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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle...

2

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project ID: 143 Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Brief Description: Examines the social, environmental and economic impacts of hydrogen fuel cell and gasoline vehicles. Purpose This project aims to investigate fuel cell vehicles through environmental impact, life cycle assessment, sustainability, and thermodynamic analyses. The project will assist in the development of highly qualified personnel in such areas as system analysis, modeling, methodology development, and applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Organization: University of Ontario Institute of Technology

3

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fuel Life-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen vs. Conventional Transportation Fuels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fuel life-cycle analyses were performed to compare the affects of hydrogen on annual U.S. light-duty transportation emissions in future year 2030. Five scenarios were developed… (more)

DeGolyer, Jessica Suzanne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Life Cycle Analysis of wind–fuel cell integrated system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, Canada’s Kyoto greenhouse gas (GHG) emission target is 571 Mt of CO2 equivalent emitted per year by 2010; however, if current emission trends continue, a figure of 809 Mt is projected by 2010 (Cote C. Basic of clean development mechanism—joint implementation and overview of CDM project cycle, 2003 regional workshop on CDM-JI, February 2003, Halifax). This underscores the need for additional reduction of 240 Mt. The Federal Government Action Plan 2000 aims to reduce this gap from 240 to 65 Mt (Cote C. Basic of clean development mechanism—joint implementation and overview of CDM project cycle, 2003 regional workshop on CDM-JI, February 2003, Halifax). In order to accomplish this goal, renewable energy use in all sectors will be required, and this type of energy is particularly applicable in power generation. Traditional power generation is a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions after industrial and transportation sectors (Environment Canada. Canada’s Greenhouse Gas Inventory 1990–1998. Final submission to the UNFCCC Secretariat, 2002 [Available from: http://www.ec.gc.ca/climate/resources_reportes-e.html]. Although wind energy, solar power and other forms of renewable energy are non-GHG emitting in their operation, there are GHG emissions in their different stages of life cycle (i.e. material extraction, manufacturing, construction and transportation, etc.). These emissions must be accounted for in order to assess accurately their capacity to reduce GHG emission and meet Kyoto targets. The current trend in electricity generation is towards integrated energy systems. One such proposed system is the wind–fuel cell integrated system for remote communities. This paper presents a detailed Life Cycle Analysis of the wind–fuel cell integrated system for application in Newfoundland and Labrador. The study confirms that wind–fuel integrated system is a zero emission system while in operation. There are significant emissions of \\{GHGs\\} during the production of the various components (wind turbine, fuel cell and electrolyzer). However, the global warming potential (GWP) of wind-integrated system is far lower (at least by two orders of magnitude) than the conventional diesel system, presently used in remote communities.

Faisal I. Khan; Kelly Hawboldt; M.T. Iqbal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model [1] NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model This model calculates the 2005 national average life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for petroleum-based fuels sold or distributed in the United

7

Decision-making of biomass ethanol fuel policy based on life cycle 3E assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate the environmental, economic, energy performance of biomass ethanol fuel in China and to support the decision-making of biomass ethanol energy policy, an assessment method of life cycle 3E (economy, en...

Ru-bo Leng PhD; Du Dai; Xiao-jun Chen…

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Life-Cycle Analysis of Transportation Fuels and Vehicle Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Camelina Algae Gasoline Diesel Jet Fuel Liquefied Petroleum Gas Naphtha Residual Oil Hydrogen Fischer Coke Nuclear Energy Hydrogen #12;GREET examines more than 80 vehicle/fuel systems Conventional Spark-Tropsch diesel 4 Dimethyl ether 4 Biodiesel Fuel Cell Vehicles 4 On-board hydroge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

9

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

10

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

11

Transportation Center Seminar... Life-Cycle Analysis of Transportation Fuels and Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with life-cycle analysis (LCA). In fact, LCA of transportation fuels and vehicle systems has a history of more than 30 years. Over this period, LCA methodologies have evolved and critical data have become readily available. This is especially true in the past ten years when LCA has been applied extensively

Bustamante, Fabián E.

12

Life Cycle Inventory Energy Consumption and Emissions for Biodiesel versus Petroleum Diesel Fueled Construction Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Inventory Energy Consumption and Emissions for Biodiesel versus Petroleum Diesel Fueled Construction Vehicles ... In general, LCI emissions of HC and CO are lower if NSPS-compliant soyoil plants are used. ... The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a methodology for characterizing at high resolution the energy use and emissions of a plug-in parallel-hybrid diesel-electric school bus (PHSB) to support assessments of sensitivity to driving cycles and ... ...

Shih-Hao Pang; H. Christopher Frey; William J. Rasdorf

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

13

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiative forcing from bio- fuel and gasoline GHG emissions,directly to additional bio- fuel feedstocks. The averagelife cycle GHGs from bio- fuels highlights the limitations

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FTR: Fischer-Tropsch reactor LCA: life cycle analysis LCI:software. Life cycle analyses (LCA) using a modified GREETfor the process. Keywords: LCA, Fischer-Tropsch, avation

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Life-cycle assessment of diesel, natural gas and hydrogen fuel cell bus transportation systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sustainable Transport Energy Programme (STEP) is an initiative of the Government of Western Australia, to explore hydrogen fuel cell technology as an alternative to the existing diesel and natural gas public transit infrastructure in Perth. This project includes three buses manufactured by DaimlerChrysler with Ballard fuel cell power sources operating in regular service alongside the existing natural gas and diesel bus fleets. The life-cycle assessment (LCA) of the fuel cell bus trial in Perth determines the overall environmental footprint and energy demand by studying all phases of the complete transportation system, including the hydrogen infrastructure, bus manufacturing, operation, and end-of-life disposal. The \\{LCAs\\} of the existing diesel and natural gas transportation systems are developed in parallel. The findings show that the trial is competitive with the diesel and natural gas bus systems in terms of global warming potential and eutrophication. Emissions that contribute to acidification and photochemical ozone are greater for the fuel cell buses. Scenario analysis quantifies the improvements that can be expected in future generations of fuel cell vehicles and shows that a reduction of greater than 50% is achievable in the greenhouse gas, photochemical ozone creation and primary energy demand impact categories.

Jamie Ally; Trevor Pryor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

importation, or wastewater recycling. Identifying regionsWastewater Recycling Life-Cycle Inputs for Wastewater Recycling (Data Source: (

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metrics of Life-Cycle Performance Energy Payback Times (EPBT) Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) Toxic Gases #12;6 Life Cycle GHG Emissions ­EuropeLife Cycle GHG Emissions ­Europe Insolation: 1700 kwh/m2-yr 0 10 #12;7 Life Cycle GHG Emissions ­Comparison with Conventional Technologies Life Cycle GHG Emissions

19

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Assessment 10(1), 68–76. NETL (2008). Development offossil carbon in the fuel (NETL, 2008). The upstream portionof the carbon in the fuel (NETL, 2008), which is directly

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Life cycle study of coal-based dimethyl ether as vehicle fuel for urban bus in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, a life cycle model of coal-based dimethyl ether (CBDME) as a vehicle fuel is established for China. Its life cycle from well to wheel are divided into three phases. They are feedstock extraction, fuel production and fuel consumption in vehicle. The primary energy consumption (PEC) and global warming potential (GWP) of CBDME pathway are analyzed and compared with coal-based diesel (CBD) as a latent rival to replace conventional petroleum-based diesel (CPBD). This study demonstrates that the LCA methodology is very suitable and effective for the choice of vehicle fuels. One result is that the greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission of coal-based vehicle fuel pathways is usually concentrated on fuel production stage. The percentages of CBDME and CBD pathways both exceed 60%. The application of carbon capture and storage (CCS) is helpful for coal-based vehicle fuel pathways to improve their global warming effect dramatically. Compared with CBD pathway, CBDME pathway consumes less PEC and emits less \\{GHGs\\} emission as well. Even though the CCS and CH4-fired generation are used, the advantages of CBDME are still kept. For saving petroleum energy and reducing global warming effect, CBDME has greater potential than CBD to substitute CPBD under current fuel synthesis technologies. If the hurdles such as the maturity of engine and vehicle technologies, corresponding regulations and standards and infrastructures are reliably solved, CBDME will have better prospect in China.

Liang Zhang; Zhen Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels ... Hill, J.; Nelson, E.; Tilman, D.; Polasky, S.; Tiffany, D. Environmental, Economic, and Energetic Costs and Benefits of Biodiesel and Ethanol Biofuels Proc. ...

Hong Huo; Michael Wang; Cary Bloyd; Vicky Putsche

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

22

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

144 Figure 63: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Life-Cycle157 Figure 64: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Water68 Table 14: Hydroelectricity-Related FWSE (Data Source: (

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we used Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model to assess the life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of four soybean-derived fuels: biodiesel fuel produced via transesterification, two renewable diesel fuels (I and II) produced from different hydrogenation processes, and renewable gasoline produced from catalytic cracking. Five approaches were employed to allocate the coproducts: a displacement approach; two allocation approaches, one based on the energy value and the other based on the market value; and two hybrid approaches that integrated the displacement and allocation methods. The relative rankings of soybean-based fuels in terms of energy and environmental impacts were different under the different approaches, and the reasons were analyzed. Results from the five allocation approaches showed that although the production and combustion of soybean-based fuels might increase total energy use, they could have significant benefits in reducing fossil energy use (>52%), petroleum use (>88%), and GHG emissions (>57%) relative to petroleum fuels. This study emphasized the importance of the methods used to deal with coproduct issues and provided a comprehensive solution for conducting a life-cycle assessment of fuel pathways with multiple coproducts.

Huo, H.; Wang, M.; Bloyd, C.; Putsche, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Quantifying Variability in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Inventories of Alternative Middle Distillate Transportation Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence of variability in life cycle analysis (LCA) is inherent due to both inexact LCA procedures and variation of numerical inputs. ... Carbon storage in soils of traditional slash-and-burn agriculture up to 6 m depth (185 t ha-1) was not significantly lower than under a primary forest (196 t ha-1) but declined significantly under (semi-) permanent cultures (to 146-167 t ha-1). ...

Russell W. Stratton; Hsin Min Wong; James I. Hileman

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Jet fuel and crude oil price history. From IATA website:oil discovery and fuel production………………………. ……..4 Figure.2: Jet fuel and crude oil price history……………………………. …………

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ethanol; NGCC = natural gas combined-cycle; BIGCC =gasification combined-cycle. P ART III U NCERTAINTY Aaverage, (ii) natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC), (iii) coal

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

29

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jet fuel and crude oil price history……………………………. …………6Figure 2 Jet fuel and crude oil price history. From IATAa sharp decrease in crude oil price occurred in the 1950s.

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle/Fuel Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

31

Hybrid Life-Cycle Assessment of Natural Gas Based Fuel Chains for Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The end use is passenger transportation with a sub-compact car that has an internal combustion engine for the natural gas case and a fuel cell for the methanol and hydrogen cases. ... Then, trucks are used to transport the fuels to a fueling station in Geneva, Switzerland. ... In evaluating fuel/vehicle options with the potential to improve the greenness of cars [diesel (direct injection) and ethanol in internal combustion engines, battery-powered, gasoline hybrid elec., and hydrogen fuel cells], we find no option dominates the others on all dimensions. ...

Anders Hammer Strømman; Christian Solli; Edgar G. Hertwich

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

32

Life-Cycle Analysis of Alternative Automobile Fuel/Propulsion Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For example, almost all alternatively fueled vehicles currently sold are designed to be able to run on two or more fuels (battery-powered cars are the notable exception). ... When the weight of the fuel tank, engine, or other components of the car change, the structure of the car must be adjusted as well. ... The liquid fuels require a reformer to extract hydrogen for the fuel cell, and so there are emissions of conventional air pollutants and GHG in the reforming process as well as a loss in efficiency. ...

Lester Lave; Heather MacLean; Chris Hendrickson; Rebecca Lankey

2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

IFR fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase, which includes completion of facility modifications and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the development of the electrorefining pyroprocess, the design and construction of the facility for the hot demonstration, the design and fabrication of the equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation.

Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Fuel for Water Pumping Motor Efficiency GW EnergyRequired for Water Pumps Using Electric Motors (AdaptedGasoline motors typically used for water pumps are

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

CANDU fuel cycle flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High neutron economy, on-power refuelling, and a simple bundle design provide a high degree of flexibility that enables CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium; registered trademark) reactors to be fuelled with a wide variety of fuel types. Near-term applications include the use of slightly enriched uranium (SEU), and recovered uranium (RU) from reprocessed spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Plutonium and other actinides arising from various sources, including spent LWR fuel, can be accommodated, and weapons-origin plutonium could be destroyed by burning in CANDU. In the DUPIC fuel cycle, a dry processing method would convert spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel to CANDU fuel. The thorium cycle remains of strategic interest in CANDU to ensure long-term resource availability, and would be of specific interest to those countries possessing large thorium reserves, but limited uranium resources.

Torgerson, D.F.; Boczar, P.G. [Chalk River Lab., Ontario (Canada); Dastur, A.R. [AECL CANDU, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Freshwater Consumption in LCA. Environmental Science &of Freshwater Consumption in LCA. Environmental Science &Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) US 2002 (428) model. Carnegie

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Life-Cycle Assessment Comparing Select Gas-to-Liquid Fuels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with both conventional and ultra-low sulfur diesel, and FRFG motor fuels. * The UCF LCA develops a set of near-term (2006) and long-term (2015) scenarios to assess impacts...

38

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact Analysis for a Shale Oil Complex at Parachute Creek,of Paraho Crude Shale Oil Into Military Specification Fuels.CO, 1974; An Assessment of Oil Shale Technologies. Office of

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Comparative Life-Cycle Assessment of Residential Heating Systems, Focused on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to analyze a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for residential heating applications by...producer, the user as an individual and the user...intended as the heating demand of a building, applied by defa...

Alba Cánovas; Rainer Zah; Santiago Gassó

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Municipal Sewage Sludge to Produce Synthetic Fuels,5.4 million dry metric tons of sludge annually or 47pounds of sewage sludge (dry weight basis) for every

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in several earlier corn ethanol energy analysis is thatR. (2006). Ethanol’s energy return on investment: A surveyD. (1991). Ethanol fuels - energy security, economics, and

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Emission Reduction Using RTP Green Fuel in Industry Facilities: A Life Cycle Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scenario analyses were also conducted to determine responses to model assumptions including different biomass feedstocks, feedstock transport mode and distance, and geographical locations of the pyrolysis process. ... The savings of GHG emissions compared to fossil heavy fuel oil is greater than 80% for all of these biomass feedstocks. ...

Jiqing Fan; David Shonnard; Tom Kalnes; Monique Streff; Geoff Hopkins

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

Life cycle assessment of biohydrogen and biomethane production and utilisation as a vehicle fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental burdens for the production and utilisation of biomethane vehicle fuel or a biohydrogen/biomethane blend produced from food waste or wheat feed, based on data from two different laboratory experiments, have been compared. For food waste treated by batch processes the two stage system gave high hydrogen yields (84.2 l H2 kg?1 VS added) but a lower overall energy output than the single stage system. Reduction in environmental burdens compared with diesel was achieved, supported by the diversion of waste from landfill. For wheat feed, the semi continuously fed two stage process gave low hydrogen yields (7.5 l H2 kg?1 VS added) but higher overall energy output. The process delivers reduction in fossil fuel burdens, and improvements in process efficiencies will lead to reduction in CO2 burdens compared with diesel. The study highlights the importance of understanding and optimising biofuel production parameters according to the feedstock utilised.

Tim Patterson; Sandra Esteves; Richard Dinsdale; Alan Guwy; Jon Maddy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

USCEA fuel cycle '93  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Council for Energy Awareness sponsored the Fuel Cycle '93 conference in Dallas, Texas, on March 21-24, 1993. Over 250 participants attended, numerous papers were presented, and several panel discussions were held. The focus of most industry participants remains the formation of USEC and the pending US-Russian HEU agreement. Following are brief summaries of two key papers and the Fuel Market Issues panel discussion.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Program Record 13006 (Offices of Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies: Life-Cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 13006 Date: April 24, 2013 Title: Life-cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles Originator: Tien Nguyen & Jake Ward Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Pat Davis Date: April 25, 2013 Items: DOE is pursuing a portfolio of technologies with the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and petroleum consumption while being cost-effective. This record documents the assumptions and results of analyses conducted to estimate the life-cycle costs resulting from several fuel/vehicle pathways, for a future mid-size car. The results are summarized graphically in the following figure. Costs of Operation for Future Mid-Size Car

46

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

life-cycle energy requirements (e total ) and global warmingtotal life-cycle global warming impacts. Chapter 3 Life-cycle Energy and Global

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

49

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fuel Cycle Subcommittee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report to NEAC Report to NEAC Fuel Cycle Subcommittee Meeting of April 23, 2013 Washington D.C. June 13, 2013 Burton Richter (Chair), Margaret Chu, Darleane Hoffman, Raymond Juzaitis, Sekazi K Mtingwa, Ronald P Omberg, Joy L Rempe, Dominique Warin 2 I Introduction and Summary The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC met in Washington on April 23, 2013. The meeting focused on issues relating to the NE advanced reactor program (sections II, III, and IV), and on storage and transportation issues (section V) related to a possible interim storage program that is the first step in moving toward a new permanent repository as recommended by the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) and discussed in the recent response by DOE to Congress on the BRC report 1 . The agenda is given in

51

Analysis of environmental factors impacting the life cycle cost analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery-powered passenger vehicles. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the further developments and testing of the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Model previously developed by Engineering Systems Management, Inc. (ESM) on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract No. DE-AC02-91CH10491. The Model incorporates specific analytical relationships and cost/performance data relevant to internal combustion engine (ICE) powered vehicles, battery powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and fuel cell/battery-powered electric vehicles (FCEVs).

NONE

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance.

Monado, Fiber, E-mail: fiber.monado@gmail.com [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia and Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University (Indonesia); Ariani, Menik [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung (Indonesia); Aziz, Ferhat [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [CRINES, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okoyama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program to provide computational support for the analysis of capital investments in buildings.

54

life cycle inventory | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

life cycle inventory life cycle inventory Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system for eGrid regions (AKGD, AKMS, AZNM, CAMX, ERCT, FRCC, HIMS, HIOA, MROE, MROW, NEWE, NWPP, NYCW, NYLI, NYUP, RFCE, RFCM, RFCW, RMPA, SPNO, SPSO, SRMV, SRMW, SRSO, SRTV, SRVC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory forms (xls and xml) . A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included.Datasets include generation and transmission of electricity for each of the eGrid regions. It is representative of the year 2008 mix of fuels used for utility generations for each of the eGrid regions Source USLCI Database Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords eGrid Electricity grid LCI life cycle inventory US Data application/zip icon egrid_electricity_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 7 MiB)

55

Life Cycle Asset Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

(The following directives are deleted or consolidated into this Order and shall be phased out as noted in Paragraph 2: DOE 1332.1A; DOE 4010.1A; DOE 4300.1C; DOE 4320.1B; DOE 4320.2A; DOE 4330.4B; DOE 4330.5; DOE 4540.1C; DOE 4700.1). This Order supersedes specific project management provisions within DOE O 430.1A, LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT. The specific paragraphs canceled by this Order are 6e(7); 7a(3); 7b(11) and (14); 7c(4),(6),(7),(11), and (16); 7d(4) and (8); 7e(3),(10), and (17); Attachment 1, Definitions (item 30 - Line Item Project, item 42 - Project, item 48 - Strategic System); and Attachment 2, Contractor Requirements Document (paragraph 1d regarding a project management system). The remainder of DOE O 430.1A remains in effect. Cancels DOE O 430.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.3.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

Environmental Decision-Making Using Life Cycle Impact Assessment and Stochastic Multiattribute Decision Analysis: A Case Study on Alternative Transportation Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ecological Science and Engineering, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, and Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, New York 14623 ... For example, the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005 and Executive Order 13423 require state and federal fleets to have vehicles capable of using alternative fuels—although there are few guidelines for assessing the systemic environmental impact of alternative fuel technologies (26, 27). ... This case study is limited to life cycle air emissions for the fuel alternatives: gasoline (GAS), low-sulfur diesel (LSD), 100% soy-biodiesel (BD100), electric vehicle (EV), and 85% corn-based ethanol (EtOH). ...

Kristin Rogers; Thomas P. Seager

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Sustainability Features of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear fuel cycle is the series of stages that nuclear fuel materials go through in a cradle to grave framework. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is the current fuel cycle implemented in the United States; in which an ...

Passerini, Stefano

59

Nanocellulose Life Cycle Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The commercialization of nanocellulose is forthcoming with the projected GPD of $600 billion worldwide by 2020;(1, 2) hence it is critical that we understand how much environmental impact the fabrication process will generate and design the best manufacturing system accordingly. ... Commodity chemicals are often produced with similar technology throughout the world and often sourced outside the US, so the European data was considered acceptable despite some differences in fuel sources for electricity generation. ... (46) The CED method further breaks down energy use into the categories of nonrenewable (fossil, nuclear, and biomass) and renewable (biomass, solar/wind/geothermal, and hydro) energy. ...

Qingqing Li; Sean McGinnis; Cutter Sydnor; Anthony Wong; Scott Renneckar

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

60

Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle and Fuel Systems with the GREET Model - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Michael Wang (Primary Contact), Amgad Elgowainy, Jeongwoo Han and Hao Cai Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) ESD362 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Phone: (630) 252-2819 Email: mqwang@anl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2009 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Evaluate environmental benefits of hydrogen fuel * cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) with various renewable hydrogen production pathways relative to baseline gasoline pathways. Conduct vehicle-cycle analysis of hydrogen FCEVs. *

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessment of potential life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission effects from using corn-based butanol as a transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since advances in the ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation process in recent years have led to significant increases in its productivity and yields, the production of butanol and its use in motor vehicles have become an option worth evaluating. This study estimates the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. It employs a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis tool: the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The estimates of life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are based on an Aspen Plus(reg. sign) simulation for a corn-to-butanol production process, which describes grain processing, fermentation, and product separation. Bio-butanol-related WTW activities include corn farming, corn transportation, butanol production, butanol transportation, and vehicle operation. In this study, we also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. Our study shows that driving vehicles fueled with corn-based butanol produced by the current ABE fermentation process could result in substantial fossil energy savings (39%-56%) and avoid large percentage of the GHG emission burden, yielding a 32%-48% reduction relative to using conventional gasoline. On energy basis, a bushel of corn produces less liquid fuel from the ABE process than that from the corn ethanol dry mill process. The coproduction of a significant portion of acetone from the current ABE fermentation presents a challenge. A market analysis of acetone, as well as research and development on robust alternative technologies and processes that minimize acetone while increase the butanol yield, should be conducted.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Life Cycle Modeling of Propulsion Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation pm034das2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Life Cycle...

63

Uranium Mining Life-Cycle Energy Cost vs. Uranium Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The long-term viability of nuclear energy systems depends on the availability of uranium and on the question, whether the overall energy balance of the fuel cycle is positive, taking into account the full life-cy...

W. Eberhard Falck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fuel cycle cost uncertainty from nuclear fuel cycle comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examined the uncertainty in fuel cycle cost (FCC) calculation by considering both model and parameter uncertainty. Four different fuel cycle options were compared in the analysis including the once-through cycle (OT), the DUPIC cycle, the MOX cycle and a closed fuel cycle with fast reactors (FR). The model uncertainty was addressed by using three different FCC modeling approaches with and without the time value of money consideration. The relative ratios of FCC in comparison to OT did not change much by using different modeling approaches. This observation was consistent with the results of the sensitivity study for the discount rate. Two different sets of data with uncertainty range of unit costs were used to address the parameter uncertainty of the FCC calculation. The sensitivity study showed that the dominating contributor to the total variance of FCC is the uranium price. In general, the FCC of OT was found to be the lowest followed by FR, MOX, and DUPIC. But depending on the uranium price, the FR cycle was found to have lower FCC over OT. The reprocessing cost was also found to have a major impact on FCC.

Li, J.; McNelis, D. [Institute for the Environment, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Yim, M.S. [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles Powered by a Fuel Cell and by Internal Combustion Engine for Canada Project ID: 117 Principal Investigator: Xianguo Li Purpose In this study, a full life cycle analysis of an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) and a fuel cell vehicle (FCV) has been carried out. The impact of the material and fuel used in the vehicle on energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions is analyzed for Canada. Four different methods of obtaining hydrogen were analyzed; using coal and nuclear power to produce electricity and extraction of hydrogen through electrolysis and via steam reforming of natural gas in a natural gas plant and in a hydrogen refueling station.

66

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Life Cycle Assessments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessments A life cycle assessment (LCA) is a systematic, cradle-to-grave process that evaluates the environmental impacts of products, processes, and services. Its...

67

VISION - Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s (AFCI) fundamental objective is to provide technology options that - if implemented - would enable long-term growth of nuclear power while improving sustainability and energy security. The AFCI organization structure consists of four areas; Systems Analysis, Fuels, Separations and Transmutations. The Systems Analysis Working Group is tasked with bridging the program technical areas and providing the models, tools, and analyses required to assess the feasibility of design and deployment options and inform key decision makers. An integral part of the Systems Analysis tool set is the development of a system level model that can be used to examine the implications of the different mixes of reactors, implications of fuel reprocessing, impact of deployment technologies, as well as potential "exit" or "off ramp" approaches to phase out technologies, waste management issues and long-term repository needs. The Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) is a computer-based simulation model that allows performing dynamic simulations of fuel cycles to quantify infrastructure requirements and identify key trade-offs between alternatives. It is based on the current AFCI system analysis tool "DYMOND-US" functionalities in addition to economics, isotopic decay, and other new functionalities. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI and Generation IV reactor development studies.

Steven J. Piet; A. M. Yacout; J. J. Jacobson; C. Laws; G. E. Matthern; D. E. Shropshire

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Life Cycle Analysis Toolbox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The life cycle analysis toolbox is a valuable integration of decision-making tools and supporting materials developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to help Department of Energy managers improve environmental quality, reduce costs, and minimize risk. The toolbox provides decision-makers access to a wide variety of proven tools for pollution prevention (P2) and waste minimization (WMin), as well as ORNL expertise to select from this toolbox exactly the right tool to solve any given P2/WMin problem. The central element of the toolbox is a multiple criteria approach to life cycle analysis developed specifically to aid P2/WMin decision-making. ORNL has developed numerous tools that support this life cycle analysis approach. Tools are available to help model P2/WMin processes, estimate human health risks, estimate costs, and represent and manipulate uncertainties. Tools are available to help document P2/WMin decision-making and implement programs. Tools are also available to help track potential future environmental regulations that could impact P2/WMin programs and current regulations that must be followed. An Internet-site will provide broad access to the tools.

Bishop, L.; Tonn, B.E.; Williams, K.A.; Yerace, P.; Yuracko, K.L.

1999-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Quebec Life Cycle Inventory Database Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) in Quebec (Canada) is increasingly important. Yet, ... life cycle inventory (LCI) data. The Quebec government invested in the creation of a Quebec LCI database. The approach is to work...

Pascal Lesage; Réjean Samson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program...

71

Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Climate Change IR Indian Railways Jatropha Jatropha curcas L. KCl potassium chloride LCA life cycle assessment LCI life cycle inventory LCIA life cycle impact assessment MSRTH...

72

Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Development Plan for the Fuel Cycle Simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Simulator (FCS) project was initiated late in FY-10 as the activity to develop a next generation fuel cycle dynamic analysis tool for achieving the Systems Analysis Campaign 'Grand Challenge.' This challenge, as documented in the Campaign Implementation Plan, is to: 'Develop a fuel cycle simulator as part of a suite of tools to support decision-making, communication, and education, that synthesizes and visually explains the multiple attributes of potential fuel cycles.'

Brent Dixon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

2D representation of life cycle greenhouse gas emission and life cycle cost of energy conversion for various energy resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We suggest a 2D-plot representation combined with life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and life cycle cost for various energy conversion technologies. In general, life cycle ... use life cycle GHG emissions ...

Heetae Kim; Claudio Tenreiro; Tae Kyu Ahn

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fuel Cycle CrossCut Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CrossCut Group CrossCut Group 1 NERAC Briefing: Assessment of Dose of Closed vs Open Gen-IV Fuel Cycles David Wade NERAC Meeting September 30, 2002 Fuel Cycle CrossCut Group 2 Public Dose and Worker Dose Comparison of Open vs Closed Fuel Cycles * Gen-IV fuel cycle options are meant to address all stated Gen-IV Goals - Dose to workers and to the public is one of the numerous elements to be evaluated by Gen-IV R&D - The Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group was assigned to take an early look at dose implication tradeoffs of open and closed fuel cycles * FCCG Interpretation of Assignment: - Collect already-existing evaluations and prepare a briefing on what is currently known Fuel Cycle CrossCut Group 3 Approach * Look at Actual Historical Doses Based on Operational Experience - Data compiled by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic

78

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development Program Presentation to Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board James C. Bresee, ScD, JD Advisory Board Member Office of Nuclear Energy July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 2 Outline Fuel Cycle R&D Mission Changes from the Former Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative The Science-Based Approach Key Collaborators Budget History Program Elements Summary July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 3 Fuel Cycle R&D Mission The mission of Fuel Cycle Research and Development is to develop options to current fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while reducing proliferation risks by conducting

79

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation factsheet Download the Fact Sheet The U.S. Department of Energy enlisted NREL to review and "harmonize" life cycle assessments (LCA) of electricity generation technologies. Hundreds of assessments have been published, often with considerable variability in results. These variations in approach, while usually legitimate, hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Learn more about life cycle assessments of energy technologies. By harmonizing this data, NREL seeks to reduce the uncertainty around estimates for environmental impacts of renewables and increase the value of

80

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis Abdellatif M. Yacout Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Engineering Division The nuclear fuel cycle is a complex system with multiple components and activities that are combined to provide nuclear energy to a variety of end users. The end uses of nuclear energy are diverse and include electricity, process heat, water desalination, district heating, and possibly future hydrogen production for transportation and energy storage uses. Components of the nuclear fuel cycle include front end components such as uranium mining, conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, and the reactor component. Back end of the fuel cycle include used fuel coming out the reactor, used fuel temporary and permanent storage, and fuel reprocessing. Combined with those components there

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The behavioral manipulation hypothesis Life cycle of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The behavioral manipulation hypothesis · No one knows how the parasite causes these Life cycle eat mostly hares · Linked cycles? Predator-Prey Cycles? · Think and then discuss: · Under the hypothesis that predators cause this cycle, what would you expect for the following when hare populations

Mitchell, Randall J.

82

Life Cycle Assessment of Biomass Conversion Pathways.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study has investigated the life cycle of three biomass feedstocks including forest residue, agricultural residue, and whole forest for biohydrogen and biopower production in… (more)

Kabir, Md R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National...

84

Life Cycle Assessment: Past, Present, and Future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can develop into life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA), which is a transdisciplinary integration framework of models rather than a model in itself. ... As the environmental burden from agriculture, and especially from livestock breeding, is known to be quite important, such an analysis was interesting for policy purposes. ...

Jeroen B. Guinée; Reinout Heijungs; Gjalt Huppes; Alessandra Zamagni; Paolo Masoni; Roberto Buonamici; Tomas Ekvall; Tomas Rydberg

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Nuclear Fuel Cycle | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cycle Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cycle This is an illustration of a nuclear fuel cycle that shows the required steps to process natural uranium from ore for preparation for fuel to be loaded in nuclear reactors. This is an illustration of a nuclear fuel cycle that shows the required steps to process natural uranium from ore for preparation for fuel to be loaded in nuclear reactors. The mission of NE-54 is primarily focused on activities related to the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle which includes mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment. Uranium Mining Both "conventional" open pit, underground mining, and in situ techniques are used to recover uranium ore. In general, open pit mining is used where deposits are close to the surface and underground mining is used

86

Life Cycle Optimization of Automobile Replacement:? Model and Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Optimization of Automobile Replacement:? Model and Application ... Moreover, manufacturers have been exploring new propulsion systems and fuels, such as hybrid electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. ... The catalytic activity of samples taken from an oxidation catalyst mounted on diesel-driven automobiles and aged under road conditions was recovered to a significant extent by washing with a dilute solution of citric acid. ...

Hyung Chul Kim; Gregory A. Keoleian; Darby E. Grande; James C. Bean

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Advanced Fuel Cycles Activities in IAEA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable scientific and technical progress in many areas of Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) has been recognized as probable answers to ever-growing issues threatening sustainability, environmental protection and non-proliferation. These recent global developments such as Russian initiative on Global Nuclear Infrastructure-International Fuel Centre and the US initiative on Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) have made advanced fuel cycles as one of the decisive influencing factor for the future growth of nuclear energy. International Atomic Energy Agency has initiated the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) with overall objective of bringing together technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required achieving desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. One of the interesting common features of these initiatives (INPRO, GNEP and GNI-IFC) is closed fast reactor fuel cycles and proliferation resistance. Any fuel cycle that integrate P and T into it is also known as 'Advanced Fuel Cycle' (AFC) that could achieve reduction of plutonium and Minor Actinide (MA) elements (namely Am, Np, Cm, etc.). In this regard, some Member States are also evaluating alternative concepts involving the use of thorium fuel cycle, inert-matrix fuel or coated particle fuel. Development of 'fast reactors with closed fuel cycles' would be the most essential step for implementation of P and T. The scale of realization of any AFC depends on the maturity of the development of all these elemental technologies such as recycling MA, Pu as well as reprocessed uranium. In accordance with the objectives of the Agency, the programme B entitled 'Nuclear Fuel cycle technologies and materials' initiated several activities aiming to strengthen the capabilities of interested Member States for policy making, strategic planning, technology development and implementation of safe, reliable, economically efficient, proliferation resistant, environmentally sound and secure nuclear fuel cycle programmes. The paper describes some on-going IAEA activities in the area of: MA-fuel and target, thorium fuel cycle, coated particle fuel, MA-property database, inert matrix fuels, liquid metal cooled fast reactor fuels and fuel cycles, management of reprocessed uranium and proliferation resistance in fuel cycle. (authors)

Nawada, H.P.; Ganguly, C. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, Department of Nuclear Energy, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Carter, J.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

89

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Jones, R.; Carter, J.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 5 Identify the governing phenomenology Identify the governing phenomenology Develop a first-principle based model of the...

91

NREL: Energy Analysis: Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life cycle assessment (LCA) harmonization helps lenders, utility executives, and lawmakers get the best, most precise information on greenhouse gas emissions from various sources of energy. LCA has been used to estimate and compare GHG emissions from utility-scale power systems for three decades, often with considerable variability in results. Harmonization provides more exact estimates of greenhouse-gas emissions for renewable and conventional electricity generation technologies, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature and reducing uncertainty. Highlights of Recent Studies Chart that compares published and harmonized lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster.

92

Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

Physics challenges for advanced fuel cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced fuel cycles and associated optimized reactor designs will require substantial improvements in key research area to meet new and more challenging requirements. The present paper reviews challenges and issues in the field of reactor and fuel cycle physics. Typical examples are discussed with, in some cases, original results.

Giuseppe Palmiotti; Massimo Salvatores; Gerardo Aliberti

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that work together in unison. In order to support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; Gretchen Matthern; Steven Piet; David Shropshire; Tyler Schweitzer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Database Life Cycle Inventory Database The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials, components, and assemblies. The database helps manufacturers, building designers, and developers select energy-efficient and environmentally friendly materials, products, and processes for their projects based on the environmental impact of an item over its entire lifespan. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the database in 2003 with input from a variety of partners. NREL maintains and updates the database with support from the

96

Life Cycle Assessment of a Wind Farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the next step of the LCA, specific energy expenditures and produced emissions were linked to the inventory analysis result. The database of the Swiss Center for Life Cycle Inventories Ecoinvent lists over 4,00...

Hermann-Josef Wagner; Jyotirmay Mathur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To help facility managers make sound decisions, FEMP provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments.

99

Life-Cycle Analysis of Geothermal Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The results and tools from this project will help GTP and stakeholders determine and communicate GT energy and GHG benefits and water impacts. The life-cycle analysis (LCA) approach is taken to address these effects.

100

Life cycle assessment of various hydrogen production methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive life cycle assessment (LCA) is reported for five methods of hydrogen production, namely steam reforming of natural gas, coal gasification, water electrolysis via wind and solar electrolysis, and thermochemical water splitting with a Cu–Cl cycle. Carbon dioxide equivalent emissions and energy equivalents of each method are quantified and compared. A case study is presented for a hydrogen fueling station in Toronto, Canada, and nearby hydrogen resources close to the fueling station. In terms of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, thermochemical water splitting with the Cu–Cl cycle is found to be advantageous over the other methods, followed by wind and solar electrolysis. In terms of hydrogen production capacities, natural gas steam reforming, coal gasification and thermochemical water splitting with the Cu–Cl cycle methods are found to be advantageous over the renewable energy methods.

E. Cetinkaya; I. Dincer; G.F. Naterer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Basics

102

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links Below are links to life cycle inventory (LCI) databases, life cycle assessment (LCA) information, LCA tools, research institutes utilizing LCA, labeling initiatives and organizations, international LCA initiatives, LCA online forums. Life Cycle Inventory Data Ecoinvent: Swiss Centre for Life Cycle Inventories IVAM LCA Data 4: Dutch LCA Database KITECH (Korea Institute of Industrial Technology): Korea National Cleaner Production Center LCI Database Life Cycle Assessment Information IERE (The Institute for Environmental Research and Education): The American Center for Life Cycle Assessment SETAC (Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry): SETAC Life Cycle Assessment SPOLD (Society for Promotion of Life-cycle Assessment Development): 2.0 LCA Consultants homepage

103

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings To help facility managers make sound...

104

Nuclear Fuel Cycle | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cycle Fuel Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cycle GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding research and development of nuclear fuel and waste management technologies that meet the nation's energy supply, environmental, and energy security needs. GC-52 also advises DOE on issues involving support for international fuel cycle initiatives aimed at advancing a common vision of the necessity of the expansion of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes worldwide in a safe and secure manner. In addition, GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the management and disposition of excess uranium in DOE's uranium stockpile. GC-52 attorneys participate in meetings of DOE's Uranium Inventory Management Coordinating Committee and provide advice on compliance with statutory requirements for the sale or transfer of uranium.

105

Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development Department of Energy Awards 15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development August 1,...

106

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses...

107

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions ... Life cycle GHG emissions were found to decrease by less than 4% in almost all scenarios modeled. ... Resulting changes in fuel use, life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides are estimated. ...

Aranya Venkatesh; Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

Target structural reliability in life cycle consideration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of minimising life cycle cost can be rationally applied to determine a target reliability of structures. However, there has been a recent legal requirement to reduce CO2 emissions, therefore, the minimisation of life cycle CO2 emission could be an alternative approach in structural design. This paper explains the general formulae for deciding the optimum reliability by minimising the total life cycle cost and the amount of CO2 emission in the structure's lifetime, and also shows that these formulae can be applied to decision making for the cost-benefit problem related to seismic strengthening of structures. Additionally, the role of the engineer is discussed, reflecting the current situation in Japan.

Jun Kanda; Tsuyoshi Takada; Hang Choi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Physics of fusion-fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaluation of nuclear fusion fuels for a magnetic fusion economy must take into account the various technological impacts of the various fusion fuel cycles as well as the relative reactivity and the required ..beta..'s and temperatures necessary for economic steady-state burns. This paper will review some of the physics of the various fusion fuel cycles (D-T, catalyzed D-D, D-/sup 3/He, D-/sup 6/Li, and the exotic fuels: /sup 3/He/sup 3/He and the proton-based fuels such as P-/sup 6/Li, P-/sup 9/Be, and P-/sup 11/B) including such items as: (1) tritium inventory, burnup, and recycle, (2) neutrons, (3) condensable fuels and ashes, (4) direct electrical recovery prospects, (5) fissile breeding, etc. The advantages as well as the disadvantages of the different fusion fuel cycles will be discussed. The optimum fuel cycle from an overall standpoint of viability and potential technological considerations appears to be catalyzed D-D, which could also support smaller relatively clean, lean-D, rich-/sup 3/He satellite reactors as well as fission reactors.

McNally, J.R. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

111

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

112

IFR fuel cycle--pyroprocess development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle is based on the use of a metallic fuel alloy, with nominal composition U-2OPu-lOZr. In its present state of development, this fuel system offers excellent high-burnup capabilities. Test fuel has been carried to burnups in excess of 20 atom % in EBR-II irradiations, and to peak burnups over 15 atom % in FFTF. The metallic fuel possesses physical characteristics, in particular very high thermal conductivity, that facilitate a high degree of passive inherent safety in the IFR design. The fuel has been shown to provide very large margins to failure in overpower transient events. Rapid overpower transient tests carried out in the TREAT reactor have shown the capability to withstand up to 400% overpower conditions before failing. An operational transient test conducted in EBR-II at a power ramp rate of 0.1% per second reached its termination point of 130% of normal power without any fuel failures. The IFR metallic fuel also exhibits superior compatibility with the liquid sodium coolant. Equally as important as the performance advantages offered by the use of metallic fuel is the fact that this fuel system permits the use of an innovative reprocessing method, known as ``pyroprocessing,`` featuring fused-salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Development of the IFR pyroprocess has been underway at the Argonne National Laboratory for over five years, and great progress has been made toward establishing a commercially-viable process. Pyroprocessing offers a simple, compact means for closure of the fuel cycle, with anticipated significant savings in fuel cycle costs.

Laidler, J.J.; Miller, W.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

IFR fuel cycle--pyroprocess development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle is based on the use of a metallic fuel alloy, with nominal composition U-2OPu-lOZr. In its present state of development, this fuel system offers excellent high-burnup capabilities. Test fuel has been carried to burnups in excess of 20 atom % in EBR-II irradiations, and to peak burnups over 15 atom % in FFTF. The metallic fuel possesses physical characteristics, in particular very high thermal conductivity, that facilitate a high degree of passive inherent safety in the IFR design. The fuel has been shown to provide very large margins to failure in overpower transient events. Rapid overpower transient tests carried out in the TREAT reactor have shown the capability to withstand up to 400% overpower conditions before failing. An operational transient test conducted in EBR-II at a power ramp rate of 0.1% per second reached its termination point of 130% of normal power without any fuel failures. The IFR metallic fuel also exhibits superior compatibility with the liquid sodium coolant. Equally as important as the performance advantages offered by the use of metallic fuel is the fact that this fuel system permits the use of an innovative reprocessing method, known as pyroprocessing,'' featuring fused-salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Development of the IFR pyroprocess has been underway at the Argonne National Laboratory for over five years, and great progress has been made toward establishing a commercially-viable process. Pyroprocessing offers a simple, compact means for closure of the fuel cycle, with anticipated significant savings in fuel cycle costs.

Laidler, J.J.; Miller, W.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fuel Cycle Technology Documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Technology Documents Fuel Cycle Technology Documents January 11, 2013 Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Issued on January 11, 2013, the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste is a framework for moving toward a sustainable program to deploy an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security and other activities. October 30, 2012 2012 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Report The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security

115

A model for life cycle records management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this paper is to update an old Records Management concept; the management of records according to the records life cycle. Accordingly, the authors are presenting a new version of the Records Management life cycle model and its associated elements. The basic concept is that every record progresses through three phases; a record is created, is used and maintained, and dispositioned. In this presentation, the authors update the very old straight line model and the more current circular model with a new model that essentially combines the two. The model portrays Records Management as having a distinct straight-line beginning, a circular use and maintenance phase, and a distinct straight-line end. The presentation maps Records Management Program elements and activities against the phases depicted in the model. The authors believe that this new records life cycle model is an enhanced physical representation of the process. This presentation is designed to help put all of the specialized Records Management topics that participants have heard about during the conference in the perspective of the records life cycle.

Tayfun, A.C.; Gibson, S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model This presentation by...

117

International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

Leigh, I.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The integral fast reactor fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid-metal reactor (LMR) has the potential to extend the uranium resource by a factor of 50 to 100 over current commercial light water reactors (LWRs). In the integral fast reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system - reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process - is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. A key feature of the IFR concept is the metallic fuel. The lead irradiation tests on the new U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II have surpassed 185000 MWd/t burnup, and its high burnup capability has now been fully demonstrated. The metallic fuel also allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Pyroprocessing, which utilizes high temperatures and molten salt and molten metal solvents, can be advantageously utilized for processing metal fuels because the product is metal suitable for fabrication into new fuel elements. Direct production of a metal product avoids expensive and cumbersome chemical conversion steps that would result from use of the conventional Purex solvent extraction process. The key step in the IFR process is electrorefining, which provides for recovery of the valuable fuel constituents, uranium and plutonium, and for removal of fission products. A notable feature of the IFR process is that the actinide elements accompany plutonium through the process. This results in a major advantage in the high-level waste management.

Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Uranium to Electricity: The Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a series of industrial processes that produce fuel for the production of electricity in nuclear reactors, use the fuel to generate electricity, and subsequently manage the spent reactor fuel. While the physics and ...

Frank A. Settle

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nuclear reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the author, the first sustained nuclear fission chain reaction was not at the University of Chicago, but at the Oklo site in the African country of Gabon. Proof of this phenomenon is provided by mass spectrometric and analytical chemical measurements by French scientists. The U.S. experience in developing power-producing reactors and their related fuel and fuel cycles is discussed.

Pearlman, H

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION): A Tool for Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Futures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that are intended to work together. To support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system such as how the system would respond to each technological change, a series of which moves the fuel cycle from where it is to a postulated future state. The system analysis working group of the United States research program on advanced fuel cycles (formerly called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION. For example, VISION users can now change yearly the selection of separation or reactor technologies, the performance characteristics of those technologies, and/or the routing of material among separation and reactor types - with the model still operating on a PC in <5 min.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Steven J. Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire; Robert F. Jeffers; A. M. Yacout; Tyler Schweitzer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Advanced Technologies in Life Cycle Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Increasing competitive pressure within industries producing long-living, cost intensive products drive the need to optimize product life cycles in terms of faster time to market, sustainable operation, reengineering and recycling. In this context, complexity of IT systems is growing and has to connect different life cycle phases. Especially new concepts of Product Service Systems (PSS) lead to a connection between product design, maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO). There are still many challenges concerning interface problems between different IT-Systems. They are caused by different data formats, continuous demand for information or integration of new technologies. Thus, Life Cycle Engineering (LCE) has gained an important role and needs to consider integration of new industry 4.0 solutions like cloud services, big data or cyber physical systems. This paper gives an overview about these challenges, future development and new research approaches. A deeper view is taken at one promising approach in the field of maintenance of Printed Circuit Boards (PCB). This approach is about invention and implementation of a new process that combines both electrical and optical measuring techniques to automate circuit and layout plan reconstruction of long-living and cost intensive electronic boards.

Rainer Stark; Hendrik Grosser; Boris Beckmann-Dobrev; Simon Kind

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on AddThis.com... Publications Software FAQs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs

125

Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREET Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2B—Integration of Supply Chains II: Bioproducts—Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREET Model Jennifer B. Dunn, Biofuel Life Cycle Analysis Team Lead, Argonne National Laboratory

126

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

Deru, M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Life-cycle assessment of NAND flash memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information for nand ?ash lca,” Consortium on Green DesignLife Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA), US 1997 Industry BenchmarkLife Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA), US 1997 Industry Benchmark

Boyd, Sarah; Horvath, A; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

129

An ideal sealed source life-cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last 40 years, barriers to compliant and timely disposition of radioactive sealed sources have become apparent. The story starts with the explosive growth of nuclear gauging technologies in the 1960s. Dozens of companies in the US manufactured sources and many more created nuclear solutions to industrial gauging problems. Today they do not yet know how many Cat 1, 2, or 3 sources there are in the US. There are, at minimum, tens of thousands of sources, perhaps hundreds of thousands of sources. Affordable transportation solutions to consolidate all of these sources and disposition pathways for these sources do not exist. The root problem seems to be a lack of necessary regulatory framework that has allowed all of these problems to accumulate with no national plan for solving the problem. In the 1960s, Pu-238 displaced Pu-239 for most neutron and alpha source applications. In the 1970s, the availability of inexpensive Am-241 resulted in a proliferation of low energy gamma sources used in nuclear gauging, well logging, pacemakers, and X-ray fluorescence applications for example. In the 1980s, rapid expansion of worldwide petroleum exploration resulted in the expansion of Am-241 sources into international locations. Improvements of technology and regulation resulted in a change in isotopic distribution as Am-241 made Pu-239 and Pu-238 obsolete. Many early nuclear gauge technologies have been made obsolete as they were replaced by non-nuclear technoogies. With uncertainties in source end of life disposition and increased requirements for sealed source security, nuclear gauging technology is the last choice for modern process engineering gauging solutions. Over the same period, much was learned about licensing LLW disposition facilities as evident by the closure of early disposition facilities like Maxey Flats. The current difficulties in sealed source disposition start with adoption of the NLLW policy act of 1985, which created the state LLW compact system they we have today. This regulation created a new regulatory framework seen as promising at the time. However, now they recognize that, despite the good intentions, the NIJWP/85 has not solved any source disposition problems. The answer to these sealed source disposition problems is to adopt a philosophy to correct these regulatory issues, determine an interim solution, execute that solution until there is a minimal backlog of sources to deal with, and then let the mechanisms they have created solve this problem into the foreseeable future. The primary philosophical tenet of the ideal sealed source life cycle follows. You do not allow the creation (or importation) of any source whose use cannot be justified, which cannot be affordably shipped, or that does not have a well-delinated and affordable disposition pathway. The path forward dictates that we fix the problem by embracing the Ideal Source Life cycle. In figure 1, we can see some of the elements of the ideal source life cycle. The life cycle is broken down into four portions, manufacture, use, consolidation, and disposition. These four arbitrary elements allow them to focus on the ideal life cycle phases that every source should go through between manufacture and final disposition. As we examine the various phases of the sealed source life cycle, they pick specific examples and explore the adoption of the ideal life cycle model.

Tompkins, Joseph Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

FUEL CYCLE TECHNOLOGIES QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM DOCUMENT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) is the top-level quality policy and requirements document for the Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program. The quality assurance (QA) requirements specified herein apply to Participants that manage and/or perform work within FCT Program.

131

FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Uncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyses involving coal. Greenhouse gas emissions from fuel use and methane releases at coal mines, fuel.5 million metric tons of methane emissions. Close to 95% of domestic coal was consumed by the electricityUncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal Aranya Venkatesh

Jaramillo, Paulina

133

16 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of road pavement materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: At present the choice of materials and techniques in road construction is dictated by structural requirements and economic aspects. However, ecological factors have gained in importance due to environmental considerations in politics and society. To evaluate the environmental impact of motorways, a life cycle assessment (LCA) according to ISO 14040 was carried out for different pavement types. By investigating different case scenarios, the reduction potential of environmental impact was quantified. The biggest reduction in air pollution can be achieved by improving pavement properties (e.g., texture, stiffness and flatness) which would significantly reduce the fuel consumption of vehicles.

C. Thiel; T. Stengel; C. Gehlen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies Learn about how NREL research analysts are evaluating various LCA studies in the Life Cycle Analysis Harmonization Project. NREL is a leader in the field of life cycle assessment (LCA) of energy technologies, both renewable and conventional. Life cycle assessment is a standardized technique that tracks all material, energy, and pollutant flows of a system-from raw material extraction, manufacturing, transport, and construction to operation and end-of-life disposal. Life cycle assessment can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate comparisons of energy technologies. Life cycle assessments provide a well-established and comprehensive framework to compare renewable energy technologies with fossil-based and

136

Evaluation and Adaptation of 5-Cycle Fuel Economy Testing and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Adaptation of 5-Cycle Fuel Economy Testing and Calculations for HEVs and PHEVs Evaluation and Adaptation of 5-Cycle Fuel Economy Testing and Calculations for HEVs and PHEVs 2012...

137

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Solar Water Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of Administration Several provisions of Missouri law govern energy efficiency in state facilities. In 1993 Missouri enacted legislation requiring life-cycle cost analysis for all new construction of state buildings and substantial

138

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 * November 2010 3 * November 2010 Electricity Natural Gas Power Heat Natural Gas or Biogas Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Hydrogen Natural Gas Converted to hydrogen on site via steam-methane reforming electrolyzer peak burner heat sink FC SYSTEM + H 2 Renewables H 2 -FC H 2 -storage 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) * Grid electricity (hourly) * Fuel prices * Water price 0 2 4

139

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

Kinetics of pyroprocesses in ATW fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) combines the technologies of accelerators and reactors to treat the nuclear waste problem. An ATW system uses a high-current accelerator to generate spallation neutrons to initiate the transmutation of actinides and select fission products in a subcritical nuclear assembly surrounding the target volume. For high burnup and efficient operation, an ATW system requires simple, reliable, and efficient fuel preparation and cleanup procedures to periodically remove {open_quotes}neutron poisons.{close_quotes} We have identified several fuel cycles based on pyroprocessing.

Li, Ning; Hu, Y.C.; Park, B.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GREET Life-Cycle Analysis of Biofuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Li Li 收件人 School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology Battery Recycling: How to Make It Happen Analysis can help identify a clear path for battery production and recycling  Purpose is to clear the road for mass-market introduction of battery-powered vehicles by identifying any roadblocks on the way  Life cycle analysis (LCA) is used to identify significant environmental issues  Availability of recycling processes can:  Assure against major waste problems at end-of-life  Reduce environmental impacts  Reduce raw material supply issues  Reduce net material costs  Create viable business opportunities  Economic and institutional constraints must also be accounted for

142

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL Campaign Links Images Wiki 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Sedlacek 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Springston 2010 ASR Fall Meeting: Sedlacek News, June 14, 2011: Next-generation Aerosol-sampling Stations to Head for India Related Campaigns Aerosol Life Cycle: Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer - CIMS 2011.07.10, Lee, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: HR-ToF-AMS 2011.06.15, Zhang, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: ARM Mobile Facility 2 Aerosol Observing System 2011.06.15, Sedlacek, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: UV-APS and Nano-SMPS 2011.06.10, Hallar, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL 2011.06.01 - 2011.08.31 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below.

143

NREL: Energy Analysis - Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Factsheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Download the Factsheet Flowchart that shows the life cycle stages for concentrating solar power systems. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Figure 1. Process flow diagram illustrating the life cycle stages for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The yellow box defined by the grey line shows the systems boundaries assumed in harmonization. Enlarge image NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review literature on life cycle assessments of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, identify

144

Fuzzy Logic-based energy efficiency Life Cycle Assessment with a case study of corn-based fuel ethanol in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fuzzy logic based method of energy efficiency assessment of Biomass-based Fuel Ethanol (BFE) production is introduced in this paper. Energy relevant inventory variables are defined and described by fuzzy sets representing the differences in energy inventory data between the BFE system and its reference. A fuzzy reasoning process is developed to derive the energy efficiency from the fuzzificated inventory data. This method distinguishes itself by simple calculation, lower requirements of data accuracy and capability of processing subjectivity. A case study of corn-based fuel ethanol from Northeast China is conducted to demonstrate the application of the proposed method.

Suiran Yu; Jing Tao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Life-cycle GHG emission Factors of Final Energy in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this manuscript, a model for the estimation of the life-cycle GHG emission factors of final energy and an empirical study of China is presented. A linear programming method is utilized to solve the problem that several forms of final energy are utilized in the life-cycle of one certain type of final energy. Nine types of final energy are considered, including raw coal, crude oil, raw natural gas, treated coal, diesel, gasoline, fuel oil, treated natural gas, and electricity. The results indicate that the life-cycle GHG emission factors of final energy in China slightly decreased in recent years.

Jiang Lixue; Ou Xunmin; Ma Linwei; Li Zheng; Ni Weidou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Integrating ALWR and ALMR fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress in the design of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) and in the development of the pyro-metallurgical processing system (Actinide Recycle System) have the potential to allow the back end of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cycle to be closed in an economically viable and environmentally preferable way. The design and development progress that makes closing the ALWR fuel cycle (removing the fissionable and fertile material for re-use prior to disposal) the most cost effective and environmentally sound approach are presented. Key factors addressed include: resource extension, a reduction in the risk and cost of waste disposal, and the added proliferation resistance associated with the pyro-metallurgical processing system.

Boardman, C.E.; Wadekamper, D.C. [General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States). Nuclear Energy Div.; Ehrman, C.S.; Hess, C.; Ocker, M. [Burns and Roe Co., Oradall, NJ (United States); Thompson, M. [Thompson (Marion), Fremont, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fuel Cycle Research & Development | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Research & Fuel Cycle Research & Development Fuel Cycle Research & Development Fuel Cycle Research & Development The mission of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is to conduct research and development to help develop sustainable fuel cycles, as described in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. Sustainable fuel cycle options are those that improve uranium resource utilization, maximize energy generation, minimize waste generation, improve safety, and limit proliferation risk. The FCRD program will develop a suite of options to enable future policymakers to make informed decisions about how best to manage used fuel from nuclear reactors. The overall goal is to demonstrate the technologies necessary to allow commercial deployment of solutions for the sustainable management of used

148

Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity.

Leuze, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear power and the fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to rising energy costs and climate concerns, nuclear power is once again being seriously considered as an energy source by several countries. This revival of nuclear power is closely linked with the choice of fuel cycles available, and the intentions of countries pursuing nuclear power are likely to be, correctly or incorrectly, judged by the choice of fuel cycle they make. The needs and constraints of the emerging nuclear powers may, however, be different from the expectations of a segment of the world community. If this potential growth in nuclear power is not to be stifled, it is imperative that a climate of mutual trust is developed respecting every country's right to develop peaceful uses of nuclear power without leading to an atmosphere of mistrust regarding the 'intentions' behind the pursuit of peaceful nuclear power. While it will be a near impossibility to completely decouple the peaceful uses of nuclear power from its more destructive applications, it is important that aspiring countries develop a clear and transparent process. Technology-supplier countries also need to develop and follow clear and consistent treaties and national policies, avoiding ad hoc country-specific arrangements. We review here the state of interest in nuclear power and current policies and discuss fuel cycle options that may pave the way for the future growth of nuclear power.

Rizwan-uddin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Safeguarding and Protecting the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International safeguards as applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are a vital cornerstone of the global nuclear nonproliferation regime - they protect against the peaceful nuclear fuel cycle becoming the undetected vehicle for nuclear weapons proliferation by States. Likewise, domestic safeguards and nuclear security are essential to combating theft, sabotage, and nuclear terrorism by non-State actors. While current approaches to safeguarding and protecting the nuclear fuel cycle have been very successful, there is significant, active interest to further improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards and security, particularly in light of the anticipated growth of nuclear energy and the increase in the global threat environment. This article will address two recent developments called Safeguards-by-Design and Security-by-Design, which are receiving increasing broad international attention and support. Expected benefits include facilities that are inherently more economical to effectively safeguard and protect. However, the technical measures of safeguards and security alone are not enough - they must continue to be broadly supported by dynamic and adaptive nonproliferation and security regimes. To this end, at the level of the global fuel cycle architecture, 'nonproliferation and security by design' remains a worthy objective that is also the subject of very active, international focus.

Trond Bjornard; Humberto Garcia; William Desmond; Scott Demuth

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

152

Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Initiatives » Fuel Cycle Technologies » Fuel Cycle Research & Initiatives » Fuel Cycle Technologies » Fuel Cycle Research & Development » Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents November 8, 2011 2011 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting As the largest domestic source of low-carbon energy, nuclear power is making major contributions toward meeting our nation's current and future energy demands. The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security goals. We rely on nuclear energy because it provides a consistent, reliable and stable source of base load electricity with an excellent safety record in the United States. July 11, 2011 Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report

153

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NREL: Energy Analysis - Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, analysts have conducted life cycle assessments on the environmental impacts associated with a variety of nuclear power technologies and systems. These life cycle assessments have had wide-ranging results. To better understand greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from nuclear power systems, NREL completed a comprehensive review and analysis of life cycle assessments focused on light water reactors (LWRs)-including both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs)-published between 1980 and 2010. NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions

155

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Life Cycle Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings October 4, 2013 - 4:54pm Addthis To help facility managers make sound decisions, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials assume discount rates and energy price projections determined

156

Microsoft Word - Fuel Cycle Subcomm report final v2.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the Fuel Cycle of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 15, 2011 Washington, D.C. Members: Burton Richter (Chairman) Darleane Hoffman Raymond Juzaitis Sekazi Mtingwa Ron Omberg Joy Rempe Dominique Warin Fuel Cycle Subcommittee Report 6/15/2011 2 I. Introduction and Summary The Fuel Cycle subcommittee of NEAC met April 25-26 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The main topics of discussion were the Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) disposal program, the System Study Program's methodology that is to be used to set priorities for R&D on advanced fuel cycles, and the University Programs. In addition to these, we were briefed on the budget, but have no comments other than a hope for a good outcome and restrict ourselves to general advice until more is known. A current complication in the design of the Fuel Cycle R&D FCRD program is the Blue

157

Fuel Cycle Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Radiochemical Separation & Processing Recycle & Waste Management Uranium Enrichment Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Fuel Cycle Science & Technology SHARE Fuel Cycle Science and Technology The ORNL expertise and experience across the entire nuclear fuel cycle is underpinned by extensive facilities and a comprehensive modeling and simulation capability ORNL supports the understanding, development, evaluation and deployment of

158

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2010 -- Washington D.C. lm001das2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life...

159

Life Cycle Exergy Analysis of Wind Energy Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Wind power capacity is currently growing fast around the world. At the same time different forms of life cycle analysis are becoming common for… (more)

Davidsson, Simon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Methodolog...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

more than 2,100 published references as potentially being life cycle assessments (LCA) of electricity generation technologies. Each reference was then subjected to three...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Harmonization of Energy Generation Life Cycle Assessments (LCA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Harmonization of Energy Generation Life Cycle Assessments (LCA) FY2010 LCA Milestone Report November 2010 Ethan Warner, Garvin Heath, and Patrick O'Donoughue Management Report...

162

Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas from the United States (Life Cycle Analysis Greenhouse Gas Report, or LCA GHG Report) and invites the submission of comments. LifecycleGreenhouseGas.pdf More...

163

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

processing technology data based on actual experimental data - SimaPro - a commercial LCA software package used for life cycle analysis Source: Powell et. al (2010) 13 Managed...

164

NREL: Energy Analysis - Biopower Results - Life Cycle Assessment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems, NREL completed a comprehensive review and analysis of life cycle assessments (LCA) on co-fired (with coal), direct combustion, gasification and pyrolysis biopower...

165

Life cycle assessment (LCA) of industrial milk production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was carried out for milk production extending ... to study the influence of transport. The agriculture was found to be the main hot...

Merete Høgaas Eide

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

gas (GHG) perspective? *How do those results compare with natural gas sourced from Russia and delivered to the same European and Asian markets via pipeline? Life Cycle GHG...

167

Coupling fuel cycles with repositories: how repository institutional choices may impact fuel cycle design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The historical repository siting strategy in the United States has been a top-down approach driven by federal government decision making but it has been a failure. This policy has led to dispatching fuel cycle facilities in different states. The U.S. government is now considering an alternative repository siting strategy based on voluntary agreements with state governments. If that occurs, state governments become key decision makers. They have different priorities. Those priorities may change the characteristics of the repository and the fuel cycle. State government priorities, when considering hosting a repository, are safety, financial incentives and jobs. It follows that states will demand that a repository be the center of the back end of the fuel cycle as a condition of hosting it. For example, states will push for collocation of transportation services, safeguards training, and navy/private SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inspection at the repository site. Such activities would more than double local employment relative to what was planned for the Yucca Mountain-type repository. States may demand (1) the right to take future title of the SNF so if recycle became economic the reprocessing plant would be built at the repository site and (2) the right of a certain fraction of the repository capacity for foreign SNF. That would open the future option of leasing of fuel to foreign utilities with disposal of the SNF in the repository but with the state-government condition that the front-end fuel-cycle enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities be located in that state.

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 24-207A Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Miller, W.F. [Texas A.M. University System, MS 3133 College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

169

Fuel cycle analysis of once-through nuclear systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once-through fuel cycle systems are commercially used for the generation of nuclear power, with little exception. The bulk of these once-through systems have been water-cooled reactors (light-water and heavy water reactors, LWRs and HWRs). Some gas-cooled reactors are used in the United Kingdom. The commercial power systems that are exceptions use limited recycle (currently one recycle) of transuranic elements, primarily plutonium, as done in Europe and nearing deployment in Japan. For most of these once-through fuel cycles, the ultimate storage of the used (spent) nuclear fuel (UNF, SNF) will be in a geologic repository. Besides the commercial nuclear plants, new once-through concepts are being proposed for various objectives under international advanced nuclear fuel cycle studies and by industrial and venture capital groups. Some of the objectives for these systems include: (1) Long life core for remote use or foreign export and to support proliferation risk reduction goals - In these systems the intent is to achieve very long core-life with no refueling and limited or no access to the fuel. Most of these systems are fast spectrum systems and have been designed with the intent to improve plant economics, minimize nuclear waste, enhance system safety, and reduce proliferation risk. Some of these designs are being developed under Generation IV International Forum activities and have generally not used fuel blankets and have limited the fissile content of the fuel to less than 20% for the purpose on meeting international nonproliferation objectives. In general, the systems attempt to use transuranic elements (TRU) produced in current commercial nuclear power plants as this is seen as a way to minimize the amount of the problematic radio-nuclides that have to be stored in a repository. In this case, however, the reprocessing of the commercial LWR UNF to produce the initial fuel will be necessary. For this reason, some of the systems plan to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. Examples of systems in this class include the small modular reactors being considered internationally; e.g. 4S [Tsuboi 2009], Hyperion Power Module [Deal 2010], ARC-100 [Wade 2010], and SSTAR [Smith 2008]. (2) Systems for Resource Utilization - In recent years, interest has developed in the use of advanced nuclear designs for the effective utilization of fuel resources. Systems under this class have generally utilized the breed and burn concept in which fissile material is bred and used in situ in the reactor core. Due to the favorable breeding that is possible with fast neutrons, these systems have tended to be fast spectrum systems. In the once-through concepts (as opposed to the traditional multirecycle approach typically considered for fast reactors), an ignition (or starter) zone contains driver fuel which is fissile material. This zone is designed to last a long time period to allow the breeding of sufficient fissile material in the adjoining blanket zone. The blanket zone is initially made of fertile depleted uranium fuel. This zone could also be made of fertile thorium fuel or recovered uranium from fuel reprocessing or natural uranium. However, given the bulk of depleted uranium and the potentially large inventory of recovered uranium, it is unlikely that the use of thorium is required in the near term in the U.S. Following the breeding of plutonium or fissile U-233 in the blanket, this zone or assembly then carries a larger fraction of the power generation in the reactor. These systems tend to also have a long cycle length (or core life) and they could be with or without fuel shuffling. When fuel is shuffled, the incoming fuel is generally depleted uranium (or thorium) fuel. In any case, fuel is burned once and then discharged. Examples of systems in this class include the CANDLE concept [Sekimoto 2001], the traveling wave reactor (TWR) concept of TerraPower [Ellis 2010], the ultra-long life fast reactor (ULFR) by ANL [Kim 2010], and the BNL fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR) concept [Fisher 1979]. (3) Thermal systems for resource extensio

Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Comprehensive Fuel Cycle - Community Perspective - 13093  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Should a five-county region surrounding the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site ('SRS') use its assets to help provide solutions to closing the nation's nuclear fuel cycle? That question has been the focus of a local ad hoc multi-disciplinary community task force (Tier I) that has been at work in recent months outlining issues and identifying unanswered questions to determine if assuming a leadership role in closing the nuclear fuel cycle is in the community's interest. If so, what are the terms and conditions under which we the community would agree to participate? Our starting point was the President's Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future ('Commission') which made a total of eight (8) recommendations in its final report. There are several recommendations that are directly relevant to the Tier I group and potential efforts of the Region. These are the 'consent-based approach', the creation of an independent nuclear waste management entity funded from the existing nuclear waste fee; the 'prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities', and 'continued U.S. innovation in nuclear energy technology and for workforce development'. (authors)

McLeod, Richard V. [Savannah River Community Reuse Organization, P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)] [Savannah River Community Reuse Organization, P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States); Frazier, Timothy A. [Dickstein Shapiro LLP, 1825 Eye Street NW, Washington, DC, 20006-5403 (United States)] [Dickstein Shapiro LLP, 1825 Eye Street NW, Washington, DC, 20006-5403 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

(Coordinated research on fuel cycle cost)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) have been exploring the possibility of parallel studies on the externals costs of employing fuel cycles to deliver energy services. These studies are of particular importance following the activities of the US National Energy Strategy (NES), where the potential discrepancies between market prices and the social costs of energy services were raised as significant policy concerns. To respond to these concerns, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Resources for the Future (RFF) have begun a collaborative effort for the DOE to investigate the external costs, or externalities, generated by cradle to grave fuel cycle activities. Upon initiating this project, the CEC expressed an interest to the DOE that Europe should conduct a parallel study and that the two studies should be highly coordinated for consistency in the results. This series of meetings with members of the CEC was undertaken to resolve some issues implied by pursuing parallel, coordinated studies; issues that were previously defined by the August meetings. In addition, it was an opportunity for some members of the US research team and the DOE sponsor to meet with their European counterparts for the study, as well as persons in charge of research areas that ultimately would play a key role in the European study.

Cantor, R.A.; Shelton, R.B.; Krupnick, A.J.

1990-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings To help facility managers make sound decisions, FEMP provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials provided here assume discount rates and energy price projections (TXT 17 KB) determined annually by FEMP and the Energy Information Administration. Building Life Cycle Cost Software FEMP's Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) software can help you calculate life cycle costs, net savings, savings-to-investment ratio, internal rate of return, and payback period for Federal energy and water conservation projects funded by agencies or alternatively financed. BLCC also estimates emissions and emission reductions. An energy escalation rate calculator (EERC) computes an average escalation rate for energy savings performance contracts when payments are based on energy cost savings.

173

Invited Review The life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a century. Various aspects of the life cycle, however, have been elucidated only recently, whilst others Ostensibly, the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi has been elucidated for nearly a century (Chagas, 1909 it attaches (Bonaldo et al., 1988) and is a cAMP mediated process (Gonzales-Perdomo et al., 1988; Rangel

Engman, David M.

174

Life Cycle of the Corn-Soybean Agroecosystem for Biobased  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the agriculture and production stages. This paper compiles a more comprehensive life cycle inventory (LCI) for use not be neglected in bioproduct LCAs. Introduction Agricultural life cycle assessments (LCAs) are becoming choices. A LCA quantifies the environmental impacts of a product or process. Impact-minimizing LCAs

Illinois at Chicago, University of

175

Emerging approaches, challenges and opportunities in life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- rable. For instance, CO2 and CH4 emissions can both be expressed as CO2-equivalent emissions by using in the life cycle and sums them across the whole system. Typically, several hundreds of emissions and resources are quantified. In the third phase, life-cycle impact assessment (LCIA), emissions and resources

Napp, Nils

176

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Over the last thirty years, more than 100 life cycle assessments (LCAs) have been conducted and published for a variety of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation could

177

Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy Feedstocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy Feedstocks ... The environmental burdens of cultivating algae for bioenergy have been quantified and compared to several terrestrial crops using a stochastic life cycle model. ... Algae are an appealing source for bioenergy due to their high yields relative to terrestrial energy crops. ...

Andres F. Clarens; Eleazer P. Resurreccion; Mark A. White; Lisa M. Colosi

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fuel Cycle Technologies, Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will provide leadership and expertise in supporting the management of national programs that...

179

Why reconsider the thorium fuel cycle?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we have endeavored to present the available technical information on the potential use of Th in nuclear fuel cycle (FC) applications as compared to U without subjective evaluations. Where helpful, we have compared the technical attributes of Th-232 as a fertile isotope and U-233 as a fissile isotope with other similar isotopes (i.e., U-238, and U-235 and Pu-239, respectively). In addition, we have summarized (a) experience gained to-date with fabricating and reprocessing of Th-232/U-233 fuels, (b) factors concerning Th fuel irradiation in both test reactors and power reactors, and (c) differences in the backend of the FC with emphasis on repository risks. As might be expected, many technical aspects of Th vs. U have not changed since the sixties. However, there are some factors elaborated in this paper that have changed. Changes potentially encouraging Th use are: (a) the ability to recover large amounts of Th as a byproduct with small attendant costs and environmental impacts, (b) the potential to produce fewer minor actinides (MA) and less Pu during power production, and (c) increased concerns about proliferation which might be somewhat mitigated by the high radioactivity and amenability to isotopic dilution of U-233. Changes challenging Th utilization are: (a) obtaining sufficient experience handling Th/U-233 fuels, (b) the existence of large inventories of depleted U and continuing discovery of large U resources, and (c) recognition that the extent to which U-233 might mitigate proliferation concerns is not as large as originally hoped.

Krahn, S.; Croff, A.; Ault, T.; Wymer, R. [Vanderbilt University: 2301 Vanderbilt Place/PMB 351831, Nashville, TN, 37235 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Institute of Standards and Technology Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Finance, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/information/download_blcc.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Building Life-Cycle Cost, BLCC References: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs[1] Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BLCC[2]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the

182

2012 Fuel Cycle MPACT Working Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Site Site Hydrogen Research Center 301 Gateway Drive Aiken, SC 29803 Accommodations Country Inn & Suites Aiken 3270 Whiskey Road Aiken, SC 29803 (803) 649-4024 RESERVATIONS: The cut-off date for guest room block reservations is Wednesday, February 22, 2012. We have a block of rooms reserved at this hotel at the government per diem rate of $86.00 per night. Please reference DOE -NE Fuel Cycle MPACT Working Group Meeting when making your reservations to the get the government rate. Reservations will be by individual call-in, per your institutional protocol. Here is a listing of other hotels that offer government room rates. Please note that we do not have rooms reserved at the list locations, only Country Inn & Suites in Aiken. Maps Maps to SRNL from Columbia, Aiken, and Augusta

183

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Title Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Masanet, Eric R., Yuan Chang, Anand R. Gopal, Peter H. Larsen, William R. Morrow, Roger Sathre, Arman Shehabi, and Pei Zhai Journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources Volume 38 Date Published 2013 Keywords electricity, energy policy, environmental analysis, life-cycle impact, life-cycle inventory Abstract The application of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to electric power (EP) technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts. While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use, LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life-cycle energy, GHG emissions, air pollutant emissions, and water use implications of EP technologies. With continued progress, LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically-thorough and environmentally-holistic manner for more robust deployment decisions. This article summarizes: (1) major challenges in applying LCA to EP technologies thus far, (2) LCA results to date on the various impacts of EP technologies, and (3) opportunities for improving LCAs as applied to EP technologies moving forward.

184

Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Economic prospects of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IFR fuel cycle based on pyroprocessing involves only few operational steps and the batch-oriented process equipment systems are compact. This results in major cost reductions in all of three areas of reprocessing, fabrication, and waste treatment. This document discusses the economic aspects of this fuel cycle.

Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitivity study has been conducted to assess the robustness of the conclusions presented in the MIT Fuel Cycle Study. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycles. The options include limited recycling in LWRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. The analysis allowed optimization of the fast reactor conversion ratio with respect to desired fuel cycle performance characteristics. The following parameters were found to significantly affect the performance of recycling technologies and their penetration over time: Capacity Factors of the fuel cycle facilities, Spent Fuel Cooling Time, Thermal Reprocessing Introduction Date, and in core and Out-of-core TRU Inventory Requirements for recycling technology. An optimization scheme of the nuclear fuel cycle is proposed. Optimization criteria and metrics of interest for different stakeholders in the fuel cycle (economics, waste management, environmental impact, etc.) are utilized for two different optimization techniques (linear and stochastic). Preliminary results covering single and multi-variable and single and multi-objective optimization demonstrate the viability of the optimization scheme. (authors)

Passerini, S.; Kazimi, M. S.; Shwageraus, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

agencies to evaluate fuel and vehicle technologies with respect to greenhouse gas (GHG) metrics 3 Approach, Data Sources, and General Assumptions Approach: build LCA...

188

Life cycle sustainability assessment of UK electricity scenarios to 2070  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Decarbonising the UK electricity mix is vital to achieving the national target of 80% reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050, relative to a 1990 baseline. Much work so far has focused only on costs and GHG emissions ignoring other sustainability issues. This paper goes beyond to assess the life cycle sustainability of different electricity scenarios for the UK, extending to 2070. The scenarios include the main technologies relevant to the UK: nuclear, gas, coal with and without carbon capture and storage (CCS), wind, solar photovoltaics and biomass. Three levels of decarbonisation are considered and the implications are assessed for techno-economic, environmental and social impacts on a life cycle basis. The results show that decarbonisation is likely to increase electricity costs despite anticipated future cost reductions for immature technologies. Conversely, sensitivity to volatile fuel prices decreases by two-thirds in all the scenarios with low-carbon technologies. To meet the GHG emission targets, coal CCS can only play a limited role, contributing 10% to the electricity mix at most; the use of CCS also increases other sustainability impacts compared to today, including worker injuries, large accident fatalities, depletion of fossil fuels and long-term waste storage. This calls into question the case for investing in coal CCS. A very low-carbon mix with nuclear and renewables provides the best overall environmental performance, but some impacts increase, such as terrestrial eco-toxicity. Such a mix also worsens some social issues such as health impacts from radiation and radioactive waste storage requirements. UK-based employment may more than double by 2070 if a renewables-intensive mix is chosen. However, the same mix also increases depletion of elements nearly seven-fold relative to the present, emphasising the need for end-of-life recycling. Very low-carbon mixes also introduce considerable uncertainty due to low dispatchability and grid instability. With equal weighting assumed for each sustainability impact, the scenario with an equal share of nuclear and renewables is ranked best.

Laurence Stamford; Adisa Azapagic

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

2013 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review MeetingTransactions Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is charged with identifying promising sustainable fuel cycles and developing strategies for effective disposition of used fuel and high-level nuclear waste, enabling policymakers to make informed decisions about these critical issues. Sustainable fuel cycles will improve uranium resource utilization, maximize energy generation while minimizing waste, improve safety, and limit proliferation risk. To achieve its mission, FCT has initiated numerous activities in each of the technical campaign areas, of which this report provides a sample.

Not Listed

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

3 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) aspects of concrete  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The concrete industry is considered to be a large consumer of energy and natural resources, and is one of the main sources of greenhouse emissions and waste generation. The production and utilization of concrete and concrete structures have a large impact on the environment, and so the environmental assessment of concrete is of great importance in terms of achieving a sustainable society. This chapter includes instructions on how to apply the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to concrete, including a general description, life cycle inventory and life cycle impact assessment of concrete, future trends and sources of further information.

S.B. Marinkovi?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Microalgal Biodiesel – A CA-GREET Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Microalgal Biodiesel – A CA-GREET Model ... A life cycle assessment (LCA) focused on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the production of microalgal biodiesel was carried out based on a detailed engineering and economic analysis. ... Based on detailed mass and energy balances, calculated GHG emissions from this algal biodiesel system are 70% lower than those of conventional diesel fuel, meeting the minimum 50% GHG reduction requirements under the EPA RFS2 and 60% for the European Union Renewable Energy Directive. ...

Ian C. Woertz; John R. Benemann; Niu Du; Stefan Unnasch; Dominick Mendola; B. Greg Mitchell; Tryg J. Lundquist

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

Comment on “Life-Cycle Analysis of Alternative Automobile Fule/Propulsion Technologies”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comment on “Life-Cycle Analysis of Alternative Automobile Fule/Propulsion Technologies” ... It should also be noted that the GHG emissions attributable to electric vehicles are not reported at all, except in Table 1 where they are listed as comparable to the 1998 Ford Taurus, which serves as the baseline vehicle. ... A life-cycle perspective analyzed fossil fuels (conventional unleaded and reformulated gasolines, low S reformulated diesel, compressed natural gas [CNG]), biomass ethanol, and electricity together with current and advanced internal combustion engines (ICE, indirect [port] and direct injection, spark, and compression ignited) and elec. ...

Thomas P. Seager; Randy L. Brown

2001-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

193

Comment on “Effects of Ethanol on Vehicle Energy Efficiency and Implications on Ethanol Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

‡ Mechanical Engineering School, University of Campinas, Brazilian Bioethanol Science and Technology Laboratory (CTBE), CNPEM/ABTLuS, Campinas, Brazil ... Without belaboring their use of “efficiency”, this argument is not a novel conclusion from their work, as the functional unit used in many biofuel life-cycle studies and renewable fuel policies is fuel energy content and/or vehicle efficiency-adjusted travel distance. ...

Bret Strogen; Simone Pereira Souza; Jeffrey R. Lidicker

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO WHEELS ENERGY INPUTS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, criteria pollutant emissions, air toxics emissions, and multimedia impacts on a full fuel cycle basis for alternative-fueled vehicles is important when assessing the overall control, and assumptions regarding feedstock sources and fuel production conversion efficiency

195

Benefits and concerns of a closed nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power can play an important role in our energy future, contributing to increasing electricity demand while at the same time decreasing carbon dioxide emissions. However, the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States today is unsustainable. As stated in the 1982 Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of spent nuclear fuel generated by commercial nuclear power plants operating in a “once-through” fuel cycle in the deep geologic repository located at Yucca Mountain. However, unyielding political opposition to the site has hindered the commissioning process to the extant that the current administration has recently declared the unsuitability of the Yucca Mountain site. In light of this the DOE is exploring other options, including closing the fuel cycle through recycling and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of closing the fuel cycle is receiving special attention because of its ability to minimize the final high level waste (HLW) package as well as recover additional energy value from the original fuel. The technology is, however, still very controversial because of the increased cost and proliferation risk it can present. To lend perspective on the closed fuel cycle alternative, this presents the arguments for and against closing the fuel cycle with respect to sustainability, proliferation risk, commercial viability, waste management, and energy security.

Widder, Sarah H.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

Life cycle water use for electricity generation: a review and harmonization of literature estimates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article provides consolidated estimates of water withdrawal and water consumption for the full life cycle of selected electricity generating technologies, which includes component manufacturing, fuel acquisition, processing, and transport, and power plant operation and decommissioning. Estimates were gathered through a broad search of publicly available sources, screened for quality and relevance, and harmonized for methodological differences. Published estimates vary substantially, due in part to differences in production pathways, in defined boundaries, and in performance parameters. Despite limitations to available data, we find that: water used for cooling of thermoelectric power plants dominates the life cycle water use in most cases; the coal, natural gas, and nuclear fuel cycles require substantial water per megawatt-hour in most cases; and, a substantial proportion of life cycle water use per megawatt-hour is required for the manufacturing and construction of concentrating solar, geothermal, photovoltaic, and wind power facilities. On the basis of the best available evidence for the evaluated technologies, total life cycle water use appears lowest for electricity generated by photovoltaics and wind, and highest for thermoelectric generation technologies. This report provides the foundation for conducting water use impact assessments of the power sector while also identifying gaps in data that could guide future research.

J Meldrum; S Nettles-Anderson; G Heath; J Macknick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive...

198

title Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources volume year month abstract p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy GHG emissions air pollutant emissions and water use implications of EP technologies With continued progress LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically thorough and environmentally holistic manner for more robust deployment

199

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner Barbara Adams In this presentation we describe the prospective life-cycle modeling of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), a novel type of material with the potential for efficiently capturing CO2. Life-cycle modeling of emerging technologies, conducted early in the innovation process, can generate knowledge that can feed back to inform scientific discovery and development. We discuss the challenges of credibly modeling a system that does not yet exist, and describe methodological approaches including parametric system modeling (quantifying relations between system elements), scenario projections (defining plausible pathways for system scale-up),

200

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Institutional Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Ohio State Architect's Office In 1995 Ohio passed legislation requiring that all state agencies perform life-cycle cost analyses prior to the construction of new buildings, and energy consumption analyses prior to new leases. Both analyses are to be primary considerations in either building design or leasing decisions. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs October 8, 2013 - 2:14pm Addthis The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program to provide computational support for the analysis of capital investments in buildings. BLCC5 Program Register and download. BLCC 5.3-13 (for Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux). BLCC is programmed in Java with an XML file format. The user's guide is part of the BLCC Help system. BLCC version 5.3-13 contains the following modules: FEMP Analysis; Energy Project Federal Analysis; Financed Project Office of Management and Budget Analysis MILCON Analysis; Energy Project MILCON Analysis; Energy Conservation Investment Program Project MILCON Analysis; Non-Energy Project

202

NREL: Energy Analysis - Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Geothermal Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for geothermal technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from geothermal power generation Credit: Goldstein, B., G. Hiriart, R. Bertani, C. Bromley, L. Gutiérrez-Negrín, E. Huenges, H. Muraoka, A. Ragnarsson, J. Tester, V. Zui, 2011: Geothermal Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 4.6 Enlarge image

203

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Impacts of Innovative Technologies Speaker(s): Oliver Jolliet Date: July 15, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone This seminar starts by providing a short introduction to the field of Environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) through a practical example of packaging. It will then develop the case of the Life Cycle Benefits and Impacts of the Internet; raising the different scientific challenges that LCA faces to provide relevant results for innovative technologies.--The rapid development of the Internet and the related potential impacts on and benefits for the environment deserves attention. The infrastructure that supports a university's use of the Internet has been comprehensively

204

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Ocean Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for ocean power technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of wave and tidal range technologies. Credit: Lewis, A., S. Estefen, J. Huckerby, W. Musial, T. Pontes, J. Torres-Martinez, 2011: Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 6.11 Enlarge image

205

Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Wastewater-Based Algal Biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Wastewater-Based Algal Biofuels ... The potential for large-scale implementation of centrate-based algal biofuel, however, is limited by availability of centrate. ...

Dongyan Mu; Min Min; Brian Krohn; Kimberley A. Mullins; Roger Ruan; Jason Hill

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Life cycle assessment framework in agriculture on the farm level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a method that can be used to assess the environmental impact of agriculture, but impact categories and the functional unit of classical LCA’s must be adapted to the specific ... as ...

Guido Haas; Frank Wetterich…

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS: COMPARING PLA PLASTIC FOOD USE PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yin (Judy) Lee CHBE 484 April 14, 2009 #12;Executive Summary A life cycle analysis (LCA) was conducted sections--agriculture, manufacture and transport. Energy inputs for each of these sections were determined ............................................................................................................... 6 4 Agriculture

208

NREL: Energy Analysis - Hydropower Results - Life Cycle Assessment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the systematic review and analysis. The majority of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission estimates for hydropower cluster between about 4 and 14 g CO2eqkWh. The...

209

Incorporating uncertainty in the Life Cycle Cost Analysis of pavements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an important tool to evaluate the economic performance of alternative investments for a given project. It considers the total cost to construct, maintain, and operate a pavement over its ...

Swei, Omar Abdullah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Life Cycle and Mesoscale Frontal Structure of an Intermountain Cyclone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-resolution analyses and MesoWest surface observations are used to examine the life cycle and mesoscale frontal structure of the “Tax Day Storm,” an intermountain cyclone that produced the second lowest sea level pressure observed in Utah ...

Gregory L. West; W. James Steenburgh

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Public Facilities (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All facilities using public funds for construction or renovation must undergo a life cycle analysis, which will consider energy efficiency and on-site energy equipment using the sun, wind, oil,...

213

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE ROADMAP rsed e Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project * Maintain data quality and transparency. * Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data. * Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making tool. * Maintain compatibility with international LCI databases. * Provide exceptional data accessibility.

214

Role of Recycling in the Life Cycle of Batteries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ROLE OF RECYCLING IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF BATTERIES ROLE OF RECYCLING IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF BATTERIES J.L. Sullivan, L. Gaines, and A. Burnham Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division Keywords: battery, materials, recycling, energy Abstract Over the last few decades, rechargeable battery production has increased substantially. Applications including phones, computers, power tools, power storage, and electric-drive vehicles are either commonplace or will be in the next decade or so. Because advanced rechargeable batteries, like those

215

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Technology Insights and Perspectives for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report provides a rich resource of information for exploring fuel cycle characteristics. The most noteworthy trends can be traced back to the utilization efficiency of natural uranium resources. By definition, complete uranium utilization occurs only when all of the natural uranium resource can be introduced into the nuclear reactor long enough for all of it to undergo fission. Achieving near complete uranium utilization requires technologies that can achieve full recycle or at least nearly full recycle of the initial natural uranium consumed from the Earth. Greater than 99% of all natural uranium is fertile, and thus is not conducive to fission. This fact requires the fuel cycle to convert large quantities of non-fissile material into fissile transuranics. Step increases in waste benefits are closely related to the step increase in uranium utilization going from non-breeding fuel cycles to breeding fuel cycles. The amount of mass requiring a disposal path is tightly coupled to the quantity of actinides in the waste stream. Complete uranium utilization by definition means that zero (practically, near zero) actinide mass is present in the waste stream. Therefore, fuel cycles with complete (uranium and transuranic) recycle discharge predominately fission products with some actinide process losses. Fuel cycles without complete recycle discharge a much more massive waste stream because only a fraction of the initial actinide mass is burned prior to disposal. In a nuclear growth scenario, the relevant acceptable frequency for core damage events in nuclear reactors is inversely proportional to the number of reactors deployed in a fuel cycle. For ten times the reactors in a fleet, it should be expected that the fleet-average core damage frequency be decreased by a factor of ten. The relevant proliferation resistance of a fuel cycle system is enhanced with: decreasing reliance on domestic fuel cycle services, decreasing adaptability for technology misuse, enablement of material accountability, and decreasing material attractiveness.

S. Bays; S. Piet; N. Soelberg; M. Lineberry; B. Dixon

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Economic Life Cycle Assessment as element of sustainability certification – a key success factor moving beyond Life Cycle Costing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Target topic: achieving sustainability, saving energy, and improving occupant comfort? Lead Author Wolfram Trinius, PhD, Ingenieurb?ro Trinius, Hamburg, Germany and University of Gavle, Sweden Co Authors Harry Hirsch, HH Consulting, Baden... Baden, Germany Simone Lakenbrink, DU Diederichs Project Management, Munich, Germany Title Economic Life Cycle Assessment as element of sustainability certification ? a key success factor moving beyond Life Cycle Costing The move from...

Trinius, W.; Hirsch, H.

218

21 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of windows and window materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Windows are a significant component in sustainable buildings in both the impacts caused by their material life cycles and by their influence on the performance of a building over its service life. Life cycle assessment (LCA) studies have compared the impacts of different framing materials with mixed results. LCA has also been used to estimate the environmental payback of higher manufacturing impacts from producing better performing windows. Future sustainable window selection should make use of standardized LCA data for windows and utilize advanced technologies to optimize window performance.

J. Salazar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Technology Analysis - Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis diagram of the battery recycling life cycle Several types of recycling processes are available, recovering materials usable at different stages of the production cycle- from metallic elements to materials that can be reused directly in new batteries. Recovery closer to final usable form avoids more impact-intensive process steps. Portions courtesy of Umicore, Inc. To identify the potential impacts of the growing market for automotive lithium-ion batteries, Argonne researchers are examining the material demand and recycling issues related to lithium-ion batteries. Research includes: Conducting studies to identify the greenest, most economical recycling processes, Investigating recycling practices to determine how much of which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Screen Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options The Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) invests in research and development (R&D) to ensure that the United States will maintain its domestic nuclear energy capability and scientific and technical leadership in the international community of nuclear power nations in the years ahead. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap presents a high-level vision and framework for R&D activities that are needed to keep the nuclear energy option viable in the near term and to expand its use in the decades ahead. The roadmap identifies the development

222

Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies - Nuclear Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Bookmark and Share Much of the NE Division's research is directed toward developing software and performing analyses, system engineering design, and experiments to support the demonstration and optimization of the electrometallurgical

223

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION Prepared For: California to Tank, Criteria Pollutants, Multi-media impacts, EMFAC #12;#12;vii Table of Contents Acknowledgements

224

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus Preprint Robb Barnitt and Jeff Gonder To be presented at the SAE 2011 World Congress...

225

Summary and recommendations: Total fuel cycle assessment workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities of the Total Fuel Cycle Assessment Workshop held in Austin, Texas, during October 6--7, 1994. It also contains the proceedings from that workshop.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Fuel Cycle Options for Optimized Recycling of Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduction of transuranic inventories of spent nuclear fuel depends upon the deployment of advanced fuels that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and the availability of facilities to separate and reprocess ...

Aquien, A.

227

International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide: (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs; and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids - international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Long-Term Shifts in Life-Cycle Energy Efficiency and Carbon Intensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

System-level life-cycle efficiency may decrease as mitigation efforts intensify, since low-efficiency renewable systems with high output have much lower GHG emissions than some high-efficiency fossil fuel systems. ... Climate policies accelerate both improvements in EF and the adoption of renewable technologies, resulting in considerably lower primary energy demand and GHG emissions. ... Schipper, L.; Saenger, C.; Sudardshan, A.Transport and carbon emissions in the United States: The Long View Energies 2011, 4, 563– 581 ...

Sonia Yeh; Gouri Shankar Mishra; Geoff Morrison; Jacob Teter; Raul Quiceno; Kenneth Gillingham; Xavier Riera-Palou

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microtur

231

Wood energy fuel cycle optimization in beech and spruce forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel synergistic approach to reducing emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is presented. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization (FCO) aims to provide cleaner burning fuels through optimization of forestry and renewable energy management practices. In this work, beech and spruce forests of average and high quality were modelled and analysed to determine the volume of fuel wood and its associated bark fraction produced during typical forestry cycles. Two separate fuel wood bark production regimes were observed for beech trees, while only one production regime was observed for spruce. The single tree and stand models were combined with existing thinning parameters to replicate existing management practices. Utilizing estimates of initial seedling numbers and existing thinning patterns a dynamic model was formed that responded to changes in thinning practices. By varying the thinning parameters, this model enabled optimization of the forestry practices for the reduction of bark impurities in the fuel wood supply chain. Beech forestry cycles responded well to fuel cycle optimization with volume reductions of bark from fuel wood of between ~10% and ~20% for average and high quality forest stands. Spruce, on the other hand, was fairly insensitive to FCO with bark reductions of 0–5%. The responsiveness of beech to FCO further supports its status as the preferred RWC fuel in Switzerland. FCO could easily be extended beyond Switzerland and applied across continental Europe and North America.

Nickolas K Meyer; Marco Mina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Comparative life cycle assessment of tubular wind towers and foundations – Part 2: Life cycle analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the first part of the paper the design of tubular towers and respective onshore foundations was addressed. The considered solutions were based on steel, concrete and hybrid steel-concrete tubular towers supporting multi-megawatt turbines of 2, 3.6 and 5 MW power with hub heights of 80, 100 and 150 m respectively. In this second part of the paper, the life cycle analysis of the designed case studies is performed and conclusions about their environmental impact are drawn. Two different scenarios concerning the lifetime of the towers were established. The first scenario considers 20 years lifetime and two different construction methods for the connection of the steel segments, the first based in current technology using flange connections and the second using newly developed friction connections. Assuming equal importance for all environmental categories in this scenario, it may be concluded that for heights up to 100 m hybrid towers with friction connections are the most efficient solution. For higher heights, the concrete tower becomes more efficient. The second scenario considers an increased total lifetime of 40 years, assuming the reuse of the tower after 20 years of operation. In this case, the use of friction connections in steel towers enhances the possibility of dismantling and reusing the tower potentiating much better performance in relation to the environmental category of global warming.

H. Gervásio; C. Rebelo; A. Moura; M. Veljkovic; L. Simões da Silva

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SiC Research for SiC Research for Accident Tolerant Fuels Shannon Bragg-Sitton Idaho National Laboratory Advanced LWR Fuels Technical Lead Advanced Fuels Campaign Advanced LWR Fuels Pathway Lead Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program August 2013 Outline  Overview of DOE SiC research  Severe accident modeling: MELCOR analysis w/SiC  Recent characterization test results - Oxidation kinetics - Irradiation studies - Fuel-clad interactions - Elastic property measurement - Thermal properties - Failure model analysis - Quench testing  Technology development - ASTM standards development - SiC/SiC joining technology 2 SiC Gap Analysis and Feasibility Study  SiC Gap Analysis / Feasibility - Milestone report issued July 30, 2013 - Incorporates results of work funded

234

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

235

NREL: Energy Analysis - Wind Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet) Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet) Cover of the LWind LCA Harmonization Fact Sheet Download the Fact Sheet Wind Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization To better understand the state of knowledge of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from utility-scale wind power systems, NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a meta-analytical process called "harmonization." Over the last 30 years, several hundred life cycle assessments have been conducted for wind power technologies with wide-ranging results. Harmonization for onshore and offshore wind power systems was performed by adjusting published greenhouse gas estimates to achieve:

236

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map Photo of a green field with an ocean in the background. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database NREL and its partners created the U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database to help life cycle assessment (LCA) practitioners answer questions about environmental impact. This database provides individual gate-to-gate, cradle-to-gate and cradle-to-grave accounting of the energy and material flows into and out of the environment that are associated with producing a material, component, or assembly in the U.S. The goals of the U.S. LCI Database project are: Maintain data quality and transparency Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making

237

Quantifying Cost Risk Early in the Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method for analyzing life cycle cost risk on large programs is presented that responds to an increased emphasis on improving sustainability for long-term programs. This method provides better long-term risk assessment and risk management techniques. It combines standard Monte Carlo analysis of risk drivers and a new data-driven method developed by the BMDO. The approach permits quantification of risks throughout the entire life cycle without resorting to difficult to support subjective methods. The BMDO methodology is shown to be relatively straightforward to apply to a specific component or process within a project using standard technical risk assessment methods. The total impact on system is obtained using the program WBS, which allows for the capture of correlated risks shared by multiple WBS items. Once the correlations and individual component risks are captured, a Monte Carlo simulation can be run using a modeling tool such as ANALYTICA to produce the overall life cycle cost risk.

B. Mar

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Life cycle assessment and biomass carbon accounting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biomass feedstocks Biomass feedstocks and the climate implications of bioenergy Steven Hamburg Environmental Defense Fund Slides adapted from Reid Miner NCASI On the landscape, the single-plot looks like this 75 Harvested and burned for energy In year zero, the plot is harvested and the wood is burned for energy 1.1 Year 1 After regeneration begins, the growing biomass sequesters small amounts of CO2 annually 2.1 Year 2 2.8 Year 3 ??? Year X, until next harvest Σ = . Over time, if carbon stocks are returned to pre-harvest levels... ...the net emissions over this time are zero. single plot analysis Net Cumulative CO2 combustion emissions Cumulative CO2 combustion emissions Time Time Biomass energy Fossil fuel energy single plot analysis Net Cumulative CO2 combustion emissions Cumulative

239

World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

TRISO-Fuel Element Performance Modeling for the Hybrid LIFE Engine with Pu Fuel Blanket  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the hybrid LIFE engine to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burnup of a weapons-grade Pu blanket. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties for all TRISO layers, and a procedure to remap the elastic solutions in order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2} (E > 0.18 MeV). In order to model fast fluences in the range of {approx} 7 {approx} 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2}, for which no data exist, careful scalings and extrapolations of the known TRISO material properties are carried out under a number of potential scenarios. A number of findings can be extracted from our study. First, failure of the internal pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer occurs within the first two months of operation. Then, the particles behave as BISO-coated particles, with the internal pressure being withstood directly by the SiC layer. Later, after 1.6 years, the remaining PyC crumbles due to void swelling and the fuel particle becomes a single-SiC-layer particle. Unrestrained by the PyC layers, and at the temperatures and fluences in the LIFE engine, the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. Second, the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Obtaining more reliable measurements, especially at higher fluences, is an imperative for the fidelity of our models. Finally, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in the scope of fuel performance. The mechanical integrity of 2-cm graphite pebbles that act as fuel matrix has also been studied and it is concluded that they can reliable serve the entire LIFE burnup cycle without failure.

DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, M; Caro, A

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

2012 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Report 2012 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Report The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security goals. We rely on nuclear energy because it provides a consistent, reliable and stable source of base load electricity with an excellent safety record in the United States. In order to continue or expand the role for nuclear power in our long- term energy platform, the United States must: Continually improve the safety and security of nuclear energy and its associated technologies worldwide. Develop solutions for the transportation, storage, and long-term disposal of used nuclear fuel and associated wastes.

242

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

243

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

R.E. Sweeney

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

245

SAFEGUARDS EXPERIENCE ON THE DUPIC FUEL CYCLE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguards have been applied to the R and D process for directly fabricating CANDU fuel with PWR spent fuel material. Safeguards issues to be resolved were identified in the areas such as international cooperation on handling foreign origin nuclear material, technology development of operator's measurement system of the bulk handling process of spent fuel material, and a built-in C/S system for independent verification of material flow. The fuel cycle concept (Direct Use of PWR spent fuel in CANDU, DUPIC) was developed in consideration of reutilization of over-flowing spent fuel resources at PWR sites and a reduction of generated high level wastes. All those safeguards issues have been finally resolved, and the first batch of PWR spent fuel material was successfully introduced in the DUPIC lab facility and has been in use for routine process development.

J. HONG; H. KIM; ET AL

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Transuranium Elements in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transuranium elements, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium, are formed via neutron capture processes of actinides, and are mainly by-products of fuel irradiation during the operation of a nuclear react...

Thomas Fanghänel; Jean-Paul Glatz; Rudy J. M. Konings…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Life-cycle energy analyses of electric vehicle storage batteries. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of several life-cycle energy analyses of prospective electric vehicle batteries are presented. The batteries analyzed were: Nickel-zinc; Lead-acid; Nickel-iron; Zinc-chlorine; Sodium-sulfur (glass electrolyte); Sodium-sulfur (ceramic electrolyte); Lithium-metal sulfide; and Aluminum-air. A life-cycle energy analysis consists of evaluating the energy use of all phases of the battery's life, including the energy to build it, operate it, and any credits that may result from recycling of the materials in it. The analysis is based on the determination of three major energy components in the battery life cycle: Investment energy, i.e., The energy used to produce raw materials and to manufacture the battery; operational energy i.e., The energy consumed by the battery during its operational life. In the case of an electric vehicle battery, this energy is the energy required (as delivered to the vehicle's charging circuit) to power the vehicle for 100,000 miles; and recycling credit, i.e., The energy that could be saved from the recycling of battery materials into new raw materials. The value of the life-cycle analysis approach is that it includes the various penalties and credits associated with battery production and recycling, which enables a more accurate determination of the system's ability to reduce the consumption of scarce fuels. The analysis of the life-cycle energy requirements consists of identifying the materials from which each battery is made, evaluating the energy needed to produce these materials, evaluating the operational energy requirements, and evaluating the amount of materials that could be recycled and the energy that would be saved through recycling. Detailed descriptions of battery component materials, the energy requirements for battery production, and credits for recycling, and the operational energy for an electric vehicle, and the procedures used to determine it are discussed.

Sullivan, D; Morse, T; Patel, P; Patel, S; Bondar, J; Taylor, L

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The low net GHG mitigation obtained in the ethanol scenarios is mainly caused by the considerable amounts of steam and electricity consumed in the process of converting biomass into bioethanol, particularly for pretreatment, hydrolysis, extract concentration, distillation, and drying processes (12). ... Figure 3. Fossil fuel displacement in a life cycle perspective for alternative energy utilizations of 1 ha year agricultural land, shown as (a) net consumption/displacement of crude oil, hard coal, and natural gas, respectively, and as (b) net fossil fuel displacement (positive values represent fuel consumptions and negative values represent fuel displacements). ... However, the electric car and plug-in hybrid cars (electric motor and combustion engine) are still in a development stage and commercialization is not expected to occur until 10 to 15 years from now (37). ...

Karsten Hedegaard; Kathrine A. Thyø; Henrik Wenzel

2008-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Cost-effective fuel cycle closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. government is moving toward meeting its obligation to accept spent fuel from commercial light water reactors (LWRs) in 1998 by providing an interim storage facility. Site work and analysis of the deep, geologic repository at Yucca Mountain will continue at a reduced level of effort. This provides the time required to reevaluate the use of spent-fuel recycling instead of direct disposal. A preliminary assessment of this option is presented in this paper.

Ehrman, C.S. [Burns & Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States); Boardman, C.E. [General Electric Company, San Jose, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle energy analysis (LCEA) of buildings and the building sector: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This review summarizes and organizes the literature on life cycle assessment (LCA), life cycle energy analysis (LCEA) and life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) studies carried out for environmental evaluation of buildings and building related industry and sector (including construction products, construction systems, buildings, and civil engineering constructions). The review shows that most LCA and LCEA are carried out in what is shown as “exemplary buildings”, that is, buildings that have been designed and constructed as low energy buildings, but there are very few studies on “traditional buildings”, that is, buildings such as those mostly found in our cities. Similarly, most studies are carried out in urban areas, while rural areas are not well represented in the literature. Finally, studies are not equally distributed around the world.

Luisa F. Cabeza; Lídia Rincón; Virginia Vilariño; Gabriel Pérez; Albert Castell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fuel cycle options for optimized recycling of nuclear fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The accumulation of transuranic inventories in spent nuclear fuel depends on both deployment of advanced reactors that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and on availability of the facilities that separate and ...

Aquien, Alexandre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Information Resources: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products This March 28, 2013 webcast reviewed DOE's recently completed three-part study of the life-cycle energy and environmental impacts of LED lighting products relative to incandescent and CFL alternatives. The reports for Parts 1 and 2 were published in February 2012 and June 2012, respectively, providing a literature review and life-cycle assessment (LCA) for lamps utilizing these three light source technologies. Presenters Jason Tuenge of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Brad Hollomon of Compa Industries focused on findings from Part 3, which augments the LCA results with chemical analysis of a variety of lamps using standard testing procedures from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of California. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different lamps, were tested to ascertain whether potentially toxic elements are present in concentrations that exceed regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste.

254

WAR & PEACE & WAR THE LIFE CYCLES OF IMPERIAL NATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAR & PEACE & WAR THE LIFE CYCLES OF IMPERIAL NATIONS PETER TURCHIN A Review of Chapters 13 & 14: Strong North-South gradient · North: Piedemont, Lombardia in Po Valley · South: Calabria, Sicily OF IMPERIAL NATIONS because, "we still make babies the old-fashioned way, we kill each

White, Douglas R.

255

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Lorie Hamelin, Marianne Wesnæs and Henrik AND ALTERNATIVES 28 2.2.1 Reference Scenario (Scenario A) 28 2.2.2 Biogas from raw pig slurry and fibre fraction from chemical- mechanical separation (Scenario F) 29 2.2.3 Biogas from raw cow slurry and fibre

256

Life Cycle Assessment Practices: Benchmarking Selected European Automobile Manufacturers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Assessment Practices: Benchmarking Selected European Automobile Manufacturers Jean in the automobile industry where vehicle manufacturers (OEMs) are launching several new or re- vamped models each year. The automobile industry is therefore a very emblematic sector for best practices of LCA

Boyer, Edmond

257

Design for, and Evaluation of Life Cycle Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?. DESIGN FOR, AND EVALUATION OF LIFE CYCLE PERFORMANCE David J. Ahner Eldon W. Hall GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK ABSTRACT EQUIPMENT DEGRADATION Project evaluation necessarily requires performance estimates over..., operating procedures, equipment availabilities, etc. This paper discusses the general nature, and the ther mal interaction of power plant components as individual equipment degradation occurs, describing overall plant performance trends and quant...

Ahner, D. J.; Hall, E. W.

258

RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS Comparison of Life-Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of agricultural oper- ations were used to generate air emissions data for soy- bean production: the greenhouse-output life-cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) model; and SimaPro software equipped with the Franklin database. EIO-LCA specifically to U.S. soybean agriculture and processing, which resulted in several major findings. The EIO

Illinois at Chicago, University of

259

2007 american chemical Society Life-cycle analyses are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thorough analysis and quantifica- tion of impacts resulting from agriculture. LCA studies have shown initiatives. A life-cycle analysis (LCA) of bioproduction sys- tems is needed to evaluate potential benefits (5, 6); however, modern agricultural systems are respon- sible for significant environmental impacts

Illinois at Chicago, University of

260

A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Petroleum and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To determine the validity of this assump- tion, a comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) allows a quantitative such as ethanol and biodiesel, and various databases catalog the environmental impacts of agriculture (15-19). One showsgreenhousegasemissionsreductionsforbiolubricants but increased impacts of eutrophication, smog production, and energy use (20). Agricultural

Illinois at Chicago, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Toward Meaningful End Points of Biodiversity in Life Cycle Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here, we review the use of indicators and approaches to model biodiversity loss in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), a methodology used to evaluate the cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of products. ... patch diversity, richness, composition, number of ecosystems, relative or absolute area, area of seminatural vegetation in agriculture, emergent patterns in species distribution (richness, endemism) ...

Michael Curran; Laura de Baan; An M. De Schryver; Rosalie van Zelm; Stefanie Hellweg; Thomas Koellner; Guido Sonnemann; Mark A. J. Huijbregts

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Life Cycle Approaches to Sustainable Consumption: A Critical Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Approaches to Sustainable Consumption: A Critical Review ... Different study designs and a better integration with consumer research can provide further interesting insights. ... Spain faces the challenge of 80–95% greenhouse gas emissions reduction by 2050 (European Energy Roadmap). ...

Edgar G. Hertwich

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

Life-cycle cost analysis of floating offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this article is to put forward a methodology in order to evaluate the Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) of a Floating Offshore Wind Farm (FOWF). In this paper CBS is evaluated linked to Life-Cycle Cost System (LCS) and taking into account each of the phases of the FOWF life cycle. In this sense, six phases will be defined: definition, design, manufacturing, installation, exploitation and dismantling. Each and every one of these costs can be subdivided into different sub-costs in order to obtain the key variables that run the life-cycle cost. In addition, three different floating platforms will be considered: semisubmersible, Tensioned Leg Platform (TLP) and spar. Several types of results will be analysed according to each type of floating platform considered: the percentage of the costs, the value of the cost of each phase of the life-cycle and the value of the total cost in each point of the coast. The results obtained allow us to become conscious of what the most important costs are and minimize them, which is one of the most important contributions nowadays. It will be useful to improve the competitiveness of floating wind farms in the future.

Castro-Santos Laura; Diaz-Casas Vicente

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis for Condensate Receiving System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to determine the life-cycle costs of several options relevant to the Condensate Removal System serving the Compressed Air System (CAS) at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The best option (least present value) will be selected as the preferred configuration to construct.

C Mellen

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor physics and fuel cycle analysis is a core competency of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division. The Division has played a major role in the design and analysis of advanced reactors, particularly liquid-metal-cooled reactors. NE researchers have concentrated on developing computer codes for

266

2011 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting 1 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting 2011 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting As the largest domestic source of low-carbon energy, nuclear power is making major contributions toward meeting our nation's current and future energy demands. The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security goals. We rely on nuclear energy because it provides a consistent, reliable and stable source of base load electricity with an excellent safety record in the United States. To support nuclear energy's continued and expanded role in our energy platform, therefore, the United States must continually improve its knowledge, technology, and policy in order to:

267

International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

Leigh, I.W.; Lakey, L.T.; Schneider, K.J.; Silviera, D.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

Leigh, I.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Software Platform Evaluation - Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Software Platform Evaluation (SPE) is to document the top-level evaluation of potential software platforms on which to construct a simulation model that satisfies the requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). See the Software Requirements Specification for Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model (INEEL/EXT-05-02643, Rev. 0) for a discussion of the objective and scope of the VISION model. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies. This document will serve as a guide for selecting the most appropriate software platform for VISION. This is a “living document” that will be modified over the course of the execution of this work.

J. J. Jacobson; D. E. Shropshire; W. B. West

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

271

Fossil fuel combined cycle power generation method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting fuel energy to electricity includes the steps of converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one mixed gas stream of lower average molecular weight including at least a first lower molecular weight gas and a second gas, the first and second gases being different gases, wherein the first lower molecular weight gas comprises H.sub.2 and the second gas comprises CO. The mixed gas is supplied to at least one turbine to produce electricity. The mixed gas stream is divided after the turbine into a first gas stream mainly comprising H.sub.2 and a second gas stream mainly comprising CO. The first and second gas streams are then electrochemically oxidized in separate fuel cells to produce electricity. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

Labinov, Solomon D [Knoxville, TN; Armstrong, Timothy R [Clinton, TN; Judkins, Roddie R [Knoxville, TN

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

Life cycle assessment and sustainability analysis of products, materials and technologies. Toward a scientific framework for sustainability life cycle analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are many approaches to study the environmental and sustainability aspects of production and consumption. Some of these reside at the level of concepts, e.g., industrial ecology, design for environment, and cleaner production. Other approaches are based on the use of quantitative models, e.g., life cycle assessment, material flow accounting and strategic environmental assessment. This paper focuses on the development of a framework that is able to incorporate different models for environmental analysis, with the option of a broader scope that also includes economic and social aspects, thus covering the three pillars of sustainability. This framework builds on the ISO-framework for life cycle assessment, but takes a broader view, and allows us to move from micro questions on specific products, via meso questions on life styles up to macro questions in which the entire societal structure is part of the analysis.

Reinout Heijungs; Gjalt Huppes; Jeroen B. Guinée

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Life cycle costs for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projected constant dollar life cycle cost (LCC) estimates are presented for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition program being managed by the US Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD). The scope of the LCC estimate includes: design, construction, licensing, operation, and deactivation of a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility (FFF) that will be used to purify and convert weapons-derived plutonium oxides to MOX fuel pellets and fabricate MOX fuel bundles for use in commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWRs); fuel qualification activities and modification of facilities required for manufacture of lead assemblies that will be used to qualify and license this MOX fuel; and modification, licensing, and operation of commercial PWRs to allow irradiation of a partial core of MOX fuel in combination with low-enriched uranium fuel. The baseline cost elements used for this document are the same as those used for examination of the preferred sites described in the site-specific final environmental impact statement and in the DOE Record of Decision that will follow in late 1999. Cost data are separated by facilities, government accounting categories, contract phases, and expenditures anticipated by the various organizations who will participate in the program over a 20-year period. Total LCCs to DOE/MD are projected at approximately $1.4 billion for a 33-MT plutonium disposition mission.

Williams, K.A.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

275

Environmental Aspects of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles: Parametric Modeling and Preliminary Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................... 10 2 Simplified schematic of the once-through open fuel cycle .................................. 12 3 Simplified schematic of the plutonium-burning fuel cycle .................................. 13 4 Simplified schematic of the actinide... ..................................................... 23 7 Material flow for the plutonium-burning fuel cycle, year 0 ................................. 24 8 Material flow for the plutonium-burning fuel cycle, year 40 ............................... 25 9 Material flow for the actinide-burning fuel...

Yancey, Kristina D.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

Life Cycle Assessment for Sustainable Metropolitan Water Systems Planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is useful as an information tool for the examination of alternative future scenarios for strategic planning. ... Water systems supply additional functions includ ing the following:? (1) nutrient recovery ? the treatment and land application of biosolids brings back the nutrients to the natural cycle in agriculture, horticulture, and forest systems, which can prevent the need for chemical fertilizers and thus avoid their production; (2) energy recovery ? which can include the generation of electricity or the cogeneration of thermal energy and electricity from biogas at sewage treat ment plants (STPs) or biosolids combustion off-site [This generation activity replaces the production of electrical and thermal energy from other energy sources.]; ...

Sven Lundie; Gregory M. Peters; Paul C. Beavis

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Environmental life-cycle assessment of highway construction projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finland (Junnila et al 2003). The energy use and emissions from the life-cycle of the office building was assessed assuming fifty years as its service life. This study conducted an inventory as well as impact assessment on the office building as given... of office buildings in Finland. The practical aspects of this study are that more environmentally-conscious design can be made but further studies have to be conducted to standardize the results of this study in countries in a different geographic...

Rajagopalan, Neethi

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Chemicals with LCA: The Examples of Trichloroethylene andin Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product orand outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life

Hellweg, Stefanie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Eric Masanet, 1 Yuan Chang, 1 Anand R. Gopal, 2 Peter Larsen, 2,3 William R. Morrow III, 2 Roger Sathre, 2 Arman Shehabi, 2 and Pei Zhai 2 1 McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208; email: eric.masanet@northwestern.edu, yuan.chang@northwestern.edu 2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720; email: argopal@lbl.gov, wrmorrow@lbl.gov, rsathre@lbl.gov, ashehabi@lbl.gov, pzhai@lbl.gov 3 Management Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; email: phlarsen@lbl.gov Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 2013. 38:107-36 First published online as a Review in Advance on August 7, 2013 The Annual Review of Environment and Resources is online at http://environ.annualreviews.org

280

Frostbite Theater - Monarch Butterflies - Life Cycle of the Monarch  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measure the Diameter of the Sun! Measure the Diameter of the Sun! Previous Video (Let's Measure the Diameter of the Sun!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Monarch Butterfly Pupation) Monarch Butterfly Pupation Life Cycle of the Monarch Butterfly Follow the life cycle of the Monarch butterfly from egg to adult! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a field that used to house a bunch of ugly trailers that were used for office space. A couple of years ago the Lab tore them down and in an effort to cut the cost of lawn maintanence, they planted a bunch of wild flowers in their place. Steve: Last year Joanna and I planted this plant. This is milkweed. It's a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Changing Biomass, Fossil, and Nuclear Fuel Cycles for Sustainability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy and chemical industries face two great sustainability challenges: the need to avoid climate change and the need to replace crude oil as the basis of our transport and chemical industries. These challenges can be met by changing and synergistically combining the fossil, biomass, and nuclear fuel cycles.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

13 - Generation IV reactor designs, operation and fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter looks at Generation IV nuclear reactors, such as the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR), the supercritical water reactor (SCWR), the molten salt reactor (MSR), the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), the lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) and the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR). Reactor designs and fuel cycles are also described.

N. Cerullo; G. Lomonaco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

LMFBR operation in the nuclear cycle without fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantiation is given to expediency of investigation of nuclear power (NP) development with fast reactors cooled by lead-bismuth alloy operating during extended time in the open nuclear fuel cycle with slightly enriched or depleted uranium make-up. 9 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Toshinsky, S.I. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Kaluga (Russian Federation)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS, EMISSIONS, AND WATER IMPACTS Prepared For be divided into two parts: · Well-to-Tank (WTT) Feedstock extraction, transport, storage, processing, distribution, transport, and storage · Tank-to-Wheels (TTW) Refueling, consumption and evaporation The full

285

Estimating Externalities of Hydro Fuel Cycles, Report 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three major objectives of this hydropower study: (1) to implement the methodological concepts that were developed in the background document (ORNL/RFF 1992) as a means of estimating the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles and, by so doing, to demonstrate their application to the hydroelectric fuel cycle (different fuel cycles have unique characteristics that need to be addressed in different ways); (2) to develop, given the time and resources, the best range of estimates of externalities associated with hydroelectric projects, using two benchmark projects at two reference sites in the US; and (3) to assess the state of the information that is available to support the estimation of externalities associated with the hydroelectric fuel cycle and, by so doing, to assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and in setting future research agendas. The main consideration in defining these objectives was a desire to have more information about externalities and a better method for estimating them. As set forth in the agreement between the US and the EC, the study is explicitly and intentionally not directed at any one audience. This study is about a methodology for estimating externalities. It is not about how to use estimates of externalities in a particular policy context.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Grand Challenges for Life-Cycle Assessment of Biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grand Challenges for Life-Cycle Assessment of Biofuels ... Both advocates and critics of biofuels often focus on a restricted set of scenarios that appear to reinforce their a priori beliefs about how biofuel production and use might function. ... Converting rain forest, peatland, savanna, or grassland to produce food crop-based biofuels in Brazil, southeast Asia, and the US creates a biofuel C debt by releasing 17-420 times more CO2 than the annual greenhouse gas (GHG) redns. ...

T. E. McKone; W. W. Nazaroff; P. Berck; M. Auffhammer; T. Lipman; M. S. Torn; E. Masanet; A. Lobscheid; N. Santero; U. Mishra; A. Barrett; M. Bomberg; K. Fingerman; C. Scown; B. Strogen; A. Horvath

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

Life Cycle Assessment of Amonix 7700 HCPV Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We estimated the energy payback time (EPBT) and greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the life cycle of the Amonix high-concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) system with III-V solar cells. For a location in the southwest United States, the Amonix 7700 has an EPBT of only 0.86 yrs and GHG emissions of 24g CO{sub 2}-eq./kWh we expect further decreases in both by 2011.

Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

288

Algae biodiesel life cycle assessment using current commercial data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Autotrophic microalgae represent a potential feedstock for transportation fuels, but life cycle assessment (LCA) studies based on laboratory-scale or theoretical data have shown mixed results. We attempt to bridge the gap between laboratory-scale and larger scale biodiesel production by using cultivation and harvesting data from a commercial algae producer with ?1000 m2 production area (the base case), and compare that with a hypothetical scaled up facility of 101,000 m2 (the future case). Extraction and separation data are from Solution Recovery Services, Inc. Conversion and combustion data are from the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET). The LCA boundaries are defined as “pond-to-wheels”. Environmental impacts are quantified as NER (energy in/energy out), global warming potential, photochemical oxidation potential, water depletion, particulate matter, and total \\{NOx\\} and SOx. The functional unit is 1 MJ of energy produced in a passenger car. Results for the base case and the future case show an NER of 33.4 and 1.37, respectively and GWP of 2.9 and 0.18 kg CO2-equivalent, respectively. In comparison, petroleum diesel and soy diesel show an NER of 0.18 and 0.80, respectively and GWP of 0.12 and 0.025, respectively. A critical feature in this work is the low algal productivity (3 g/m2/day) reported by the commercial producer, relative to the much higher productivities (20–30 g/m2/day) reported by other sources. Notable results include a sensitivity analysis showing that algae with an oil yield of 0.75 kg oil/kg dry biomass in the future case can bring the NER down to 0.64, more comparable with petroleum diesel and soy biodiesel. An important assumption in this work is that all processes are fully co-located and that no transport of intermediate or final products from processing stage to stage is required.

Howard Passell; Harnoor Dhaliwal; Marissa Reno; Ben Wu; Ami Ben Amotz; Etai Ivry; Marcus Gay; Tom Czartoski; Lise Laurin; Nathan Ayer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher first costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches.

290

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

Estimating Externalities of Natural Gas Fuel Cycles, Report 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes methods for estimating the external costs (and possibly benefits) to human health and the environment that result from natural gas fuel cycles. Although the concept of externalities is far from simple or precise, it generally refers to effects on individuals' well being, that result from a production or market activity in which the individuals do not participate, or are not fully compensated. In the past two years, the methodological approach that this report describes has quickly become a worldwide standard for estimating externalities of fuel cycles. The approach is generally applicable to any fuel cycle in which a resource, such as coal, hydro, or biomass, is used to generate electric power. This particular report focuses on the production activities, pollution, and impacts when natural gas is used to generate electric power. In the 1990s, natural gas technologies have become, in many countries, the least expensive to build and operate. The scope of this report is on how to estimate the value of externalities--where value is defined as individuals' willingness to pay for beneficial effects, or to avoid undesirable ones. This report is about the methodologies to estimate these externalities, not about how to internalize them through regulations or other public policies. Notwithstanding this limit in scope, consideration of externalities can not be done without considering regulatory, insurance, and other considerations because these institutional factors affect whether costs (and benefits) are in fact external, or whether they are already somehow internalized within the electric power market. Although this report considers such factors to some extent, much analysis yet remains to assess the extent to which estimated costs are indeed external. This report is one of a series of reports on estimating the externalities of fuel cycles. The other reports are on the coal, oil, biomass, hydro, and nuclear fuel cycles, and on general methodology.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Moving toward multilateral mechanisms for the fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilateral mechanisms for the fuel cycle are seen as a potentially important way to create an industrial infrastructure that will support a renaissance and at the same time not contribute to the risk of nuclear proliferation. In this way, international nuclear fuel cycle centers for enrichment can help to provide an assurance of supply of nuclear fuel that will reduce the likelihood that individual states will pursue this sensitive technology, which can be used to produce nuclear material directly usable nuclear weapons. Multinational participation in such mechanisms can also potentially promote transparency, build confidence, and make the implementation of IAEA safeguards more effective or more efficient. At the same time, it is important to ensure that there is no dissemination of sensitive technology. The Russian Federation has taken a lead role in this area by establishing an International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC) for the provision of enrichment services at its uranium enrichment plant located at the Angarsk Electrolysis Chemical Complex (AECC). This paper describes how the IUEe is organized, who its members are, and the steps that it has taken both to provide an assured supply of nuclear fuel and to ensure protection of sensitive technology. It also describes the relationship between the IUEC and the IAEA and steps that remain to be taken to enhance its assurance of supply. Using the IUEC as a starting point for discussion, the paper also explores more generally the ways in which features of such fuel cycle centers with multinational participation can have an impact on safeguards arrangements, transparency, and confidence-building. Issues include possible lAEA safeguards arrangements or other links to the IAEA that might be established at such fuel cycle centers, impact of location in a nuclear weapon state, and the transition by the IAEA to State Level safeguards approaches.

Panasyuk,A.; Rosenthal,M.; Efremov, G. V.

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order 13123 Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order 13123 Guide describes the clarification of...

294

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Report provides tables of present-value factors for use in the life-cycle cost analysis of capital...

295

Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Handbook Final Version 9-30-14 | Department...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Handbook Final Version 9-30-14 Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Handbook Final Version 9-30-14 This handbook provides procedures, information, examples, and tools to...

296

Life-Cycle Assessment of Highway Pavement Alternatives in Aspects of Economic, Environmental, and Social Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Input Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) provides economic transactions, environmental emissions, and energy use throughout a product's life cycle based on a dollar amount of the product. A custom EIO-LCA model was conducted to compare...

Mao, Zhuting

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

297

Life Cycle Assessment for Emerging Technologies: Case Studies for Photovoltaic and Wind Power (11 pp)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The life cycle inventory analysis for photovoltaic power shows that each production ... be important for specific elementary flows. A life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) shows that there ... Material consumption...

Niels Jungbluth; Christian Bauer…

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The effect of carbonation after demolition on the life cycle assessment of pavements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high contribution of CO? emissions associated with pavements has driven research to assess the life cycle of concrete versus asphalt structures and to develop a strategy to reduce the carbon footprint. The life cycle ...

Rossick, Katelyn M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

300

The Product Process Service Life Cycle Assessment Framework to Estimate GHG Emissions for Highways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter introduces readers to the Product Process Service (PPS) Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) framework. This framework is founded in principals of pavement life cycle assessment and provides the basis for too...

Amlan Mukherjee; Darrell Cass

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Handbook Final Version 9-30-14  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This handbook provides procedures, information, examples, and tools to develop consistent and defensible life-cycle cost estimates (LCCE) and perform appropriate life-cycle cost analyses (LCCA) for capital projects. LCC Handbook – Final, September 2014

302

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be used to assist carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) planners to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintended environmental trade-offs. LCA is an analytical framework for determining environmental impacts resulting from processes, products, and services. All life cycle stages are evaluated including raw material sourcing, processing, operation, maintenance, and component end-of-life, as well as intermediate stages such as transportation. In recent years a growing number of LCA studies have analyzed CCS systems. We reviewed 50+ LCA studies, and selected 11 studies that compared the environmental performance of 23 electric power plants with and without CCS. Here we summarize and interpret the findings of these studies. Regarding overall climatemitigation effectiveness of CCS, we distinguish between the capture percentage of carbon in the fuels, the net carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We also identify trade-offs between the climate benefits and the potential increased non-climate impacts of CCS. Emissions of non-CO2 flue gases such as NOx may increase due to the greater throughput of fuel, and toxicity issues may arise due to the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) capture solvent, resulting in ecological and human health impacts. We discuss areas where improvements in LCA data or methods are needed. The decision to implement CCS should be based on knowledge of the overall environmental impacts of the technologies, not just their carbon capture effectiveness. LCA will be an important tool in providing that knowledge.

Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric; Cain, Jennifer; Chester, Mikhail

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

303

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order 13123  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guide describes the clarification of how agencies determine the life-cycle cost for investments required by Executive Order 13123.

304

Life Cycle Comparison of Coal Gasification by Conventional versus Calcium Looping Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After separation of H2, the remaining gas is used as fuel in a boiler to produce steam that is used in a steam turbine to produce electricity. ... Note that, as described in Section 2.1, the conventional process has nonzero GHG emissions due to combustion of the gases remaining after CO2 and H2S removal, while CLP does not have any GHG emissions. ... The conventional process with CO2 recovery from flue gas was compared with the calcium looping process based on their life cycle land use, water use, and GHG emissions. ...

Berrin Kursun; Shwetha Ramkumar; Bhavik R. Bakshi; Liang-Shih Fan

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Computational Framework for Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines incorporating Structural Health Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Computational Framework for Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines incorporating Structural of wind turbines and reducing the life-cycle costs significantly. This paper presents a life-cycle management (LCM) framework for online monitoring and performance assessment of wind turbines, enabling

Stanford University

306

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...assumed. The life-cycle boundary includes emissions...the results of life-cycle assessment. Often...required. Gasoline, diesel, liquefied petroleum...prior work on the life cycle of petroleum products...and/or com-putable general equilibrium models with...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

An algorithm for a decomposition of weighted digraphs --with applications to life cycle analysis in ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ecology L. Sun M. Wang § Abstract In the analysis of organism life cycles in ecology, comparisons of life the decomposition was formalized by Wardle [Ecology 79(7), 2539-2549 (1998)]. However there are difficulties no such simple cycles are obtainable. When applied to life cycle analysis in ecology, the proposed method

Wang, Mei

308

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Sensitivity of economic performance of the nuclear fuel cycle to simulation modeling assumptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing different nuclear fuel cycles and assessing their implications require a fuel cycle simulation model as complete and realistic as possible. In this thesis, methodological implications of modeling choices are ...

Bonnet, Nicéphore

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Determination of the proper operating range for the CAFCA IIB fuel cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fuel cycle simulation tool, CAFCA II was previously modified to produce the most recent version, CAFCA IIB. The code tracks the mass distribution of transuranics in the fuel cycle in one model and also projects costs ...

Warburton, Jamie (Jamie L.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Adoption of Advanced Fuel Cycle Technology Under a Single Repository Policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Develops the tools to investiage the hypothesis that the savings in repository space associated with the implementation of advanced nuclear fuel cycles can result in sufficient cost savings to offset the higher costs of those fuel cycles.

Paul Wilson

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

313

Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as “fission product other” or “actinide other”. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

Steven J. Piet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Analysis of multi-recycle thorium fuel cycles in comparison with once-through fuel cycles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research is to develop a methodology for a thorium fuel recycling analysis that provides results for isotopics and radio-toxicity evaluation and… (more)

Huang, Lloyd Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

VISION User Guide - VISION (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R&D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating “what if” scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level for U.S. nuclear power. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., “reactor types” not individual reactors and “separation types” not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation of disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. Note that recovered uranium is itself often partitioned: some RU flows with recycled transuranic elements, some flows with wastes, and the rest is designated RU. RU comes out of storage if needed to correct the U/TRU ratio in new recycled fuel. Neither RU nor DU are designated as wastes. VISION is comprised of several Microsoft Excel input files, a Powersim Studio core, and several Microsoft Excel output files. All must be co-located in the same folder on a PC to function. We use Microsoft Excel 2003 and have not tested VISION with Microsoft Excel 2007. The VISION team uses both Powersim Studio 2005 and 2009 and it should work with either.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert F. Jeffers; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; Benjamin A. Baker; Joseph Grimm

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fuel Cycle Utilizing Plutonium-238 as a“Heat Spike” for Proliferation Resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists’ Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Fuel Cycle

W. R. Waltz; W. L. Godfrey; A. K. Williams

317

Assessment of the environmental footprint of nuclear energy systems. Comparison between closed and open fuel cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy perspectives for the current century are dominated by the anticipated significant increase of energy needs. Particularly, electricity consumption is anticipated to increase by a factor higher than two before 2050. Energy choices are considered as structuring political choices that implies a long-standing and stable policy based on objective criteria. LCA (life cycle analysis) is a structured basis for deriving relevant indicators which can allow the comparison of a wide range of impacts of different energy sources. Among the energy-mix, nuclear power is anticipated to have very low GHG-emissions. However, its viability is severely addressed by the public opinion after the Fukushima accident. Therefore, a global LCA of the French nuclear fuel cycle was performed as a reference model. Results were compared in terms of impact with other energy sources. It emphasized that the French nuclear energy is one of the less impacting energy, comparable with renewable energy. In a second, part, the French scenario was compared with an equivalent open fuel cycle scenario. It demonstrates that an open fuel cycle would require about 16% more natural uranium, would have a bigger environmental footprint on the “non radioactive indicators” and would produce a higher volume of high level radioactive waste.

Ch. Poinssot; S. Bourg; N. Ouvrier; N. Combernoux; C. Rostaing; M. Vargas-Gonzalez; J. Bruno

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fuel cycles and envisioned roles of fast neutron reactors and hybrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future innovative nuclear fuel cycles will require insuring sustainability in terms of safe operation, optimal use of resources, radioactive waste minimization and reduced risk of proliferation. The present paper introduces some basic notions and fundamental fuel cycle strategies. The simulation approach needed to evaluate the impact of the different fuel cycle alternatives will also be shortly discussed.

Salvatores, Massimo [CEA-Cadarache, DEN-Dir, Bat. 101, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

Proceedings of GLOBAL 2013: International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Conference - Nuclear Energy at a Crossroads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global conference is a forum for the discussion of the scientific, technical, social and regulatory aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. Relevant topics include global utilization of nuclear energy, current fuel cycle technologies, advanced reactors, advanced fuel cycles, nuclear nonproliferation and public acceptance.

NONE

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Strengthening the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle against proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts several research programs that serve to reduce the risks of fissile-material diversion from the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle. The objectives are to provide economical and efficient neutron or power generation with the minimum of inherent risks, and to further minimize risks by utilizing sophisticated techniques to detect attempts at material diversion. This paper will discuss the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, the Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), and Proliferation-Resistant Closed-Cycle Reactors. The first two are sponsored by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation.

Travelli, A.; Snelgrove, J.; Persiani, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fuel cycle analysis in a thorium fueled reactor using bidirectional fuel movement : correction to report MIT-2073-1, MITNE-51  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report corrects an error discovered in the code used in the study "Fuel Cycle Analysis in a Thorium Fueled Reactor Using Bidirectional Fuel Movement," MIT-2073-1, MITNE-51. The results of the correction show considerable ...

Stephen, James D.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

323

Health and environmental impacts of the hydroelectric fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impacts on health and the environment and the associated damage costs caused by the hydroelectric fuel cycle are assessed in this paper. To this purpose, a large hydroelectric project along the Nestos river in northern Greece has been selected as an example. A large number of impacts have been identified. Occupational accidents, impacts on agriculture and forests, noise produced during the operation of the plant, impacts on biodiversity due to the physical presence of the dams, and alterations to the local water balance are the most important of them. The results of the analysis show that the major contributors to the damage cost of the hydroelectric fuel cycle are impacts on biodiversity and fatal occupational accidents, especially those that occur during the construction phase of the project. Nonetheless hydroelectricity is an environmentally-friendly energy source that exhibits lower damage values compared to other electricity generating technologies.

I.G. Kollas; S. Mirasgedis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Estimating Externalities of Coal Fuel Cycles, Report 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The agreement between the US DOE and the EC established the specific objectives of the study: (a) to develop a methodological framework that uses existing data and models to quantify the external costs and benefits of energy; (b) to demonstrate the application of the framework to estimate the externalities of the coal, biomass, oil, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, photovoltaic, and wind fuel cycles (by agreement with the EC, the US addressed the first six of these); and (c) to identify major gaps in the availability of information to quantify impacts, damages, benefits, and externalities of fuel cycles; and to suggest priorities for future research. The main consideration in defining these objectives was a desire to have more information about externalities, and a better method for estimating them.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transactions Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program supports the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) mission to: “Enhance U.S. security and economic growth through transformative science, technology innovation, and market solutions to meet our energy, nuclear security, and environmental challenges.” Goal 1 of DOE’s Strategic Plan is to innovate energy technologies that enhance U.S. economic growth and job creation, energy security, and environmental quality. FCT does this by investing in advanced technologies that could transform the nuclear fuel cycle in the decades to come. Goal 2 of DOE’s Strategic Plan is to strengthen national security by strengthening key science, technology, and engineering capabilities. FCT does this by working closely with the National Nuclear Security Administration and the U.S Department of State to develop advanced technologies that support the Nation’s nuclear nonproliferation goals.

Lori Braase; W. Edgar May

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems ANL/ESD/08-3 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express

327

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group The Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation IV goals and (2) identify key fuel cycle issues associated with Generation IV goals. This included examination of "fuel resource inputs and waste outputs for the range of potential Generation IV fuel cycles, consistent with projected energy demand scenarios." This report summarizes the results of the studies. The membership of the FCCG comprised 8 US members and 7 members from Generation IV International Forum (GIF) countries including members from

328

Development of a nuclear fuel cycle transparency framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel cycle transparency can be defined as a confidence building approach among political entities to ensure civilian nuclear facilities are not being used for the development of nuclear weapons. Transparency concepts facilitate the transfer of nuclear technology, as the current international political climate indicates a need for increased methods of assuring non-proliferation. This research develops a system which will augment current non-proliferation assessment activities undertaken by U.S. and international regulatory agencies. It will support the export of nuclear technologies, as well as the design and construction of Gen. IV energy systems. Additionally, the framework developed by this research will provide feedback to cooperating parties, thus ensuring full transparency of a nuclear fuel cycle. As fuel handling activities become increasingly automated, proliferation or diversion potential of nuclear material still needs to be assessed. However, with increased automation, there exists a vast amount of process data to be monitored. By designing a system that monitors process data continuously, and compares this data to declared process information and plant designs, a faster and more efficient assessment of proliferation risk can be made. Figure 1 provides an illustration of the transparency framework that has been developed. As shown in the figure, real-time process data is collected at the fuel cycle facility; a reactor, a fabrication plant, or a recycle facility, etc. Data is sent to the monitoring organization and is assessed for proliferation risk. Analysis and recommendations are made to cooperating parties, and feedback is provided to the facility. The analysis of proliferation risk is based on the following factors: (1) Material attractiveness: the quantification of factors relevant to the proliferation risk of a certain material (e.g., highly enriched Pu-239 is more attractive than that of lower enrichment) (2) The static (baseline) risk: the quantification of risk factors regarding the expected value of proliferation risk under normal (not proliferating) operations. (3) The dynamic (changing) risk: the quantification of risk factors regarding the observed value of proliferation risk, based on monitor signals from facility operations. This framework could be implemented at facilities which have been exported (for instance, to third world countries), or facilities located in sensitive countries. Sandia National Laboratories is currently working with the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to implement a demonstration of nuclear fuel cycle transparency technology at the Fuel Handling Training Model designed for the Monju Fast Reactor at the International Cooperation and Development Training Center in Japan. This technology has broad applications, both in the U.S. and abroad. Following the demonstration, we expect to begin further testing of the technology at an Enrichment Facility, a Fast Reactor, and at a Recycle Facility.

Love, Tracia L.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Non-Proliferating Fuel Cycle: No Enrichment, Reprocessing or Accessible Spent Fuel - 12375  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current fuel cycles offer a number of opportunities for access to plutonium, opportunities to create highly enriched uranium and access highly radioactive wastes to create nuclear weapons and 'dirty' bombs. The non-proliferating fuel cycle however eliminates or reduces such opportunities and access by eliminating the mining, milling and enrichment of uranium. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces the production of plutonium per unit of energy created, eliminates reprocessing and the separation of plutonium from the spent fuel and the creation of a stream of high-level waste. It further simplifies the search for land based deep geologic repositories and interim storage sites for spent fuel in the USA by disposing of the spent fuel in deep sub-seabed sediments after storing the spent fuel at U.S. Navy Nuclear Shipyards that have the space and all of the necessary equipment and security already in place. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces transportation risks by utilizing barges for the collection of spent fuel and transport to the Navy shipyards and specially designed ships to take the spent fuel to designated disposal sites at sea and to dispose of them there in deep sub-seabed sediments. Disposal in the sub-seabed sediments practically eliminates human intrusion. Potential disposal sites include Great Meteor East and Southern Nares Abyssal Plain. Such sites then could easily become international disposal sites since they occur in the open ocean. It also reduces the level of human exposure in case of failure because of the large physical and chemical dilution and the elimination of a major pathway to man-seawater is not potable. Of course, the recovery of uranium from sea water and the disposal of spent fuel in sub-seabed sediments must be proven on an industrial scale. All other technologies are already operating on an industrial scale. If externalities, such as reduced terrorist threats, environmental damage (including embedded emissions), long term care, reduced access to 'dirty' bomb materials, the social and political costs of siting new facilities and the psychological impact of no solution to the nuclear waste problem, were taken into account, the costs would be far lower than those of the present fuel cycle. (authors)

Parker, Frank L. [Vanderbilt University (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Dealing with uncertainties in Life Cycle Assessment for emerging technologies; test case LCA of Silicon Thin-film PV.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Onzekerheden in the benodigde inputdata voor Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) en Life Cycle Costing (LCC) studies zijn het onderwerp van veel publicaties en vormen een… (more)

Salve, José Luis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY13 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) the SNAP demonstration was enhanced with respect to query and navigation usability issues.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

11 - Environmental life-cycle assessment (LCA) of lubricants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Lubricants impact on the environment from raw material extraction to manufacturing, usage and disposal or reuse. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is utilised for evaluation of the environmental impacts of energy and material flows throughout the product life. Several comprehensive \\{LCAs\\} have compared mineral oil-based and bio-based lubricants, reporting varying conclusions. Environmental savings of biolubricants are more apparent at a local level than at a global scale. Negative impacts mainly stem from their agricultural production and performance in the use phase. \\{LCAs\\} should be used in industrial product design of biolubricants. Sustainable development indicators also consider the socio-economic impact of a product. Optimised lubricants determine significant energy savings.

Jan C.J. Bart; Emanuele Gucciardi; Stefano Cavallaro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Life cycle considerations in propulsion alternatives for fast vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast vessels are being built and operated for a large range of passenger-carrying applications. Fast cargo-carrying vessels are being considered in a variety of sizes as well. A major decision in design and construction of these vessels is the propulsion system; this decision has major impacts on the operation economics as well as the operational capabilities of the vessels. Factors involved in consideration of propulsion alternatives for fast vessels are examined, with emphasis upon the total life cycle operating implications of these factors. A methodology for considering the factors is suggested, and an example is presented with results of the consideration tradeoffs.

Luck, D.L. [General Electric Co., Evendale, OH (United States). GE Marine and Industrial Engines

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Background and Reflections on the Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the ever-growing body of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature on electricity generation technologies, inconsistent methods and assumptions hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Synthesis of the body of previous research is necessary to generate robust results to assess and compare environmental performance of different energy technologies for the benefit of policy makers, managers, investors, and citizens. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory initiated the LCA Harmonization Project in an effort to rigorously leverage the numerous individual studies to develop collective insights. The goals of this project were to: (1) understand the range of published results of LCAs of electricity generation technologies, (2) reduce the variability in published results that stem from inconsistent methods and assumptions, and (3) clarify the central tendency of published estimates to make the collective results of LCAs available to decision makers in the near term. The LCA Harmonization Project's initial focus was evaluating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity generation technologies. Six articles from this first phase of the project are presented in a special supplemental issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology on Meta-Analysis of LCA: coal (Whitaker et al. 2012), concentrating solar power (Burkhardt et al. 2012), crystalline silicon photovoltaics (PVs) (Hsu et al. 2012), thin-film PVs (Kim et al. 2012), nuclear (Warner and Heath 2012), and wind (Dolan and Heath 2012). Harmonization is a meta-analytical approach that addresses inconsistency in methods and assumptions of previously published life cycle impact estimates. It has been applied in a rigorous manner to estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from many categories of electricity generation technologies in articles that appear in this special supplemental supplemental issue, reducing the variability and clarifying the central tendency of those estimates in ways useful for decision makers and analysts. Each article took a slightly different approach, demonstrating the flexibility of the harmonization approach. Each article also discusses limitations of the current research, and the state of knowledge and of harmonization, pointing toward a path of extending and improving the meta-analysis of LCAs.

Heath, G. A.; Mann, M. K.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Illustrating Anticipatory Life Cycle Assessment for Emerging Photovoltaic Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In emerging technology cases,(8) LCA practitioners have responded with a number of strategies including developing structured scenarios within LCA models,(9, 10) thermodynamic process modeling,(11) consideration of experience curves from analogous industries to identify potential future improvements in efficiency,(12) dimensional analysis to explore scaling effects,(13) exploring market-driven impacts through consequential LCA,(14) and uncertainty bounding analyses to provide upper and lower limits to environmental impact. ... (22) Examples include use of stochastic multiattribute analysis after characterization to generate a probabilistic rank ordering of alternatives according to their overall life cycle impacts. ... Presented at the 2nd World Conference on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion, Vienna, 1998. ...

Ben A. Wender; Rider W. Foley; Valentina Prado-Lopez; Dwarakanath Ravikumar; Daniel A. Eisenberg; Troy A. Hottle; Jathan Sadowski; William P. Flanagan; Angela Fisher; Lise Laurin; Matthew E. Bates; Igor Linkov; Thomas P. Seager; Matthew P. Fraser; David H. Guston

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

336

TRPLSC-658; No of Pages 7 Review Life-cycle analysis and the ecology of biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels have been proposed as an ecologically benign alternative to fossil fuels. There is, however, considerable uncertainty in the scientific literature about their ecological benefit. Here, we review studies that apply life-cycle analysis (LCA), a computational tool for assessing the efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of energy systems, to biofuel feedstocks. Published values for energy efficiency and GHG differ significantly even for an individual species, and we identify three major sources of variation in these LCA results. By providing new information on biogeochemistry and plant physiology, ecologists and plant scientists can increase the accuracy of LCA for biofuel production systems. Plant science in the energy industry Plant biomass as a source of liquid fuel for transportation

unknown authors

337

System Losses Study - FIT (Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This team aimed to understand the broad implications of changes of operating performance and parameters of a fuel cycle component on the entire system. In particular, this report documents the study of the impact of changing the loss of fission products into recycled fuel and the loss of actinides into waste. When the effort started in spring 2009, an over-simplified statement of the objective was “the number of nines” – how would the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, and waste management change as the number of nines of separation efficiency changed. The intent was to determine the optimum “losses” of TRU into waste for the single system that had been the focus of the Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP), namely sustained recycle in burner fast reactors, fed by transuranic (TRU) material recovered from used LWR UOX-51 fuel. That objective proved to be neither possible (insufficient details or attention to the former GNEP options, change in national waste management strategy from a Yucca Mountain focus) nor appropriate given the 2009-2010 change to a science-based program considering a wider range of options. Indeed, the definition of “losses” itself changed from the loss of TRU into waste to a generic definition that a “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. All streams from either separation or fuel fabrication are products; fuel feed streams must lead to fuels with tolerable impurities and waste streams must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for one or more disposal sites. And, these losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of TRU into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. The effort has provided a mechanism for connecting these three Campaigns at a technical level that had not previously occurred – asking smarter and smarter questions, sometimes answering them, discussing assumptions, identifying R&D needs, and gaining new insights. The FIT model has been a forcing function, helping the team in this endeavor. Models don’t like “TBD” as an input, forcing us to make assumptions and see if they matter. A major addition in FY 2010 was exploratory analysis of “modified open fuel” cycles, employing “minimum fuel treatment” as opposed to full aqueous or electrochemical separation treatment. This increased complexity in our analysis and analytical tool development because equilibrium conditions do not appear sustainable in minimum fuel treatment cases, as was assumed in FY 2009 work with conventional aqueous and electrochemical separation. It is no longer reasonable to assume an equilibrium situation exists in all cases.

Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert S. Cherry; Denia Djokic; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Impact of energy supply infrastructure in life cycle analysis of hydrogen and electric systems applied to the Portuguese transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen and electric vehicle technologies are being considered as possible solutions to mitigate environmental burdens and fossil fuel dependency. Life cycle analysis (LCA) of energy use and emissions has been used with alternative vehicle technologies to assess the Well-to-Wheel (WTW) fuel cycle or the Cradle-to-Grave (CTG) cycle of a vehicle's materials. Fuel infrastructures, however, have thus far been neglected. This study presents an approach to evaluate energy use and CO2 emissions associated with the construction, maintenance and decommissioning of energy supply infrastructures using the Portuguese transportation system as a case study. Five light-duty vehicle technologies are considered: conventional gasoline and diesel (ICE), pure electric (EV), fuel cell hybrid (FCHEV) and fuel cell plug-in hybrid (FC-PHEV). With regard to hydrogen supply, two pathways are analysed: centralised steam methane reforming (SMR) and on-site electrolysis conversion. Fast, normal and home options are considered for electric chargers. We conclude that energy supply infrastructures for FC vehicles are the most intensive with 0.03–0.53 MJeq/MJ emitting 0.7–27.3 g CO2eq/MJ of final fuel. While fossil fuel infrastructures may be considered negligible (presenting values below 2.5%), alternative technologies are not negligible when their overall LCA contribution is considered. EV and FCHEV using electrolysis report the highest infrastructure impact from emissions with approximately 8.4% and 8.3%, respectively. Overall contributions including uncertainty do not go beyond 12%.

Alexandre Lucas; Rui Costa Neto; Carla Alexandra Silva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Estimating Fuel Cycle Externalities: Analytical Methods and Issues, Report 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities that produce electric power typically range from extracting and transporting a fuel, to its conversion into electric power, and finally to the disposition of residual by-products. This chain of activities is called a fuel cycle. A fuel cycle has emissions and other effects that result in unintended consequences. When these consequences affect third parties (i.e., those other than the producers and consumers of the fuel-cycle activity) in a way that is not reflected in the price of electricity, they are termed ''hidden'' social costs or externalities. They are the economic value of environmental, health and any other impacts, that the price of electricity does not reflect. How do you estimate the externalities of fuel cycles? Our previous report describes a methodological framework for doing so--called the damage function approach. This approach consists of five steps: (1) characterize the most important fuel cycle activities and their discharges, where importance is based on the expected magnitude of their externalities, (2) estimate the changes in pollutant concentrations or other effects of those activities, by modeling the dispersion and transformation of each pollutant, (3) calculate the impacts on ecosystems, human health, and any other resources of value (such as man-made structures), (4) translate the estimates of impacts into economic terms to estimate damages and benefits, and (5) assess the extent to which these damages and benefits are externalities, not reflected in the price of electricity. Each step requires a different set of equations, models and analysis. Analysts generally believe this to be the best approach for estimating externalities, but it has hardly been used! The reason is that it requires considerable analysis and calculation, and to this point in time, the necessary equations and models have not been assembled. Equally important, the process of identifying and estimating externalities leads to a number of complex issues that also have not been fully addressed. This document contains two types of papers that seek to fill part of this void. Some of the papers describe analytical methods that can be applied to one of the five steps of the damage function approach. The other papers discuss some of the complex issues that arise in trying to estimate externalities. This report, the second in a series of eight reports, is part of a joint study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commission of the European Communities (EC)* on the externalities of fuel cycles. Most of the papers in this report were originally written as working papers during the initial phases of this study. The papers provide descriptions of the (non-radiological) atmospheric dispersion modeling that the study uses; reviews much of the relevant literature on ecological and health effects, and on the economic valuation of those impacts; contains several papers on some of the more complex and contentious issues in estimating externalities; and describes a method for depicting the quality of scientific information that a study uses. The analytical methods and issues that this report discusses generally pertain to more than one of the fuel cycles, though not necessarily to all of them. The report is divided into six parts, each one focusing on a different subject area.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The energy and water nexus in Chinese electricity production: A hybrid life cycle analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Between 2000 and 2010, China?s electricity production had increased threefold and accounted for 50% of domestic and 12% of global CO2 emissions in 2010. Substantial changes in the electricity fuel mix are urgently required to meet China?s carbon intensity target of reducing CO2 emissions by 40–45% by 2020. Moreover, electricity production is the second largest consumer of water in China, but water requirements vary significantly between different electricity generation technologies. By integrating process-based life-cycle analysis (LCA) and input–output analysis (IOA) and through tracking national supply chains, we have provided a detailed account of total life-cycle carbon emissions (g/kWh) and water consumption (l/kWh) for eight electricity generation technologies – (pulverized) coal, gas, oil, hydro, nuclear, wind, solar photovoltaic, and biomass. We have demonstrated that a shift to low carbon renewable electricity generation technologies, i.e. wind, could potentially save more than 79% of total life-cycle CO2 emissions and more than 50% water consumption per kWh electricity generation compared to the current fuel mix and technology for electricity generation. If the projected wind farms are built by 2020, Inner Mongolia, one of the water scarce northern provinces, would annually save 179 MT CO2 (i.e. 44% of Inner Mongolia?s total CO2 emissions in 2008) and 418 million m3 (Mm3) water (18% of its industrial water use in 2008) compared with the same amount of electricity produced from coal.

Kuishuang Feng; Klaus Hubacek; Yim Ling Siu; Xin Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS – a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

John Sullivan

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

342

Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS – a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

Sullivan, John

343

How car material life-cycle emissions are considered in environmental rating methodologies? Suggestion of expedite models and discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reviews existing vehicle environmental rating methodologies worldwide and focuses on how these methodologies deal with alternative vehicle technologies (plug-in vehicles, hybrid vehicles, and fuel cell vehicles) and emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O, and CH4) and pollutants (NOx, VOC, CO, SOx, PM10 and PM2.5) derived from embodied materials life cycle. United States, Mexico, Europe and Australia have public access data and websites with top 10 rankings. The ways the scores are calculated for each vehicle have differences in what regards the considered boundaries for the emissions analysis. In Europe, there is still not a unique rating methodology or ranking system, e.g., Belgium, Germany and United Kingdom have their specific scoring schemes. Multilinear regression models were developed as an attempt to estimate the vehicle embodied emissions as a function of vehicle lifecycle mileage, electricity mix, vehicle mass, battery mass and fuel cell power to cope with different production regions and different alternative vehicle technologies. The regression models were validated against Volkswagen life cycle assessments (LCAs), and compared against American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) – Green Book linear functions for material assessment and UK 12 material dataset for materials assessment. The developed models proved to be useful in applications related to rating methodologies using life-cycle concepts, with good reliability for comparisons considering the complexity of processes involved in vehicle materials life-cycle assessment.

Gonçalo N. Correia; Teresa P. Batista; Sara S. Marques; Carla M. Silva

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electrical energy storage systems: A comparative life cycle cost analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Large-scale deployment of intermittent renewable energy (namely wind energy and solar PV) may entail new challenges in power systems and more volatility in power prices in liberalized electricity markets. Energy storage can diminish this imbalance, relieving the grid congestion, and promoting distributed generation. The economic implications of grid-scale electrical energy storage technologies are however obscure for the experts, power grid operators, regulators, and power producers. A meticulous techno-economic or cost-benefit analysis of electricity storage systems requires consistent, updated cost data and a holistic cost analysis framework. To this end, this study critically examines the existing literature in the analysis of life cycle costs of utility-scale electricity storage systems, providing an updated database for the cost elements (capital costs, operational and maintenance costs, and replacement costs). Moreover, life cycle costs and levelized cost of electricity delivered by electrical energy storage is analyzed, employing Monte Carlo method to consider uncertainties. The examined energy storage technologies include pumped hydropower storage, compressed air energy storage (CAES), flywheel, electrochemical batteries (e.g. lead–acid, NaS, Li-ion, and Ni–Cd), flow batteries (e.g. vanadium-redox), superconducting magnetic energy storage, supercapacitors, and hydrogen energy storage (power to gas technologies). The results illustrate the economy of different storage systems for three main applications: bulk energy storage, T&D support services, and frequency regulation.

Behnam Zakeri; Sanna Syri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nano Insulation Materials: Synthesis and Life Cycle Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The application of manufactured nanomaterials provides not only advantages resulting from their unique properties, but also disadvantages derived from the possible high energy use and CO2 burden related to their manufacture, operation, and disposal. It is therefore important to evaluate the trade-offs of process economics with the associated environmental impacts in order to strengthen the existing advantages while counteracting disadvantages of nanomaterials. This is of particular importance at the early stage of the development, where different synthetic approaches with different energy and environmental impacts may be employed. We discuss here the importance of life cycle assessment (LCA) on the synthesis of nano insulation materials (NIMs) consisting of hollow silica nanospheres (HSNSs). The results indicate that the use of recyclable and environmentally friendly raw materials can improve greatly the process environmental footprints. New synthetic procedures are developed accordingly for HSNS \\{NIMs\\} with improved environmental features as well as thermal insulation performance. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. Selection and peer-review under responsibility of the International Scientific Committee of the 21st CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering in the person of the Conference Chair Prof. Terje K. Lien.

Tao Gao; Linn Ingunn C. Sandberg; Bjørn Petter Jelle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Life cycle assessment in support of sustainable transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In our rapidly urbanizing world, sustainable transportation presents a major challenge. Transportation decisions have considerable direct impacts on urban society, both positive and negative, for example through changes in transit times and economic productivity, urban connectivity, tailpipe emissions and attendant air quality concerns, traffic accidents, and noise pollution. Much research has been dedicated to quantifying these direct impacts for various transportation modes. Transportation planning decisions also result in a variety of indirect environmental and human health impacts, a portion of which can accrue outside of the transit service area and so outside of the local decision-making process. Integrated modeling of direct and indirect impacts over the life cycle of different transportation modes provides decision support that is more comprehensive and less prone to triggering unintended consequences than a sole focus on direct tailpipe emissions. The recent work of Chester et al (2013) in this journal makes important contributions to this research by examining the environmental implications of introducing bus rapid transit and light rail in Los Angeles using life cycle assessment (LCA). Transport in the LA region is dominated by automobile trips, and the authors show that potential shifts to either bus or train modes would reduce energy use and emissions of criteria air pollutants, on an average passenger mile travelled basis. This work compares not just the use of each vehicle, but also upstream impacts from its manufacturing and maintenance, as well as the construction and maintenance of the entire infrastructure required for each mode. Previous work by the lead author (Chester and Horvath 2009), has shown that these non-operational sources and largely non-local can dominate life cycle impacts from transportation, again on an average (or attributional) basis, for example increasing rail-related GHG emissions by >150% over just operational emissions. While average results are valuable in comparing transport modes generally, they are less representative of local planning decisions, where the focus is on understanding the consequences of new infrastructure and how it might affect traffic, community impacts, and environmental aspects going forward. Chester et al (2013) also present their results using consequential LCA, which provides more detailed insights about the marginal effects of the specific rapid bus and light rail lines under study. The trade-offs between the additional resources required to install the public transit infrastructure (the 'resource debt') and the environmental advantages during the operation of these modes can be considered explicitly in terms of environmental impact payback periods, which vary with the type of environmental impact being considered. For example, bus rapid transit incurs a relatively small carbon debt associated with the GHG emissions of manufacturing new buses and installing transit infrastructure and pays this debt off almost immediately, while it takes half a century for the light rail line to pay off the 'smog debt' of its required infrastructure. This payback period approach, ubiquitous in life cycle costing, has been useful for communicating the magnitude of unintended environmental consequences from other resource and land management decisions, e.g., the release of soil carbon from land conversion to bioenergy crops (Fargione et al 2008), and will likely grow in prevalence as consequential LCA is used for decision support. The locations of projected emissions is just as important to decision-making as their magnitudes, as policy-making bodies seek to understand effects in their jurisdictions; however, life cycle impact assessment methods typically aggregate results by impact category rather than by source or sink location. Chester et al (2013) address this issue by providing both local (within Los Angeles) and total emissions results, with accompanying local-only payback periods. Much more challenging is the geographic mapping of impacts that these emissions wi

Matthew J Eckelman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC The Fuel Cycle subcommittee of NEAC met April 25-26 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The main topics of discussion were the Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) disposal program, the System Study Program's methodology that is to be used to set priorities for R&D on advanced fuel cycles, and the University Programs. In addition to these, we were briefed on the budget, but have no comments other than a hope for a good outcome and restrict ourselves to general advice until more is known. A current complication in the design of the Fuel Cycle R&D FCRD program is the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) which has been created to address the issues involved in long term disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and any of

348

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 The United States currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is stored onsite in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal envisioned in a deep mined geologic repository. This report provides an estimate of potential waste inventory and waste form characteristics for the DOE used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and a variety of commercial fuel cycle alternatives in order to support subsequent system-level evaluations of disposal system performance. Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition R5a.docx More Documents & Publications Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis

349

June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC The Fuel Cycle subcommittee of NEAC met April 25-26 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The main topics of discussion were the Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) disposal program, the System Study Program's methodology that is to be used to set priorities for R&D on advanced fuel cycles, and the University Programs. In addition to these, we were briefed on the budget, but have no comments other than a hope for a good outcome and restrict ourselves to general advice until more is known. A current complication in the design of the Fuel Cycle R&D FCRD program is the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) which has been created to address the issues involved in long term disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and any of

350

A framework and methodology for nuclear fuel cycle transparency.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key objective to the global deployment of nuclear technology is maintaining transparency among nation-states and international communities. By providing an environment in which to exchange scientific and technological information regarding nuclear technology, the safe and legitimate use of nuclear material and technology can be assured. Many nations are considering closed or multiple-application nuclear fuel cycles and are subsequently developing advanced reactors in an effort to obtain some degree of energy self-sufficiency. Proliferation resistance features that prevent theft or diversion of nuclear material and reduce the likelihood of diversion from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. IAEA Safeguards have been effective in minimizing opportunities for diversion; however, recent changes in the global political climate suggest implementation of additional technology and methods to ensure the prompt detection of proliferation. For a variety of reasons, nuclear facilities are becoming increasingly automated and will require minimum manual operation. This trend provides an opportunity to utilize the abundance of process information for monitoring proliferation risk, especially in future facilities. A framework that monitors process information continuously can lead to greater transparency of nuclear fuel cycle activities and can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation associated with these activities. Additionally, a framework designed to monitor processes will ensure the legitimate use of nuclear material. This report describes recent efforts to develop a methodology capable of assessing proliferation risk in support of overall plant transparency. The framework may be tested at the candidate site located in Japan: the Fuel Handling Training Model designed for the Monju Fast Reactor at the International Cooperation and Development Training Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

McClellan, Yvonne; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Love, Tracia L.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A Parametric Study of the DUPIC Fuel Cycle to Reflect Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Management Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) tandem analysis, the Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactor (DUPIC) fuel cycle in a CANDU 6 reactor is studied using the DRAGON/DONJON chain of codes with the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries. The reference feed material is a 17 x 17 French standard 900-MW(electric) PWR fuel. The PWR spent-fuel composition is obtained from two-dimensional DRAGON assembly transport and depletion calculations. After a number of years of cooling, this defines the initial fuel nuclide field in the CANDU unit cell calculations in DRAGON, where it is further depleted with the same neutron group structure. The resulting macroscopic cross sections are condensed and tabulated to be used in a full-core model of a CANDU 6 reactor to find an optimized channel fueling rate distribution on a time-average basis. Assuming equilibrium refueling conditions and a particular refueling sequence, instantaneous full-core diffusion calculations are finally performed with the DONJON code, from which both the channel power peaking factors and local parameter effects are estimated. A generic study of the DUPIC fuel cycle is carried out using the linear reactivity model for initial enrichments ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 wt% in a PWR. Because of the uneven power histories of the spent PWR assemblies, the spent PWR fuel composition is expected to differ from one assembly to the next. Uneven mixing of the powder during DUPIC fuel fabrication may lead to uncertainties in the composition of the fuel bundle and larger peaking factors in CANDU. A mixing method for reducing composition uncertainties is discussed.

Rozon, Daniel; Shen Wei [Institut de Genie Nucleaire (Canada)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

A comparative assessment of the economics of plutonium disposition including comparison with other nuclear fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has been evaluating three technologies for the disposition of approximately 50 metric tons of surplus plutonium from defense-related programs: reactors, immobilization, and deep boreholes. As part of the process supporting an early CY 1997 Record of Decision (ROD), a comprehensive assessment of technical viability, cost, and schedule has been conducted. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has managed and coordinated the life-cycle cost (LCC) assessment effort for this program. This paper discusses the economic analysis methodology and the results prior to ROD. Other objectives of the paper are to discuss major technical and economic issues that impact plutonium disposition cost and schedule. Also to compare the economics of a once-through weapons-derived MOX nuclear fuel cycle to other fuel cycles, such as those utilizing spent fuel reprocessing. To evaluate the economics of these technologies on an equitable basis, a set of cost estimating guidelines and a common cost-estimating format were utilized by all three technology teams. This paper also includes the major economic analysis assumptions and the comparative constant-dollar and discounted-dollar LCCs.

Williams, K.A.; Miller, J.W.; Reid, R.L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Development and implementation of future advanced fuel cycles including those that recycle fuel materials, use advanced fuels different from current fuels, or partition and transmute actinide radionuclides, will impact the waste management system. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign can reasonably conclude that advanced fuel cycles, in combination with partitioning and transmutation, which remove actinides, will not materially alter the performance, the spread in dose results around the mean, the modeling effort to include significant features, events, and processes

354

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Development and implementation of future advanced fuel cycles including those that recycle fuel materials, use advanced fuels different from current fuels, or partition and transmute actinide radionuclides, will impact the waste management system. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign can reasonably conclude that advanced fuel cycles, in combination with partitioning and transmutation, which remove actinides, will not materially alter the performance, the spread in dose results around the mean, the modeling effort to include significant features, events, and processes

355

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Rowe-Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Final_Updated.pptx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Future Challenges Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nathan Rowe Chris Pickett Oak Ridge National Laboratory Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Users Annual Training Meeting May 20-23, 2013 St. Louis, Missouri 2 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Introduction * Changing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities * Nuclear Security Challenges * How to Respond? - Additional Protocol - State-Level Concept - Continuity of Knowledge * Conclusion 3 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Fuel Cycle Source: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) web site IAEA Safeguards Begins Here 4 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material Accounting Nuclear Weapons Cycle Conversion

356

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and conventional gas are not significantly...harmonized estimates of life cycle GHG emissions...unconventional gas used for electricity...combined cycle turbine (NGCC) compared...explanation of the remaining harmonization...evaluated shale gas LCAs: inclusion of missing life cycle stages...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fuel cycle modelling of open cycle thorium-fuelled nuclear energy systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, we have sought to determine the advantages, disadvantages, and viability of open cycle thorium–uranium-fuelled (Th–U-fuelled) nuclear energy systems. This has been done by assessing three such systems, each of which requires uranium enriched to ?20% 235U, in comparison to a reference uranium-fuelled (U-fuelled) system over various performance indicators, spanning material flows, waste composition, economics, and proliferation resistance. The values of these indicators were determined using the UK National Nuclear Laboratory’s fuel cycle modelling code ORION. This code required the results of lattice-physics calculations to model the neutronics of each nuclear energy system, and these were obtained using various nuclear reactor physics codes and burn-up routines. In summary, all three Th–U-fuelled nuclear energy systems required more separative work capacity than the equivalent benchmark U-fuelled system, with larger levelised fuel cycle costs and larger levelised cost of electricity. Although a reduction of ?6% in the required uranium ore per kWh was seen for one of the Th–U-fuelled systems compared to the reference U-fuelled system, the other two Th–U-fuelled systems required more uranium ore per kWh than the reference. Negligible advantages and disadvantages were observed for the amount and the properties of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generated by the systems considered. Two of the Th–U-fuelled systems showed some benefit in terms of proliferation resistance of the SNF generated. Overall, it appears that there is little merit in incorporating thorium into nuclear energy systems operating with open nuclear fuel cycles.

S.F. Ashley; B.A. Lindley; G.T. Parks; W.J. Nuttall; R. Gregg; K.W. Hesketh; U. Kannan; P.D. Krishnani; B. Singh; A. Thakur; M. Cowper; A. Talamo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Environmental Impact of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Fate of Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The resurgence of nuclear power as a strategy for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has, in parallel, revived interest in the environmental impact of actinides. Just as GHG emissions are the main environmental impact of the combustion of fossil fuels, the fate of actinides, consumed and produced by nuclear reactions, determines whether nuclear power is viewed as an environmentally “friendly” source of energy. In this article, we summarize the sources of actinides in the nuclear fuel cycle, how actinides are separated by chemical processing, the development of actinide-bearing materials, and the behavior of actinides in the environment. At each stage, actinides present a unique and complicated behavior because of the 5f electronic configurations.

Ewing, Rodney C.; Runde, W.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since greenhouse gases are a global concern, rather than a local concern as are some kinds of effluents, one must compare the entire lifecycle of nuclear power to alternative technologies for generating electricity. A recent critical analysis by Sovacool (2008) gives a clearer picture. "It should be noted that nuclear power is not directly emitting greenhouse gas emissions, but rather that lifecycle emissions occur through plant construction, operation, uranium mining and milling, and plant decommissioning." "[N]uclear energy is in no way 'carbon free' or 'emissions free,' even though it is much better (from purely a carbon-equivalent emissions standpoint) than coal, oil, and natural gas electricity generators, but worse than renewable and small scale distributed generators" (Sovacool 2008). According to Sovacool, at an estimated 66 g CO2 equivalent per kilowatt-hour (gCO2e/kWh), nuclear power emits 15 times less CO2 per unit electricity generated than unscrubbed coal generation (at 1050 gCO2e/kWh), but 7 times more than the best renewable, wind (at 9 gCO2e/kWh). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2009) has long recognized CO2 emissions in its regulations concerning the environmental impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. In Table S-3 of 10 CFR 51.51(b), NRC lists a 1000-MW(electric) nuclear plant as releasing as much CO2 as a 45-MW(e) coal plant. A large share of the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle is due to the energy consumption to enrich uranium by the gaseous diffusion process. A switch to either gas centrifugation or laser isotope separation would dramatically reduce the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Strom, Daniel J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Simulation Model for the Waterfall Software Development Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Software development life cycle or SDLC for short is a methodology for designing, building, and maintaining information and industrial systems. So far, there exist many SDLC models, one of which is the Waterfall model which comprises five phases to be completed sequentially in order to develop a software solution. However, SDLC of software systems has always encountered problems and limitations that resulted in significant budget overruns, late or suspended deliveries, and dissatisfied clients. The major reason for these deficiencies is that project directors are not wisely assigning the required number of workers and resources on the various activities of the SDLC. Consequently, some SDLC phases with insufficient resources may be delayed; while, others with excess resources may be idled, leading to a bottleneck between the arrival and delivery of projects and to a failure in delivering an operational product on time and within budget. This paper proposes a simulation model for the Waterfall development proce...

Bassil, Youssef

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Fuels via Partial Redox Cycles with Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The University of Minnesota is developing a solar thermochemical reactor that will efficiently produce fuel from sunlight, using solar energy to produce heat to break chemical bonds. The University of Minnesota is envisioning producing the fuel by using partial redox cycles and ceria-based reactive materials. The team will achieve unprecedented solar-to-fuel conversion efficiencies of more than 10% (where current state-of-the-art efficiency is 1%) by combined efforts and innovations in material development, and reactor design with effective heat recovery mechanisms and demonstration. This new technology will allow for the effective use of vast domestic solar resources to produce precursors to synthetic fuels that could replace gasoline.

None

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

PROTEUS - Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulation Toolset for Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis PROTEUS Faster and more accurate neutronics calculations enable optimum reactor design... Argonne National Laboratory's powerful reactor physics toolset, PROTEUS, empowers users to create optimal reactor designs quickly, reliably and accurately. ...Reducing costs for designers of fast spectrum reactors. PROTEUS' long history of validation provides confidence in predictive simulations Argonne's simulation tools have more than 30 years of validation history against numerous experiments and measurements. The tools within PROTEUS work together, using the same interface files for easier integration of calculations. Multi-group Fast Reactor Cross Section Processing: MC 2 -3 No other fast spectrum multigroup generation tool

363

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY12 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building on previous internal investments and leveraging ongoing advancements in semantic technologies, PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In developing this proof of concept prototype, the utility and relevancy of semantic technologies to the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D) has been better understood.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.; Neorr, Peter A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Systems Analysis supports engineering economic analyses and trade-studies, and requires a requisite reference cost basis to support adequate analysis rigor. In this regard, the AFCI program has created a reference set of economic documentation. The documentation consists of the “Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) Cost Basis” report (Shropshire, et al. 2007), “AFCI Economic Analysis” report, and the “AFCI Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies Report.” Together, these documents provide the reference cost basis, cost modeling basis, and methodologies needed to support AFCI economic analysis. The application of the reference cost data in the cost and econometric systems analysis models will be supported by this report. These methodologies include: the energy/environment/economic evaluation of nuclear technology penetration in the energy market—domestic and internationally—and impacts on AFCI facility deployment, uranium resource modeling to inform the front-end fuel cycle costs, facility first-of-a-kind to nth-of-a-kind learning with application to deployment of AFCI facilities, cost tradeoffs to meet nuclear non-proliferation requirements, and international nuclear facility supply/demand analysis. The economic analysis will be performed using two cost models. VISION.ECON will be used to evaluate and compare costs under dynamic conditions, consistent with the cases and analysis performed by the AFCI Systems Analysis team. Generation IV Excel Calculations of Nuclear Systems (G4-ECONS) will provide static (snapshot-in-time) cost analysis and will provide a check on the dynamic results. In future analysis, additional AFCI measures may be developed to show the value of AFCI in closing the fuel cycle. Comparisons can show AFCI in terms of reduced global proliferation (e.g., reduction in enrichment), greater sustainability through preservation of a natural resource (e.g., reduction in uranium ore depletion), value from weaning the U.S. from energy imports (e.g., measures of energy self-sufficiency), and minimization of future high level waste (HLW) repositories world-wide.

David E. Shropshire

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Application of life cycle analysis: The case of green bullets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis (LCA) has been used to analyze the desirability of replacing lead with a composite of tungsten and tin in projectile slugs used in small arms ammunition at US Department of Energy (DOE) training facilities for security personnel. The analysis includes consideration of costs, performance, environmental and human health impacts, availability of raw materials, and stakeholder acceptance. The DOE expends approximately 10 million rounds of small-arms ammunition each year training security personnel. This deposits over 300,000 pounds of lead and copper annually into DOE firing ranges, contributing to lead migration in the surrounding environment. Human lead intake occurs by inhalation of contaminated indoor firing range air and air containing lead particles that are resuspended during regular maintenance and cleanup, and by skin absorption while cleaning weapons. Projectiles developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using a composite of tungsten and tin perform as well as, or better than, those fabricated using lead. A cost analysis shows that tungsten-tin is less costly to use than lead, since, for the current number of rounds used annually, the higher tungsten-tin purchase price is small compared with higher maintenance costs associated with lead. The tungsten-tin composite presents a much smaller potential for adverse human health and environmental impacts than lead. Only a small fraction of the world`s tungsten production occurs in the United States, however, and market-economy countries account for only around 15% of world tungsten production. Life cycle analysis clearly shows that advantages outweigh risks in replacing lead with tungsten-tin in small-caliber projectiles at DOE training facilities. Concerns about the availability of raw tungsten are mitigated by the ease of converting back to lead (if necessary) and the recyclability of tungsten-tin rounds.

Bogard, J.S.; Yuracko, K.L.; Murray, M.E.; Lowden, R.A.; Vaughn, N.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Integrated Electrorefining Efficiency Test for Pyrochemical Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrochemical processing plays an important role in the development of next generation nuclear reactors and closed nuclear fuel cycle technology. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has implemented a pyrochemical process for the treatment of sodium-bonded spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). A successful demonstration of the technology was performed from 1996 to 1999 for the Department of Energy (DOE) [1]. Processing of the spent fuel and associated research and development activities have been integrated into DOE’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives (AFCI) program since 2003. Electrorefining can be considered to be the signature or central technology for pyrochemical processing. In order to assess the efficiencies involved in the electrorefining process, an integrated electrorefining efficiency test was performed in the Mk-IV electrorefiner. This paper summarizes the observations and results obtained from the test. EXPERIMENT AND RESULTS The primary goal of the integrated processing efficiency test is to demonstrate the integrated actinide dissolution and recovery efficiencies typical for the fixed operating parameters that have been applied to Mk-IV electrorefiner (ER) and cathode processor (CP) to treat spent EBR-II driver fuel during the last three years. The findings are of importance for scaling-up the pyroprocess to recover and recycle valuable actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The test was performed in the Mk-IV electrorefiner. The ER is located in the hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex. Descriptions of the major components of the ER and the process in general have been provided elsewhere [2]. Salt and cadmium levels were measured, and multiple samples were obtained prior to performing the integrated test to establish an ER baseline for assessing the test results. The test consisted of four electrorefining batches of spent driver fuel with approximately 50 kg heavy metal. Typically, three to four ER runs are required to complete a batch. Fig. 1 shows pictures of the cathodes produced by three electrorefining runs during the second batch. The cathode No.3 in the figure has clearly different morphology than that of the first two. The cathodes produced by the other three batches have the similar morphology as those pictured. The first and second cathodes are ordinary uranium dendrite, and the third and fourth cathode show typically high Zr content morphology [3]. The end-point for each batch was determined by weighing each anode basket and assuring a net residue mass being equal or less than 3.0 kg. The 3.0 kg residue included any un-dissolved fuel constituents and adhering salt. Previous operating experience has shown that uranium dissolution in excess of 99.7 wt% was achieved when using this established end-point. Cladding hull samples were taken from each basket after it was removed from the ER. The actinide dissolution efficiency will be evaluated when the analytical results become available. Cathode No. 1 Cathode No. 2 Cathode No. 3 Fig.1 Three cathodes produced through electrorefining the second batch of spent EBR-II driver fuel As a part of the integrated efficiency test, the cat

S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; R. W. Benedict; D. Vaden; B. R. Westphal

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of streetlight technologies for minor roads in United Arab Emirates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method is used to investigate the environmental impacts of two recent energy efficient streetlight technologies, Ceramic Metal Halide (CMH) and Light Emitting Diode (LED), with the aim of assessing their application in Abu Dhabi — United Arab Emirates (UAE). The cradle to grave analysis for CMH and LED streetlights includes raw material extraction, production of streetlight fixture, use and end of life scenario, all modeled using the SimaPro software package. The results show that LED lights have larger environmental impact during the production stage, but this is offset during the operational life of the lamp, due to the lower energy consumption of LEDs. For both types of lamps, the production stage has significantly less overall impact when compared to the impact during their operational life. The analysis in this paper also covers a scenario where stand-alone light fixtures are powered by photovoltaic (PV) panels, with and without battery recycling, in addition to a scenario where the energy used for operation comes from a solar power plant. In all the cases analyzed, the LED lamp has a lower overall environmental impact. Furthermore, our analysis shows that most environmental impacts come from battery production, consumption of fossil fuels for energy, and transportation of parts.

Sabina Abdul Hadi; Muna R. Al Kaabi; Meshayel O. Al Ali; Hassan A. Arafat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

369

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

0 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Report describes the 2010 edition of energy price indices and discount factors for performing...

371

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis-2013 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2013 Handbook describes the annual supplements to the NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special...

372

Life cycle assessment of electric mobility: answers and challenges—Zurich, April 6, 2011  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At this forum most recent results of life cycle assessment studies of electric car driving compared to driving fossil- and agro...

Rolf Frischknecht; Karin Flury

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the "Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products" webcast, held March 28, 2013.

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive life cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selected European Automobile Manufacturers Summary: Umweltinformatik 1.3. Users of LCA in the automotive industry According to the Life Cycle Initiative launched... of the...

375

Status of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) activities in the Nordic Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The status of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) activities in the Nordic Region (period ... the most important ones. All aspects of LCA methodology are used: 90% use impact...

Ole J. Hanssen

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cockerill T. 2008. Life cycle GHG assessment of fossil fuelreduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintendedemission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advanced fuel cycles and impacts On The Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals identified for advanced fuel cycles, such as that proposed by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, is to reduce the volume of wastes that would ultimately have to be disposed in a geologic repository. Besides reducing volume, techniques that recycle the vast majority of actinides along with the removal of key fission products also reduce the inventory of radionuclides that must ultimately be disposed and the thermal output of the wastes. Advanced recycling techniques may also generate waste forms having different characteristics than those that have been considered for disposal in a repository at Yucca Mountain to-date. These all have a potential impact on several aspects of a repository, such as the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, including surface and subsurface facility design, pre-closure and post-closure safety analyses, and ultimately licensing. These changes would all have to be performed in accordance with the requirements at 10 CFR 63 and approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a license amendment prior to the disposal of any wastes from an advanced fuel cycle. (authors)

Nutt, W.M.; Peters, M.T. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle 15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development August 1, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it will award up to $15 million to 34 research organizations as part of the Department's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). AFCI is the Department's nuclear energy research and development program supporting the long-term goals and objectives of the United States' nuclear energy policy. These projects will provide necessary data and analyses to further U.S. nuclear fuel cycle technology development, meet the need for advanced nuclear energy production and help to close the nuclear fuel cycle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Financing Strategies For A Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help meet the nation’s energy needs, recycling of partially used nuclear fuel is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle, but implementing this step will require considerable investment. This report evaluates financing scenarios for integrating recycling facilities into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options from fully government owned to fully private owned were evaluated using DPL (Decision Programming Language 6.0), which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest lifecycle cost, lowest unit cost). This evaluation concludes that the lowest unit costs and lifetime costs are found for a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. However, this does not mean that the facilities should necessarily be constructed and operated by the government. The costs for hybrid combinations of public and private (commercial) financed options can compete under some circumstances with the costs of the government option. This analysis shows that commercial operations have potential to be economical, but there is presently no incentive for private industry involvement. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) currently establishes government ownership of partially used commercial nuclear fuel. In addition, the recently announced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) suggests fuels from several countries will be recycled in the United States as part of an international governmental agreement; this also assumes government ownership. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual facility capacity led to the greatest variations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; and the annual operating costs, forgiveness of debt, and overnight costs dominate the costs computed for the government case. The uncertainty in operations, leading to lower than optimal processing rates (or annual plant throughput), is the most detrimental issue to achieving low unit costs. Conversely, lowering debt interest rates and the required return on investments can reduce costs for private industry.

David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Concept for a small, colocated fuel cycle facility for oxide breeder fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) program to examine innovative liquid-metal reactor (LMR) system designs over the past three years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) collaborated on studies of mixed oxide fuel cycle options. A principal effort was an advanced concept for a small integrated fuel cycle colocated with a 1300-MW(e) reactor station. The study provided a scoping design and a basis on which to proceed with implementation of such a facility if future plans so dictate. The facility integrated reprocessing, waste management, and refabrication functions in a single facility of nominal 35-t/year capacity utilizing the latest technology developed in fabrication programs at WHC and in reprocessing at ORNL. The concept was based on many years of work at both sites and extensive design studies of prior years.

Burch, W.D.; Stradley, J.G.; Lerch, R.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

EARTHQUAKE CAUSED RELEASES FROM A NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fuel cycle facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory is a nuclear facility which must be licensed in order to operate. A safety analysis is required for a license. This paper describes the analysis of the Design Basis Accident for this facility. This analysis involves a model of the transient behavior of the FCF inert atmosphere hot cell following an earthquake initiated breach of pipes passing through the cell boundary. The hot cell is used to process spent metallic nuclear fuel. Such breaches allow the introduction of air and subsequent burning of pyrophoric metals. The model predicts the pressure, temperature, volumetric releases, cell heat transfer, metal fuel combustion, heat generation rates, radiological releases and other quantities. The results show that releases from the cell are minimal and satisfactory for safety. This analysis method should be useful in other facilities that have potential for damage from an earthquake and could eliminate the need to back fit facilities with earthquake proof boundaries or lessen the cost of new facilities.

Charles W. Solbrig; Chad Pope; Jason Andrus

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Assessment of National Nuclear Fuel Cycle for Transmutations of High Level Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI) has been investigated for the safe processing of the spent nuclear fuels (SNFs), which has focused mainly ... of the SNFs considering the characteristics of the nuclear m...

Taeho Woo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Life Cycle Assessment of Energy and Energy Carriers from Waste Matter – A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of economic growth, population, and rapid urbanization is increasing the pace of energy consumption and waste production. These trends, if left unchecked, will lead to massive environmental degradation. Waste-to-energy (WtE) conversion is one way of alleviating the twin problems of fossil fuel use and solid waste disposal, and their related problems (climate change, pollution etc). Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a useful tool for assessing the environmental performances of WtE systems. Over fifty LCA studies on various WtE systems are reviewed, comprising different waste sources, energy products, and including countries from six continents. A variety of waste types, such as agricultural residues, used cooking oil, manure, municipal solid waste, and waste wood were studied. The review found that a large majority of WtE has lower greenhouse gas emissions when compared to fossil fuels. However, some WtE studies showed an increase in environmental impacts such as acidification and eutrophication, compared to fossil fuel extraction and use. This is due to the use of chemicals (fertilizers, pesticides) in agriculture and the allocation of these impacts to the use of the agricultural waste for energy conversion. Other problems with LCA are also highlighted, including allocation issues, definition of reference systems and functional units.

Augustine Quek; Rajasekhar Balasubramanian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...throughout the fuel cycle (both intentional...production in the price environment of...50). When the effect of coproduct...comparison with other fuel sources...for coal is, on average, only ?5% from...given that the effect of harmonizing...thermal efficiency, fuel heating value...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermal efficiency, fuel heating value, power plant...natural gas as a bridge fuel . Clim Change 118 : 609...emissions and freshwater consumption of Marcellus shale gas...following Fig. S1) for the fuel cycle of shale gas...water, and/or oil) Vessel and pipeline blowdowns...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Operation of CANDU power reactor in thorium self-sufficient fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of calculations for CANDU reactor operation in thorium fuel cycle. Calculations...233U and mode of operation in self-sufficient cycle. For the mode of accumulation of 233U it was a...

B. R. Bergelson; A. S. Gerasimov; G. V. Tikhomirov

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Eco-design and Life Cycle Assessment of a chemical process: the case study of HDA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The well-known benchmark process for hydrodealkylation of toluene (HDA) to produce benzene is revisited in a multi-objective approach to identify environmentally friendly and cost-effective solutions. Some guidelines to develop an eco-design framework for chemical processes, involving multiple criteria to be satisfied simultaneously are proposed, based on simulation, optimization, multiple choice decision making procedures and life cycle assessment. Two studies related to the selection of the primary energy source, either fuel oil or natural gas for the utility production system (UPS) of the HDA process are conducted. In each case, a multi-objective optimization problem involving the total annual cost of the process, and five environmental burdens is carried out.

Adama Ouattara; Luc Pibouleau; Catherine Azzaro-Pantel; Serge Domenech

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Life-Cycle Assessment of the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in Indian Locomotives (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With India's transportation sector relying heavily on imported petroleum-based fuels, the Planning Commission of India and the Indian government recommended the increased use of blended biodiesel in transportation fleets, identifying Jatropha as a potentially important biomass feedstock. The Indian Oil Corporation and Indian Railways are collaborating to increase the use of biodiesel blends in Indian locomotives with blends of up to B20, aiming to reduce GHG emissions and decrease petroleum consumption. To help evaluate the potential for Jatropha-based biodiesel in achieving sustainability and energy security goals, this study examines the life cycle, net GHG emission, net energy ratio, and petroleum displacement impacts of integrating Jatropha-based biodiesel into locomotive operations in India. In addition, this study identifies the parameters that have the greatest impact on the sustainability of the system.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A SCOPING STUDY OF ADVANCED THORIUM FUEL CYCLES FOR CANDU REACTORS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? A study was conducted to scope the relative merits of various thorium fuel cycles in CANDU reactors. It was determined that, due to the… (more)

Friedlander, Yonni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annual generation by fuel type. .of total annual generation by fuel type. Other Renewablesof annual estimates of total generation by fuel type and

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effect of reduced enrichment on the fuel cycle for research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new fuels developed by the RERTR Program and by other international programs for application in research reactors with reduced uranium enrichment (<20% EU) are discussed. It is shown that these fuels, combined with proper fuel-element design and fuel-management strategies, can provide at least the same core residence time as high-enrichment fuels in current use, and can frequently significantly extend it. The effect of enrichment reduction on other components of the research reactor fuel cycle, such as uranium and enrichment requirements, fuel fabrication, fuel shipment, and reprocessing are also briefly discussed with their economic implications. From a systematic comparison of HEU and LEU cores for the same reference research reactor, it is concluded that the new fuels have a potential for reducing the research reactor fuel cycle costs while reducing, at the same time, the uranium enrichment of the fuel.

Travelli, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fuel Cycle Scenario Definition, Evaluation, and Trade-offs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report aims to clarify many of the issues being discussed within the AFCI program, including Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) versus Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel, single-pass versus multi-pass recycling, thermal versus fast reactors, potential need for transmutation of technetium and iodine, and the value of separating cesium and strontium. It documents most of the work produced by INL, ANL, and SNL personnel under their Simulation, Evaluation, and Trade Study (SETS) work packages during FY2005 and the first half of FY2006. This report represents the first attempt to calculate a full range of metrics, covering all four AFCI program objectives - waste management, proliferation resistance, energy recovery, and systematic management/economics/safety - using a combination of "static" calculations and a system dynamic model, DYMOND. In many cases, we examine the same issue both dynamically and statically to determine the robustness of the observations. All analyses are for the U.S. reactor fleet. This is a technical report, not aimed at a policy-level audience. A wide range of options are studied to provide the technical basis for identifying the most attractive options and potential improvements. Option improvement could be vital to accomplish before the AFCI program publishes definitive cost estimates. Information from this report will be extracted and summarized in future policy-level reports. Many dynamic simulations of deploying those options are included. There are few "control knobs" for flying or piloting the fuel cycle system into the future, even though it is dark (uncertain) and controls are sluggish with slow time response: what types of reactors are built, what types of fuels are used, and the capacity of separation and fabrication plants. Piloting responsibilities are distributed among utilities, government, and regulators, compounding the challenge of making the entire system work and respond to changing circumstances. We identify four approaches that would increase our ability to pilot the fuel cycle system: (1) have a recycle strategy that could be implemented before the 2030-2050 approximate period when current reactors retire so that replacement reactors fit into the strategy, (2) establish an option such as multi-pass blended-core IMF as a downward plutonium control knob and accumulate waste management benefits early, (3) establish fast reactors with flexible conversion ratio as a future control knob that slowly becomes available if/when fast reactors are added to the fleet, and (4) expand exploration of blended assemblies and cores, which appear to have advantages and agility. Initial results suggest multi-pass full-core MOX appears to be a less effective way than multi-pass blended core IMF to manage the fuel cycle system because it requires higher TRU throughput while more slowly accruing waste management benefits. Single-pass recycle approaches for LWRs (we did not study the VHTR) do not meet AFCI program objectives and could be considered a "dead end". Fast reactors appear to be effective options but a significant number of fast reactors must be deployed before the benefit of such strategies can be observed.

Steven J. Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Christopher T. Laws; Lee C. Cadwallader; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Robert N. Hill; J. D. Smith; Andrew S. Goldmann; George Bailey

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Developing life-cycle phases for the DoDAF using ISO15704 Annex A (GERAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a development of the US Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF) based on life-cycle concept of the Generalized Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology (GERAM) framework/ISO 15704:2000 requirements. Previous ... Keywords: DoDAF, Enterprise architecture, GERAM, ISO15704, Life-cycle

Kamal Chaharsooghi; Mohammad Ahmadi Achachlouei

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Profiles of Polyhydroxybutyrates Derived from Corn Grain: A Life Cycle Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Profiles of Polyhydroxybutyrates Derived from Corn Grain: A Life Cycle Perspective ... Polyhydroxybutyrates derived from corn grain could reduced nonrenewable energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions compared to petroleum-based polymer. ... Cradle-to-gate environmental performance of PHB derived from corn grain is evaluated through life cycle assessment (LCA), particularly nonrenewable energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. ...

Seungdo Kim; Bruce E. Dale

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Cyberinfrastructure for Integrated Monitoring and Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Cyberinfrastructure for Integrated Monitoring and Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines Kay Abstract. Integrating structural health monitoring into life-cycle management strategies for wind turbines data) can effectively be used to capture the operational and structural behavior of wind turbines

Stanford University

399

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including the sewer network. It first describes the LCA hypothesis which concerns two types of waste water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

400

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA Completed November 18th, 2013 as part of a continuing study, the UBC LCA Project #12;1 Executive Summary This study used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental performance of the University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Life Cycle Assessment to Evaluate the Environmental Impact of Biochar Implementation in Conservation Agriculture in Zambia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment to Evaluate the Environmental Impact of Biochar Implementation in Conservation Agriculture in Zambia ... This paper applies life cycle assessment (LCA) on agricultural biochar use in sub-Saharan Africa, perhaps one of the most feasible areas for biochar as a means of climate change mitigation and adaptation. ...

Magnus Sparrevik; John L. Field; Vegard Martinsen; Gijs D. Breedveld; Gerard Cornelissen

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Freshwater Consumption of Marcellus Shale Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Freshwater Consumption of Marcellus Shale Gas ... We present results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of Marcellus shale gas used for power generation. ... The analysis employs the most extensive data set of any LCA of shale gas to date, encompassing data from actual gas production and power generation operations. ...

Ian J. Laurenzi; Gilbert R. Jersey

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) inviting universities, national laboratories, and industry to compete for up to $15 million to advance nuclear technologies closing the nuclear fuel cycle. These projects will provide necessary data and analyses to further U.S. nuclear fuel cycle technology development, as part of the Department's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the domestic technology R&D component of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Studies resulting from this FOA will

404

DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) inviting universities, national laboratories, and industry to compete for up to $15 million to advance nuclear technologies closing the nuclear fuel cycle. These projects will provide necessary data and analyses to further U.S. nuclear fuel cycle technology development, as part of the Department's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the domestic technology R&D component of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Studies resulting from this FOA will

405

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric-and Nuclear Power: A Life-cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric- and Nuclear, photovoltaic, nuclear, life cycle 1 #12;Introduction The production of energy by burning fossil fuels generates, it is envisioned that expanding generation technologies based on nuclear power and renewable energy sources would

407

LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics were calculated for reference HEU and two proposed LEU fuel cycles using an 11-group diffusion-theory neutron flux solution in hexagonal-Z geometry. The diffusion theory model was benchmarked with a detailed Monte Carlo core model. The two proposed LEU fuel designs increased the {sup 235}U loading 20% and the fuel meat volume 51%. The first LEU design used {sup 10}B as a burnable absorber. Either proposed LEU fuel element would provide equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics similar to those of the HEU fuel cycle. Irradiation rates of Co control followers and Ir disks in the center of the core were reduced 6 {plus minus} 1% in the LEU equilibrium core compared to reference HEU core. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Energy Systems Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401

409

Dr. Hussein Khalil at Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technologies Subcommittee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Blue Blue ribbon presentation by Dr. Hussein Khalil Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Blue ribbon presentation by Hussein Khalil Hussein Khalil Dr. Hussein Khalil during the panel discussion Oct. 21, 2010 On October 12 Hussein Khalil, director of Argonne's Nuclear Engineering Division, participated in a Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technologies

410

Preliminary study: isotopic safeguards techniques (IST) LMFBR fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This memorandum presents the preliminary results of the effort to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT), formulated for the LWR system, to the LMFBR fuel cycle. The detailed isotopic compositional changes with burnup developed for the CRBR was utilized as the reference case. This differs from the usual LMFBR design studies in that the core uranium is natural uranium rather than depleted. Nevertheless, the general isotopic behavior should not differ significantly and does allow an initial insight into the expected behavior of isotopic correlations for the LMFBR power systems such as: the U.K. PFR and reprocessing plant; the French Phenix and Superphenix; and the US reference conceptual design studies (CDS) of homogeneous and heterogeneous LMFBR systems as they are developed.

Persiani, P.J.; Kroc, T.K.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Generation Technologies Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: April 11, 2011 - 10:00am Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Eric Masanet One barrier to the full support and deployment of alternative energy systems and the development of a sustainable energy policy is the lack of robust conclusions about the life cycle environmental impacts of energy technologies. A significant number of life cycle assessments (LCA) of energy technologies have been published, far greater than many are aware. However, there is a view held by many decision-makers that the state of the science in LCA of energy technologies is inconclusive because of perceived and real variability and uncertainty in published estimates of life cycle

412

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

414

Grouped actinide separation in advanced nuclear fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aiming at cleaner waste streams (containing only the short-lived fission products) a partitioning and transmutation (P-T) scheme can significantly reduce the quantities of long-lived radionuclides consigned to waste. Many issues and options are being discussed and studied at present in view of selecting the optimal route. The choice is between individual treatment of the relevant elements and a grouped treatment of all actinides together. In the European Collaborative Project ACSEPT (Actinide recycling by Separation and Transmutation), grouped separation options derived from an aqueous extraction or from a dry pyroprocessing route were extensively investigated. Successful demonstration tests for both systems have been carried out in the frame of this project. The aqueous process called GANEX (Grouped Actinide Extraction) is composed of 2 cycles, a first one to recover the major part of U followed by a co-extraction of Np, Pu, Am, and Cm altogether. The pyro-reprocessing primarily applicable to metallic fuels such as the U-Pu-Zr alloy originally developed by the Argonne National Laboratory (US) in the mid 1980s, has also been applied to the METAPHIX fuels containing up to 5% of minor actinides and 5% of lanthanides (e.g. U{sub 60}Pu{sub 20}-Zr{sub 10}Am{sub 2}Nd{sub 3.5}Y{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}). A grouped actinide separation has been successfully carried out by electrorefining on solid Al cathodes. At present the recovery of the actinides from the alloy formed with Al upon electrodeposition is under investigation, because an efficient P-T cycle requires multiple re-fabrication and re-irradiation. (authors)

Glatz, J.P.; Malmbeck, R.; Ougier, M.; Soucek, P. [Joint Research Center - Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Murakamin, T.; Tsukada, T.; Koyama, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komaeshi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

OECD/NEA Ongoing activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering all aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Activities related to fuels, materials, physics, separation chemistry, and fuel cycles scenarios are being undertaken. By publishing state-of-the-art reports and organizing workshops, the groups are able to disseminate recent research advancements to the international community. Current activities mainly focus on advanced nuclear systems, and experts are working on analyzing results and establishing challenges associated to the adoption of new materials and fuels. By comparing different codes, the Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios is aiming at gaining further understanding of the scientific issues and specific national needs associated with the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. At the back end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical processing) are being assessed. Current and future activities comprise studies on minor actinides separation and post Fukushima studies. Regular workshops are also organized to discuss recent developments on Partitioning and Transmutation. In addition, the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC) focuses on the analysis of the economics of nuclear power across the fuel cycle in the context of changes of electricity markets, social acceptance and technological advances and assesses the availability of the nuclear fuel and infrastructure required for the deployment of existing and future nuclear power. The Expert Group on the Economics of the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (EBENFC), in particular, is looking at assessing economic and financial issues related to the long term management of spent nuclear fuel. (authors)

Cornet, S.M. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12 Boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); McCarthy, K. [Idaho Nat. Lab. - P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Chauvin, N. [CEA Saclay, Nuclear Energy Division, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reducing California's Greenhouse Gas Emissions through ProductLife-Cycle Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Product life-cycle optimization addresses the reduction ofenvironmental burdens associated with the production, use, andend-of-life stages of a product s life cycle. In this paper, we offer anevaluation of the opportunities related to product life-cycleoptimization in California for two key products: personal computers (PCs)and concrete. For each product, we present the results of an explorativecase study to identify specific opportunities for greenhouse gas (GHG)emissions reductions at each stage of the product life cycle. We thenoffer a discussion of the practical policy options that may exist forrealizing the identified GHG reduction opportunities. The case studiesdemonstrate that there may be significant GHG mitigation options as wellas a number of policy options that could lead to life-cycle GHG emissionsreductions for PCs and concrete in California.

Masanet, Eric; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Worrell,Ernst

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Technical Cost Modeling- Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

418

Technical Cost Modeling- Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

419

Developing A New High Capacity Anode With Long Cycle Life  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

420

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Emerging approaches, challenges and opportunities in life cycle assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than conventional fuels, mainly because...over conventional fuels before any tax exemptions...and their specific effects, thus missing a...been available, average market mixes have...estimating mass, fuel consumption and costs of energy conversion...C. Hellweg S. , Effects of consumptive water use...

Stefanie Hellweg; Llorenç Milà i Canals

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P100H hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations. The NY Composite cycle, the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle cycle, and the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) cycle as well as a custom Baltimore parcel delivery cycle were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory. Fuel consumption was measured and analyzed for all three vehicles. Vehicle laboratory results are compared on the basis of fuel economy. The hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery van demonstrated 19%-52% better fuel economy than the conventional diesel parcel delivery van and 30%-56% better fuel economy than the conventional gasoline parcel delivery van on cycles other than the highway-oriented HHDDT cycle.

Lammert, M. P.; Burton, J.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions. 10 refs.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Application of life cycle analysis: The case of green bullets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis (LCA) provides a general framework for assessing and summarizing all of the information important to a decision. LCA has been used to analyze the desirability of replacing lead (Pb) with a composite of tungsten (W) and tin (Sn) in projectile slugs used in small arms ammunition at US Department of Energy (DOE) training facilities for security personnel. The analysis includes consideration of costs, performance, environmental and human health impacts, availability of raw materials, and stakeholder acceptance. The DOE expends approximately 10 million rounds of small-arms ammunition each year training security personnel. This deposits over 300,000 pounds of lead and copper annually into DOE firing ranges, contributing to lead migration in the surrounding environment. Human lead intake occurs by inhalation of contaminated indoor firing range air and air containing lead particles that are resuspended during regular maintenance and cleanup, and by skin absorption while cleaning weapons. Projectiles developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) using a composite of tungsten and tin perform as well as, or better than, those fabricated using lead. A cost analysis shows that tungsten-tin is less costly to use than lead, since, for the current number of rounds used annually, the higher tungsten-tin purchase price is small compared with higher maintenance costs associated with lead. The tungsten-tin composite presents a much smaller potential for adverse human health and environmental impacts than lead. Only a small fraction of the world`s tungsten production occurs in the US, however, and market-economy countries account for only around 15% of world tungsten production. Stakeholders would prefer tungsten-tin on the basis of total cost, performance, reduced environmental impact and lower human toxicity. Lead is preferable on the basis of material availability.

Bogard, J.S.; Yuracko, K.L.; Lowden, R.A.; Murray, M.E.; Vaughn, N.L.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Avery, K.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated with temperature constraints that limit changes to the encapsulating materials, and they generally have less capacity to dissipate heat from the waste package and its immediate surroundings than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Open emplacement modes can be ventilated for many years prior to permanent closure of the repository, limiting peak temperatures both before and after closure, and combining storage and disposal functions in the same facility. Open emplacement modes may be practically limited to unsaturated host formations, unless emplacement tunnels are effectively sealed everywhere prior to repository closure. Thermal analysis of disposal concepts and waste inventory cases has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature constraints. For example, the choice of salt as the host medium expedites the schedule for geologic disposal by approximately 50 yr (other factors held constant) thereby reducing future reliance on surface decay storage. Rock salt has greater thermal conductivity and stability at higher temperatures than other media considered. Alternatively, the choice of salt permits the use of significantly larger waste packages for SNF. The following sections describe the selection of reference waste inventories, geologic settings, and concepts of operation, and summarize the results from the thermal analysis.

Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Massimiliano, Fratoni [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Greenberg, Harris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

LIFE Materails: Molten-Salt Fuels Volume 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) is to use fusion neutrons to fission materials with no enrichment and minimum processing and have greatly reduced wastes that are not of interest to making weapons. Fusion yields expected to be achieved in NIF a few times per day are called for with a high reliable shot rate of about 15 per second. We have found that the version of LIFE using TRISO fuel discussed in other volumes of this series can be modified by replacing the molten-flibe-cooled TRISO fuel zone with a molten salt in which the same actinides present in the TRISO particles are dissolved in the molten salt. Molten salts have the advantage that they are not subject to radiation damage, and hence overcome the radiation damage effects that may limit the lifetime of solid fuels such as TRISO-containing pebbles. This molten salt is pumped through the LIFE blanket, out to a heat exchanger and back into the blanket. To mitigate corrosion, steel structures in contact with the molten salt would be plated with tungsten or nickel. The salt will be processed during operation to remove certain fission products (volatile and noble and semi-noble fission products), impurities and corrosion products. In this way neutron absorbers (fission products) are removed and neutronics performance of the molten salt is somewhat better than that of the TRISO fuel case owing to the reduced parasitic absorption. In addition, the production of Pu and rare-earth elements (REE) causes these elements to build up in the salt, and leads to a requirement for a process to remove the REE during operation to insure that the solubility of a mixed (Pu,REE)F3 solid solution is not exceeded anywhere in the molten salt system. Removal of the REE will further enhance the neutronics performance. With molten salt fuels, the plant would need to be safeguarded because materials of interest for weapons are produced and could potentially be removed.

Moir, R; Brown, N; Caro, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Kaufman, L; Kramer, K; Latkowski, J; Powers, J; Shaw, H; Turchi, P

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

431

Identification and Analysis of Critical Gaps in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes Required by the SINEMA Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current state of the art in nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) modeling is an eclectic mixture of codes with various levels of applicability, flexibility, and availability. In support of the advanced fuel cycle systems analyses, especially those by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), Unviery of Cincinnati in collaboration with Idaho State University carried out a detailed review of the existing codes describing various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and identified the research and development needs required for a comprehensive model of the global nuclear energy infrastructure and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. Relevant information obtained on the NFC codes was compiled into a relational database that allows easy access to various codes' properties. Additionally, the research analyzed the gaps in the NFC computer codes with respect to their potential integration into programs that perform comprehensive NFC analysis.

Adrian Miron; Joshua Valentine; John Christenson; Majd Hawwari; Santosh Bhatt; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar: Michael Lineberry

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Michael Wang Argonne National Laboratory June 10, 2008 Project ID # AN2 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Overview * Project start date: Oct. 2002 * Project end date: Continuous * Percent complete: N/A * Inconsistent data, assumptions, and guidelines * Suite of models and tools * Unplanned studies and analyses * Total project funding from DOE: $2.04 million through FY08 * Funding received in FY07: $450k * Funding for FY08: $840k Budget * H2A team * PSAT team * NREL * Industry stakeholders Partners Timeline Barriers to Address 3 Objectives * Expand and update the GREET model for hydrogen production pathways and for applications of FCVs and other FC systems

433

Life cycle GHG analysis of rice straw bio-DME production and application in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thailand is one of the leading countries in rice production and export; an abundance of rice straw, therefore, is left in the field nowadays and is commonly burnt to facilitate quick planting of the next crop. The study assesses the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of using rice straw for bio-DME production in Thailand. The analysis is divided into two scenarios of rice straw bio-DME utilization i.e. used as automotive fuel for diesel engines and used as LPG supplement for household application. The results reveal that that utilization of rice straw for bio-DME in the two scenarios could help reduce GHG emissions by around 14–70% and 2–66%, respectively as compared to the diesel fuel and LPG substituted. In case rice straw is considered as a by-product of rice cultivation, the cultivation of rice straw will be the major source of GHG emission contributing around 50% of the total GHG emissions of rice straw bio-DME production. Several factors that can affect the GHG performance of rice straw bio-DME production are discussed along with measures to enhance GHG performance of rice straw bio-DME production and utilization.

Thapat Silalertruksa; Shabbir H. Gheewala; Masayuki Sagisaka; Katsunobu Yamaguchi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

Hsu, D. D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions or oil consumption. Because such externality...associated with oil consumption. We compare externality and oil consumption costs to the costs...and no gasoline engine). We estimate...manufacturing, fuel cycle, and operation...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Gas Animal Waste Waste water treatment 6 Coke Oven Gas Petroleum Coke Nuclear Energy Hydrogen GREET Examines More Than 85 VehicleFuel Systems Conventional Spark-Ignition...

437

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supported by Materials Technology Program to meet national objectives for improved fuel economy * Identify specific technology improvements that affect major cost drivers *...

438

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

New Fuel Cycle and Fuel Management Options in Heavy Liquid Metal-Cooled Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Fuel Management of Reactors Other Than Light Water Reactors

Ehud Greenspan; Pavel Hejzlar; Hiroshi Sekimoto; Georgy Toshinsky; David Wade

440

Life-Cycle Methods for Comparing Primary and Rechargeable Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If battery materials are recycled, the recovered metals may be used in the production of new batteries, or they may be used for another secondary application. ... fuels ... The converted fuel equivalent demand is about 49 times less for rechargeable batteries than for primary ones. ...

Rebecca L. Lankey; Francis C. McMichael

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels life cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Discrete Element Model for Simulations of Early-Life Thermal Fracturing Behaviors in Ceramic Nuclear Fuel Pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discrete element Model (DEM) representation of coupled solid mechanics/fracturing and heat conduction processes has been developed and applied to explicitly simulate the random initiations and subsequent propagations of interacting thermal cracks in a ceramic nuclear fuel pellet during initial rise to power and during power cycles. The DEM model clearly predicts realistic early-life crack patterns including both radial cracks and circumferential cracks. Simulation results clearly demonstrate the formation of radial cracks during the initial power rise, and formation of circumferential cracks as the power is ramped down. In these simulations, additional early-life power cycles do not lead to the formation of new thermal cracks. They do, however clearly indicate changes in the apertures of thermal cracks during later power cycles due to thermal expansion and shrinkage. The number of radial cracks increases with increasing power, which is consistent with the experimental observations.

Hai Huang; Ben Spencer; Jason Hales

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power

443

Preliminary LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle calculations have been performed with reference HEU fuel and LEU fuel using Cd wires or boron as burnable absorbers. The /sup 235/U content in the LEU element has increased 20% to 480g compared to the reference HEU element. The number of fuel plates has remained unchanged while the fuel meat thickness has increased to 0.76 mm from 0.51 mm. The LEU meat density is 5.1 Mg U/m/sup 3/. The reference fuel cycle was a 31 element core operating at 56 MW with a 19.8 day cycle length and eight fresh elements loaded per cycle. Comparable fuel cycle characteristics can be achieved using the proposed LEU fuel element with either Cd wires or boron burnable absorbers. The neutron flux for E/sub n/ > 1 eV changes very little (<5%) in LEU relative to HEU cores. Thermal flux reductions are 5 to 10% in non-fueled positions, and 20 to 30% in fuel elements.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Life Cycle Assessment of Automobile/Fuel Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assuming that the demand response is proportional to price, this experience suggests that a further tripling of price would be required to induce drivers to choose a vehicle mix that averaged 4.7 L/100 km (50 mpg). ...

Heather L. MacLean; Lester B. Lave

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

445

Life-cycle energy and emission analysis of power generation from forest biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Forest harvest residues, which include limbs, branches, and tree tops, have the potential to generate energy. This paper uses a life-cycle assessment to determine the energy input-to-output ratios for each unit operation in the use of these residues for power generation. Two preparation options for obtaining the biomass were evaluated. For Option 1, the forest residues were chipped at the landing, while for Option 2 they were bundled and chipped at the power plant. Energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were found for power plants sizes ranging from 10 to 300 MW. For power plants with capacities greater than 30 MW, the transportation of either bundles or woodchips to the power plant used the most energy, especially at larger power plant sizes. Option 1 used less energy than Option 2 for all power plant sizes, with the difference between the two becoming smaller for larger power plants. For the life-cycle GHG emissions, Option 1 ranges from 14.71 to 19.51 g-CO2eq/kW h depending on the power plant size. Option 2 ranges from 21.42 to 20.90 g-CO2eq/kW h. The results are not linear and are close to equal at larger power plant sizes. The GHG emissions increase with increasing moisture content. For a 300 MW power plant with chipping at the landing, the GHG emissions range from 11.17 to 22.24 g-CO2eq/kW h for moisture contents from 15% to 50%. The sensitivity analysis showed both energy use and GHG emissions are most sensitive to moisture content and then plant lifetime. For the equipment, both the energy use and GHG emissions are most sensitive to changes in the fuel consumption and load capacity of the chip van and the log-haul truck used to transport either bundles or wood chips to the power plant.

Amit Thakur; Christina E. Canter; Amit Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Biogenic greenhouse gas emissions linked to the life cycles of biodiesel derived from European rapeseed and Brazilian soybeans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogenic greenhouse gas emissions linked to the life cycles of biodiesel derived from European 2008 Abstract Biogenic emissions of carbonaceous greenhouse gases and N2O turn out to be important determinants of life cycle emissions of greenhouse gases linked to the life cycle of biodiesel from European

447

Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee (FCSC) of NEAC met in Washington, August 17- 19, 2010. DOE's new science-based approach to all matters related to nuclear energy is being implemented. The general approach was outlined to NEAC in the briefing on the NE Roadmap. There are many new directions being considered, and this meeting of the FCSC was to brief the Subcommittee on new directions in nuclear energy that might go beyond our present 4.5% enriched LWRs. The goal is to develop new concepts that have advantages over present systems in some combination of cost, passive safety, proliferation resistance, sustainability, and used fuel disposition.

448

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle (FC) Subcommittee of NEAC met February 7-8, 2012 in Washington (Drs. Hoffmann and Juzaitis were unable to attend). While the meeting was originally scheduled to occur after the submission of the President's FY 2013 budget, the submission was delayed a week; thus, we could have no discussion on balance in the NE program. The Agenda is attached as Appendix A. The main focus of the meeting was on accident tolerant fuels, an important post Fukushima issue, and on issues related to the report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) as related to the

449

Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee (FCSC) of NEAC met in Washington, August 17- 19, 2010. DOE's new science-based approach to all matters related to nuclear energy is being implemented. The general approach was outlined to NEAC in the briefing on the NE Roadmap. There are many new directions being considered, and this meeting of the FCSC was to brief the Subcommittee on new directions in nuclear energy that might go beyond our present 4.5% enriched LWRs. The goal is to develop new concepts that have advantages over present systems in some combination of cost, passive safety, proliferation resistance, sustainability, and used fuel disposition.

450

Description of Transmutation Library for Fuel Cycle System Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the Transmutation Library that is used in Fuel Cycle System Analyses. This version replaces the 2008 version.[Piet2008] The Transmutation Library has the following objectives: • Assemble past and future transmutation cases for system analyses. • For each case, assemble descriptive information such as where the case was documented, the purpose of the calculation, the codes used, source of feed material, transmutation parameters, and the name of files that contain raw or source data. • Group chemical elements so that masses in separation and waste processes as calculated in dynamic simulations or spreadsheets reflect current thinking of those processes. For example, the CsSr waste form option actually includes all Group 1A and 2A elements. • Provide mass fractions at input (charge) and output (discharge) for each case. • Eliminate the need for either “fission product other” or “actinide other” while conserving mass. Assessments of waste and separation cannot use “fission product other” or “actinide other” as their chemical behavior is undefined. • Catalog other isotope-specific information in one place, e.g., heat and dose conversion factors for individual isotopes. • Describe the correlations for how input and output compositions change as a function of UOX burnup (for LWR UOX fuel) or fast reactor (FR) transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) for either FR-metal or FR-oxide. This document therefore includes the following sections: • Explanation of the data set information, i.e., the data that describes each case. In no case are all of the data presented in the Library included in previous documents. In assembling the Library, we return to raw data files to extract the case and isotopic data, into the specified format. • Explanation of which isotopes and elements are tracked. For example, the transition metals are tracked via the following: two Zr isotopes, Zr-other, Tc99, Tc-other, two Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd isotopes, Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd-other, four other specific TM isotopes, and TM-other. Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd are separated because their content constrains the loading of waste in glass, so we have to know the mass of those elements independent of others. • Rules for collapsing long lists of isotopes (~1000) to the 81 items in the library. For each tracked isotope, we define which short-lived isotopes’ mass (at t=0) is included with the mass of the tracked isotope at t=0, which short-lived radioactive progeny must be accounted for when the tracked isotope decays, and to which of the other 80 items the mass of the tracked isotope goes when it decays. • Explanation of where raw data files can be found on the fuel cycle data portal. • Explanation of generic cross section sets • Explanation of isotope-specific parameters such as heat and dose conversion factors • Explanation of the LWR UOX burnup and FR TRU CR correlations.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Edward A. Hoffman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Evaluation to Inform R&D Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Evaluation and Screening (E&S) of nuclear fuel cycle options has been conducted in fulfilment of a Charter specified for the study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy. The E&S study used an objective and independently reviewed evaluation process to provide information about the potential benefits and challenges that could strengthen the basis and provide guidance for the research and development(R&D) activities undertaken by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Office. Using the nine evaluation criteria specified in the Charter and associated evaluation metrics and processes developed during the E&S study, a screening was conducted of 40 nuclear fuel cycle evaluation groups to provide answers to the questions: (1) Which nuclear fuel cycle system options have the potential for substantial beneficial improvements in nuclear fuel cycle performance, and what aspects of the options make these improvements possible? (2)Which nuclear material management approaches can favorably impact the performance of fuel cycle options? (3)Where would R&D investment be needed to support the set of promising fuel cycle system options and nuclear material management approaches identified above, and what are the technical objectives of associated technologies?

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; H. Ludewig; W. Halsey; J. Gehin; R. Jubin; J. Buelt; S. Stockinger; K. Jenni; B. Oakley

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Evaluation of fuel cycle scenarios on MOX fuel recycling in PWRs and SFRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prospects on advanced fuel cycle scenario are considered for achieving a progressive integration of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) technology within the current French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear fleet, in a view to benefit from fissile material multi-recycling capability. A step by step process is envisioned, and emphasis is put on its potential implementation through the nuclear mass inventory calculations with the COSAC code. The overall time scale is not optimized. The first step, already implemented in several countries, the plutonium coming from the reprocessing of used Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels is recycled into a small number of LWRs. The second step is the progressive introduction of the first SFRs, in parallel with the continuation of step 1. This second step lets to prepare the optimized multi recycling of MOX fuel which is considered in step 3. Step 3 is characterized by the introduction of a greater number of SFR and MOX management between EPR reactors and SFRs. In the final step 4, all the fleet is formed with SFRs. This study assesses the viability of each step of the overall scenario. The switch from one step to the other one could result from different constrains related to issues such as resources, waste, experience feedback, public acceptance, country policy, etc.

Carlier, B.; Caron-Charles, M.; Van Den Durpel, L. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, Paris La Defense (France); Senentz, G. [AREVA, 33 rue La Lafayette, 75009 Paris (France); Serpantie, J.P. [AREVA, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, Lyon (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model - 13413  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system, and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity. (authors)

Djokic, Denia [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Piet, Steven J.; Pincock, Layne F.; Soelberg, Nick R. [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boyd et al. : “Life-cycle energy demand and global warmingLife-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-to assess the life-cycle energy demand of its products for

Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boyd et al. : “Life-cycle energy demand and global warmingLife-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-to assess the life-cycle energy demand of its products for

Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z