of coated particle fuel using advanced fuel performance modeling techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifying material properties provides another approach to optimize coated particle fuel used in pebble bed reactors. In this study, the MIT fuel performance model (TIMCOAT) was applied after benchmarking against the ...

Soontrapa, Chaiyod

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Capital Account Openness and Bankruptcies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a model where opening the capital account of an economy causes more bankruptcies to take place in the non tradables sector. Non tradable …rms must forecast the future state of the economy when investing since the demand for their goods depends on this. In our model the interest rate is a powerful signal that non tradable …rms use when the capital account is closed, but its informational content decreases once the capital account opens up and international (as well as domestic) shocks a¤ect it. Keywords: Capital Account Openness, Bankruptcies. 1

Luis Angeles; Luis Angeles

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modeling Deep Burn TRISO Particle Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. First principles calculations are being used to investigate the critical issue of fission product palladium attack on the SiC coating layer. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel. Kinetic Monte Carlo techniques are shedding light on transport of fission products, most notably silver, through the carbon and SiC coating layers. The diffusion of fission products through an alternative coating layer, ZrC, is being assessed via DFT methods. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Schuck, Paul C [ORNL; Rudin, Sven [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wills, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wirth, Brian D. [University of California, Berkeley; Kim, Sungtae [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost of capital Wind Deployment System model ii Executive Summary Energycosts, performance and fuel prices taken from EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), 20% wind

Blair, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Utility Fuel Inventory Model (UFIM) 5.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utility Fuel Inventory Model (UFIM) is the essential tool for performing fuel inventory analysis. Using the power of your personal computer, UFIM helps users develop money-saving inventory ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

Modeling Nuclear Fuels with a Combined Potts-Phase Field Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Science Challenges for Nuclear Applications. Presentation Title, Modeling Nuclear Fuels with a Combined Potts-Phase Field Model.

53

Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production and end use costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol from various feedstocks (switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees), biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL), coal (coal to liquid, or CTL), and coal with biomass (CBTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion ratio, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the structure and methodology of AltSim, presents results, and provides a detailed sensitivity analysis. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 sets a goal for the increased use of biofuels in the U.S., ultimately reaching 36 billion gallons by 2022. AltSim's base case assumes EPA projected feedstock costs in 2022 (EPA, 2009). For the base case assumptions, AltSim estimates per gallon production costs for the five ethanol feedstocks (corn, switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees) of $1.86, $2.32, $2.45, $1.52, and $1.91, respectively. The projected production cost of biodiesel is $1.81/gallon. The estimates for CTL without biomass range from $1.36 to $2.22. With biomass, the estimated costs increase, ranging from $2.19 per gallon for the CTL option with 8% biomass to $2.79 per gallon for the CTL option with 30% biomass and carbon capture and sequestration. AltSim compares the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) associated with both the production and consumption of the various fuels. EISA allows fuels emitting 20% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than conventional gasoline and diesels to qualify as renewable fuels. This allows several of the CBTL options to be included under the EISA mandate. The estimated GHG emissions associated with the production of gasoline and diesel are 19.80 and 18.40 kg of CO{sub 2} equivalent per MMBtu (kgCO{sub 2}e/MMBtu), respectively (NETL, 2008). The estimated emissions are significantly higher for several alternatives: ethanol from corn (70.6), GTL (51.9), and CTL without biomass or sequestration (123-161). Projected emissions for several other alternatives are lower; integrating biomass and sequestration in the CTL processes can even result in negative net emissions. For example, CTL with 30% biomass and 91.5% sequestration has estimated production emissions of -38 kgCO{sub 2}e/MMBtu. AltSim also estimates the projected well-to-wheel, or lifecycle, emissions from consuming each of the various fuels. Vehicles fueled with conventional diesel or gasoline and driven 12,500 miles per year emit 5.72-5.93 tons of CO{sub 2} equivalents per year (tCO{sub 2}e/yr). Those emissions are significantly higher for vehicles fueled with 100% ethanol from corn (8.03 tCO{sub 2}e/yr) or diesel from CTL without sequestration (10.86 to 12.85 tCO{sub 2}/yr). Emissions could be significantly lower for vehicles fueled with diesel from CBTL with various shares of biomass. For example, for CTL with 30% biomass and carbon sequestration, emissions would be 2.21 tCO{sub 2}e per year, or just 39% of the emissions for a vehicle fueled with conventional diesel. While the results presented above provide very specific estimates for each option, AltSim's true potential is as a tool for educating policy makers and for exploring 'what if?' type questions. For example, AltSim allows one to consider the affect of various levels of carbon taxes on the production cost estimates, as well as increased costs to the end user on an annual basis. Other sections of AltSim allow the user to understand the implications of various polices in terms of costs to the government or land use requirements. AltSim's structure allows the end user to explore each of these alternatives and understand the sensitivities implications a

Williams, Ryan; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

Model documentation, Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. For AEO98, the RFM was modified in three principal ways, introducing capital cost elasticities of supply for new renewable energy technologies, modifying biomass supply curves, and revising assumptions for use of landfill gas from municipal solid waste (MSW). In addition, the RFM was modified in general to accommodate projections beyond 2015 through 2020. Two supply elasticities were introduced, the first reflecting short-term (annual) cost increases from manufacturing, siting, and installation bottlenecks incurred under conditions of rapid growth, and the second reflecting longer term natural resource, transmission and distribution upgrade, and market limitations increasing costs as more and more of the overall resource is used. Biomass supply curves were also modified, basing forest products supplies on production rather than on inventory, and expanding energy crop estimates to include states west of the Mississippi River using information developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Finally, for MSW, several assumptions for the use of landfill gas were revised and extended.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

RAM Capital Management Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RAM Capital Management Group RAM Capital Management Group Jump to: navigation, search Name RAM Capital Management Group Place Boca Raton, Florida Zip 33486 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Private VC fund and investment banking advisory firm investing in fuel cells and hydrogen. References RAM Capital Management Group[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. RAM Capital Management Group is a company located in Boca Raton, Florida . References ↑ "RAM Capital Management Group" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=RAM_Capital_Management_Group&oldid=350184" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

57

Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont) Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont) Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Construction Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Loan Program Provider Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund The Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund's Flexible Capital Fund (the "Flex Fund") is designed for companies in Vermont's rural areas that are smaller and work on a less-than global scale, offering a return on investment that does not always meet venture capital levels. These rural companies may need a form of "equity" to fuel growth but need it in lesser amounts and perhaps at lower returns than traditional venture

58

A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

Leiby, P.N.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fuel Inventory Management for Electric Companies: Current Uses of the EPRI Utility Fuel Inventory Model (UFIM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes current applications of the Utility Fuel Inventory Model (UFIM) developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This model is designed to help electric companies to better manage policy and operational decisions related to managing power plant fuel inventories. This report specifically address: (i) problems currently faced by electric power companies where fuel inventories can be used to address the problems; and, (ii) how the UFIM analysis tool can be used to ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Dynamic Modeling in Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells Controller Design  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a dynamic model of the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power unit is developed for the purpose of designing a controller to regulate fuel flow rate, fuel temperature, air flow rate, and air temperature to maintain the SOFC stack temperature, fuel utilization rate, and voltage within operation limits. A lumped model is used to consider the thermal dynamics and the electro-chemial dynamics inside an SOFC power unit. The fluid dynamics at the fuel and air inlets are considered by using the in-flow ramp-rates.

Lu, Ning; Li, Qinghe; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Combustion Characterization and Modelling of Fuel Blends for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Value (405,990 DOE) COMBUSTION CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELLING OF FUEL BLENDS FOR POWER GENERATION GAS TURBINES University of Central Florida Presentation-Petersen, 1013...

62

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

against * steady state and transient operational cell data. Complete fuel cell water transport model improvements * and code package development to include two phase flow....

63

VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.transportation.anl.gov/modeling_simulation/VISION/ OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels References: The VISION Model [1] Estimate the potential energy use, oil use, and carbon emission impacts of advanced light and heavy-duty vehicle technologies and alternative fuels through 2050. The VISION model has been developed to provide estimates of the potential

64

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Model, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,Solid-Polymer- Electrolyte Fuel Cell, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Input--output capital coefficients for energy technologies. [Input-output model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Input-output capital coefficients are presented for five electric and seven non-electric energy technologies. They describe the durable goods and structures purchases (at a 110 sector level of detail) that are necessary to expand productive capacity in each of twelve energy source sectors. Coefficients are defined in terms of 1967 dollar purchases per 10/sup 6/ Btu of output from new capacity, and original data sources include Battelle Memorial Institute, the Harvard Economic Research Project, The Mitre Corp., and Bechtel Corp. The twelve energy sectors are coal, crude oil and gas, shale oil, methane from coal, solvent refined coal, refined oil products, pipeline gas, coal combined-cycle electric, fossil electric, LWR electric, HTGR electric, and hydroelectric.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Capital costs have major impact on projected power sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas-fired power plants dominate the 2011 Annual ... AEO2011 also includes several alternative cases with lower assumed capital costs of nuclear, fossil fuel ...

67

CAPITAL STRUCTURE, LIQUIDITY AND TRANSFERABLE HUMAN CAPITAL IN COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes how human capital and economic uncertainty affect capital structure and managerial compensation. We model a competitive industry where wealth constrained managers provide human capital that can be transferred across firms, and where equityholders give managers access to the physical assets of the firm. Equityholders and managers bargain for the firm’s stochastic free cash flows. We show that the level of net debt acts as a tool to attract and retain human capital. Negative net debt occurs in volatile and human capital intensive industries. Cash holdings (or unused lines of credit) in booms serve as a costly hedge against liquidity shocks in recession. The cost of holding cash is internalized by managers, unlike the cost associated with raising cash in recession through a dilutive equity issue. We obtain simple expressions for the equilibrium payout rate and the managerial compensation rate and we show how, in recessions, they are influenced by each party’s outside option.

Bart M. Lambrecht; Grzegorz Pawlina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Variable fuel tax models. [Revenue generated via 4 models for Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Four variable fuel tax models are investigated with respect to Alabama Highway Department operations. The Fixed Percentage Fuel Tax Model establishes the state gasoline tax as a constant percentage of the wholesale price of gasoline. The Price Index Economic Model pegs state fuel taxes to a ratio of price indexes. The Fuel Efficiency Tax Model relates the gasoline tax to the variables of Consumer Price Index and vehicle efficiency. The Sales Tax Model establishes a sales tax on the purchase of gasoline and motor fuel sold in the state. Estimates of the amount of revenue expected to be generated by each model are made. Advantages and disadvantages of each model are presented.

Vecellio, R.L.; Moore, R.K.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Mechanical modeling of porous oxide fuel pellet A Test Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A poro-elasto-plastic material model has been developed to capture the response of oxide fuels inside the nuclear reactors under operating conditions. Behavior of the oxide fuel and variation in void volume fraction under mechanical loading as predicted by the developed model has been reported in this article. The significant effect of void volume fraction on the overall stress distribution of the fuel pellet has also been described. An important oxide fuel issue that can have significant impact on the fuel performance is the mechanical response of oxide fuel pellet and clad system. Specifically, modeling the thermo-mechanical response of the fuel pellet in terms of its thermal expansion, mechanical deformation, swelling due to void formation and evolution, and the eventual contact of the fuel with the clad is of significant interest in understanding the fuel-clad mechanical interaction (FCMI). These phenomena are nonlinear and coupled since reduction in the fuel-clad gap affects thermal conductivity of the gap, which in turn affects temperature distribution within the fuel and the material properties of the fuel. Consequently, in order to accurately capture fuel-clad gap closure, we need to account for fuel swelling due to generation, retention, and evolution of fission gas in addition to the usual thermal expansion and mechanical deformation. Both fuel chemistry and microstructure also have a significant effect on the nucleation and growth of fission gas bubbles. Fuel-clad gap closure leading to eventual contact of the fuel with the clad introduces significant stresses in the clad, which makes thermo-mechanical response of the clad even more relevant. The overall aim of this test problem is to incorporate the above features in order to accurately capture fuel-clad mechanical interaction. Because of the complex nature of the problem, a series of test problems with increasing multi-physics coupling features, modeling accuracy, and complexity are defined with the objective of accurate simulation of fuel-clad mechanical interaction subjected to a wide-range of thermomechanical stimuli.

Nukala, Phani K [ORNL; Barai, Pallab [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Used for Off-Road Recreation: Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model Stacy C. Davis Lorena F. Truett Patricia S. Hu ORNL/TM-1999/100 Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model Stacy C. Davis Lorena F. Truett Patricia S. Hu July 1999 Prepared for the Office of Highway Information Management Federal Highway Administration U.S. Department of Transportation Washington, DC 20590 Prepared by the Statistics and Data Analysis Program Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6073 managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-96OR22464 Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model - iii - TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

72

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fuel Cell Systems Sensors Air Management Benchmarking Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Systems F u e l P r o c e s s o r Sensors Air Management Benchmarking Modeling Patrick Davis Patrick Davis Targets and Status 50 kWe (net) Integrated Fuel Cell Power System 5000 2000 1000 Hours Durability 45 125 275 $/kW Cost (including H2 storage) 650 500 400 W/L Power density (w/o H2 stor) Operating on direct hydrogen 5000 2000 1000 Hours Durability 45 125 325 $/kW Cost 325 250 140 W/L Power density Operating on Tier 2 gasoline containing 30 ppm sulfur, average 2010 2005 2003 status Units Characteristics Projects Fuel Cell Power Systems Analysis ANL NREL TIAX Directed Technologies, Inc. TIAX TIAX * Fuel Cell Systems Analysis * Fuel Cell Vehicle Systems Analysis * Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/ Systems * DFMA Cost Estimates of Fuel Cell/ Reformer Systems at Low, Medium, & High Production Rates * Assessment of Fuel Cell Auxiliary

74

Liquid Fuels Market Model of the National Energy Modeling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The outside battery-limit (OSBL) costs include the cost of cooling water, steam and electric power generation and distribution, fuel oil and fuel gas ...

75

Fossil Fuel Emission Verification Modeling at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

We have an established project at LLNL to develop the tools needed to constrain fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions using measurements of the carbon-14 isotope in atmospheric samples. In Figure 1 we show the fossil fuel plumes from Los Angeles and San Francisco for two different weather patterns. Obviously, a measurement made at any given location is going to depend on the weather leading up to the measurement. Thus, in order to determine the GHG emissions from some region using in situ measurements of those GHGs, we use state-of-the-art global and regional atmospheric chemistry-transport codes to simulate the plumes: the LLNL-IMPACT model (Rotman et al., 2004) and the WRFCHEM community code (http://www.wrf-model.org/index.php). Both codes can use observed (aka assimilated) meteorology in order to recreate the actual transport that occurred. The measured concentration of each tracer at a particular spatio-temporal location is a linear combination of the plumes from each region at that location (for non-reactive species). The challenge is to calculate the emission strengths for each region that fit the observed concentrations. In general this is difficult because there are errors in the measurements and modeling of the plumes. We solve this inversion problem using the strategy illustrated in Figure 2. The Bayesian Inference step combines the a priori estimates of the emissions, and their uncertainty, for each region with the results of the observations, and their uncertainty, and an ensemble of model predicted plumes for each region, and their uncertainty. The result is the mathematical best estimate of the emissions and their errors. In the case of non-linearities, or if we are using a statistical sampling technique such as a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, then the process is iterated until it converges (ie reaches stationarity). For the Bayesian inference we can use both a direct inversion capability, which is fast but requires assumptions of linearity and Gaussianity of errors, or one of several statistical sampling techniques, which are computationally slower but do not require either linearity or Gaussianity (Chow, et al., 2008; Delle Monache, et al., 2008). The emission regions we are using are based on the air-basins defined by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), see Figure 3. The only difference is that we have joined some of the smaller air basins together. The results of a test using 4 days of simulated observations using our ensemble retrieval system are shown in Figure 3 (right). The main source of the variation between the different model configurations arises from the uncertainty in the atmospheric boundary layer parameterization in the WRF model. We are currently developing a capability to constrain the boundary layer height in our carbon-14 work either by weighting the ensemble member results by the accuracy of their boundary layer height (using commercial aircraft observations), or as part of the retrieval process using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) capability.

Cameron-Smith, P; Kosovic, B; Guilderson, T; Monache, L D; Bergmann, D

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

Anand, Krishnasamy [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ra, youngchul [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Proceedings of the NETL Workshop on Fuel Cell Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This workshop was the first U.S. DOE sponsored meeting devoted to fuel cell modeling. The workshop was attended by over 45 people from industry, universities, and the government. The goals of the meeting were to assess the status of fuel cell modeling, and determine how new developments in fuel cell modeling can improve cell design, stack design, and power system design. The primary focus was on cell and stack modeling. Following a review of DOE/NETL fuel cell related programs and activities, Professor Robert Selman (Illinois Institute of Technology) kicked off the technical portion of the workshop by presenting an overview of fuel cell phenomena and the status of fuel cell modeling. This overview provided the necessary background for establishing a common framework for discussing fuel cell modeling. A distinction was made between micro modeling, electrode modeling, cell modeling, stack modeling, and system modeling. It was proposed that all modeling levels be supported for further development. In addition, due to significant advances being made outside the U.S., it was proposed that dialog/exchange with other international researchers be established. Following the Overview Session, eight leading researchers in modeling gave individual presentations. These presentations provided additional information on the status and present direction of model developments. All these presentations can be found in Attachment A. Before the workshop, a survey was sent out requesting comments from the attendees. Results from this survey can be found in Attachment B. This survey was then used as initial talking points at the individual breakout sessions on the afternoon of the workshop. Breakouts were organized by microfundamental modeling, cell modeling, stack modeling, and systems modeling.

Randall S. Gemmen; J. R. Selman

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Clean Cities: Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) Coalition Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) Coalition The Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition Contact Information Jennifer Ceponis 518-458-2161 jceponis@cdtcmpo.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Jennifer Ceponis Photo of Jennifer Ceponis Jennifer Ceponis has been the coordinator of Capital District Clean Communities Coalition since 2012. Ceponis is a Senior Transportation Planner at the Capital District Transportation Committee (CDTC), where she worked since 2008 on bicycle and pedestrian planning, transportation demand management programs and community planning. The Clean Communities Coalition

79

Modeling and Validation of a Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and construction of a fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle based on the conversion of a five passenger production sedan. The vehicle uses a relatively small fuel cell stack to provide average power demands, and a battery pack to provide peak power demands for varied driving conditions. A model of this vehicle was developed using ADVISOR, an A__dvanced Vehicle Simulator that tracks energy flow and fuel usage within the vehicle drivetrain and energy conversion components.

Michael J. Ogburn; Douglas J. Nelson; Keith Wipke; Tony Markel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

CAPITAL REGION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. September 18, 2007 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-07-23 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A07TG036) SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2007" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results o Four evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in May 2007, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2007. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. . INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Commission reports that it is constantly improving thl stability, reliability, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 2. Brown, S. ,Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model Clark, N. N. andModal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 4.6. E XHAUST A

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Materials Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Fuels (MMSNF) Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial photo of Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory University of Chicago Chicago Photography courtesy Thomas F Ewing Privacy and Security Notice The MMSNF Workshops The goal of the Materials Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Fuels (MMSNF) workshops is to stimulate research and discussions on modeling and simulations of nuclear fuels, to assist the design of improved fuels and the evaluation of fuel performance. In addition to research focused on existing or improved types of LWR reactors, recent modeling programs, networks, and links have been created to develop innovative nuclear fuels and materials for future generations of nuclear reactors. Examples can be found in Europe (e.g. F-BRIDGE project and ACTINET network and SAMANTHA cooperative network), in the USA (e.g. CASL, NEAMS, CESAR and CMSN network

83

PYRO, a system for modeling fuel reprocessing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compact, on-site fuel reprocessing and waste management for the Integral Fast Reactor are based on the pyrochemical reprocessing of metal fuel. In that process, uranium and plutonium in spent fuel are separated from fission products in an electrorefiner using liquid cadmium and molten salt solvents. Quantitative estimates of the distribution of the chemical elements among the metal and salt phases are essential for development of both individual pyrochemical process steps and the complete process. This paper describes the PYRO system of programs used to generate reliable mass flows and compositions.

Ackerman, J.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Thermal Model to Evaluate Sub-Freezing Startup for a Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicle Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Stack and System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, I. Mechanistic ModelI V Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, II. Empirical Modelexchange membrane fuel cells," Journal of Power Sources,

Sundaresan, Meena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Thermal Model to Evaluate Sub-Freezing Startup for a Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicle Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Stack and System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IV Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, I. Mechanistic ModelIV Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, II. Empirical Modelexchange membrane fuel cells," Journal of Power Sources,

Sundaresan, Meena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit Program (Manitoba, Canada) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Venture Capital Tax Credit Program (Manitoba, Venture Capital Tax Credit Program (Manitoba, Canada) Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit Program (Manitoba, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Solar Wind Program Info State Manitoba Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Personal Tax Incentives Provider Manitoba Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade The Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit Program (SBVCTC) assists eligible small corporations to issue new equity to primarily new investors.

87

Fuel cycle assessment: A compendium of models, methodologies, and approaches  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to profile analytical tools and methods which could be used in a total fuel cycle analysis. The information in this document provides a significant step towards: (1) Characterizing the stages of the fuel cycle. (2) Identifying relevant impacts which can feasibly be evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively. (3) Identifying and reviewing other activities that have been conducted to perform a fuel cycle assessment or some component thereof. (4) Reviewing the successes/deficiencies and opportunities/constraints of previous activities. (5) Identifying methods and modeling techniques/tools that are available, tested and could be used for a fuel cycle assessment.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Lumped-parameter fuel rod model for rapid thermal transients  

SciTech Connect

The thermal behavior of fuel rods during simulated accident conditions is extremely sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient which is, in turn, very sensitive to the cladding surface temperature and the fluid conditions. The development of a semianalytical, lumped-parameter fuel rod model which is intended to provide accurate calculations, in a minimum amount of computer time, of the thermal response of fuel rods during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident is described. The results show good agreement with calculations from a comprehensive fuel-rod code (FRAP-T) currently in use at Aerojet Nuclear Company. (auth)

Perkins, K.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Modeling of polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Propulsion systems based on the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) are being developed. This paper reports an analysis undertaken to design improved PEFC systems. A reference system design with some variants were set up for a methanol-fueled PEFC propulsion system. Efficiency improves from 38.4 to 44.1% as cell current density goes from 0.75 to 0.45 A/cm{sup 2}, while fuel cell efficiency increases from 52.6 to 60.0%; to get a net power output of 80 kWe, the active fuel cell area must increase from 18.8 to 27.3 m{sup 2}. Three parametric studies were conducted on the off-design performance of the reference system.

Kumar, R.; Ahluwalia, R.; Geyer, H.K.; Krumpelt, M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Kinetic Modeling of Combustion Characteristics of Real Biodiesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel fuels are of much interest today either for replacing or blending with conventional fuels for automotive applications. Predicting engine effects of using biodiesel fuel requires accurate understanding of the combustion characteristics of the fuel, which can be acquired through analysis using reliable detailed reaction mechanisms. Unlike gasoline or diesel that consists of hundreds of chemical compounds, biodiesel fuels contain only a limited number of compounds. Over 90% of the biodiesel fraction is composed of 5 unique long-chain C{sub 18} and C{sub 16} saturated and unsaturated methyl esters. This makes modeling of real biodiesel fuel possible without the need for a fuel surrogate. To this end, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed for determining the combustion characteristics of a pure biodiesel (B100) fuel, applicable from low- to high-temperature oxidation regimes. This model has been built based on reaction rate rules established in previous studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Computed results are compared with the few fundamental experimental data that exist for biodiesel fuel and its components. In addition, computed results have been compared with experimental data for other long-chain hydrocarbons that are similar in structure to the biodiesel components.

Naik, C V; Westbrook, C K

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants and fluid transmission systems. [GEOCOST  

SciTech Connect

The GEOCOST computer program is a simulation model for evaluating the economics of developing geothermal resources. The model was found to be both an accurate predictor of geothermal power production facility costs and a valid designer of such facilities. GEOCOST first designs a facility using thermodynamic optimization routines and then estimates costs for the selected design using cost models. Costs generated in this manner appear to correspond closely with detailed cost estimates made by industry planning groups. Through the use of this model, geothermal power production costs can be rapidly and accurately estimated for many alternative sites making the evaluation process much simpler yet more meaningful.

Schulte, S.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effects of Historical Urbanization in the Brussels Capital Region on Surface Air Temperature Time Series: A Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the local impact of change in impervious surfaces in the Brussels capital region (BCR), Belgium, on trends in maximum, minimum, and mean temperatures between 1960 and 1999. Specifically, data are combined from remote sensing ...

R. Hamdi; A. Deckmyn; P. Termonia; G. R. Demarée; P. Baguis; S. Vanhuysse; E. Wolff

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Networks, Information & Social Capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates how information flows enable social networks to constitute social capital. By analyzing

Aral, Sinan

2008-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Not Available

1994-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

95

Vermont Seed Capital Fund (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seed Capital Fund (Vermont) Seed Capital Fund (Vermont) Vermont Seed Capital Fund (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Vermont Department of Taxes The Vermont Seed Capital Fund increases the amount of investment capital available to new Vermont firms or to existing Vermont firms for the purpose of expansion. The first $5 million of capitalization contributed by taxpayers on or before January 1, 2014. Lesser of 4% of contribution or 50% of tax liability prior to allowance of this credit. There is a four year

96

Modeling PWR Fuel Corrosion Product Deposition and Growth Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes further developments to the crud chemistry model developed in 2003. This model calculates the thermal and chemical conditions within fuel crud deposits. The model was developed to understand fuel crud scrape observations and help alleviate AOA in plants suffering this problem. The model predicts the main form of boron in thick crud (30µm) is precipitated LiBO2. This precipitates because Li and boric acid concentrate in the bottom of the deposit due to evaporation. The rise in temper...

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHP and CHHP Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the fuel cell power model for CHP and CHHP economics and performance analysis.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL MANUFACTURING COST MODEL: SIMULATING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE, MANUFACTURING, AND COST OF PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful commercialization of fuel cells will depend on the achievement of competitive system costs and efficiencies. System cost directly impacts the capital equipment component of cost of electricity (COE) and is a major contributor to the O and M component. The replacement costs for equipment (also heavily influenced by stack life) is generally a major contributor to O and M costs. In this project, they worked with the SECA industrial teams to estimate the impact of general manufacturing issues of interest on stack cost using an activities-based cost model for anode-supported planar SOFC stacks with metallic interconnects. An earlier model developed for NETL for anode supported planar SOFCs was enhanced by a linkage to a performance/thermal/mechanical model, by addition of Quality Control steps to the process flow with specific characterization methods, and by assessment of economies of scale. The 3-dimensional adiabatic performance model was used to calculate the average power density for the assumed geometry and operating conditions (i.e., inlet and exhaust temperatures, utilization, and fuel composition) based on publicly available polarizations curves. The SECA team provided guidance on what manufacturing and design issues should be assessed in this Phase I demonstration of cost modeling capabilities. They considered the impact of the following parameters on yield and cost: layer thickness (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) on cost and stress levels, statistical nature of ceramic material failure on yield, and Quality Control steps and strategies. In this demonstration of the capabilities of the linked model, only the active stack (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) and interconnect materials were included in the analysis. Factory costs are presented on an area and kilowatt basis to allow developers to extrapolate to their level of performance, stack design, materials, seal and system configurations, and internal corporate overheads and margin goals.

Eric J. Carlson; Yong Yang; Chandler Fulton

2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The FIT Model - Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All mass streams from fuel separation and fabrication are products that must meet some set of product criteria – fuel feedstock impurity limits, waste acceptance criteria (WAC), material storage (if any), or recycle material purity requirements such as zirconium for cladding or lanthanides for industrial use. These must be considered in a systematic and comprehensive way. The FIT model and the “system losses study” team that developed it [Shropshire2009, Piet2010] are an initial step by the FCR&D program toward a global analysis that accounts for the requirements and capabilities of each component, as well as major material flows within an integrated fuel cycle. This will help the program identify near-term R&D needs and set longer-term goals. The question originally posed to the “system losses study” was the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, waste management, etc. versus the separation efficiency. In other words, are the costs associated with marginal reductions in separations losses (or improvements in product recovery) justified by the gains in the performance of other systems? We have learned that that is the wrong question. The right question is: how does one adjust the compositions and quantities of all mass streams, given uncertain product criteria, to balance competing objectives including cost? FIT is a method to analyze different fuel cycles using common bases to determine how chemical performance changes in one part of a fuel cycle (say used fuel cooling times or separation efficiencies) affect other parts of the fuel cycle. FIT estimates impurities in fuel and waste via a rough estimate of physics and mass balance for a set of technologies. If feasibility is an issue for a set, as it is for “minimum fuel treatment” approaches such as melt refining and AIROX, it can help to make an estimate of how performances would have to change to achieve feasibility.

Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Meliisa C Teague; Gregory M Teske; Kurt G Vedros

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Documentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model for predicting choice of alternative fuel and among alternative vehicle technologies for light-duty motor vehicles is derived. The nested multinomial logit (NML) mathematical framework is used. Calibration of the model is based on information in the existing literature and deduction based on assuming a small number of key parameters, such as the value of time and discount rates. A spreadsheet model has been developed for calibration and preliminary testing of the model.

Greene, D.L.

2001-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

103

Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

Lee, S.Y.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

105

Kinetic Modeling of Toluene Oxidation for Surrogate Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect

New environmental issues, like the effect of combustion-generated greenhouse gases, provide motivation to better characterize oxidation of hydrocarbons. Transportation, in particular, significantly contributes to energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Kinetic studies about the combustion of fuels under conditions typical of internal combustion engines provides important support to improve mechanism formulation and to eventually provide better computational tools that can be used to increase the engine performance. It is foreseeable that at least in the next 30 years the main transportation fuels will be either gasoline or diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are very complex mixtures of many components. Moreover, their specifications and performance requirements significantly change the composition of these fuels: gasoline and diesel mixtures are different if coming from different refineries or they are different from winter to summer. At the same time a fuel with a well defined and reproducible composition is needed for both experimental and modeling work. In response to these issues, surrogate fuels are proposed. Surrogate fuels are defined as mixtures of a small number of hydrocarbons whose relative concentrations is adjusted in order to approximate the chemical and physical properties of a real fuel. Surrogate fuels are then very useful both for the design of reproducible experimental tests and also for the development of reliable kinetic models. The primary reference fuels (PRF) are a typical and old example of surrogate fuel: n-heptane and iso-octane mixtures are used to reproduce antiknock propensity of complex mixtures contained in a gasoline. PRFs are not able to surrogate gasoline in operating conditions different from standard ones and new surrogates have been recently proposed. Toluene is included in all of them as a species able to represent the behavior of aromatic compounds. On the other side, the toluene oxidation chemistry is not so well established and uncertainties still remain in the mechanism. This is especially true in the low temperature regime (< 850K). In these conditions, the toluene reactivity is too low to be conveniently investigated. Nonetheless, gasoline surrogates work in the engine at low temperatures, because of the presence of very reactive alkanes. The effect of these component interactions have to be taken into account. This work's aim is to present the model activity carried out by two different research groups, comparing the main pathways and results, matching data carried out in different devices both for pure toluene and mixtures. This is the starting point for a further activity to improve the two kinetic schemes.

Frassoldati, A; Mehl, M; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Modeling the Effect of Fuel Ethanol Concentration on Cylinder Pressure Evolution in Direct-Injection Flex-Fuel Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the compression stroke. The residues calculated from the proposed model were validated with those generated from to detect the fuel ethanol concentration by placing them in the tank or in the fuel line. However by means of the closed-loop air/fuel ratio correction signal based on the Exhaust Gas Oxygen (EGO) sensor

Stefanopoulou, Anna

107

RM Capital Investment Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Investment Plans FY 2004 (568kb pdf) FY 2005 (625kb pdf) FY 2006 (625kb pdf) FY 2007 (1.45mb pdf) Meter policy Capital Investment Plans...

108

Modeling Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Design and Analysis Moe A Khaleel BJ Koeppel, W Liu, K Lai, KP Recknagle, EM Ryan, EV Stephens, X Sun Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 11 th Annual SECA Workshop Pittsburgh, PA July 27-29, 2009 1 PNNL SOFC Modeling Tools SOFC-MP Stack level model for fast analysis of co/counter-flow SOFC stack performance Detailed electrochemistry model Cell level model for the investigation of secondary reactions (degradation/contamination) mechanisms within the tri-layer Component-based design and performance modeling Contact material Interconnect Glass seal 2 SOFC-MP Stack Simulation Code Recent Accomplishments Major memory improvements of 3D model to accommodate 50-cell stacks on LINUX platform. Previously, developed a 2D (or stacked

109

Renewable Fuels Module, Appendix - Model Performance, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This appendix discusses performance aspects of the Renewable Fuels Module (RFM). It is intended to present the pattern of response of the RFM to typical changes in its major inputs from other NEMS modules.

Perry M. Lindstrom

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Application of alternating current impedance to fuel cell modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AC impedance has provided a useful diagnostic tool in the Los Alamos polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) program. The author reviews the techniques he has used in ac impedance modeling. These techniques include equation implementation, model simplification and verification, least squares fitting, application of two-dimensional Laplace equation solvers handling complex interfacial boundary conditions, and interpretation of impedance features. The separate features of the complete electrode model are explained by analytic examples.

Springer, T.E.

1999-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

111

2008 Model Fuel Cell Car Competition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Car Competition Regional Structure Design Competition Structure Judges will grade one car from each school. Each judge can give up to 35 points per car as follows:...

112

Job Maintenance and Capital Development Fund (North Carolina) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance and Capital Development Fund (North Carolina) Maintenance and Capital Development Fund (North Carolina) Job Maintenance and Capital Development Fund (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Grant Program Provider Department of Commerce The Job Maintenance and Capital Development Fund provides annual grants to businesses which are located in Development Tier I counties. The Fund is intended to encourage the retention of significant numbers of high-paying, high-quality job and large-scale capital investments. Grants may be made for a term of up to ten years. The business must have at least 2000 employees and invest $200 million in capital improvements

113

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The purpose of this law is to create jobs and to stimulate business and economic growth in the state by providing an income tax capital credit for approved projects. The Income Tax Capital Credit is a credit of five percent (5%) of the capital costs of a qualifying project offered by the Alabama Department of Revenue. The credits is applied to the Alabama income tax liability or financial institution excise tax generated by the project income, each year for 20 years. This credit cannot be carried forward or

114

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $1 million (Canadian) Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Grant Program Rebate Program Provider Nova Scotia Department of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism The Capital Investment Incentive (CII) is part of the Productivity Investment Program as outlined in the economic growth plan for Nova Scotia,

115

Pennsylvania Capital Access Program (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Capital Access Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Capital Access Program (Pennsylvania) Pennsylvania Capital Access Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Funding Source Pennsylvania Economic Development Financing Authority (PEDFA) State Pennsylvania Program Type

116

Capital Access Program (CAP) (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAP) (Michigan) CAP) (Michigan) Capital Access Program (CAP) (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Michigan Program Type Loan Program The Capital Access Program (CAP), utilizes public resources to generate private financing for small business in Michigan seeking access to capital.

117

Model Year 2013: Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

13: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 13: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 1 (Updated 3/6/13) 1 Source: http:/afdc.energy.gov/vehicles/search/light/ Fuel/Powertrain Type Make Model Vehicle Type Engine Size/Cylinders Transmission Emissions Class 2 Fuel Economy Gasoline 3,4 City/Hwy Fuel Economy Alt Fuel 3,4 City/Hwy HEV Acura ILX Sedan 1.5L I4 ECVT Tier 2 Bin 3 LEVII PZEV 39 / 38 N/A FFV E85 Audi A4 Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi A5 Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi A5 Cabriolet Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi Allroad Quatro Wagon 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 27 14 / 18 FFV E85 Audi Q5 SUV 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 28 14 / 19 HEV Audi Q5 Hybrid SUV 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 24 / 30 N/A FFV E85 Bentley

118

Analytic Loss Distributional Approach Model for Operational Risk from the alpha-Stable Doubly Stochastic Compound Processes and Implications for Capital Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under the Basel II standards, the Operational Risk (OpRisk) advanced measurement approach is not prescriptive regarding the class of statistical model utilised to undertake capital estimation. It has however become well accepted to utlise a Loss Distributional Approach (LDA) paradigm to model the individual OpRisk loss process corresponding to the Basel II Business line/event type. In this paper we derive a novel class of doubly stochastic alpha-stable family LDA models. These models provide the ability to capture the heavy tailed loss process typical of OpRisk whilst also providing analytic expressions for the compound process annual loss density and distributions as well as the aggregated compound process annual loss models. In particular we develop models of the annual loss process in two scenarios. The first scenario considers the loss process with a stochastic intensity parameter, resulting in an inhomogeneous compound Poisson processes annually. The resulting arrival process of losses under such a model...

Peters, Gareth W; Young, Mark; Yip, Wendy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Capital E | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

E E Jump to: navigation, search Name Capital E Place Washington, Washington, DC Zip DC 20003 Sector Services, Solar Product Capital E is a consulting firm which provides services such as technology evaluation and strategic marketing support for mainly fuel cell and solar power industries. Coordinates 38.89037°, -77.031959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.89037,"lon":-77.031959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Handbook of SiC Properties for Fuel Performance Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The SiC layer integrity in the TRISO-coated gas-reactor fuel particle is critical to the performance, allowed burn-up, and hence intrinsic efficiency of high temperature gas cooled reactors. While there has been significant developmental work on manufacturing the fuel particles, detailed understanding of what effects the complex in-service stress state combined with realistic materials property data under irradiation has on fuel particle survival is not adequately understood. This fact particularly frustrates the modeling efforts that seek to improve fuel performance through basic understanding. In this work the properties of SiC in the non-irradiated and irradiated condition are reviewed and analyzed in terms of applicability to TRISO fuel modeling. In addition to a review of literature data, new data has been generated to fill-in holes in the existing database, specifically in the high-temperature irradiation regime. Another critical piece of information, the strength of the SiC/Pyrolytic carbon interface, is measured and a formalism for its analysis presented. Finally, recommended empirical treatments of the data are suggested.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Nozawa, Takashi [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Kondo, Sosuke [ORNL; Petti, David [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling PWR Fuel Corrosion Product Deposition and Growth Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) drove industry to conduct crud scrape campaigns at a number of units to characterize and better understand the material being deposited on the fuel clad surface. This report describes the first phase of a program to develop models that describe the crud deposition and growth process, including the many phenomena that influence not only the deposit mass, but the composition. The models will be benchmarked against published crud...

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Working Group Transport Modeling Working Group The Transport Modeling Working Group meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, share experimental and computational results, and collaboratively develop methodologies for and understanding of transport phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. Its members include principle investigators and supporting personnel from transport-related projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Learn more about DOE research activities can be found in the Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Fuel cell operation relies on effective mass transport of species through individual components and across the interfaces between components. Among these species are hydrogen, oxygen, water, protons, and electrons. Transport behavior is a function of operating conditions and component properties such as microstructure and surface properties. Understanding and optimizing the controlling transport phenomena are critical to the efficient and cost-effective operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A better understanding of mass transport in the fuel cell, especially of water, has the potential to lead to improved designs and more efficient systems.

123

Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

06: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 06: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Fuel Type EPAct Compliant? Model Vehicle Type Emission Class Powertrain Fuel Capacity Range American Honda Motor Corporation 888-CCHONDA www.honda.com CNG Dedicated EPAct Yes Civic GX Compact Sedan SULEV Tier 2 Bin II 1.7L, 4-cylinder 8 GGE 200 mi HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Accord Hybrid Sedan ULEV 3.0L V6 144 volt NiMH + 17.1 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Civic Hybrid Sedan CA ULEV 1.3L, 4-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 13.2 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Insight Two-seater SULEV (CVT model) ULEV (MT model) 1.0L, 3-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 10.6 Gal Gasoline 636 mi DaimlerChrysler 800-999-FLEET www.fleet.chrysler.com E85 FFV EPAct Yes Dodge Ram Pickup 1500 Series 1 Pickup Tier 2 Bin 10A 4.7L V8 26 Gal 416 mi E85 FFV

124

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) spent fuel transportation and handling facility models  

SciTech Connect

A spent fuel logistics study was conducted in support of the US DOE program to develop facilities for preparing spent unreprocessed fuel from commercial LWRs for geological storage. Two computerized logistics models were developed. The first one was the site evaluation model. Two studies of spent fuel handling facility and spent fuel disposal facility siting were completed; the first postulates a single spent fuel handling facility located at any of six DOE laboratory sites, while the second study examined siting strategies with the spent fuel repository relative to the spent fuel handling facility. A second model to conduct storage/handling facility simulations was developed. (DLC)

Andrews, W.B.; Bower, J.C.; Burnett, R.A.; Engel, R.L.; Rolland, C.W.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modeling and cold start in alcohol-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Neat alcohol fuels offer several benefits over conventional gasoline in automotive applications. However, their low vapor pressure and high heat of vaporization make it difficult to produce a flammable vapor composition from a neat alcohol fuel during a start under cold ambient conditions. Various methods have been introduced to compensate for this deficiency. In this study, the authors applied computer modeling and simulation to evaluate the potential of four cold-start technologies for engines fueled by near-neat alcohol. The four technologies were a rich combustor device, a partial oxidation reactor, a catalytic reformer, and an enhanced ignition system. The authors ranked the competing technologies by their ability to meet two primary criteria for cold starting an engine at {minus}25 deg C and also by several secondary parameters related to commercialization. Their analysis results suggest that of the four technologies evaluated, the enhanced ignition system is the best option for further development.

Markel, A.J.; Bailey, B.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

MODELING AND DESIGN FOR A DIRECT CARBON FUEL CELL WITH ENTRAINED FUEL AND OXIDIZER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The novel molten carbonate fuel cell design described in this report uses porous bed electrodes. Molten carbonate, with carbon fuel particles and oxidizer entrained, is circulated through the electrodes. Carbon may be reacted directly, without gasification, in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The cathode reaction is 2CO{sub 2} + O{sub 2} 4e{sup -} {yields} 2CO{sub 3}{sup =}, while the anode reaction can be either C + 2CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO{sub 2} + 4e{sup -} or 2C + CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO + 2e{sup -}. The direct carbon fuel cell has an advantage over fuel cells using coal-derived synthesis gas in that it provides better overall efficiency and reduces equipment requirements. Also, the liquid electrolyte provides a means for transporting the solid carbon. The porous bed cell makes use of this carbon transport ability of the molten salt electrolyte. A one-dimensional model has been developed for predicting the performance of this cell. For the cathode, dependent variables are superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the gas phase, superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the liquid phase, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The variables are related by correlations, from the literature, for gas-liquid mass transfer, liquid-solid mass transfer, cathode current density, electrode overpotential, and resistivity of a liquid with entrained gas. For the anode, dependent variables are superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the gas phase, superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the liquid phase, superficial C flux, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The same types of correlations relate the variables as in the cathode, with the addition of a correlation for resistivity of a fluidized bed. CO production is not considered, and axial dispersion is neglected. The model shows behavior typical of porous bed electrodes used in electrochemical processes. Efficiency is comparable to that of membrane electrode fuel cells. Effective bed depths are on the order of 1-5 centimeter, giving power/volume lower than for membrane electrode cells. The porous bed design, however, uses less expensive materials and is more resistant to fouling by coal impurities. The model will be used in the second phase of the project to design a laboratory-scale prototype cell. The prototype cell will demonstrate the concept and provide experimental data for improving the model.

Alan A. Kornhauser; Ritesh Agarwal

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel use. Mesoscale Modeling Data Set and Mesoscale Modelobserved, quantified in the data set, and modeled to improveerrors for the validation data set are less than 2% for fuel

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Sensitivity of economic performance of the nuclear fuel cycle to simulation modeling assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparing different nuclear fuel cycles and assessing their implications require a fuel cycle simulation model as complete and realistic as possible. In this thesis, methodological implications of modeling choices are ...

Bonnet, Nicéphore

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layer Title Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layer Publication Type...

130

TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRISO-coated Particle Nuclear Fuel Performance Models,” Rareet al. , “A Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on LaserC.D. Heising, “Closing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Thorium and

Powers, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

MODELING THE PERFORMANCE OF HIGH BURNUP THORIA AND URANIA PWR FUEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel performance models have been developed to assess the performance of ThO[subscript 2]-UO[subscript 2]

Long, Y.

133

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

Numerical modeling of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planned use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future introduces new challenges and opportunities, especially to the engine design community. Hydrogen is a bio-friendly fuel that can be produced from renewable resources and has no carbon dioxide combustion products; and in a properly designed ICE, almost zero NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon emissions can be achieved. Because of the unique properties of hydrogen combustion - in particular the highly wrinkled nature of the laminar flame front due to the preferential diffusion instability - modeling approaches for hydrocarbon gaseous fuels are not generally applicable to hydrogen combustion. This paper reports on the current progress to develop a engine design capability based on KIVA family of codes for hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engines in support of the National Hydrogen Program. A turbulent combustion model, based on a modified eddy-turnover model in conjunction with an intake flow valve model, is found to describe well the efficiency and NO{sub x} emissions of this engine satisfy the Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) standard established by the California Resource Board. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Capital Access Program (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Capital Access Program provides loan guarantees to small businesses seeking access to commercial credit. Premiums paid by the borrower and matched by Vermont Economic Development Authority fund...

136

TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

34 34 ORNL/TM-2001/134 TAFV Alternative Fuels and TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Vehicles Choice Model Documentation Documentation July 2001 David L. Greene David L. Greene Corporate Fellow Corporate Fellow DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

137

Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Lessons Learned from Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics C. Welch Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39446 February 2006 Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics C. Welch Prepared under Task Nos. HS04.2000 and HS06.1002 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39446 February 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

138

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell: a model of a central utility plant.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This central utilities plant model details the major elements of a central utilities plant for several classes of users. The model enables the analyst to select optional, cost effective, plant features that are appropriate to a fuel cell application. These features permit the future plant owner to exploit all of the energy produced by the fuel cell, thereby reducing the total cost of ownership. The model further affords the analyst an opportunity to identify avoided costs of the fuel cell-based power plant. This definition establishes the performance and capacity information, appropriate to the class of user, to support the capital cost model and the feasibility analysis. It is detailed only to the depth required to identify the major elements of a fuel cell-based system. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Virginia Capital Access Program (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capital Access Program (Virginia) Capital Access Program (Virginia) Virginia Capital Access Program (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Loan Program Provider Virginia Economic Development Partnership The Virginia Capital Access Program (CAP), in partnership with Virginia's Small Business Financing Authority, provides access to capital for small businesses. Businesses must apply to participating banks for a traditional loan, and the lender advises the company of enrollment in CAP. The program offers loan guarantees on a portfolio of loans through a loan loss reserve, which it establishes at each participating bank. Funds can be used for

140

Florida Venture Capital Program (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Venture Capital Program (Florida) Florida Venture Capital Program (Florida) Florida Venture Capital Program (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Funding Source US Department of the Treasury State Florida Program Type Equity Investment Grant Program Provider Florida Opportunity Fund The Florida Venture Capital Program provides equity investments and convertible debt instruments to emerging Florida companies and companies locating in Florida with long-term growth potential. Equity investments require a matching private capital investment or other credit assistance. Equity investments and debt instruments ranging from $1,000,000 to $5,000,000 are available, though larger transactions are permitted in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit (Connecticut) Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit (Connecticut) Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development The Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit allows a tax credit of 5% of the amount paid for any new fixed capital investment. Companies with fewer than 800 full-time employees may take a tax credit for machinery and equipment purchased and installed in a facility. The credit is based on a percentage of the amount spent on machinery that exceeds the amount spend on machinery

142

Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

Heinz Pitsch

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Model documentation Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analaytical approach and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1996 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Recent Advances in Detailed Chemical Kinetic Models for Large Hydrocarbon and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for these two primary reference fuels for diesel, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Also, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. Methyl decanoate and methyl stearate are large methyl esters that are closely related to biodiesel fuels, and kinetic models for these molecules have also been developed. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the fuel molecule size and structure on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Herbinet, O; Mehl, M

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable fuels module (RFM) consists of five submodules that represent the various types of renewable energy technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (wind, solar, and geothermal) are used to generate electricity, the interaction with the electricity market module (EMM) is important for modeling grid-connected renewable-electric applications. The penetration of grid-connected generation technologies, with the exception of municipal solid waste, is determined by EMM. Hydropower is included in EMM directly. renewable fuels module (RFM) consists of five submodules that represent the various types of renewable energy technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (wind, solar, and geothermal) are used to generate electricity, the interaction with the electricity market module (EMM) is important for modeling grid-connected renewable-electric applications. The penetration of grid-connected generation technologies, with the exception of municipal solid waste, is determined by EMM. Hydropower is included in EMM directly. Figure 11. Renewable Fuels Module Structure Each submodule of RFM is solved independently of the rest. Because variable operation and maintenance costs for renewable technologies are lower than for any other major generating technology and they produce almost no air pollution, all available renewable generating capacity is dispatched first by EMM.

146

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Michael Wang Argonne National Laboratory June 10, 2008 Project ID # AN2 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Overview * Project start date: Oct. 2002 * Project end date: Continuous * Percent complete: N/A * Inconsistent data, assumptions, and guidelines * Suite of models and tools * Unplanned studies and analyses * Total project funding from DOE: $2.04 million through FY08 * Funding received in FY07: $450k * Funding for FY08: $840k Budget * H2A team * PSAT team * NREL * Industry stakeholders Partners Timeline Barriers to Address 3 Objectives * Expand and update the GREET model for hydrogen production pathways and for applications of FCVs and other FC systems

147

The Ohio Capital Access Program (OCAP) (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Ohio Capital Access Program (OCAP) (Ohio) The Ohio Capital Access Program (OCAP) (Ohio) The Ohio Capital Access Program (OCAP) (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Loan Program Provider Ohio Development Services Agency The Ohio Capital Access Program (OCAP) encourages state depository financial institutions to make loans to for-profit or nonprofit small businesses that are having difficulty obtaining business loans through conventional underwriting standards. The business' principal place of business must be in Ohio with revenues less than $10 million and with fewer

148

An integrated performance model for high temperature gas cooled reactor coated particle fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of coated fuel particles is essential for the development and deployment of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) systems for future power generation. Fuel performance modeling is indispensable for understanding ...

Wang, Jing, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Determination of the proper operating range for the CAFCA IIB fuel cycle model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuel cycle simulation tool, CAFCA II was previously modified to produce the most recent version, CAFCA IIB. The code tracks the mass distribution of transuranics in the fuel cycle in one model and also projects costs ...

Warburton, Jamie (Jamie L.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Swiftsure Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Place San Francisco, California Product Swiftsure Capital, US-based private investment corporation focusing on the financing of early-stage businesses in the software,...

151

Renewable Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Capital Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89109 Sector Solar Product Investment vehicle of Ed Stevenson, founder of Solar Integrated...

152

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Multi-Dimensional Modeling - Fuel Spray...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primary breakup mechanisms. In a diesel engine, liquid fuel is injected into the combustion chamber near the end of the compression stroke. Following injection, the fuel...

153

Helium Behavior in Oxide Nuclear Fuels: First Principles Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UO2 and (U, Pu)O2 solid solutions (the so-called MOX) nowadays are used as commercial nuclear fuels in many countries. One of the safety issues during the storage of these fuels is related to their self-irradiation that produces and accumulates point defects and helium therein. We present density functional theory (DFT) calculations for UO2, PuO2 and MOX containing He atoms in octahedral interstitial positions. In particular, we calculated basic MOX properties and He incorporation energies as functions of Pu concentration within the spin-polarized, generalized gradient approximation (GGA) DFT calculations. We also included the on-site electron correlation corrections using the Hubbard model (in the framework of the so-called DFT + U approach). We found that PuO2 remains semiconducting with He in the octahedral position while UO2 requires a specific lattice distortion. Both materials reveal a positive energy for He incorporation, which, therefore, is an exothermic process. The He incorporation energy increases with the Pu concentration in the MOX fuel.

Gryaznov, D.; Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Kotomin, E. A.; Heifets, Eugene; Zhukovskii, Yuri F.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

155

Modeling for electrical characteristics of solid oxide fuel cell based on fractional calculus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It's vital for the research of electrochemical reaction in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to establish accurate dynamic model of its electrical characteristics. The inherent potential polarization of SOFC is analyzed, and integer order dynamic model is ... Keywords: electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, equivalent circuit, fractional order dynamic model, genetic algorithm, integer order dynamic model, solid oxide fuel cell

HongLiang Cao; Li Xi; ZhongHua Deng; Qin Yi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on

157

Texas Capital Fund (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Capital Fund is designed to promote growth in rural non-entitlement areas, generally defined as cities with less than 50,000 residents or counties with less than 200,000 residents....

158

Social capital and microfinance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter one is titled "Social Capital and Group Banking." Lending to the poor is costly due to high screening, monitoring, and enforcement costs. Group lending advocates believe individuals are able to select creditworthy ...

Karlan, Dean S

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Capital Investment Tax Credit (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credit (Florida) Tax Credit (Florida) Capital Investment Tax Credit (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Enterprise Florida The Capital Investment Tax Credit is an annual credit, provided for up to twenty years, against the corporate income tax. Eligible projects are those in designated high-impact portions of the following sectors: clean energy, biomedical technology, financial services, information technology, silicon technology, transportation equipment manufacturing, or be a corporate

160

Mapping surface fuels using LIDAR and multispectral data fusion for fire behavior modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fires have become intense and more frequent in the United States. Improving the accuracy of mapping fuel models is essential for fuel management decisions and explicit fire behavior prediction for real-time support of suppression tactics and logistics decisions. This study has two main objectives. The first objective is to develop the use of LIght Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) remote sensing to assess fuel models in East Texas accurately and effectively. More specific goals include: (1) developing LIDAR derived products and the methodology to use them for assessing fuel models; (2) investigating the use of several techniques for data fusion of LIDAR and multispectral imagery for assessing fuel models; (3) investigating the gain in fuels mapping accuracy with LIDAR as opposed to QuickBird imagery alone; and, (4) producing spatially explicit digital fuel maps. The second objective is to model fire behavior using FARSITE (Fire Area Simulator) and to investigate differences in modeling outputs using fuel model maps, which differ in accuracy, in east Texas. Estimates of fuel models were compared with in situ data collected over 62 plots. Supervised image classification methods provided better accuracy (90.10%) with the fusion of airborne LIDAR data and QuickBird data than with QuickBird imagery alone (76.52%). These two fuel model maps obtained from the first objective were used to see the differences in fire growth with fuel model maps of different accuracies. According to our results, LIDAR derived data provides accurate estimates of surface fuel parameters efficiently and accurately over extensive areas of forests. This study demonstrates the importance of using accurate maps of fuel models derived using new LIDAR remote sensing techniques.

Mutlu, Muge

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modelling of the Uncertainty of Nuclear Fuel Thermal Behaviour Using the URANIE Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the global framework of nuclear fuel behaviour simulation, the response of the models describing the physical phenomena occurring during the irradiation in reactor is mainly conditioned by the confidence in the calculated temperature of the fuel. ... Keywords: uncertainty, thermal behaviour, nuclear fuel, URANIE

Antoine Boulore; Christine Struzik; Fabrice Gaudier

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Gas Turbine (GT) Systems Steady State Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Gas Turbine (GT) Systems Steady State Modeling Penyarat plants offer high cycle efficiencies. In this work a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine power, Gas turbine, Hybrid, Solid Oxide Fuel Cell hal-00703135,version1-31May2012 Author manuscript

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

EIA model documentation: Electricity market module - electricity fuel dispatch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM) as it was used for EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1997. It replaces previous documentation dated March 1994 and subsequent yearly update revisions. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This document serves four purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the model for reviewers and potential users of the EFD including energy experts at the Energy Information Administration (EIA), other Federal agencies, state energy agencies, private firms such as utilities and consulting firms, and non-profit groups such as consumer and environmental groups. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation which details model enhancements that were undertaken for AE097 and since the previous documentation. Last, because the major use of the EFD is to develop forecasts, this documentation explains the calculations, major inputs and assumptions which were used to generate the AE097.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Genetic programming model of solid oxide fuel cell stack: first results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that predict performance are important tools in understanding and designing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Modelling of SOFC stack-based systems is a powerful approach that can provide useful insights into the nonlinear dynamics of ... Keywords: SOFC stack, genetic programming, modelling, nonlinear dynamics, simulation, solid oxide fuel cells

Uday K. Chakraborty

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Search for Model Year 2001 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

166

Search for Model Year 2004 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Bifuel (Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

167

Search for Model Year 2008 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

168

Search for Model Year 2003 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

169

Search for Model Year 2002 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

170

Search for Model Year 2000 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

171

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model used to analyze the economics and performance of combined heat, hydrogen, and power (CHHP) systems.

Steward, D.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

Search for Model Year 2014 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Type Model Year: 2014 Select Class... Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles...

173

Design of a power management model for a solar/fuel cell hybrid energy system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis proposes a Power Management Model (PMM) for optimization of several green power generation systems. A Photovoltaic/Fuel cell Hybrid Energy System (PFHES) consisting of… (more)

Melendez, Rosana.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Appendix model performance - model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix discusses performance aspects of the Renewable Fuels Module (RFM). It is intended to present the pattern of response of the RFM to typical changes in its major inputs from other NEMS modules. The overall approach of this document, with the particular statistics presented, is designed to be comparable with similar analyses conducted for all of the modules of NEMS. While not always applicable, the overall approach has been to produce analyses and statistics that are as comparable as possible with model developer`s reports for other NEMS modules. Those areas where the analysis is somewhat limited or constrained are discussed. Because the RFM consists of independent submodules, this appendix is broken down by submodule.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

DOE and EPA Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2013 Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2013 Models EPA Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2013 Models DOE and EPA Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2013 Models December 6, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are releasing the 2013 Fuel Economy Guide, giving consumers clear and easy-to-read information to help them choose the most fuel efficient and low greenhouse gas emitting vehicles that meet their needs. The 2013 models include efficient and low-emission vehicles in a variety of classes and sizes, but notable this year is the growing availability of hybrids and the increasing number of electric vehicles. "This Administration has been working to foster a new generation of clean, fuel-efficient American vehicles, and part of that effort is

176

IT Capital Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IT Capital Planning IT Capital Planning and Architecture Division (IM-21) Peter Lenentine, Director IM Organization Structure (as of 12/19/2013) Chief Information Officer (IM-1) Robert Brese Deputy Chief Information Officer Donald Adcock Associate CIO for Cyber Security (IM-30) Paul Cunningham (Acting) Corporate IT Project Management Office (IM-40) Frank Husson, Director Associate CIO for IT Planning, Architecture, and E-Government (IM-20) TheAnne Gordon Technology Evaluation Office (IM-50) Peter Tseronis, Director (Acting) Associate CIO for IT Corporate Management (IM-10) Sarah Gamage Associate CIO for Energy IT Services (IM-60) Virginia Arreguin Deputy Associate CIO for Cyber Security Paul Cunningham Deputy Associate CIO for Energy IT Services John Berthiaume (Acting) Human Capital and Administrative

177

Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices, land rents, capital intensity of housing and housingrents and capital intensities. A richer formulation, inof development and the capital intensity of development. His

Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Venture Capital and the New Energy Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

venture capital is increasingly providing expansion capital for new companies in the energy sector. The result is a dramatic increase of private capital flows supporting an...

179

Human Capital Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan Human Capital Plan More Documents & Publications Strategic Use of Human Capital DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2011 - 2015) Energy.gov Careers & Internships For Staff &...

180

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in “target ” channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium “driver ” fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GREET 1.0 -- Transportation fuel cycles model: Methodology and use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, Co, NOx, SOx, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Enhanced model and fuzzy strategy of air to fuel ratio control for spark ignition engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various mathematical models for the air to fuel ratio and control for spark ignition (SI) engines have been proposed to satisfy technical specifications. This paper reveals an improvement of the mean value model (MVEM) and a simple yet effective nonlinear ... Keywords: Air-fuel ratio, FOPDDT, Fuzzy control, Internal combustion, Nonlinear control

Anurak Jansri; Pitikhate Sooraksa

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1997 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs. and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Finally, such documentation facilitates continuity in EIA model development by providing information sufficient to perform model enhancements and data updates as part of EIA`s ongoing mission to provide analytical and forecasting information systems.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The FIT 2.0 Model - Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All mass streams from fuel separation and fabrication are products that must meet some set of product criteria – fuel feedstock impurity limits, waste acceptance criteria (WAC), material storage (if any), or recycle material purity requirements such as zirconium for cladding or lanthanides for industrial use. These must be considered in a systematic and comprehensive way. The FIT model and the “system losses study” team that developed it [Shropshire2009, Piet2010b] are steps by the Fuel Cycle Technology program toward an analysis that accounts for the requirements and capabilities of each fuel cycle component, as well as major material flows within an integrated fuel cycle. This will help the program identify near-term R&D needs and set longer-term goals. This report describes FIT 2, an update of the original FIT model.[Piet2010c] FIT is a method to analyze different fuel cycles; in particular, to determine how changes in one part of a fuel cycle (say, fuel burnup, cooling, or separation efficiencies) chemically affect other parts of the fuel cycle. FIT provides the following: Rough estimate of physics and mass balance feasibility of combinations of technologies. If feasibility is an issue, it provides an estimate of how performance would have to change to achieve feasibility. Estimate of impurities in fuel and impurities in waste as function of separation performance, fuel fabrication, reactor, uranium source, etc.

Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Gregory M Teske

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.  

SciTech Connect

Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hazel Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazel Capital Hazel Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Hazel Capital Place London, England, United Kingdom Zip WC2A 1AL Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Hazel Capital is an asset management company investing in Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency (in energy transmission, building construction, electronic and engineered products), Water, Transportation, Waste Management, Recycling & Pollution Control. References Hazel Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hazel Capital is a company located in London, England, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Hazel Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hazel_Capital&oldid=346400

187

An improved structural mechanics model for the FRAPCON nuclear fuel performance code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to provide improved predictions of Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) for the FRAPCON nuclear fuel performance code, a new model, the FRAPCON Radial-Axial Soft Pellet (FRASP) model, was developed. This ...

Mieloszyk, Alexander James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: ? Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels. ? Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

Morgan, Dane; Yang, Yong

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capital, coal and natural gas fuel prices, and electricityFossil fuel prices – Natural Gas, Oil and Coal Technological

Blair, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of diesel combustion with oxygenated fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of oxygenated hydrocarbons as additives to diesel fuels on ignition, NOx emissions and soot production has been examined using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. N-heptane was used as a representative diesel fuel, and methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether and dimethoxymethane were used as oxygenated fuel additives. It was found that addition of oxygenated hydrocarbons reduced NOx levels and reduced the production of soot precursors. When the overall oxygen content in the fuel reached approximately 25% by mass, production of soot precursors fell effectively to zero, in agreement with experimental studies. The kinetic factors responsible for these observations are discussed.

Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Fisher, E; Glaude, P A; Marinov, N M; Westbrook, C K

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.  

SciTech Connect

A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

Cardoni, Jeffrey

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board Summary of the State of the Practice and State of the Art of Modeling Peak Spreading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traffic congestion in large metropolitan areas has become so acute that many commuters are adjusting their departure and/or arrival times for work and other destinations to avoid the worst of what is now called the “peak period”. The adjustments in departure times combined with travel times that can last beyond the peak hour have led to the phenomena of peak spreading, where the peak hour demand on a particular roadway exceeds the peak hour capacity and causes demand to shift to the “shoulders ” of the peak hour, or the hours adjacent to the peak hour. This situation is so pronounced in the TPB region, that most of the major freeways in the areas have peak periods that last from roughly 6 AM to 10 AM in the morning and 3 PM to 7 PM in the evening where stop and go traffic is common throughout. The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board (TPB) engaged Vanasse Hangen Brustlin (VHB) to review and summarize the state of the practice and the state of the art with regards to modeling peak spreading at the MPO level. VHB began this effort by reviewing the recent MPO survey and following up with staff at large MPOs with characteristics similar

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

MODELING ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FRESH FUEL SHIPPING CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor Fresh Fuel Shipping Container (ATR FFSC) is currently licensed per 10 CFR 71 to transport a fresh fuel element for either the Advanced Test Reactor, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). During the licensing process, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) raised a number of issues relating to the criticality analysis, namely (1) lack of a tolerance study on the fuel and packaging, (2) moderation conditions during normal conditions of transport (NCT), (3) treatment of minor hydrogenous packaging materials, and (4) treatment of potential fuel damage under hypothetical accident conditions (HAC). These concerns were adequately addressed by modifying the criticality analysis. A tolerance study was added for both the packaging and fuel elements, full-moderation was included in the NCT models, minor hydrogenous packaging materials were included, and fuel element damage was considered for the MURR and MITR-II fuel types.

Rick J. Migliore

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

KINETIC MODELING OF FUEL EFFECTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY, PROPERTIES, AND SOURCES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kinetic modeling is an important tool for engine design and can also be used for engine tuning and to study response to fuel chemistry and properties before an engine configuration is physically built and tested. Methodologies needed for studying fuel effects include development of fuel kinetic mechanisms for pure compounds, tools for designing surrogate blends of pure compounds that mimic a desired market fuel, and tools for reducing kinetic mechanisms to a size that allows inclusion in complex CFD engine models. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of these tools to reproduce engine results for a series of research diesel fuels using surrogate fuels in an engine and then modeling results with a simple 2 component surrogate blend with physical properties adjusted to vary fuel volatility. Results indicate that we were reasonably successful in mimicking engine performance of real fuels with blends of pure compounds. We were also successful in spanning the range of the experimental data using CFD and kinetic modeling, but further tuning and matching will be needed to exactly match engine performance of the real and surrogate fuels.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL; Niak, Chitralkumar [Reaction Design; Puduppakkam, Karthik [Reaction Design

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advancements in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements and related structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important aspect of the design and analysis of nuclear reactors is the ability to predict the behavior of fuel elements in the adverse environment of a reactor system. By understanding the thermomechanical behavior of the different materials which constitute a nuclear fuel element, analysis and predictions can be made regarding the integrity and reliability of fuel element designs. The SMiRT conference series, through the division on fuel elements and the post-conference seminars on fuel element modeling, provided technical forums for the international participation in the exchange of knowledge concerning the thermomechanical modeling of fuel elements. This paper discusses the technical advances in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements presented at the SMiRT conference series since its inception in 1971. Progress in the areas of material properties and constitutive relationships, modeling methodologies, and integral modeling approaches was reviewed and is summarized in light of their impact on the thermomechanical modeling of nuclear fuel elements. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

Billone, M.C.; Montgomery, R.O.; Rashid, Y.R.; Head, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (USA); Royal Naval Coll., Greenwich (UK))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Model for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel Claddings: A Status Report on Current Model Capabilities Model for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel Claddings: A Status Report on Current Model Capabilities The report demonstrates a meso-scale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride precipitation in the cladding of used fuels during long-term dry-storage. While the Zr-based claddings (regarded as a barrier for containment of radioactive fission products and fuel) are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service in the reactor. The amount of hydrogen that the cladding picks up is primarily a function of the exact chemistry and microstructure of the claddings and reactor operating conditions, time-temperature history, and

197

EPA and DOE Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2014 Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA and DOE Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2014 Models EPA and DOE Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2014 Models EPA and DOE Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2014 Models December 3, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are releasing the 2014 Fuel Economy Guide, providing consumers with a valuable resource to identify and choose the most fuel efficient and low greenhouse gas emitting vehicles that meet their needs. The 2014 models include efficient and low-emission vehicles in a variety of classes and sizes, ensuring a wide variety of choices available for consumers. "For American families, the financial and environmental bottom line are high priorities when shopping for a new vehicle," said Administrator Gina

198

EPA and DOE Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2014 Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA and DOE Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2014 Models EPA and DOE Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2014 Models EPA and DOE Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2014 Models December 3, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are releasing the 2014 Fuel Economy Guide, providing consumers with a valuable resource to identify and choose the most fuel efficient and low greenhouse gas emitting vehicles that meet their needs. The 2014 models include efficient and low-emission vehicles in a variety of classes and sizes, ensuring a wide variety of choices available for consumers. "For American families, the financial and environmental bottom line are high priorities when shopping for a new vehicle," said Administrator Gina

199

DOE and EPA Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2013 Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE and EPA Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2013 Models DOE and EPA Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2013 Models DOE and EPA Release Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 2013 Models December 6, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are releasing the 2013 Fuel Economy Guide, giving consumers clear and easy-to-read information to help them choose the most fuel efficient and low greenhouse gas emitting vehicles that meet their needs. The 2013 models include efficient and low-emission vehicles in a variety of classes and sizes, but notable this year is the growing availability of hybrids and the increasing number of electric vehicles. "This Administration has been working to foster a new generation of

200

Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Model-based diagnosis for proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) systems are more and more presented as a good alternative to current energy converters such as internal combustion engines. They suffer however from insufficient reliability and durability for stationary and ... Keywords: Diagnosis, Elman neural network, Flooding, PEM fuel cell, Water management

N. Yousfi Steiner; D. Candusso; D. Hissel; P. Moçoteguy

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

User Guide for VISION 3.4.7 (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters and options; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R&D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating 'what if' scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., 'reactor types' not individual reactors and 'separation types' not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation or disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. VISION is comprised of several Microsoft Excel input files, a Powersim Studio core, and several Microsoft Excel output files. All must be co-located in the same folder on a PC to function. You must use Powersim Studio 8 or better. We have tested VISION with the Studio 8 Expert, Executive, and Education versions. The Expert and Education versions work with the number of reactor types of 3 or less. For more reactor types, the Executive version is currently required. The input files are Excel2003 format (xls). The output files are macro-enabled Excel2007 format (xlsm). VISION 3.4 was designed with more flexibility than previous versions, which were structured for only three reactor types - LWRs that can use only uranium oxide (UOX) fuel, LWRs that can use multiple fuel types (LWR MF), and fast reactors. One could not have, for example, two types of fast reactors concurrently. The new version allows 10 reactor types and any user-defined uranium-plutonium fuel is allowed. (Thorium-based fuels can be input but several features of the model would not work.) The user identifies (by year) the primary fuel to be used for each reactor type. The user can identify for each primary fuel a contingent fuel to use if the primary fuel is not available, e.g., a reactor designated as using mixed oxide fuel (MOX) would have UOX as the contingent fuel. Another example is that a fast reactor using recycled transuranic (TRU) material can be designated as either having or not having appropriately enriched uranium oxide as a contingent fuel. Because of the need to study evolution in recycling and separation strategies, the user can now select the recycling strategy and separation technology, by year.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert F. Jeffers; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; Wendell D. Hintze

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Microsoft Word - FE STRATEGIC HUMAN CAPITAL MGMT PLAN082006-AB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Human Capital Management Plan September 2006 OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY GOAL The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) will insure the adequate, efficient, and environmentally sound production, storage, and use of fossil fuels to meet our Nation's energy needs. FE HUMAN RESOURCES VISION FE's human capital vision is to be an employer of choice with a diverse, well-trained, and motivated workforce that will excel. The FE Human Capital Management Plan (HCMP) describes our mission and objectives, vision, human capital strategies and implementing framework, as well as a number of ongoing and new initiatives. We are implementing an integrated human capital system that plans and executes FE-wide human capital activities. INTRODUCTION FE views its human capital resources as its most important asset. Without a highly qualified and

204

Model documentation: Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it related to the production of the 1994 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO94) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves two purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources -- wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. Of these six, four are documented in the following chapters: municipal solid waste, wind, solar and biofuels. Geothermal and wood are not currently working components of NEMS. The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological and cost characteristics of renewable energy technologies, and to pass these characteristics to other NEMS modules for the determination of mid-term forecasted renewable energy demand.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

IT Capital Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IT Capital Planning IT Capital Planning and Architecture Division (IM-21) Carol Blackston, Director (Acting) IM Organization Structure (as of 1/13/2014) Chief Information Officer (IM-1) Robert Brese Deputy Chief Information Officer Donald Adcock Associate CIO for Cyber Security (IM-30) Paul Cunningham (Acting) Corporate IT Project Management Office (IM-40) Frank Husson, Director Associate CIO for IT Planning, Architecture, and E-Government (IM-20) Russell Pereira (Acting) Associate CIO for Technology Evaluation and Chief Technology Officer (IM-50) Peter Tseronis Associate CIO for IT Corporate Management (IM-10) Sarah Gamage Associate CIO for Energy IT Services (IM-60) Virginia Arreguin Deputy Associate CIO for Cyber Security Paul Cunningham Deputy Associate CIO for Energy IT Services Steve Cox (Acting)

206

Short communication Electronic circuit model for proton exchange membrane fuel cells ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is being investigated as an alternate power source for various applications like transportation and emergency power supplies. The paper presents a novel circuit model for a PEM fuel cell that can be used to design and analyze fuel cell power systems. The PSPICE-based model uses bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and LC elements available in the PSPICE library with some modification. The model includes the phenomena like activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and mass transport effect present in a PEM fuel cell. The static and dynamic characteristics obtained through simulation are compared with experimental results obtained on a commercial fuel cell module. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Dachuan Yu; S. Yuvarajan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Human Resource Management on Social Capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past years, several researchers have analysed the relational dynamics that takes place inside and between organizations concept, mediating and moderating variables, effects, etc. considering it as a resource capable of contributing to the orientation ... Keywords: Human Resource Policy, Human Resources Management, Information Technology, Proposed a Model, Social Capital

Macarena López-Fernández; Fernando Martín-Alcázar; Pedro Miguel Romero-Fernández

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

An electrical modeling and fuzzy logic control of a fuel cell generation system  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell generation system consists of a stack, a reformer, and converters. The stack generates DC power by electrochemical reaction. For system design and analysis, it is necessary to obtain electrical models. Simplified electrical models of a fuel cell generation system for system control are proposed. Then using the electrical models, system performance of a fuel cell generation system in which power is boosted by step-up choppers is analyzed. A fuzzy controller is designed for improved system performance. Simulation and experimental results confirmed the high performance capability of the designed system.

Kim, Y.H.; Kim, S.S. [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat production (assuming 75% total efficiency for fuel cell) kWhdaycow 4 Finished compost Cubic yardsyear cow 3.32 Electricity required for digester operation kWhcowday 1...

210

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W gasoline SOFC technology development program APU applications can provide entry markets for fuel cell & Select APU Systems 2 · Summarize PEM and SOFC performance parameters · Determine most promising future Task 3: Develop design concepts · Truck Cab/SOFC/diesel · Transit bus/SOFC/CNG or diesel · Police

211

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

Wang, M. Q.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

Modeling CANDU-6 liquid zone controllers for effects of thorium-based fuels  

SciTech Connect

We use the DRAGON code to model the CANDU-6 liquid zone controllers and evaluate the effects of thorium-based fuels on their incremental cross sections and reactivity worth. We optimize both the numerical quadrature and spatial discretization for 2D cell models in order to provide accurate fuel properties for 3D liquid zone controller supercell models. We propose a low computer cost parameterized pseudo-exact 3D cluster geometries modeling approach that avoids tracking issues on small external surfaces. This methodology provides consistent incremental cross sections and reactivity worths when the thickness of the buffer region is reduced. When compared with an approximate annular geometry representation of the fuel and coolant region, we observe that the cluster description of fuel bundles in the supercell models does not increase considerably the precision of the results while increasing substantially the CPU time. In addition, this comparison shows that it is imperative to finely describe the liquid zone controller geometry since it has a strong impact of the incremental cross sections. This paper also shows that liquid zone controller reactivity worth is greatly decreased in presence of thorium-based fuels compared to the reference natural uranium fuel, since the fission and the fast to thermal scattering incremental cross sections are higher for the new fuels. (authors)

St-Aubin, E.; Marleau, G. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, P.O. Box 6079, stn. Centre Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Life Cycle Human Capital Formation, Search Intensity, and Wage Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents and estimates a unified model where both human capital investment and job search are endogenized. This unification not only enables me to quantify the relative contributions of each mechanism to life cycle wage dynamics, but also to investigate potential interactions between human capital investment and job search. Within the unified framework, the expectation of rising rental rates of human capital through searching in the future gives workers more incentive to invest in human capital. In the meantime, unemployed workers reduce their reservation rates to leave unemployment quickly to take advantage of human capital accumulation on the job. The results show that these interactions are well supported by data. Allowing for these interactions as well as heterogeneity in search technology, the unified model predicts that both human capital accumulation and job search contribute significantly to the wage growth over the life cycle with human capital accumulation accounting for 40 % of total wage growth and job search accounting for 50%. The remaining 10 % is due to the interactions of the two forces. Furthermore, job search dominates wage growth earlier in the life cycle while human capital accumulation dominates later in the life cycle. ?This paper is one of the chapters in my Ph.D. thesis. I thank my committee members, Audra Bowlus, Hiroyuki Kasahara, and Lance Lochner for their continuous guidance and support. I would also like to thank Chris Robinson, Fabien Postel-Vinay, Todd Stinebrickner, Ben Lester as well as

Huju Liu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Recovering capitalization and punctuation marks for automatic speech recognition: Case study for Portuguese broadcast news  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following material presents a study about recovering punctuation marks, and capitalization information from European Portuguese broadcast news speech transcriptions. Different approaches were tested for capitalization, both generative and discriminative, ... Keywords: Capitalization, Language modeling, Maximum entropy, Punctuation recovery, Rich transcription, Sentence boundary detection, Truecasing, Weighted finite state transducers

F. Batista; D. Caseiro; N. Mamede; I. Trancoso

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Modeling Low-Platinum-Loading Effects in Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loading Effects in Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers Wonseok Yoon*CA 94720, USA The cathode catalyst layer within a proton-with low Pt-loading catalyst layers. Model results

Yoon, Wonseok

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Search for Model Year 2005 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2005 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

219

Search for Model Year 2013 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search...

220

Search for Model Year 2009 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2009 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Search for Model Year 2010 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2010 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

222

Search for Model Year 2012 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search...

223

Search for Model Year 2011 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search...

224

Modeling the Fuel Spray and Combustion Process of the Ignition Quality Tester with KIVA-3V  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the use of KIVA-3V to develop a model that reproduces ignition behavior inside the Ignition Quality Tester, which measures the ignition delay of low-volatility fuels.

Bogin, G. E. Jr.; DeFilippo, A.; Chen, J. Y.; Chin, G.; Luecke, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Zigler, B. T.; Dean, A. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fuel quality issues in stationary fuel cell systems.  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell systems are being deployed in stationary applications for the generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen. These systems use a variety of fuel cell types, ranging from the low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) to the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Depending on the application and location, these systems are being designed to operate on reformate or syngas produced from various fuels that include natural gas, biogas, coal gas, etc. All of these fuels contain species that can potentially damage the fuel cell anode or other unit operations and processes that precede the fuel cell stack. These detrimental effects include loss in performance or durability, and attenuating these effects requires additional components to reduce the impurity concentrations to tolerable levels, if not eliminate the impurity entirely. These impurity management components increase the complexity of the fuel cell system, and they add to the system's capital and operating costs (such as regeneration, replacement and disposal of spent material and maintenance). This project reviewed the public domain information available on the impurities encountered in stationary fuel cell systems, and the effects of the impurities on the fuel cells. A database has been set up that classifies the impurities, especially in renewable fuels, such as landfill gas and anaerobic digester gas. It documents the known deleterious effects on fuel cells, and the maximum allowable concentrations of select impurities suggested by manufacturers and researchers. The literature review helped to identify the impurity removal strategies that are available, and their effectiveness, capacity, and cost. A generic model of a stationary fuel-cell based power plant operating on digester and landfill gas has been developed; it includes a gas processing unit, followed by a fuel cell system. The model includes the key impurity removal steps to enable predictions of impurity breakthrough, component sizing, and utility needs. These data, along with process efficiency results from the model, were subsequently used to calculate the cost of electricity. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to correlate the concentrations of key impurities in the fuel gas feedstock to the cost of electricity.

Papadias, D.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

EPRI PWR Fuel Cladding Corrosion (PFCC) Model: Volume 2: Corrosion Theory and Rate Equation Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI PWR Fuel Cladding Corrosion (PFCC) model has been developed to help utilities manage high burnup fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding issues. The model predicts the peak oxide thickness with 92 percent confidence of being within plus or minus 10 micrometers of the measured value, with a conservative bias of 7 micrometers when the metallurgical variables are well characterized. This volume documents the evolution of the rate equation for predicting Zircaloy cladding corrosion and the database us...

1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

Report: EM Human Capital Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN CAPITAL September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Human Capital Subcommittee Background: The enhancement of the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) human capital has been a central tenet of the Assistant Secretary's tenure, reflecting the critical nature of this resource to the achievement of EM's mission. Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB or Board) has reviewed the program's human capital issues and the plans EM has developed to address them. This review produced a number of recommendations that were presented in the Board's FY 2006 report to the Assistant Secretary and were later approved and implemented to varying degrees. * Recommendation 2006-01: Develop accountability for the Human Capital Plan

228

Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects As Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects, Henry is responsible for institutional large-project construction and management and environmental cleanup functions. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Before coming to the Lab in 2011, he served as manager of the $3.2 billion project to safely destroy the stockpile of deadly mustard chemical agent at the Pueblo Chemical Depot in Colorado. Paul Henry Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects Paul Henry, Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects As Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects, Henry is responsible for institutional large-project construction and management and environmental cleanup functions.

229

Modeling the effect of engine assembly mass on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, an analytical model is developed to estimate the impact of reducing engine assembly mass (the term engine assembly refers to the moving components of the engine system, including crankshafts, valve train, pistons, and connecting rods) on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy. The relative changes in frictional mean effective pressure and fuel economy are proportional to the relative change in assembly mass. These changes increase rapidly as engine speed increases. Based on the model, a 25% reduction in engine assembly mass results in a 2% fuel economy improvement for a typical mid-size passenger car over the EPA Urban and Highway Driving Cycles.

An, Feng [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Chemically authentic surrogate mixture model for the thermophysical properties of a coal-derived liquid fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a surrogate mixture model to represent the physical properties of a coal-derived liquid fuel using only information obtained from a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the fuel and a recently developed 'advanced distillation curve'. We then predicted the density, speed of sound, and viscosity of the fuel and compared them to limited experimental data. The surrogate contains five components (n-propylcyclohexane, trans-decalin, {alpha}-methyldecalin, bicyclohexane, and n-hexadecane), yet comparisons to limited experimental data demonstrate that the model is able to represent the density, sound speed, and viscosity to within 1, 4, and 5%, respectively. 102 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

M.L. Huber; E.W. Lemmon; V. Diky; B.L. Smith; T.J. Bruno [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Division

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model  

SciTech Connect

The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA required that certain tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-road recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Funds to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual States equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1993 to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-road recreation in the State level by different vehicle types. A modification of the methodology developed by ORNL has been used to apportion funds to the States since that time.

Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.; Hu, P.S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

EM Capital Asset Project List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Read the EM Capital Asset Project List, which includes the project's name, site, current critical decision and current total project cost.

234

Does Competition for Capital Discipline Governments? Decentralization, Globalization and Corruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many political economists believe that competition among countries—or regions within them—to attract mobile capital should discipline their governments, rendering them less corrupt and more friendly toward business. This argument surfaces repeatedly in debates over both political decentralization and globalization. We argue that it is based on an assumption— countries or regions start out identical—that is quite unrealistic. We reexamine the standard model that predicts a disciplining effect of capital mobility, and show that if units are sufficiently heterogeneous exactly the opposite prediction often follows. If some units are exogenously much more attractive to investors than others (and competition for capital is intense), the only equilibrium under capital mobility will involve polarization. Initially disadvantaged units will actually be more corrupt, more starved of capital, and slower to grow if capital is mobile than if it is not. By contrast, exogenously attractive units will do more to woo investors, suck capital out of their lower productivity counterparts, and grow faster. We suggest this may help explain the disappointing results of liberalizing capital flows within the Russian federation and in sub-Saharan Africa.

Hongbin Cai A; Daniel Treisman B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Benchmarking of the MIT High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel performance model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIT has developed a Coated Particle Fuel Performance Model to study the behavior of TRISO nuclear fuels. The code, TIMCOAT, is designed to assess the mechanical and chemical condition of populations of coated particles and ...

Stawicki, Michael A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cathode porous transport irreversibility model for PEM fuel cell design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence is studied of slip-irreversibility at the interface between the gas diffusion layer, also referred to here as the porous transport layer, and the catalyst layer of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). A two-dimensional cathode ... Keywords: catalyst layer, exergy, gas diffusion layer, slip flow irreversibility

E. O. B. Ogedengbe; M. A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Computational Modeling and Optimization of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power density (HPD) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a geometry based on a tubular type SOFC increased power density, but still maintains the beneficial feature of secure sealing for a tubular SOFC. In this paper, the electric performance of a flat-tube HPD SOFC is studied. This paper also investigates

Victoria, University of

239

Drum type fossil fueled power plant control based on fuzzy inverse MIMO model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new fuzzy controller is proposed based on inverse model of boiler-turbine system. Gain scheduling scheme is used to keep feedback rule as close as possible to optimal condition while generating plant Input/Output data. Interaction between ... Keywords: ANFIS, drum type fossil fueled power plant (FFPP), interaction, inverse model control, nonlinear model, robustness

Ali Ghaffari; Mansour Nikkhah Bahrami; Hesam Parsa

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Strategic Use of Human Capital | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

use of human capital. Strategic Use of Human Capital More Documents & Publications DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2011 - 2015) Inspection Report: DOEIG-0888 Human Capital...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sustainable Investments Capital SI Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SI Capital SI Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Investments Capital (SI Capital) Place Barcelona, Spain Zip 8021 Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product SI Capital is an independent financial institution set up to develop investment products and services for renewable energy and other sustainable projects. Coordinates 41.385589°, 2.168745° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.385589,"lon":2.168745,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

242

A Statistical Model of Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of vehicle emission models are overly simple, such as static speed-dependent models widely used in

Cappiello, Alessandra

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Waste generation process modeling and analysis for fuel reprocessing technologies  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of electric power generation requirements for the next century, even when taking the most conservative tack, indicate that the United States will have to increase its production capacity significantly. If the country determines that nuclear power will not be a significant component of this production capacity, the nuclear industry will have to die, as maintaining a small nuclear component will not be justifiable. However, if nuclear power is to be a significant component, it will probably require some form of reprocessing technology. The once-through fuel cycle is only feasible for a relatively small number of nuclear power plants. If we are maintaining several hundred reactors, the once-through fuel cycle is more expensive and ethically questionable.

Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Koehler, A. C. (Andrew C.); Farman, Richard F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Mathematical Model for Predicting the Life of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes Subjected to Hydration Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under typical PEM fuel cell operating conditions, part of membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEM FC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane life-time. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used...

Burlatsky, S F; O'Neill, J; Atrazhev, V V; Varyukhin, A N; Dmitriev, D V; Erikhman, N S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuelsl Module Renewable Fuelsl Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Renewable Fuels Module Figure 11. Renewable Fuels Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Renewable Fuels Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The renewable fuels module (RFM) represents renewable energy resoures and large–scale technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (biomass, conventional hydroelectricity, geothermal, landfill gas, solar photovoltaics, solar thermal, and wind) are used to generate electricity, the RFM primarily interacts with the electricity market module (EMM). New renewable energy generating capacity is either model–determined or

246

Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial velocity component of exhaust moving down the filter inlet channel. Soot mass collected in this way would have a smaller impact on backpressure than soot forced into the flow restrictions deeper in the porous wall structure. This project has focused on the development of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques that are generally applicable to a wide variety of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. By helping to develop improved fundamental understanding pore-scale phenomena affecting filtration, soot oxidation, and NOX abatement, this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has also assisted Dow Automotive in continuing development and commercialization of the ACM filter substrate. Over the course of this research project, ACM filters were successfully deployed on the Audi R10 TDI racecar which won the 24 Hours of LeMans endurance race in 2006, 2007, and 2008; and the 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race in 2006 and 2007. It would not have been possible for the R10 to compete in these traditionally gasoline-dominated events without reliable and effective exhaust particulate filtration. These successes demonstrated not only the performance of automotive diesel engines, but the efficacy of DPF technology as it was being deployed around the world to meet new emissions standards on consumer vehicles. During the course of this CRADA project, Dow Automotive commercialized their ACM DPF technology under the AERIFYTM DPF brand.

Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE (PART 7)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE V 2.0 SUPPLEMENT TO OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULAR A-11, PART 7: PLANNING, BUDGETING, AND ACQUISITION OF CAPITAL ASSETS JUNE 2006 CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ACP Agency Capital Plan CI Commercial Items COTS Commercial-off-the-shelf ESPC Energy Savings Performance Contract EVM Earned Value Management FAR Federal Acquisition Regulation FARA Federal Acquisition Reform Act (Clinger-Cohen Act) of 1996 1 (Division D of Pub. L. No. 104-106) FASA Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 (Pub. L. No. 103-355) FRPC Federal Real Property Council GAO Government Accountability Office GPRA Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (Pub. L. No. 103-62)

248

Yellowstone Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Capital Yellowstone Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Yellowstone Capital Name Yellowstone Capital Address 5555 San Felipe, Suite 1650 Place Houston, Texas Zip 77056 Region Texas Area Product Private equity and venture capital investment firm Phone number (713) 650-0065 Website http://www.yellowstonecapital. Coordinates 29.749479°, -95.471973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.749479,"lon":-95.471973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

BEV Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BEV Capital BEV Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: BEV Capital Name BEV Capital Address 263 Tresser Blvd., 9th Floor Place Stamford, Connecticut Zip 06901 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Venture capital firm. Phone number (203) 724-1100 Website http://www.bevcapital.com/ Coordinates 41.0518165°, -73.535274° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0518165,"lon":-73.535274,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

250

Commons Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commons Capital Commons Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Commons Capital Name Commons Capital Address 320 Washington Street, 4th floor Place Brookline, Massachusetts Zip 02445 Region Greater Boston Area Product Early-stage venture capital fund. Phone number (617) 739-3500 Website http://www.commonscapital.com/ Coordinates 42.3333887°, -71.1201943° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3333887,"lon":-71.1201943,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

A Combustion Model for the TWA 800 Center-Wing Fuel Tank Explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the National Transportation Safety Board investigation of the TWA Flight 800 accident, a combined experimental/computational effort was conducted that focused on quarter-scale testing and simulation of the fuel-air explosion in the Boeing 747 center wing fuel tank. This report summarizes the modeling approach used at Sandia National Laboratories. In this approach approximations are introduced that capture the essential physics associated with turbulent flame propagation in multiple compartment fuel tanks. This model efficiently defines the pressure loading conditions during a jet-fuel air explosion in a fuel tank confinement. Modeling calculations compare favorably with a variety of experimental quarter-scale tests conducted in rigid confinement. The modeling describes well the overpressure history in several geometry configurations. Upon demonstrating a reasonable comparison to experimental observations, a parametric study of eight possible ignition sources is then discussed. Model calculations demonstrate that different loading conditions arise as the location of the ignition event is varied. By comparing the inferred damage and calculated impulses to that seen in the recovered tank, it maybe possible to reduce the number of likely sources. A possible extension of this work to better define tank damage includes coupling the combustion model as a pressure loading routine for structural failure analysis.

Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development and validation of a combustion model for a fuel cell off-gas burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and environmentally clean power generation has never been so important. The increasing cost of fossil fuels and more stringent regulations on emissions (particularly CO2 and NOx), together with increasing demand for electricity, make the provision of cost... Development and Validation of a Combustion Model for a Fuel Cell Off-Gas Burner W. Tristan Collins Magdalene College University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy June 2008...

Collins, William Tristan

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

THETRIS: A MICRO-SCALE TEMPERATURE AND GAS RELEASE MODEL FOR TRISO FUEL  

SciTech Connect

The dominating mechanism in the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors (HTRs) is the Doppler feedback effect. These reactor designs are fueled with sub-millimeter sized kernels formed into TRISO particles that are imbedded in a graphite matrix. The best spatial and temporal representation of the feedback effect is obtained from an accurate approximation of the fuel temperature. Most accident scenarios in HTRs are characterized by large time constants and slow changes in the fuel and moderator temperature fields. In these situations a meso-scale, pebble and compact scale, solution provides a good approximation of the fuel temperature. Micro-scale models are necessary in order to obtain accurate predictions in faster transients or when parameters internal to the TRISO are needed. Since these coated particles constitute one of the fundamental design barriers for the release of fission products, it becomes important to understand the transient behavior inside this containment system. An explicit TRISO fuel temperature model named THETRIS has been developed and incorporated into the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes. The code includes gas release models that provide a simple predictive capability of the internal pressure during transients. The new model yields similar results to those obtained with other micro-scale fuel models, but with the added capability to analyze gas release, internal pressure buildup, and effects of a gap in the TRISO. The analyses show the instances when the micro-scale models improve the predictions of the fuel temperature and Doppler feedback. In addition, a sensitivity study of the potential effects on the transient behavior of high-temperature reactors due to the presence of a gap is included. Although the formation of a gap occurs under special conditions, its consequences on the dynamic behavior of the reactor can cause unexpected responses during fast transients. Nevertheless, the strong Doppler feedback forces the reactor to quickly stabilize.

J. Ortensi; A.M. Ougouag

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Surrogate Fuels for Gasoline and Application to an HCCI Engine  

SciTech Connect

Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons, such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, and cycloalkanes. In this study, a surrogate gasoline reaction mechanism is developed, and it has one representative fuel constituent from each of these classes. These selected constituents are iso-octane, n-heptane, 1-pentene, toluene, and methyl-cyclohexane. The mechanism was developed in a step-wise fashion, adding submechanisms to treat each fuel component. Reactions important for low temperature oxidation (<1000K) and cross-reactions among different fuels are incorporated into the mechanism. The mechanism consists of 1214 species and 5401 reactions. A single-zone engine model is used to evaluate how well the mechanism captures autoignition behavior for conditions corresponding to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine operation. Experimental data are available for both how the combustion phasing changes with fueling at a constant intake temperature, and also how the intake temperature has to be changed with pressure in order to maintain combustion phasing for a fixed equivalence ratio. Three different surrogate fuel mixtures are used for the modeling. Predictions are in reasonably good agreement with the engine data. In addition, the heat release rate is calculated and compared to the data from experiments. The model predicts less low-temperature heat release than that measured. It is found that the low temperature heat-release rate depends strongly on engine speed, reactions of RO{sub 2}+HO{sub 2}, fuel composition, and pressure boost.

Naik, C V; Pitz, W J; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J E; Orme, J; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Green Capital Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Green Capital Management" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGreenCapitalManagement&oldid346004" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

256

Blue Green Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Green Capital Place Spain Zip 8860 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product String representation "Spanish develop ... their projects."...

257

West Virginia Venture Capital (West Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The West Virginia Venture Capital provides investment funds to eligible businesses stimulating economic growth and providing or retaining jobs within the state through qualified venture capital...

258

Sustainable World Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Sustainable World Capital" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSustainableWorldCapital&oldid351925" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

259

Nimes Capital LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

equity firm that provides growth capital to companies focused on sustainable development, alternative energy, infrastructure, or clean technology. References Nimes Capital LLC1...

260

Ethanol Capital Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ethanol Capital Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethanol Capital Management Place Tucson, Arizona...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Persimmon Tree Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tree Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Persimmon Tree Capital Place Washington, DC Zip 20037 Sector Renewable Energy Product Persimmon is a private equity fund...

262

KRK Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by expanding it. KRK Capital Partners is a company located in Washington DC, Washington, DC . References "KRK Capital Partners" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

263

Capital Energy Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Jump to: navigation, search Name Capital Energy Offshore Place Spain Sector Wind energy Product JV between Gamesa and Capital Energy to develop offshore wind farms...

264

Solar Capital Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Capital Inc Place Benicia, California Zip 94510 Sector Solar Product Start-up investment firm seeking control positions in...

265

Certified Capital Companies (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Program Type Equity Investment Certified Capital Companies (CAPCO), the creation of the Department of Economic Development (DED,) are venture capital firms which have...

266

Wind Farm Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Wind Farm Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Farm Capital Place Connecticut...

267

CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and disposition of capital assets. CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE More Documents & Publications Chapter 7 - Acquisition Planning Audit Report: IG-0841 REAL ESTATE PROPERTY GUIDE 2013...

268

Thermal-hydraulic model of a solid-oxide fuel cell. [17. 5 watts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the electrochemistry and thermal hydraulics in a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC). Dividing a single cell layer into a number of nodes, the model sets up the steady-state heat and mass transfer equations for each node in a cell layer. Based on the average thermal and compositional conditions at each node and a specified cell voltage, the model calculates the Nernst potential and the resultant current, heat generation, and heat removal rates at each node. These calculations yield the temperature and the fuel and oxidant compositions and partial pressure matrices for the entire cell. The simulation also provides related performance data for the fuel cell stack, such as energy efficiency, fuel utilization, and power density. The model can be used to simulate operation with different fuel gases, such as hydrogen, coal gas, and methanol reformate. A mathematical model such as this can be used to examine the effects of changing one or more of the various design variables and to evaluate the effectiveness of fabrication improvements in technology development. In the design phase, the model can be used to determine the size of the stack that will be required for a given power rating and to make design decisions regarding structure-specific parameters, such as the thicknesses of the anode, electrolyte, cathode, and interconnect layers and dimensions of the flow channels in the anode and the cathode. The model can also be helpful to the fuel cell system operator. For example, given a particular stack, the most favorable operating conditions can be determined by determining a priori the effects of altering process variables, such as flow rates and feed conditions. 6 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from Ethanol/Gasoline Fuels, Phase 2: Evaluations of Field Samples and Laboratory Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study to measure the flammability of gasoline/ethanol fuel vapors at low ambient temperatures and develop a mathematical model to predict temperatures at which flammable vapors were likely to form.

Gardiner, D. P.; Bardon, M. F.; LaViolette, M.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Residential wood burning: Energy modeling and conventional fuel displacement in a national sample  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the natural, built, and behavioral factors predictive of energy consumption for residential space heating with wood or conventional fuels. This study was a secondary analysis of survey data from a nationwide representative sample of 5,682 households collected DOE in the 1984-1985 REC survey. Included were: weather, census division and utility data, interviewer-supplied dwelling measurements and respondent-reported energy-related family behaviors. Linear-regression procedures were used to develop a model that identified key determinants accounting for the variability in wood consumption. A nonlinear-regression model was employed to estimate the amount of conventional fuels used for space heating. The model was also used to estimate the amount of conventional fuels being displaced by wood-heating systems. There was a significant (p {le} .05) linear relationship between the dependent variable, square root of cords burned, various independent variables.

Warsco, K.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Summary of "Materials Modeling and Simulations for Nuclear Fuels"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary of "Materials Modeling and Simulations for Nuclear Fuels" Summary of "Materials Modeling and Simulations for Nuclear Fuels" (MMSNF 2013) workshop Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share "Materials Modeling and Simulations for Nuclear Fuels" (MMSNF 2013) workshop Workshop Summary Presentation during MMSNF Workshop in Chicago

273

Multidisciplinary Modeling, Control, and Optimization of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Power System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes a systematical study, including multidisciplinary modeling, simulation, control, and optimization, of a fuel cell - gas turbine hybrid power system that aims… (more)

Abbassi Baharanchi, Atid

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of modeling the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in EPRI report 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004. This report presents findings of follow-up activities directed toward the ultimate goal of developing an aggregate model that is applicable to the important deposition phenomena in fossil drum-type boilers.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential on the cathode) and the resulting effects of the kinetic reactions. Next, at low currents, the behavior of a PEFC is dominated by kinetic losses. These losses mainly stem from the high overpotential of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). As the current is increased, ohmic losses become a factor in lowering the overall cell potential. These ohmic losses are mainly from ionic losses in the electrodes and separator. At high currents, mass-transport limitations become increasingly important. These losses are due to reactants not being able to reach the electrocatalytic sites. Key among the issues facing PEFCs today is water management. Due to their low operating temperature (transfer limitations). Figure 3 displays experimental evidence of the effects of water management on performance. In Figure 3(a), a neutron image of water content displays flooding near the outlet of the cell due to accumulation of liquid water and a decrease in the gas flowrates. The serpentine flow field is clearly visible with the water mainly underneath the ribs. Figure 3(b) shows polarization performance at 0.4 and 0.8 V and high-frequency resistance at 0.8 V as a function of cathode humidification temperature. At low current densities, as the inlet air becomes more humid, the membrane resistance decreases, and the performance increases. At higher current densities, the same effect occurs; however, the higher temperatures and more humid air also results in a lower inlet oxygen partial pressure.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential on the cathode) and the resulting effects of the kinetic reactions. Next, at low currents, the behavior of a PEFC is dominated by kinetic losses. These losses mainly stem from the high overpotential of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). As the current is increased, ohmic losses become a factor in lowering the overall cell potential. These ohmic losses are mainly from ionic losses in the electrodes and separator. At high currents, mass-transport limitations become increasingly important. These losses are due to reactants not being able to reach the electrocatalytic sites. Key among the issues facing PEFCs today is water management. Due to their low operating temperature (< 100 C), water exists in both liquid and vapor phases. Furthermore, state-of-the-art membranes require the use of water to provide high conductivity and fast proton transport. Thus, there is a tradeoff between having enough water for proton conduction (ohmic losses), but not too much or else the buildup of liquid water will cause a situation in which the reactant-gas-transport pathways are flooded (mass-transfer limitations). Figure 3 displays experimental evidence of the effects of water management on performance. In Figure 3(a), a neutron image of water content displays flooding near the outlet of the cell due to accumulation of liquid water and a decrease in the gas flowrates. The serpentine flow field is clearly visible with the water mainly underneath the ribs. Figure 3(b) shows polarization performance at 0.4 and 0.8 V and high-frequency resistance at 0.8 V as a function of cathode humidification temperature. At low current densities, as the inlet air becomes more humid, the membrane resistance decreases, and the performance increases. At higher current densities, the same effect occurs; however, the higher temperatures and more humid air also results in a lower inlet oxygen partial pressure.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Towards CFD Modelling of Critical Heat Flux in Fuel Rod Bundles  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes actual CFD approaches to subcooled boiling and investigates their capability to contribute to fuel assembly design. In a prototype version of the CFD code CFX a wall boiling model is implemented based on a wall heat flux partition algorithm. It can be shown, that the wall boiling model is able, to calculate the cross sectional averaged vapour volume fraction with good agreement to published measurements. The most sensitive parameters of the model are identified. Needs for more detailed experiments are established which are necessary to support further model development. Nevertheless in the paper the model is applied for the investigation of the phenomena inside a hot channel in a fuel assembly. Here the essential parameter is the critical heat flux. Although subcooled boiling represents only a preliminary state toward critical heat flux essential parameters like the swirl, the cross flow between adjacent channels and concentration regions of bubbles can be determined. By calculating the temperature at the rod surface the critical regions can be identified which might later on lead to departure from nucleate boiling and possible damage of the fuel pin. The application of up-to-date CFD with a subcooled boiling model for the simulation of a hot channel enables the comparison and the evaluation of different geometrical designs of the spacer grids of a fuel rod bundle. (authors)

Krepper, Eckhard [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Safety Research, D-01314 Dresden, POB 510119 (Germany); Egorov, Yury [ANSYS Germany GmbH Staudenfeldweg 12, D-83624 Otterfing (Germany); Koncar, Bostjan ['Jozef Stefan' Institute Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Grain Boundary Percolation Modeling of Fission Gas Release in Oxide Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new approach to fission gas release modeling in oxide fuels based on grain boundary network percolation. The method accounts for variability in the bubble growth and coalescence rates on individual grain boundaries, and the resulting effect on macroscopic fission gas release. Two-dimensional representa- tions of fuel pellet microstructures are considered, and the resulting gas release rates are compared with traditional two-stage Booth models, which do not account for long-range percolation on grain boundary net- works. The results show that the requirement of percolation of saturated grain boundaries can considerably reduce the total gas release rates, particularly when gas resolution is considered.

Paul C. Millett; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nite Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nite Capital Nite Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Nite Capital Place Libertyville, Illinois Zip 60048 Product Nite Capital provides private financing for small-cap and micro-cap public companies. Coordinates 40.95912°, -92.049669° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.95912,"lon":-92.049669,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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281

Infield Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infield Capital Infield Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Infield Capital Place Boulder, Colorado Product Infield Capital was founded in 2008, and is focused on investment in early-stage clean technologies for the transportation industry, with an emphasis on future powertrain technologies. Coordinates 42.74962°, -109.714163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.74962,"lon":-109.714163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Greenview Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenview Capital Greenview Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenview Capital Place Libertyville, Illinois Zip 60048 Product Greenview Capital is a U.S. based consulting firm and merchant bank specialising in taking private companies public through a reverse merger or alternative public offering. Coordinates 40.95912°, -92.049669° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.95912,"lon":-92.049669,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

283

CMEA Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CMEA Capital CMEA Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: CMEA Capital Name CMEA Capital Address 1 Embarcadero Center Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Region Bay Area Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1989 Phone number 415-352-1250 Website http://www.cmea.com/ Coordinates 37.794497°, -122.39962° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.794497,"lon":-122.39962,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

284

Osmosis Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Osmosis Capital Osmosis Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Osmosis Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 9DN Sector Carbon Product An investment firm seeking low carbon economy opportunity investments through its Osmosis Capital Fund. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

285

Essays on international capital flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three chapters on international capital flows. Chapter 1 emphasizes the importance of innovations in the investment opportunity set, captured by changes in expected asset returns, as an important ...

Brandão, Tatiana Glindmeier Didier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Vintage Capital and Creditor Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide novel evidence linking the level of creditor protection provided by law to the degree of usage of technologically older, vintage capital in the airline industry. Using a panel of aircraft-level data around the ...

Benmelech, Efraim

287

Greener Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

clean technology VC. References Greener Capital1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

288

Atrium Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atrium Capital Atrium Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Atrium Capital Name Atrium Capital Address 3000 Sand Hill Road, Building 2, Suite 240 Place Menlo Park, California Zip 94025 Region Bay Area Product Corporate strategic venture investing Year founded 1991 Phone number (650) 233-7878 Website http://www.atriumcapital.com/ Coordinates 37.4244767°, -122.1942422° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.4244767,"lon":-122.1942422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

289

Venture Capital Program (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Venture Capital Program, provided by the ND Department of Commerce, is an innovative financial program that provides flexible financing through debt and equity investments for new or expanding...

290

Multi-Scale Modeling of Irradiation Effects on Nuclear Fuel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ab Initio-Based Rate Theory Modeling of Radiation Induced Segregation in ... Benchmarking of Structural Materials Pre-Selected for Advanced Nuclear Reactors.

291

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

momentum, and continuity equations. Models of all the major components-compressor, condenser, expansion device, and evaporator-are included. Available soon for public download....

292

Validation of Models and Simulations of Nuclear Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ... Multi-scale theoretical models and computer simulations are often used to ...

293

Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Model Purpose ... present value of the wind technology over its economi c life and then competes wind technology with fossil and other alternatives in the capacity ...

294

Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report focuses on understanding how analytical system modeling and data from AFV experiences could improve our understanding of the dynamic forces governing the transition to a hydrogen future.

Welch, C.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Summary report on the fuel performance modeling of the AFC-2A, 2B irradiation experiments  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to determine the fuel and cladding temperature history during irradiation of the AFC-2A, 2B transmutation metallic fuel alloy irradiation experiments containing transuranic and rare earth elements. Addition of the rare earth elements intends to simulate potential fission product carry-over from pyro-metallurgical reprocessing. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-2A, 2B rodlets revealed breaches in the rodlets and fuel melting which was attributed to the release of the fission gas into the helium gap between the rodlet cladding and the capsule which houses six individually encapsulated rodlets. This release is not anticipated during nominal operation of the AFC irradiation vehicle that features a double encapsulated design in which sodium bonded metallic fuel is separated from the ATR coolant by the cladding and the capsule walls. The modeling effort is focused on assessing effects of this unanticipated event on the fuel and cladding temperature with an objective to compare calculated results with the temperature limits of the fuel and the cladding.

Pavel G. Medvedev

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Gas Turbine (GT) Systems Steady State Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are of great interest nowadays. The feature of SOFCs makes them suitable for hybrid systems because they work high operating temperature and when combined with conventional turbine power plants offer high cycle efficiencies. In this work a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine power system model is developed. Two models have been developed based on simple thermodynamic expressions. The simple models are used in the preliminary part of the study and a more realistic based on the performance maps. A comparative study of the simulated configurations, based on an energy analysis is used to perform a parametric study of the overall hybrid system efficiency. Some important observations are made by means of a sensitivity study of the whole cycle for the selected configuration. The results of the selected model were compared to an earlier model from an available literature.

Penyarat Chinda; Pascal Brault

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions.

Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from High Ethanol Content Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study determined the flammability of fuel tank headspace vapors as a function of ambient temperature for seven E85 fuel blends, two types of gasoline, and denatured ethanol at a low tank fill level.

Gardiner, D.; Bardon, M.; Pucher, G.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Economic Analysis of Select Fuel Cycles Using the Steady-State Analysis Model for Advanced Fuel Cycles Schemes (SMAFS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is currently considering alternatives to the current U.S. once-through fuel cycle. This report evaluates the relative economics of three alternative fuel cycles to determine those cost components important to overall fuel cycle costs and total generation costs. The analysis determined that the unit cost of nuclear reactors is the most important nuclear generation cost parameter in future fuel cycles. The report also evaluates ...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

Athens University of Economics and BusinessCapital Mobility, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Rate of Return to Capital in the Presence of Non-Traded Goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper constructs a general equilibrium trade model of a small open economy producing an exported good, an imported good and a non-traded good by using two or more factors of production, one of which, namely capital, is imperfectly internationally mobile. Within this framework, it is shown that an exogenous capital inflow may lead to a depreciation of the real exchange rate, and to an increase in both the nominal and the real rate of return to capital. For these paradoxical results to occur it is necessary that the non-traded good is capital intensive. Key words: capital mobility, real exchange rate, nominal and real rate of return to capital Correspondence:

Konstantine Gatsios; Konstantine Gatsios; Konstantine Gatsios

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Macro System Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET; versions 1 and 2) H2A Production H2A Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis (HyDRA) HyPro...

304

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

membrane, liquid and ice phases; the movement of ice throughthe membrane, vapor, and ice phases. As in their 1-D model,species, element index, or ice phase = into the control

Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-water cycles. Deposition in drum boilers has been identified as the area of broadest concern to the industry; therefore, an improved understanding of deposition in drum boilers is expected to represent the greatest source of benefits and value to end users. The overall objective of the modeling described here is to develop a comprehensive, integrated model for deposition process...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

306

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Through-the-electrode model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with independently measured parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A one dimensional model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell was developed which makes use of independently measured parameters for predicting single cell performance. Optimization of catalyst layer formulation and properties are explored. Impact of temperature and cathode pressure upon system performance was investigated.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Grot, S.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Control-relevant Modelling and Linear Analysis of Instabilities in Oxy-fuel Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control-relevant Modelling and Linear Analysis of Instabilities in Oxy-fuel Combustion Dagfinn combustion have been proposed as an alternative to conventional gas turbine cycles for achieving CO2-capture for CO2 sequestration purposes. While combustion instabilities is a problem in modern conventional gas

Foss, Bjarne A.

310

Modelling and Design Optimization of Low Speed Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of emissions to global climate change. Although electric cars and buses have been the focus of much of electricModelling and Design Optimization of Low Speed Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles by Matthew Blair Supervisors: Dr. Zuomin Dong ABSTRACT Electric vehicles, as an emerging transportation platform, have been

Victoria, University of

311

Through-the-electrode model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with independently measured parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A one dimensional model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell was developed which makes use of independently measured parameters for predicting single cell performance. Optimization of catalyst layer formulation and properties are explored. Impact of temperature and cathode pressure upon system performance is investigated.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Grot, S.A.; Vandergborgh, N.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Optimal Control of the Solid Fuel Ignition Model with H1-Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimal control problems for the stationary as well as the time-dependent solid fuel ignition model are investigated. Existence of optimal controls is proved, and optimality systems are derived. The analysis is based on a closedness lemma for the exponential ... Keywords: control of exponential nonlinearity, explosion phenomena, optimal control, optimality conditions

Kazufumi Ito; Karl Kunisch

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Efficient Numerical Methods for an Anisotropic, Nonisothermal, Two-Phase Transport Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carry out model and numerical studies for a three-dimensional, anisotropic, nonisothermal, two-phase steady state transport model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) in this paper. Besides fully addressing the conservation equations of mass, ... Keywords: Anisotropy, Combined finite element-upwind finite volume, Kirchhoff transformation, Newton's linearization, Nonisothermality, Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), Two-phase transport

Pengtao Sun

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Long-Term Wisconsin Capital Assets Deferral and Wisconsin-Source Asset  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Wisconsin Capital Assets Deferral and Wisconsin-Source Long-Term Wisconsin Capital Assets Deferral and Wisconsin-Source Asset Exclusion Qualified Wisconsin Business Certification (Wisconsin) Long-Term Wisconsin Capital Assets Deferral and Wisconsin-Source Asset Exclusion Qualified Wisconsin Business Certification (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Personal Tax Incentives Provider Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation WEDC may certify businesses as a "Qualified Wisconsin Business". The designation allows investors with WI capital gains tax liability to both defer that tax liability and if an investment is maintained for a minimum

315

System Design Description and Requirements for Modeling the Off-Gas Systems for Fuel Recycling Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides descriptions of the off-gases evolved during spent nuclear fuel processing and the systems used to capture the gases of concern. Two reprocessing techniques are discussed, namely aqueous separations and electrochemical (pyrochemical) processing. The unit operations associated with each process are described in enough detail so that computer models to mimic their behavior can be developed. The document also lists the general requirements for the desired computer models.

Daryl R. Haefner; Jack D. Law; Troy J. Tranter

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Modelling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic and oxide fuels for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A robust and reliable code to model the irradiation behavior of metal and oxide fuels in sodium cooled fast reactors is developed. Modeling capability was enhanced by adopting a non-empirical mechanistic approach to the ...

Karahan, Aydin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Formulation, Implementation and Validation of a Two-Fluid model in a Fuel Cell CFD Code  

SciTech Connect

Water management is one of the main challenges in PEM Fuel Cells. While water is essential for membrane electrical conductivity, excess liquid water leads to ooding of catalyst layers. Despite the fact that accurate prediction of two-phase transport is key for optimal water management, understanding of the two-phase transport in fuel cells is relatively poor. Wang et. al. [1], [2] have studied the two-phase transport in the channel and diffusion layer separately using a multiphase mixture model. The model fails to accurately predict saturation values for high humidity inlet streams. Nguyen et. al. [3] developed a two-dimensional, two-phase, isothermal, isobaric, steady state model of the catalyst and gas diffusion layers. The model neglects any liquid in the channel. Djilali et. al. [4] developed a three-dimensional two-phase multicomponent model. The model is an improvement over previous models, but neglects drag between the liquid and the gas phases in the channel. In this work, we present a comprehensive two- fluid model relevant to fuel cells. Models for two-phase transport through Channel, Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) and Channel-GDL interface, are discussed. In the channel, the gas and liquid pressures are assumed to be same. The surface tension effects in the channel are incorporated using the continuum surface force (CSF) model. The force at the surface is expressed as a volumetric body force and added as a source to the momentum equation. In the GDL, the gas and liquid are assumed to be at different pressures. The difference in the pressures (capillary pressure) is calculated using an empirical correlations. At the Channel-GDL interface, the wall adhesion affects need to be taken into account. SIMPLE-type methods recast the continuity equation into a pressure-correction equation, the solution of which then provides corrections for velocities and pressures. However, in the two-fluid model, the presence of two phasic continuity equations gives more freedom and more complications. A general approach would be to form a mixture continuity equation by linearly combining the phasic continuity equations using appropriate weighting factors. Analogous to mixture equation for pressure correction, a difference equation is used for the volume/phase fraction by taking the difference between the phasic continuity equations. The relative advantages of the above mentioned algorithmic variants for computing pressure correction and volume fractions are discussed and quantitatively assessed. Preliminary model validation is done for each component of the fuel cell. The two-phase transport in the channel is validated using empirical correlations. Transport in the GDL is validated against results obtained from LBM and VOF simulation techniques. The Channel-GDL interface transport will be validated against experiment and empirical correlation of droplet detachment at the interface. References [1] Y. Wang S. Basu and C.Y. Wang. Modeling two-phase flow in pem fuel cell channels. J. Power Sources, 179:603{617, 2008. [2] P. K. Sinha and C. Y. Wang. Liquid water transport in a mixed-wet gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Chem. Eng. Sci., 63:1081-1091, 2008. [3] Guangyu Lin and Trung Van Nguyen. A two-dimensional two-phase model of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 153(2):A372{A382, 2006. [4] T. Berning and N. Djilali. A 3d, multiphase, multicomponent model of the cathode and anode of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 150(12):A1589{A1598, 2003.

Kunal Jain, Vernon Cole, Sanjiv Kumar and N. Vaidya

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

RFI Comments - Telco Capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... High-level Design Science Process Flows ... ED DPOID T APPLICATIOD FLOW COD TROL ... modeling with stochastic message sequence charts. ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

319

No more electrical infrastructure: towards fuel cell powered data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the use of fuel cells for powering data centers, based on benefits in reliability, capital and operational costs, and reduced environmental emissions. Using fuel cells effectively in data centers introduces several challenges and we highlight ...

Ana Carolina Riekstin, Sean James, Aman Kansal, Jie Liu, Eric Peterson

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Huge amounts of capital needed  

SciTech Connect

Investor-owned electric utilities will require $24 to $25 billion in capital funds in 1979, up about $2 billion from 1978. Public utility and rural electric cooperative systems will need, perhaps, another $8 billion. Rural electric cooperatives--some with big loan guarantees from the Rural Electrification Administration--and municipals ought to be able to raise the money they need for their projects. The investor-owned companies will have to go into a tight capital market-place for nearly 60% of the money they need for their projects. Most companies will be able to raise the capital they need through stock or bond offerings, partnerships with foreign banks and institutions, or a combination of these. Some companies already have turned to leveraged leasing (explained in-depth in this article) and others are investigating leasing, even of base-load generating units. But for all investor-owned companies the key to the capital market is continuing, prompt and adequate rate relief provided by state and Federal regulatory agencies. In states where commissions have balked at providing companies with adequate rates of return utilities are into the capital market for only the barest necessities. New methods for raising funds are discussed for TVA and Duke Power. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Earthrise Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earthrise Capital Earthrise Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Earthrise Capital Name Earthrise Capital Address 45 Rockefeller Plaza, 20th Floor Place New York, New York Zip 10111 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Venture capital fund primarily focused on energy, power and water production and use Phone number (212) 757-1007 Website http://www.earthrisecapital.co Coordinates 40.758928°, -73.977127° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.758928,"lon":-73.977127,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

322

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

323

SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access to Capital to someone by Access to Capital to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Access to Capital on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Access to Capital Photo of a room full of people seated in rows with a few standing in the background. Two hands in the crowd are holding up sheets of paper with 'Like'. Participants at the SunShot Summit breakout session "Big and Small Ideas:

324

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

A model and optimization of alternative fuel vehicle fleet composition with triple bottom line concerns .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alternative fuel types and technologies are increasingly being advocated for transportation needs to ameliorate concerns around energy security, climate change, and fuel cost. Each fuel… (more)

Zullo, Johnathon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? There is a growing interest in fuel cells for hybrid system. Fuel cells when combined with conventional turbine power plants offer high fuel efficiencies.… (more)

Srivastava, Nischal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Using a Quasipotential Transformation for Modeling Diffusion Media in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell , Numerical Heat Transferof Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Using a Two-EquationExchange Membrane Fuel Cells 2. Absolute Permeability ,

Weber, Adam Z.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Dragonfly Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dragonfly Capital Dragonfly Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Dragonfly Capital Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28203 Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Charlotte-based investment bank providing corporate finance and M&A advisory services to middle market companies, primarily in renewable energy Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

329

Ardour Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ardour Capital Ardour Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Ardour Capital Investments LLC Address 350 5th ave Place New York, New York Zip 10118 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 2002 Phone number 2123752950 Website http://www.ardourcapital.com Coordinates 40.74807°, -73.984959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.74807,"lon":-73.984959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Cascadia Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cascadia Capital Cascadia Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Cascadia Capital Address 701 Fifth Avenue Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98104 Region Pacific Northwest Area Product Investment bank focusing on cleantech deals Website http://www.cascadiacapital.com Coordinates 47.6044155°, -122.3298997° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6044155,"lon":-122.3298997,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Radiolysis Model Sensitivity Analysis for a Used Fuel Storage Canister  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the M3 milestone (M3FT-13PN0810027) to report on a radiolysis computer model analysis that estimates the generation of radiolytic products for a storage canister. The analysis considers radiolysis outside storage canister walls and within the canister fill gas over a possible 300-year lifetime. Previous work relied on estimates based directly on a water radiolysis G-value. This work also includes that effect with the addition of coupled kinetics for 111 reactions for 40 gas species to account for radiolytic-induced chemistry, which includes water recombination and reactions with air.

Wittman, Richard S.

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

Improvement of the Post-Blowdown Fuel Channel Analysis Model of Candu for a 35% RIH Break LOCA Without ECC  

SciTech Connect

A CATHENA model for a post-blowdown fuel channel analysis has been improved from an existing one for a Candu-6 reactor, and the analysis for a RIH 35% LBLOCA/LOECC has been performed. The results for the blowdown and post blowdown analyses show that the post blowdown model and its connection with the blowdown analysis model is successfully implemented. Also the 3-D CFD model for the fluid flow and heat transfer in the Candu fuel channel, is being developed for the post blowdown fuel channel heatup experiment CS28-1 using CFX 5.6 and its recent progress is described. (authors)

Rhee, B. W.; Kang, H.S.; Min, B.J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A Mathematical Model for Predicting the Life of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes Subjected to Hydration Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under typical PEM fuel cell operating conditions, part of membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEM FC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane life-time. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used for lifetime prediction of a GORE-SELECT membrane.

S. F. Burlatsky; M. Gummalla; J. O'Neill; V. V. Atrazhev; A. N. Varyukhin; D. V. Dmitriev; N. S. Erikhman

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

What Matters for Financial Development? Capital Controls, Institutions, and Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the extent and intensity of capital account controls, themeasure of the intensity of capital controls,” Internationalto account for the intensity of capital controls. The most

Chinn, Menzie David; Ito, Hiro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

New Roads to Capitalism: China and Global Value Chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in technology or capital-intensity between these sub-levels of capital- and labor-intensities, asset specificity,technologies, capital- and labor-intensities, representing

Dallas, Mark Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Uranium Nitride as LWR TRISO Fuel: Thermodynamic Modeling of U-C-N  

SciTech Connect

TRISO coated particle fuel is envisioned as a next generation replacement for current urania pellet fuel in LWR applications. To obtain adequate fissile loading the kernel of the TRISO particle will need to be UN. In support of the fuel development effort, an assessment of phase regions of interest in the U-C-N system was undertaken as the fuel will be prepared by the carbothermic reduction of the oxide and it will be in equilibrium with carbon within the TRISO particle. The phase equilibria and thermochemistry of the U-C-N system is reviewed, including nitrogen pressure measurements above various phase fields. Selected measurements were used to fit a first order model of the UC1-xNx phase, represented by the inter-solution of UN and UC. Fit to the data was significantly improved by also adjusting the heat of formation for UN by ~12 kJ/mol and the phase equilbria was best reproduced by also adjusting the heat for U2N3 by +XXX. The determined interaction parameters yielded a slightly positive deviation from ideality, which agrees with lattice parameter measurements which show positive deviation from Vegard s law. The resultant model together with reported values for other phases in the system were used to generate isothermal sections of the U-C-N phase diagram. Nitrogen partial pressures were also computed for regions of interest.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Shin, Dongwon [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this report is to describe the strategy for coupling three process level models to produce an integrated Used Fuel Degradation Model (FDM). The FDM, which is based on fundamental chemical and physical principals, provides direct calculation of radionuclide source terms for use in repository performance assessments. The G-value for H2O2 production (Gcond) to be used in the Mixed Potential Model (MPM) (H2O2 is the only radiolytic product presently included but others will be added as appropriate) needs to account for intermediate spur reactions. The effects of these intermediate reactions on [H2O2] are accounted for in the Radiolysis Model (RM). This report details methods for applying RM calculations that encompass the effects of these fast interactions on [H2O2] as the solution composition evolves during successive MPM iterations and then represent the steady-state [H2O2] in terms of an “effective instantaneous or conditional” generation value (Gcond). It is anticipated that the value of Gcond will change slowly as the reaction progresses through several iterations of the MPM as changes in the nature of fuel surface occur. The Gcond values will be calculated with the RM either after several iterations or when concentrations of key reactants reach threshold values determined from previous sensitivity runs. Sensitivity runs with RM indicate significant changes in G-value can occur over narrow composition ranges. The objective of the mixed potential model (MPM) is to calculate the used fuel degradation rates for a wide range of disposal environments to provide the source term radionuclide release rates for generic repository concepts. The fuel degradation rate is calculated for chemical and oxidative dissolution mechanisms using mixed potential theory to account for all relevant redox reactions at the fuel surface, including those involving oxidants produced by solution radiolysis and provided by the radiolysis model (RM). The RM calculates the concentration of species generated at any specific time and location from the surface of the fuel. Several options being considered for coupling the RM and MPM are described in the report. Different options have advantages and disadvantages based on the extent of coding that would be required and the ease of use of the final product.

Buck, Edgar C.; Jerden, James L.; Ebert, William L.; Wittman, Richard S.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

The development of an improved human capital index for assessing and forecasting national capacity and development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human capital theory is accepted as one of the foundational theories of socioeconomic development. Although, according to founding scholars, any acquired qualities and abilities that help individuals and groups be economically productive can be considered as individual or group human capital, the classical human capital model focuses on schooling and training as the major factors comprising human capital on individual, group, and national levels. Consequently, current human capital measurement tools generally assess only educational attainment on these levels. Because of this overly simplified approach, the present manner in which human capital is commonly measured by national and international entities creates difficulty in accurately assessing the strengths and weaknesses of human capital within and between countries. A major challenge to improvement of human capital variables is identification and availability of data. The factors suggested to have significant impact on human capital are mostly intangible. Collecting such data is cost prohibitive for many developing countries. Consequently, national policy-makers, multinational corporations and international aid organizations use simplified estimates of human capital. The purpose of this dissertation is to construct and validate a more comprehensive human capital index. Study research questions include: 1) What are the significant factors that affect national human capital as revealed in the literature? 2) Can an expanded measure of national human capital be developed to reflect adequate content of HC identified in the literature? 3) What is the preliminary evidence supporting the validity of the newly developed human capital index? This analysis resulted in the formation of a new human capital index, which is expanded due to the incorporation of new variables together with the routinely used education measures. The sample panel data is from 163 countries for the years 2000-2005. Literature content analysis, factor analysis and regression analyses are used to support the exploration of the research questions. The results of the analyses suggest that a human capital model, which includes additional variables together with currently used education variables, predicts the level of national economic development significantly better than the model which includes only education measures. These results have implications for human resource development, corporate human capital management, national education, and international aid policies.

Verkhohlyad, Olha

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

MELCOR Model of the Spent Fuel Pool of Fukushima Dai-ichi Unit 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unit 4 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered a hydrogen explosion at 6:00 am on March 15, 2011, exactly 3.64 days after the earthquake hit the plant and the off-site power was lost. The earthquake occurred on March 11 at 2:47 pm. Since the reactor of this Unit 4 was defueled on November 29, 2010, and all its fuel was stored in the spent fuel pool (SFP4), it was first believed that the explosion was caused by hydrogen generated by the spent fuel, in particular, by the recently discharged core. The hypothetical scenario was: power was lost, cooling to the SFP4 water was lost, pool water heated/boiled, water level decreased, fuel was uncovered, hot Zircaloy reacted with steam, hydrogen was generated and accumulated above the pool, and the explosion occurred. Recent analyses of the radioisotopes present in the water of the SFP4 and underwater video indicated that this scenario did not occur - the fuel in this pool was not damaged and was never uncovered the hydrogen of the explosion was apparently generated in Unit 3 and transported through exhaust ducts that shared the same chimney with Unit 4. This paper will try to answer the following questions: Could that hypothetical scenario in the SFP4 had occurred? Could the spent fuel in the SPF4 generate enough hydrogen to produce the explosion that occurred 3.64 days after the earthquake? Given the magnitude of the explosion, it was estimated that at least 150 kg of hydrogen had to be generated. As part of the investigations of this accident, MELCOR models of the SFP4 were prepared and a series of calculations were completed. The latest version of MELCOR, version 2.1 (Ref. 1), was employed in these calculations. The spent fuel pool option for BWR fuel was selected in MELCOR. The MELCOR model of the SFP4 consists of a total of 1535 fuel assemblies out of which 548 assemblies are from the core defueled on Nov. 29, 2010, 783 assemblies are older assemblies, and 204 are new/fresh assemblies. The total decay heat of the fuel in the pool was, at the time of the accident, 2.284 MWt, of which 1.872 MWt were from the 548 assemblies of the last core discharged and 0.412 MWt were from the older 783 assemblies. These decay heat values were calculated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the ORIGEN2.2 code (Ref. 2) - they agree with values reported elsewhere (Ref. 3). The pool dimensions are 9.9 m x 12.2 m x 11.8 m (height), and with the water level at 11.5 m, the pool volume is 1389 m3, of which only 1240 m3 is water, as some volume is taken by the fuel and by the fuel racks. The initial water temperature of the SFP4 was assumed to be 301 K. The fuel racks are made of an aluminum alloy but are modeled in MELCOR with stainless steel and B4C. MELCOR calculations were completed for different initial water levels: 11.5 m (pool almost full, water is only 0.3 m below the top rim), 4.4577 m (top of the racks), 4.2 m, and 4.026 m (top of the active fuel). A calculation was also completed for a rapid loss of water due to a leak at the bottom of the pool, with the fuel rapidly uncovered and oxidized in air. Results of these calculations are shown in the enclosed Table I. The calculation with the initial water level at 11.5 m (full pool) takes 11 days for the water to boil down to the top of the fuel racks, 11.5 days for the fuel to be uncovered, 14.65 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen and 19 days for the pool to be completely dry. The calculation with the initial water level at 4.4577 m, takes 1.1 days to uncover the fuel and 4.17 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen. The calculation with the initial water level at 4.02 m takes 3.63 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen this is exactly the time when the actual explosion occurred in Unit 4. Finally, fuel oxidation in air after the pool drained the water in 20 minutes, generates only 10 kg of hydrogen this is because very little steam is available and Zircaloy (Zr) oxidation with the oxygen of the air does not generate hydrogen. MELCOR calculated water levels and hydrogen generated in the SFP4 as a function of time for initial water le

Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Venture Capital, High Technology and Regional Development’  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the role ofventure capital in technological innovation and regional development. Both aggregate data and a unique firm level data base are employed to determine the location of major centres of venture capital, flows of venture capital investments, and patterns of investment syndication or coinvestment among venture capital firms. Three major centres of venture capital arc identified: California (San Francisco-Silicon Valley); New York; and Ncw England (Massachusetts-Connecticut): as well as three minor venture capital centres: Illinois (Chicago); Texas; and Minnesota. Venture capital firms are found to cluster in areas with high concentrations of financial institutions and those with high concentrations of technology-intensive enterprises. Venture capital firms which are based in financial centres are typically export-oriented, while those in technology centres tend to invest in their own region and attract outside venture capital. Venture capital investmcnts flow predominantly toward established high technology areas such as Silicon Valley and Boston-Iioute 128, and venturc investing is also characterized by high degrees of intra-and inter-regional syndication or coinvestment. The venture capital industry displays a high level of agglomeration due to the information intensive nature of the investment process and the importance of venture capital networks in locating investments, mobilizing resources, and establishing business start-ups. The existence of well developed venture capital networks in technology-based regions significantly accelerates the pace of technological innovation and economic development in those regions.

Richard L. Florida; Martin Kenneyt

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Preliminary Design Report for Modeling of Hydrogen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the clad-ding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. The uptake of hydrogen is limited to the equilibrium solubility calculated by applying Sievert's law. The uptake of hydrogen is an exothermic reaction that accelerates the heatup of a fuel rod. An embrittlement criteria is described that accounts for hydrogen and oxygen concentration and the extent of oxidation. A design is described for implementing the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code. A test matrix is described for assessing the impact of the proposed models on the calculated behavior of fuel rods in severe accident conditions. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled; "Preliminary Design Report for Modeling of Hydrogen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents."

Siefken, Larry James

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Understanding Global Capitalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the model emerging in Venezuela, and we could say with 21stBolivarian initiative, Venezuela. I was wondering how theand that's done by the way, Venezuela and Argentina are good

Robinson, William I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of Novel PEM Membrane and Multiphase CD Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To understand heat and water management phenomena better within an operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell's (PEMFC) conditions, a three-dimensional, two-phase computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow model has been developed and simulated for a complete PEMFC. Both liquid and gas phases are considered in the model by taking into account the gas flow, diffusion, charge transfer, change of phase, electro-osmosis, and electrochemical reactions to understand the overall dynamic behaviors of species within an operating PEMFC. The CFD model is solved numerically under different parametric conditions in terms of water management issues in order to improve cell performance. The results obtained from the CFD two-phase flow model simulations show improvement in cell performance as well as water management under PEMFCs operational conditions as compared to the results of a single phase flow model available in the literature. The quantitative information obtained from the two-phase model simulation results helped to develop a CFD control algorithm for low temperature PEM fuel cell stacks which opens up a route in designing improvement of PEMFC for better operational efficiency and performance. To understand heat and water management phenomena better within an operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell's (PEMFC) conditions, a three-dimensional, two-phase computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow model has been developed and simulated for a complete PEMFC. Both liquid and gas phases are considered in the model by taking into account the gas flow, diffusion, charge transfer, change of phase, electro-osmosis, and electrochemical reactions to understand the overall dynamic behaviors of species within an operating PEMFC. The CFD model is solved numerically under different parametric conditions in terms of water management issues in order to improve cell performance. The results obtained from the CFD two-phase flow model simulations show improvement in cell performance as well as water management under PEMFCs operational conditions as compared to the results of a single phase flow model available in the literature. The quantitative information obtained from the two-phase model simulation results helped to develop a CFD control algorithm for low temperature PEM fuel cell stacks which opens up a route in designing improvement of PEMFC for better operational efficiency and performance.

K. J. Berry; Susanta Das

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket  

SciTech Connect

This study focused on creating a new tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel performance model and demonstrating the integration of this model into an existing system of neutronics and heat transfer codes, creating a user-friendly option for including fuel performance analysis within system design optimization and system-level trade-off studies. The end product enables both a deeper understanding and better overall system performance of nuclear energy systems limited or greatly impacted by TRISO fuel performance. A thorium-fueled hybrid fusion-fission Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) blanket design was used for illustrating the application of this new capability and demonstrated both the importance of integrating fuel performance calculations into mainstream design studies and the impact that this new integrated analysis had on system-level design decisions. A new TRISO fuel performance model named TRIUNE was developed and verified and validated during this work with a novel methodology established for simulating the actual lifetime of a TRISO particle during repeated passes through a pebble bed. In addition, integrated self-consistent calculations were performed for neutronics depletion analysis, heat transfer calculations, and then fuel performance modeling for a full parametric study that encompassed over 80 different design options that went through all three phases of analysis. Lastly, side studies were performed that included a comparison of thorium and depleted uranium (DU) LIFE blankets as well as some uncertainty quantification work to help guide future experimental work by assessing what material properties in TRISO fuel performance modeling are most in need of improvement. A recommended thorium-fueled hybrid LIFE engine design was identified with an initial fuel load of 20MT of thorium, 15% TRISO packing within the graphite fuel pebbles, and a 20cm neutron multiplier layer with beryllium pebbles in flibe molten salt coolant. It operated at a system power level of 2000 MW{sub th}, took about 3.5 years to reach full plateau power, and was capable of an End of Plateau burnup of 38.7 %FIMA if considering just the neutronic constraints in the system design; however, fuel performance constraints led to a maximum credible burnup of 12.1 %FIMA due to a combination of internal gas pressure and irradiation effects on the TRISO materials (especially PyC) leading to SiC pressure vessel failures. The optimal neutron spectrum for the thorium-fueled blanket options evaluated seemed to favor a hard spectrum (low but non-zero neutron multiplier thicknesses and high TRISO packing fractions) in terms of neutronic performance but the fuel performance constraints demonstrated that a significantly softer spectrum would be needed to decrease the rate of accumulation of fast neutron fluence in order to improve the maximum credible burnup the system could achieve.

Powers, J J

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary Model Darlene Steward/ Mike Penev National Renewable Energy Laboratory Integrated Stationary Power and Transportation Workshop Phoenix, Arizona October 27, 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future 2 Introduction Goal: Develop a cost analysis tool that will be flexible and comprehensive enough to realistically analyze a wide variety of potential combined heat and power/hydrogen production scenarios Approach: Rely on the H2A discounted cash flow methodology to develop a new stationary systems model With the help of industry partners, develop and analyze a range of realistic case studies for tri-generation systems. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

347

A Dynamic Two-Phase Flow Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A dynamic two phase flow model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is presented. The two dimensional along-the-channel model includes the two phase flow of water (gaseous and liquid) in the porous diffusion layers and in the catalyst layers, as well as the transport of the species in the gas phase. Moreover, proton and water transport in the membrane and the oxygen reduction reaction in the cathodic catalyst layer is accounted for. The discretisation of the resulting flow equations is done by a mixed finite element approach. Based on this the transport equations for the species in each phase are discretised by a finite volume scheme. The coupled mixed finite element/finite volume approach gives the spatially resolved water and gas saturation and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations for the electrons and protons are solved by using Galerkin finite element schemes.

Karsten Kühn; K. Kühn; Mario Ohlberger; Jürgen O. Schumacher; C. Ziegler; R. Klöfkorn; Karsten Kühn Ab; Mario Ohlberger Cd; Jürgen O. Schumacher A; Christoph Ziegler; Robert Klöfkorn C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- kinetics models have been developed to study partial oxidation, steam or autothermal reforming of methane1 Reforming Alexandre Lebouvier, François Cauneau and Laurent Fulcheri* Center for Energy and Processes, MINES-assisted diesel fuel reformer developed for two different applications: (i) onboard H2 production for fuel cell

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

Mont Vista Capital LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vista Capital LLC Vista Capital LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Mont Vista Capital LLC Place New York, New York Zip 10167 Sector Services Product Mont Vista Capital is a leading global provider of services to clients in the alternative energy industry. Mont Vista also seeks proprietary trading and growth equity opportunities in alternative energy markets which add value for our stakeholders. References Mont Vista Capital LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Mont Vista Capital LLC is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Mont Vista Capital LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mont_Vista_Capital_LLC&oldid=348916"

350

Human Capital Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Capital Management Human Capital Management Human Capital Management The strategic management of human capital requires comprehensive planning and analysis in order to develop, implement, and evaluate programs that support every facet of employee work life. DOE human capital initiatives are designed to support continuous improvement and accountability in accordance with the DOE Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP), which is an internal DOE audit process of servicing human resources offices and addresses those documents that require coordination with the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer before being implemented; Human Resource Directors; the Department's 5-year Strategic Human Capital Management Plan; Departmental element workforce plans; the Department's personnel accountability program that is used

351

Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

EM Contractors for Capital Asset Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Read the EM Contractors for Capital Asset Projects list, which includes the project name, number, site, and contractor.

353

Determination of Basic Structure-Property Relations for Processing and Modeling in Advanced Nuclear Fuel: Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to study structure-property relations in solid solutions of nitrides and oxides with surrogate elements to simulate the behavior of fuels of inert matrix fuels of interest to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), with emphasis in zirconium-based materials. Work with actual fuels will be carried out in parallel in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Three key aspects will be explored: microstructure characterization through measurement of global texture evolution and local crystallographic variations using Electron Backscattering Diffraction (EBSD); determination of mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, quasi-static compression strength, and hardness, as functions of load and temperature, and, finally, development of structure-property relations to describe mechanical behavior of the fuels based on experimental data. Materials tested will be characterized to identify the mechanisms of deformation and fracture and their relationship to microstructure and its evolution. New aspects of this research are the inclusion of crystallographic information into the evaluation of fuel performance and the incorporation of statistical variations of microstructural variables into simplified models of mechanical behavior of fuels that account explicitly for these variations. The work is expected to provide insight into processing conditions leading to better fuel performance and structural reliability during manufacturing and service, as well as providing a simplified testing model for future fuel production.

Kirk Wheeler; Manuel Parra; Pedro Peralta

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ELECTROCHEMISTRY AND ON-CELL REFORMATION MODELING FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL STACKS  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Providing adequate and efficient cooling schemes for solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) stacks continues to be a challenge coincident with the development of larger, more powerful stacks. The endothermic steam-methane reformation reaction can provide cooling and improved system efficiency when performed directly on the electrochemically active anode. Rapid kinetics of the endothermic reaction typically causes a localized temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet. It is desirable to extend the endothermic effect over more of the cell area and mitigate the associated differences in temperature on the cell to alleviate subsequent thermal stresses. In this study, modeling tools validated for the prediction of fuel use, on-cell methane reforming, and the distribution of temperature within SOFC stacks, are employed to provide direction for modifying the catalytic activity of anode materials to control the methane conversion rate. Improvements in thermal management that can be achieved through on-cell reforming is predicted and discussed. Two operating scenarios are considered: one in which the methane fuel is fully pre-reformed, and another in which a substantial percentage of the methane is reformed on-cell. For the latter, a range of catalytic activity is considered and the predicted thermal effects on the cell are presented. Simulations of the cell electrochemical and thermal performance with and without on-cell reforming, including structural analyses, show a substantial decrease in thermal stresses for an on-cell reforming case with slowed methane conversion.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Korolev, Alexander; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fluid-Structure Interaction Modeling of High-Aspect Ratio Nuclear Fuel Plates Using COMSOL  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Lab is in the research stage of converting its fuel from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium. Due to different physical properties of the new fuel and changes to the internal fuel plate design, the current safety basis must be re-evaluated through rigorous computational analyses. One of the areas being explored is the fluid-structure interaction phenomenon due to the interaction of thin fuel plates (50 mils thickness) and the cooling fluid (water). Detailed computational fluid dynamics and fluid-structure interaction simulations have only recently become feasible due to improved numerical algorithms and advancements in computing technology. For many reasons including the already built-in fluid-structure interaction module, COMSOL has been chosen for this complex problem. COMSOL's ability to solve multiphysics problems using a fully-coupled and implicit solution algorithm is crucial in obtaining a stable and accurate solution. Our initial findings show that COMSOL can accurately model such problems due to its ability to closely couple the fluid dynamics and the structural dynamics problems.

Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL] ORNL; Ekici, Kivanc [ORNL] ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Valuing the Treasury's Capital Assistance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Capital Assistance Program (CAP) was created by the U.S. government in February 2009 to provide backup capital to large financial institutions unable to raise sufficient capital from private investors. Under the terms of the CAP, a participating ... Keywords: applications, banks, dynamic programming, finance, financial institutions, securities

Paul Glasserman; Zhenyu Wang

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

MSU CAPITAL ASSET POLICY 1. CAPITALIZATION POLICY and USEFUL LIFE: MSU records as capital assets those  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Furniture $ 5,000 10 yrs Data Processing/ Computer Hardware $ 5,000 5 yrs Office Equipment $ 5,000 5 yrs, museum and related items not meeting the above criteria are capitalized at cost or our best estimate yrs Land $ 5,000 N/A Land Improvements $ 25,000 20 yrs Infrastructure $ 500,000 20 - 75 yrs Equipment

Maxwell, Bruce D.

358

Mr. Walter Huber, Director Capital Improvements Division National Capital Region  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Walter Huber, Director Walter Huber, Director Capital Improvements Division National Capital Region 7th & D Streets, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20407 Dear Mr. Huber: As you may know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) during the early years of nuclear development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. General Services Administration (GSA) was contacted through correspondence with Mr. John P. Allen, Project Director, Special Projects Division of GSA, that the former National Bureau of Standards (NBS) building on Van Ness Street was identified as one such site. This building was used by NBS

359

Crack Growth in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Materials: From Discrete to Continuum Damage Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the cracking problem of glass and ceramic materials used in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Analyses of an internal crack and of an interface crack between dissimilar materials were conducted using a modified boundary layer modeling approach. In this approach, fracture is allowed to occur in a small process window situated at an initial crack tip. Elastic displacement crack-tip fields are prescribed as remote boundary conditions. Crack propagation was first modeled discretely. Next, a continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model for brittle materials was developed to capture damage and crack growth in the process window. In particular, the damage model was applied to a glass-ceramic material that had been developed in-house for sealing purposes. Discrete and continuum damage solutions were then compared. Finally, the CDM model was used to determine the crack propagation direction as a function of a mode mixity measure.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Koeppel, Brian J.; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Singh, Prabhakar

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Integrated fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic sub-channel models for analysis of sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) show promise as an effective way to produce clean safe nuclear power while properly managing the fuel cycle. Accurate computer modeling is an important step in the design and eventual licensing ...

Fricano, Joseph William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

General Circulation Model Calculations of the Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Sulfate and Fossil-Fuel Soot Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation code within a general circulation model is used to assess the direct solar and thermal radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol of anthropogenic origin and soot aerosol from fossil-fuel burning. The radiative effects of different ...

J. M. Haywood; D. L. Roberts; A. Slingo; J. M. Edwards; K. P. Shine

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Exploratory fuel-cell research: I. Direct-hydrocarbon polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. II. Mathematical modeling of fuel-cell cathodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A strong need exists today for more efficient energy-conversion systems. Our reliance on limited fuel resources, such as petroleum for the majority of our energy needs makes it imperative that we utilize these resources as efficiently as possible. Higher-efficiency energy conversion also means less pollution, since less fuel is consumed and less exhaust created for the same energy output. Additionally, for many industrialized nations, such as the United States which must rely on petroleum imports, it is also imperative from a national-security standpoint to reduce the consumption of these precious resources. A substantial reduction of U.S. oil imports would result in a significant reduction of our trade deficit, as well as costly military spending to protect overseas petroleum resources. Therefore, energy-conversion devices which may utilize alternative fuels are also in strong demand. This paper describes research on fuel cells for transportation.

Perry, M.L.; McLarnon, F.R.; Newman, J.S.; Cairns, E.J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

A deformation and thermodynamic model for hydride precipitation kinetics in spent fuel cladding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is contained in the Zircaloy cladding of spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors. All the spent fuel rods placed in a nuclear waste repository will have a temperature history that decreases toward ambient; and as a result, most all of the hydrogen in the Zircaloy will eventually precipitate as zirconium hydride platelets. A model for the density of hydride platelets is a necessary sub-part for predicting Zircaloy cladding failure rate in a nuclear waste repository. A model is developed to describe statistically the hydride platelet density, and the density function includes the orientation as a physical attribute. The model applies concepts from statistical mechanics to derive probable deformation and thermodynamic functionals for cladding material response that depend explicitly on the hydride platelet density function. From this model, hydride precipitation kinetics depend on a thermodynamic potential for hydride density change and on the inner product of a stress tensor and a tensor measure for the incremental volume change due to hydride platelets. The development of a failure response model for Zircaloy cladding exposed to the expected conditions in a nuclear waste repository is supported by the US DOE Yucca Mountain Project. 19 refs., 3 figs.

Stout, R.B.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Modeling of the reburn process with the use of feedlot biomass as a reburn fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal fired power plants will face many challenges in the near future as new regulations, such as the Clear Sky Act, are being implemented. These regulations impose much stricter limits on NOx emissions and plan to impose limits on mercury emissions from coal fired boilers. At this time no technologies are currently being implemented for control of Hg and this explains the strong interest in this area by the Department of Energy (DOE). Reburn technology is a very promising technology to reduce NOx emissions. Previous experimental research at TAMU reported that Feedlot Biomass (FB) can be a very effective reburn fuel, for reduction of NOx up to 90%-95%; however, little work has been done to model such a process with Feedlot Biomass as reburn fuel. The present work addresses the development of a reburn model to predict NOx and Hg emissions. The model accounts for finite rate of heating of solid fuel particles, mixing with NOx laden hot gases, size distribution, finite gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry, and oxidation and reduction reactions for NOx and Hg. To reduce the computational effort all the reactions, except those involved in mercury oxidation, are modeled using global reactions. Once the model was validated by comparison with experimental findings, extensive parametric studies were performed to evaluate the parameters controlling NOx reduction. From DOE research programs some experimental data regarding the capture of mercury from power plant is available, but currently no experimental data are available for Hg emission with reburn process. This model has shown a very large mercury reduction using biomass as a reburn fuel. The model recommends the following correlations for optimum reduction of NOx: Equivalence Ratio should be above 1.05; mixing time should be below 100ms (especially for biomass); pure air can be used as the carrier gas; the thermal power fraction of the reburner should be between 15% and 25%; residence time should be at least 0.5s and the Surface Mean Diameter (SMD) of the size distribution should be as small as possible, at least below 100 µm.

Colmegna, Giacomo

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Characterization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Components Using Electromagnetic Model-Based Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this Phase I SBIR, the contractor demonstrated a number of capabilities of model-based sensors such as MWM sensors and MWM-Arrays. The key results include (1) porosity/microstructure characterization for anodes, (2) potential for cathode material characterization, (3) stress measurements in nickel and cobalt, and (4) potential for stress measurements in non-magnetic materials with a ferromagnetic layer. In addition, potential applications for manufacturing quality control of nonconductive layers using interdigitated electrode dielectrometers have been identified. The results indicate that JENTEK's MWM technology can be used to significantly reduce solid oxide fuel cell production and operating costs in a number of ways. Preliminary investigations of solid oxide fuel cell health monitoring and scale-up issues to address industry needs have also been performed.

Zilberstein, Vladimir; Craven, Chris; Goldfine, Neil

2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

Foundation Capital.txt - Notepad  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Foundation Capital.txt Foundation Capital.txt From: Michael Bauer [MBauer@FoundationCap.com] Sent: Thursday, April 16, 2009 11:20 AM To: GC-62 Subject: Fed Register comments Dear Sir or Lady, Per Wendolyn Holland's request, here are my comments: (i) What improvements to the existing transactions (e.g. CRADAs, WFOs, User Agreements, etc.) would you suggest that DOE consider? Most obvious problem is cost of resources at national labs, which is much higher than at universities and other institutions due to imputed overhead. These costs should be reviewed to find whether they're a) really reflective of real costs at the labs, b)whether they truly reflect unique capabilities that justify the higher cost vs. comparable institutions. It's telling that many of the labs themselves tend to outsource certain research

367

Green Energy Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Partners Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Energy Capital Partners Place Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania Zip 19462 Sector Wind energy Product Pennsylvania-based project developer, founded in 2007. Planning PV as well as wind projects in the state as well as overseas. References Green Energy Capital Partners[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Green Energy Capital Partners is a company located in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania . References ↑ "Green Energy Capital Partners" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Green_Energy_Capital_Partners&oldid=346013" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

368

Eco Capital LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital LLC Capital LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Eco Capital LLC Place New York, New York Zip 10166 Sector Carbon, Renewable Energy Product New York-based advisory and investment firm prioritizing activity in renewable energy, clean technology and carbon finance. References Eco Capital LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Eco Capital LLC is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Eco Capital LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Eco_Capital_LLC&oldid=344441" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

369

Viresco International Capital Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Viresco International Capital Management Viresco International Capital Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Viresco International Capital Management Place San Diego, California Zip 92130 Product San Diego-based hedge fund, who recently initiated a fund that will prioritize activity towards clean technology - Viresco Opportunities Global Fund. References Viresco International Capital Management[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Viresco International Capital Management is a company located in San Diego, California . References ↑ "Viresco International Capital Management" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Viresco_International_Capital_Management&oldid=352843

370

Climate Human Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Human Capital Climate Human Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Human Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1K 6NG Sector Carbon, Renewable Energy, Services Product Green executive search company, listed in London's PLUS marketplace since 30 MArch 2010, focusing on the following target sectors: Carbon Markets, Environmental Sciences, Research and Advisory, Financial Services, Renewable Energy Generation and Policy. References Climate Human Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Climate Human Capital is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Climate Human Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Human_Capital&oldid=343709

371

Birch Tree Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tree Capital Tree Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Birch Tree Capital Place Framingham, Massachusetts Zip 1701 Sector Renewable Energy Product Financial advisory service with a project finance focus that has investor as well a project developer clients. Specialise in renewable power projects generating Federal tax credits and on-site cogeneration projects. References Birch Tree Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Birch Tree Capital is a company located in Framingham, Massachusetts . References ↑ "Birch Tree Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Birch_Tree_Capital&oldid=342882" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

372

Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc. Place New York, New York Zip 10022 Sector Hydro, Wind energy Product US based Private Equity investor in small hydro and wind, mostly in LatAm. References Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc. is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Quadrant Capital Advisors Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Quadrant_Capital_Advisors_Inc&oldid=350132" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

373

Haywood Dorland Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dorland Energy Capital Dorland Energy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Haywood Dorland Energy Capital Place New York, New York Sector Renewable Energy Product New York-based private equity and debt firm that invests in renewable energy companies and projects. References Haywood Dorland Energy Capital[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Haywood Dorland Energy Capital is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Haywood Dorland Energy Capital" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Haywood_Dorland_Energy_Capital&oldid=346399" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

374

Plane Tree Capital LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plane Tree Capital LLP Plane Tree Capital LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name Plane Tree Capital LLP Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1J 8DY Sector Carbon Product London-based investment management firm established in to provide investors with well managed exposure to the clean energy and carbon sectors. References Plane Tree Capital LLP[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Plane Tree Capital LLP is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Plane Tree Capital LLP" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Plane_Tree_Capital_LLP&oldid=349778" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

375

Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system , and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity.

Denia Djokic; Steven J. Piet; Layne F. Pincock; Nick R. Soelberg

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Development of fission gas swelling and release models for metallic nuclear fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel swelling and fission gas generation for fast reactor fuels are of high importance since they are among the main limiting factors in the development of metallic fast reactor fuel. Five new fission gas and swelling ...

Andrews, Nathan Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Physical and chemical comparison of soot in hydrocarbon and biodiesel fuel diffusion flames: A study of model and commercial fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data are presented to compare soot formation in both surrogate and practical fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel and petroleum fuel diffusion flames. The approach here uses differential mobility analysis to follow the size distributions and electrical charge of soot particles as they evolve in the flame, and laser ablation particle mass spectrometry to elucidate their composition. Qualitatively, these soot properties exhibit a remarkably similar development along the flames. The size distributions begin as a single mode of precursor nanoparticles, evolve through a bimodal phase marking the onset of aggregate formation, and end in a self preserving mode of fractal-like particles. Both biodiesel and hydrocarbon fuels yield a common soot composition dominated by C{sub x}H{sub y}{sup +} ions, stabilomer PAHs, and fullerenes in the positive ion mass spectrum, and C{sub x}{sup -} and C{sub 2x}H{sup -} in the negative ion spectrum. These ion intensities initially grow with height in the diffusion flames, but then decline during later stages, consistent with soot carbonization. There are important quantitative differences between fuels. The surrogate biodiesel fuel methyl butanoate substantially reduces soot levels, but soot formation and evolution in this flame are delayed relative to both soy and petroleum fuels. In contrast, soots from soy and hexadecane flames exhibit nearly quantitative agreement in their size distribution and composition profiles with height, suggesting similar soot precursor chemistry. (author)

Matti Maricq, M. [Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids --Hydrogen Storage Materials --Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis --Thermochemical Hydrogen * Fuel Cells --Polymer Electrolyte --Modeling & Analysis --Fuel...

379

Fuel Guide Economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 MODEL YEAR 2000 FUEL ECONOMY LEADERS IN POPULAR VEHICLE CLASSES Listed below are the vehicles with the highest fuel economy for the most popular classes, including both automatic and manual transmissions and gasoline and diesel vehicles. Please be aware that many of these vehicles come in a range of engine sizes and trim lines, resulting in different fuel economy values. Check the fuel economy guide or the fuel economy sticker on new vehicles to find the values for a particular version of a vehicle. CONTENTS MODEL YEAR 2000 FUEL ECONOMY LEADERS ................. 1 HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE ..................................................... 2 FUEL ECONOMY AND YOUR ANNUAL FUEL COSTS .......... 3 WHY FUEL ECONOMY IS IMPORTANT .................................

380

A Two Dimensional Model of a Direct Propane Fuel Cell with an Interdigitated Flow Field .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing environmental concerns as well as diminishing fossil fuel reserves call for a new generation of energy conversion technologies. Fuel cells, which convert the chemical… (more)

Khakdaman, Hamidreza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

THERMAL PERFORMANCE SENSITIVITY STUDIES IN SUPPORT OF MATERIAL MODELING FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. Three specific areas of interest were identified for this study. • degradation of the canister backfill gas from pure helium to a mixture of air and helium, resulting from postulated leakage due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister welds • changes in surface emissivity of system components, resulting from corrosion or other aging mechanisms, which could cause potentially significant changes in temperatures and temperature distributions, due to the effect on thermal radiation exchange between components • changes in fuel and basket temperatures due to changes in fuel assembly position within the basket cells in the canister The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

Cuta, Judith M.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operation of a Solid Polymer Fuel Cell: A Parametric Model,"1991). G. Bronoel, "Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cells Without PreciousG. Abens, "Development of a Fuel Cell Power Source for Bus,"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

System modelling to support accelerated fuel transfer rate at EBR-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) ia a 62.5 MW(th) liquid metal reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory for The United States Department of Energy. The reactor is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the Argonne-West site (ANL-W). Full power operation was achieved in 1964,- the reactor operated continuously since that time until October 1994 in a variety of configurations depending on the programmatic mission. A three year program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. It was intended to operate the reactor during the three year blanket unloading program, followed by about a half year of driver fuel unloading. However, in the summer of 1994, Congress dictacted that EBR-II be shut down October 1, and complete defueling without operation. To assist in the planning for resources needed for this defueling campaign, a mathematical model of the fuel handling sequence was developed utilizing the appropriate reliability factors and inherent mm constraints of each stage of the process. The model allows predictions of transfer rates under different scenarios. Additionally, it has facilitated planning of maintenance activities, as well as optimization of resources regarding manpower and modification effort. The model and its application is described in this paper.

Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.; Planchon, H.P.; Cutforth, D.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

THERMODYNAMIC AND KINETIC MODELING OF ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUELS - FINAL LDRD-ER REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This project enhanced our theoretical capabilities geared towards establishing the basic science of a high-throughput protocol for the development of advanced nuclear fuel that should couple modern computational materials modeling and simulation tools, fabrication and characterization capabilities, and targeted high throughput performance testing experiments. The successful conclusion of this ER project allowed us to upgrade state-of-the-art modeling codes, and apply these modeling tools to ab initio energetics and thermodynamic assessments of phase diagrams of various mixtures of actinide alloys, propose a tool for optimizing composition of complex alloys for specific properties, predict diffusion behavior in diffusion couples made of actinide and transition metals, include one new equation in the LLNL phase-field AMPE code, and predict microstructure evolution during alloy coring. In FY11, despite limited funding, the team also initiated an experimental activity, with collaboration from Texas A&M University by preparing samples of nuclear fuels in bulk forms and for diffusion couple studies and metallic matrices, and performing preliminary characterization.

Turchi, P

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Using a Quasipotential Transformation for Modeling Diffusion Media inPolymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a quasipotential approach along with conformal mapping is used to model the diffusion media of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. This method provides a series solution that is grid independent and only requires integration along a single boundary to solve the problem. The approach accounts for nonisothermal phenomena, two-phase flow, correct placement of the electronic potential boundary condition, and multilayer media. The method is applied to a cathode diffusion medium to explore the interplay between water and thermal management and performance, the impact of the rib-to-channel ratio, and the existence of diffusion under the rib and flooding phenomena.

Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E STIMATES OF EMISSIONS FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL FUEL PRODUCTIONOF EMISSIONS FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL FUEL PRODUCTION PLANTS A.

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect

n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

389

IT Capital Planning | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management IT Services PKI Remote Access Training As defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-11, "Capital planning and investment control means the...

390

Ambata Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

York-based global investment and advisory firm specializing in clean energy and sustainability with a strategic focus on the Middle East and Africa. References Ambata Capital...

391

Carbon Credit Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capital Place New York, New York Zip 10012 Sector Carbon, Services Product Project Advisory Services and Carbon Financial Services to sustainable energy companies and governments....

392

Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Human Capital Management Accountability Program (HCMAP) is an online program which serves as the vehicle for identifying and measuring these three factors, effectiveness, efficiency, and timeliness...

393

Overview of Rocky Mountain Region's Capital Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Investment Plan 2 Transmission Planning Workshop 2011 10-YR Network Load Forecast Study and Process Transmission Planning Loveland, CO June 21, 2011 3 Purpose ...

394

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Probing Complex Free-Radical Reaction Pathways of Fuel Model Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil (e.g. coal) and renewable (e.g. woody biomass) organic energy resources have received considerable attention as possible sources of liquid transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Knowledge of the reactivity of these complex materials has been advanced through fundamental studies of organic compounds that model constituent substructures. In particular, an improved understanding of thermochemical reaction pathways involving free-radical intermediates has arisen from detailed experimental kinetic studies and, more recently, advanced computational investigations. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent investigations of the fundamental pyrolysis pathways of model compounds that represent key substructures in the lignin component of woody biomass with a focus on molecules representative of the dominant beta-O-4 aryl ether linkages. Additional mechanistic insights gleaned from DFT calculations on the kinetics of key elementary reaction steps will also be presented, as well as a few thoughts on the significant contributions of Jim Franz to this area of free radical chemistry.

Buchanan III, A C [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL; Beste, Ariana [ORNL; Britt, Phillip F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Modeling and Implementation of a 1 kW, Air Cooled HTPEM Fuel Cell in a Hybrid Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Implementation of a 1 kW, Air Cooled HTPEM Fuel Cell in a Hybrid Electrical Vehicle engine vehicles (1). Hybrid systems of many kinds, combining a primary energy source having a high energy://www.ecsdl.org/terms_use.jsp #12;article, a model of a hybrid vehicle, including a HTPEM with lead acid batteries, is de- veloped

Nielsen, Mads Pagh

397

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Rhode Island Incentives and Laws Rhode Island Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Loans Expired: 04/10/2009 The Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources offers loans for up to five years, with low administrative fees, to state agencies and municipal governments to cover the incremental cost of purchasing original equipment manufactured AFVs. Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit Expired: 01/01/2008 The Alternative Fueled Vehicle and Filling Station Tax Credit entitles taxpayers to a tax credit equal to 50% of the capital, labor, and equipment

398

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL- Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel withSwinhoe. “Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelS. Tobin, “Measurement of Plutonium in Spent Nuclear Fuel by

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Modeled Salt Density for Nuclear Material Estimation in the Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Spent metallic nuclear fuel is being treated in a pyrometallurgical process that includes electrorefining the uranium metal in molten eutectic LiCl-KCl as the supporting electrolyte. We report a model for determining the density of the molten salt. Inventory operations account for the net mass of salt and for the mass of actinides present. It was necessary to know the molten salt density but difficult to measure, and it was decided to model the salt density for the initial treatment operations. The model assumes that volumes are additive for the ideal molten salt solution as a starting point; subsequently a correction factor for the lanthanides and actinides was developed. After applying the correction factor, the percent difference between the net salt mass in the electrorefiner and the resulting modeled salt mass decreased from more than 4.0% to approximately 0.1%. As a result, there is no need to measure the salt density at 500 C for inventory operations; the model for the salt density is found to be accurate.

DeeEarl Vaden; Robert. D. Mariani

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Financing Strategies for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect

To help meet our nation’s energy needs, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is being considered more and more as a necessary step in a future nuclear fuel cycle, but incorporating this step into the fuel cycle will require considerable investment. This report presents an evaluation of financing scenarios for reprocessing facilities integrated into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options, from fully government owned to fully private owned, was evaluated using a DPL (Dynamic Programming Language) 6.0 model, which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest life-cycle cost, lowest unit cost). Though all business decisions follow similar logic with regard to financing, reprocessing facilities are an exception due to the range of financing options available. The evaluation concludes that lowest unit costs and lifetime costs follow a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. Other financing arrangements, however, including regulated utility ownership and a hybrid ownership scheme, led to acceptable costs, below the Nuclear Energy Agency published estimates. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual capacity led to the greatest fluctuations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; the annual operating costs dominate the government case. It is concluded that to finance the construction and operation of such a facility without government ownership could be feasible with measures taken to mitigate risk, and that factors besides unit costs should be considered (e.g., legal issues, social effects, proliferation concerns) before making a decision on financing strategy.

David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Utilization of a finite element model to verify spent nuclear fuel storage rack welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastic and plastic finite element analyses were performed for the inner tie block assembly of a 25 port fuel rack designed for installation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The model was specifically developed to verify the adequacy of certain welds joining components of the fuel storage rack assembly. The work scope for this task was limited to an investigation of the stress levels in the inner tie welds when the rack was subjected to seismic loads. Structural acceptance criteria used for the elastic calculations performed were as defined by the rack`s designer. Structural acceptance criteria used for the plastic calculations performed as part of this effort were as defined in Subsection NF and Appendix F of Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The results confirm that the welds joining the inner tie block to the surrounding rack structure meet the acceptance criteria. The analysis results verified that the inner tie block welds should be capable of transferring the expected seismic load without structural failure.

Nitzel, M.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Documentation of the Industrial Minor Fuels and Raw Materials model (MFUEL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the industrial demand for energy is projected by components of the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS), mainly the PURchased Heat and Power System (PURHAPS) and the oil refineries model (REFPRIDE). Other components of IFFS project a few fuel uses that are sometimes considered industrial. MFUEL projects those portions of industrial demand not covered by other components of IFFS: industrial use of motor gasoline, industrial consumption of lubricants and waxes, petrochemical feedstocks, metallurgical coal, special naphthas, natural gas used as a chemical feedstock, asphalt and road oil, petroleum coke, industrial kerosene, industrial hydropower, net imports of coal coke, other petroleum, and LPG used as a feedstock or by gas utilities. Each fuel is projected by a single equation at the national level, based on historical relationships, and then shared out to Federal Regions. MFUEL accounts for 5.01 quadrillion Btu out of the industrial energy total of 19.66 quadrillion in 1983, including 3.52 quadrillion Btu out of the 7.83 quadrillion of industrial petroleum use.

Werbos, P.J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS – A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not accurately capture the flow field and heat transfer distribution in this application. Mesh resolution, turbulence modeling, and the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Because of the critical nature of this application, the need for new experiments at representative scales is clearly demonstrated.

Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Optimizing Capital Investment Decisions at Intel Corporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intel Corporation spends over $5 billion annually on manufacturing equipment. With increasing lead times from equipment suppliers and increasing complexity in forecasting market demand, optimizing capital investment decisions is a significant ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, capacity expansion, capital-intensive industries, dual sourcing, expedited equipment lead times, forecast revision, isoprofit analysis, option contracts, stochastic programming

Karl G. Kempf; Feryal Erhun; Erik F. Hertzler; Timothy R. Rosenberg; Chen Peng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Structural changes between models of fossil-fuel demand by steam-electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

A consumption function for multi-fuel steam-electric power plants is used to investigate fossil-fuel demand behavior. The input consumption equations for a plant's primary and alternate fossil fuels are derived by Shepard's lemma from a generalized Cobb-Douglas cost function reflecting average variable cost minimization constrained by technology and the demand for electricity. These equations are estimated by primary and alternate fuel subsets with ordinary least squares and seemingly unrelated regression techniques for 1974, 1977, and 1980. The results of the regression analysis show the importance of consumer demand in the fossil fuel consumption decision; it has the only significant parameter in all of the estimated equations. The estimated own- and cross-price elasticities are small, when they are statistically significant. The results for the primary fuel equations are better than those for the alternate fuel equations in all of the fuel pair subsets.

Gerring, L.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Environmental Capital Partners LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partners LLC Partners LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Environmental Capital Partners LLC Place New York, New York Zip 10017 Sector Services Product Private equity firm funded with USD 100m for investment in middle-market companies specialising in green consumer products, building materials, alternative energy, and industrial environmental services. References Environmental Capital Partners LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Environmental Capital Partners LLC is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Environmental Capital Partners LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Environmental_Capital_Partners_LLC&oldid=345026"

408

Environmental Capital Group LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group LLC Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Environmental Capital Group LLC Place Grass Valley, California Zip 95945 Product String representation "Environmental C ... tartup forward." is too long. References Environmental Capital Group LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Environmental Capital Group LLC is a company located in Grass Valley, California . References ↑ "Environmental Capital Group LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Environmental_Capital_Group_LLC&oldid=345025" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

409

Specializing Financial Intermediation: Evidence from venture capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While many parts of the financial systems are becoming increasingly commoditized, there is a concurrent trend towards greater specialization of financial intermediaries, especially in information-intensive market segments. This paper examines the impact of this specialization, focusing on venture capital. We use a unique hand-collected dataset on European venture capital deals that includes detail on the services provided by venture capital firms. We find that the willingness to invest in information-intensive deals, and the extent to which investor provide services (from corporate governance to additional financing) to their companies, critically depends on how specialized investors are. This applies not only to the organizational structure of the venture capital firm, but also to the human capital of its venture partners.

Laura Bottazzi; Marco Da Rin; Thomas Hellmann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Impact Capital Partners Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limited Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Impact Capital Partners Limited Place Los Angeles, California Zip CA 90067-1509 Product Los Angeles-based, investment intermediary that designs financial solutions and innovative strategies for achieving sustained growth and intrinsic value. References Impact Capital Partners Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Impact Capital Partners Limited is a company located in Los Angeles, California . References ↑ "Impact Capital Partners Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Impact_Capital_Partners_Limited&oldid=346814" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

411

Essays on Human Capital Mobility and Asset Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated to capital intensity. This finding suggests that? B . B (2.12b) The intensity of physical capital K i in the? i ). The intensity of general human capital input is given

Donangelo, Andres Francisco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Firm Heterogeneity in Capital labor Ratios and Wage Inequality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n d the dispersion of capital intensity across i r m s . TheThe upward trend i n capital intensity dispersion is commonof wages a n d of capital intensity across i r m s is

Leonardi, Marco

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment emissions from corn/ethanol and wood bio- fuelMulti-modal emissions Corn-ethanol production, energy use:biodiesel fuel cycles, and corn/ ethanol fuel cycles. GHGCH

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fuzzy possibilistic modeling and sensitivity analysis for optimal fuel gas scheduling in refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In refinery, fuel gas which is continuously generated during the production process is one of the most important energy sources. Optimal scheduling of fuel gas system helps the refinery to achieve energy cost reduction and cleaner production. However, ... Keywords: Fuel gas, Fuzzy possibilistic programming, Marginal value analysis, Refinery, Scheduling, Sensitivity analysis

J. D. Zhang; G. Rong

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Environmental Aspects of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles: Parametric Modeling and Preliminary Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power has the potential to help reduce rising carbon emissions, but to be considered sustainable, it must also demonstrate the availability of an indefinite fuel supply as well as not produce any significant negative environmental effects. The objective of this research was to evaluate the sustainability of nuclear power and to explore the nuclear fuel cycles that best meet this goal. First, the study quantified current and promising nuclear fuel cycles to be further evaluated and developed a set of objective metrics to describe the environmental effects of each cycle. The metrics included such factors as the amount of waste generated and the isotopic composition of the waste. Next, the evaluation used the International Atomic Energy Agency's Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System to compute nuclide compositions at various stages of the fuel cycles. Finally, the study looked at the radioactivity of the waste generated and used this and other characteristics to determine which fuel cycle meets the objectives of sustainability. Results confirm that incorporating recycling into the fuel cycle would help reduce the volume of waste needing to be stored long-term. Also, calculations made with data from the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System predicted that the waste from fuel cycles using recycling would be slightly more radiotoxic than the open fuel cycle?s waste. However, the small increase in radiotoxicity is a manageable issue and would not detract from the benefits of recycling. Therefore, recycling and reprocessing spent fuel must be incorporated into the nuclear fuel cycle to achieve sustainability.

Yancey, Kristina D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Adaptive Model Predictive Control of the Hybrid Dynamics of a Fuel Cell System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of conclusions. II. DESCRIPTION OF FUEL CELLS A fuel cell (FC) is a device that generates electricity from of Systems and Automatic of the University of Seville, generates electricity from the chemical reaction hydrogen and oxygen. This is achieved by converting chemical energy of the fuel directly into electricity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

Photoelectrochemical Materials: Theory and Modeling - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Muhammad N. Huda (Primary Contact), Yanfa Yan*, Todd Deutsch*, Mowafak M. Al-Jassim* and A. John A. Turner* Department of Physics University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX 76019 Phone: (817) 272-1097 Email: huda@uta.edu *National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5892 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX Project Start Date: September 2009 Project End Date: August 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives For FY 2012, the main goal of this project was to improve materials efficiency by understanding and hence tuning the following by theoretical/computational modeling

418

Modeling of the anode side of a direct methanol fuel cell with analytical solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, analytical solutions were derived (for any methanol oxidation reaction order) for the profiles of methanol concentration and proton current density by assuming diffusion mass transport mechanism, Tafel kinetics, and fast proton transport in the anodic catalyst layer of a direct methanol fuel cell. An expression for the Thiele modulus that allows to express the anodic overpotential as a function of the cell current, and kinetic and mass transfer parameters was obtained. For high cell current densities, it was found that the Thiele modulus ($\\phi^2$) varies quadratically with cell current density; yielding a simple correlation between anodic overpotential and cell current density. Analytical solutions were derived for the profiles of both local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer and local anodic current density in the catalyst layer. Under the assumptions of the model presented here, in general, the local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer cannot be expressed as an explicit fun...

Mosquera, Martín A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Beryllium Impregnation of Uranium Fuel: Thermal Modeling of Cylindrical Objects for Efficiency Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With active research projects related to nuclear waste immobilization and high conductivity nuclear fuels, a thermal model has been developed to simulate the temperature profile within a heat generating cylinder in order to imitate the behavior of each design. This work is being done so that it may be used in future research projects to represent how heat is being stored or dissipated in a material that has a uniformly distributed heat source from fission or radiation deposition. The model has been built to have a 2-D visual representation of the temperature distribution. A nodal system is employed for this model so that the user chooses the size of the mesh that will develop an accurate reading for their purposes. The model uses fundamental heat transfer equations and heat conduction properties for different metals. The heat transfer equations that will be used are fundamental and used at each point in the mesh developed by the user to ensure accuracy of the calculation. Below is such an example of an equation that will be used to model the temperature distribution in the cylindrical samples. By choosing the thermal properties associated with the material that is being researched, certain parameters are imposed in the equations automatically. This provides an easy method to see changes in the temperature distribution due to the improvements that have been made. Such parameters are the thermal conductivity and the thermal diffusivity along with others such as the material specific heat. The model will incorporate color variations in the display in order to allow larger meshes to be used while not diminishing the appearance of the results. The color variation will be due to a gradient from red to blue to represent hot to cold.

Lynn, Nicholas

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

420

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels model capital" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Ricmore Capital PLC Formerly Energy Asset Management Plc | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ricmore Capital PLC Formerly Energy Asset Management Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Ricmore Capital PLC (Formerly Energy Asset...

422

Capital Investment Tax Credit for Clean Energy (Florida) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Amount 5% of eligible capital costs 5% of eligible capital costs Start Date 712008 Maximum Incentive 20 year maximum...

423

Systems Modeling of Chemical Hydride Hydrogen Storage Materials for Fuel Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fixed bed reactor was designed, modeled and simulated for hydrogen storage on-board the vehicle for PEM fuel cell applications. Ammonia Borane (AB) was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to {approx}16% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. The design evaluated consisted of a tank with 8 thermally isolated sections in which H2 flows freely between sections to provide ballast. Heating elements are used to initiate reactions in each section when pressure drops below a specified level in the tank. Reactor models in Excel and COMSOL were developed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept, which was then used to develop systems models in Matlab/Simulink. Experiments and drive cycle simulations showed that the storage system meets thirteen 2010 DOE targets in entirety and the remaining four at greater than 60% of the target.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment microbial fuel cells demonstrating marine (left)Model of hydrogen fuel cell kinetic losses including5 FutureWork 5.1 Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cell Continued

Parra, Erika Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

426

Reliability modeling for capital project decisions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Exploration and Production (E&P) project costs within the oil industry are continuously increasing reflecting a reality of more harsh environments, remote locations with minimal existing… (more)

Poulassichidis, Antonios

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A capital equipment capacity planning methodology for aerospace parts manufacturing in a high-mix, low volume environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A static capacity planning model was developed and tested following a four-phased framework. This model was developed for the purposes of capital planning for capacity requirements at a large aerospace parts manufacturing ...

Reveley, Matthew A. (Matthew Aaron)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

CAPITAL FOR ENERGY AND INTER-FUEL ELASTICITIES OF SUBSTITUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas (SNG) as a possible competitor to coal or nuclear based electricity makes the definition

429

Advanced fuel cells and their future market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advantages of fuel cells over competing technologies are outlined. These include higher fuel-efficiency (and thus lower fuel costs) and financial credits that may help reduce the effective introductory capital costs and thus help broaden the market. The credits for fuel cells result from their modularity, relative independence of efficiency on size and load, dispersibility, and rapid installation time. The fuel cell of primary interest in the United States and Japan is the PAFC (whose operation is limited by materials problems to ca. 200{degrees}C), because it is the most highly developed for use with natural gas or clean light distillate fuels. Competing fuel cell (FC) technologies are the alkaline fuel cell (AFC, limited to 80{degrees}C if inexpensive construction materials are used), the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC, 650{degrees}C), and the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC, 1000{degrees}C). The author focuses on the MCFC in this paper.

Appleby, A.J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Semi-Empirical Two Step Carbon Corrosion Reaction Model in PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

The cathode CL of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was exposed to high potentials, 1.0 to 1.4 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), that are typically encountered during start up/shut down operation. While both platinum dissolution and carbon corrosion occurred, the carbon corrosion effects were isolated and modeled. The presented model separates the carbon corrosion process into two reaction steps; (1) oxidation of the carbon surface to carbon-oxygen groups, and (2) further corrosion of the oxidized surface to carbon dioxide/monoxide. To oxidize and corrode the cathode catalyst carbon support, the CL was subjected to an accelerated stress test cycled the potential from 0.6 VRHE to an upper potential limit (UPL) ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 VRHE at varying dwell times. The reaction rate constants and specific capacitances of carbon and platinum were fitted by evaluating the double layer capacitance (Cdl) trends. Carbon surface oxidation increased the Cdl due to increased specific capacitance for carbon surfaces with carbon-oxygen groups, while the second corrosion reaction decreased the Cdl due to loss of the overall carbon surface area. The first oxidation step differed between carbon types, while both reaction rate constants were found to have a dependency on UPL, temperature, and gas relative humidity.

Young, Alan; Colbow, Vesna; Harvey, David; Rogers, Erin; Wessel, Silvia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

ErgyCapital SpA formerly Greenergy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ErgyCapital SpA formerly Greenergy Capital ErgyCapital SpA formerly Greenergy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name ErgyCapital SpA (formerly Greenergy Capital) Place Milan, Italy Zip 20121 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Investment company specializing in renewable energy and energy efficiency. Coordinates 45.468945°, 9.18103° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.468945,"lon":9.18103,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

432

PII-57: Multi-Scale Modeling of Ni/YSZ Fuel Cell Anode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical reactions in a solid oxide fuel cell occur simultaneously as charge .... PII-66: Virtual Prototyping of Lightweight Designs Made with Cold and Hot ...

433

Modeling and control of a hybrid electric drivetrain for optimum fuel economy, performance and driveability.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Automotive manufacturers have been striving for decades to produce vehicles which satisfy customers’ requirements at minimum cost. Many of their concerns are on fuel economy,… (more)

Wei, Xi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Model-Based Validation of Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle Control Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen fuel cell technology has emerged as an efficient and clean alternative to internal combustion engines for powering vehicles, and hydrogen powertrains will aid in… (more)

Wilhelm, Erik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Modeling and Experimental Analysis of Biogas in Diesel and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas is a green fuel generally produced by agricultural or household waste, whose range of applications has become wider and wider in recent years. The… (more)

Quesito, Francesco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A degradation model for solid oxide fuel cell anodes due to impurities in coal syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer great promise as a clean and efficient alternative to conventional power generation technologies. A major advantage of SOFCs in… (more)

Cayan, Fatma Nihan.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Modeling of flame spread over thin fuels on downward configuration in the presence of forced convection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is to simulate the downward flame spread over thin fuel (Cellulose and Polymethylmethacrylate) in a natural convection environment. Flame spread… (more)

Patel, Gaurav Rameshbhai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Experimental Studies for CPF and SCR Model, Control System, and OBD Development for Engines Using Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The research carried out on this project developed experimentally validated Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) high?fidelity models that served as the basis for the reduced order models used for internal state estimation. The high?fidelity and reduced order/estimator codes were evaluated by the industrial partners with feedback to MTU that improved the codes. Ammonia, particulate matter (PM) mass retained, PM concentration, and NOX sensors were evaluated and used in conjunction with the estimator codes. The data collected from PM experiments were used to develop the PM kinetics using the high?fidelity DPF code for both NO2 assisted oxidation and thermal oxidation for Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (ULSF), and B10 and B20 biodiesel fuels. Nine SAE papers were presented and this technology transfer process should provide the basis for industry to improve the OBD and control of urea injection and fuel injection for active regeneration of the PM in the DPF using the computational techniques developed. This knowledge will provide industry the ability to reduce the emissions and fuel consumption from vehicles in the field. Four MS and three PhD Mechanical Engineering students were supported on this project and their thesis research provided them with expertise in experimental, modeling, and controls in aftertreatment systems.

Johnson, John; Naber, Jeffrey; Parker, Gordon; Yang, Song-Lin; Stevens, Andrews; Pihl, Josh

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

440

GreenCore Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreenCore Capital GreenCore Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GreenCore Capital Name GreenCore Capital Address 10509 Vista Sorrento Parkway Place San Diego, California Zip 92121 Region Southern CA Area Product Invests in developing promising renewable energy companies Website http://www.greencorecapital.co Coordinates 32.898095°, -117.215736° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.898095,"lon":-117.215736,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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441

Hereford Capital Advisors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hereford Capital Advisors Hereford Capital Advisors Jump to: navigation, search Name Hereford Capital Advisors Place Denver, Colorado Product US-based firm offering PV project management and capital structuring. Coordinates 39.74001°, -104.992259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.74001,"lon":-104.992259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

442

Greenwood Capital Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenwood Capital Partners Greenwood Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenwood Capital Partners Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28266 Product Corporate finance boutique working on capital-raising for clean energy companies. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Long Branch Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Capital Branch Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Long Branch Capital Place Austin, Texas Zip 78744 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Long Branch Capital makes minority investments in private companies focused on renewable energy, clean technology, and efficiency Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Carbon Capital Markets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capital Markets Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1J 8DY Sector Carbon Product London-based fund manager and trader specialising in the carbon and clean energy markets....

445

2011-2015 Human Capital Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Legacy Management (LM) needs skilled and engaged staff to accomplish our mission and carry out our responsibilities to the American people. This Human Capital Management Plan (HCMP or...