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1

Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Alternative gaseous-fuels safety assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A relative safety assessment of alternative gaseous and reference liquid fuels utilized for light automotive transportation in the public sector was completed. The specific fuels considered were compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and the liquid fuels, gasoline and diesel. The assessment methodology describes and develops the relative hazards of these fuels from an integrated generic physicochemical property and accident scenario point of view. A technique involving a method of eliciting expert judgment combined with a comparative scoring methodology was applied in establishing fuel relative safety rankings. Limitations of this type of assessment are discussed. Selected accident scenarios included fuel leakage in both residential and public garages; fueling line rupture at a refueling station in the presence of user vehicles or delivery vehicles; and vehicle collisions under rural, urban, and vehicular tunnel conditions. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate dependency upon the specific application or scenario. Gaseous fuels have increased relative risks in certain situations and are relatively safe in others. The results suggest that alternative gaseous fuels are not disqualified for public usage. The assessment also provides rationale for the development of selected safe handling criteria and recommendations.

Krupka, M.C.; Peaslee, A.T. Jr.; Laquer, H.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Gaseous-fuel safety assessment. Status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory, in support of studies sponsored by the Office of Vehicle and Engine Research and Development in the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a safety assessment of selected gaseous fuels for use in light automotive transportation. The purpose is to put into perspective the hazards of these fuels relative to present day fuels and delineated criteria for their safe handling. Fuels include compressed and liquified natural gas (CNG and LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and for reference gasoline and diesel. This paper is a program status report. To date, physicochemical property data and general petroleum and transportation information were compiled; basic hazards defined; alternative fuels were safety-ranked based on technical properties alone; safety data and vehicle accident statistics reviewed; and accident scenarios selected for further analysis. Methodology for such analysis is presently under consideration.

Krupka, M.C.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Bartlit, J.R.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage .... Numerical Study on Behavior of Top-Blown Supersonic Jets and Their Interaction á...

6

Online learning of a neural fuel control system for gaseous fueled si engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a new type of fuel control algorithm for gaseous fuelled vehicles. Gaseous fuels such as hydrogen and natural gas have been shown to be less polluting than liquid fuels such as gasoline, both at the tailpipe and on a total ...

Travis Kent Wiens

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The real air quality benefits of gaseous-fueled vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a justification for prominent inclusion of currently available gaseous-fueled vehicles (i.e., vehicles powered by propane, sometimes called liquefied petroleum gas [LPG], or natural gas--chiefly, methane--stored onboard the vehicle in gaseous or liquid state but combusted as a gas) in the mix of strategies to (a) reduce public exposure to toxic and fine particulate emissions in the urbanized areas of the developing world and (b) achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality. It also presents estimates of associated emission reduction credits into the future. Important considerations discussed are the location of fine particle and toxic emissions in congested urban areas, and the location and timing of ozone precursor emissions, with emphasis on how gaseous-fueled vehicles' role in the relationship among and magnitude of these variables differs from that of their conventionally-fueled counterparts. Efforts to enhance the measurement and quantification of gaseous-fuel benefits are also described.

Saricks, C. L.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Gaseous fueled vehicles: A role for natural gas and hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercialization of gaseous hydrogen fueled vehicles requires both the development of hydrogen fueled vehicles and the establishment of a hydrogen fueling infrastructure. These requirements create a classic chicken and egg scenario in that manufacturers will not build and consumers will not buy vehicles without an adequate refueling infrastructure and potential refueling station operators will not invest the needed capital without an adequate market to serve. One solution to this dilemma is to create a bridging strategy whereby hydrogen is introduced gradually via another carrier. The only contending alternative fuel that can act as a bridge to hydrogen fueled vehicles is natural gas. To explore this possibility, IGT is conducting emission tests on its dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV) test platform to determine what, if any, effects small quantities of hydrogen have on emissions and performance. Furthermore, IGT is actively developing an adsorbent based low-pressure natural gas storage system for NGV applications. This system has also shown promise as a storage media for hydrogen. A discussion of our research results in this area will be presented. Finally, a review of IGT's testing facility will be presented to indicate our capabilities in conducted natural gas/hydrogen vehicle (NGHV) research. 3 refs., 10 figs.

Blazek, C.F.; Jasionowski, W.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Guidelines for Estimating ESP Performance When Switching to Alternate Fuels: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel flexibility has always been an important issue for power producers, as the cost of fuel is a major factor in the cost of generating electricity. More recently, the practice of fuel switching to meet sulfur dioxide emission limits has shown the effect of alternate fuels on combustion equipment, scrubbers, and electrostatic precipitators to be a more important and complicated issue. EPRI has developed tools that address all aspects of this issue and, in particular, has developed a number of tools to p...

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques.

Gray, H.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

ESP: A system utilization benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESP: A System Utilization Benchmark Adrian T. Wong, LeonidEffective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designedEffective System Performance (ESP) benchmark, which measures

Wong, Adrian T.; Oliker, Leonid; Kramer, William T.C.; Kaltz, Teresa L.; Bailey, David H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

On-Line Measurement of Heat of Combustion of Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuel Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the on-line measurement of the heat of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixtures has been developed and tested. The method involves combustion of a test gas with a measured quantity of air to achieve a preset concentration of oxygen ...

Sprinkle Danny R.; Chaturvedi Sushil K.; Kheireddine Ali

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Measuring the Effect of Fuel Chemical Structure on Particulate and Gaseous Emissions using Isotope Tracing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique initially developed for radiocarbon dating and recently applied to internal combustion engines, carbon atoms within specific fuel molecules can be labeled and followed in particulate or gaseous emissions. In addition to examining the effect of fuel chemical structure on emissions, the specific source of carbon for PM can be identified if an isotope label exists in the appropriate fuel source. Existing work has focused on diesel engines, but the samples (soot collected on quartz filters or combustion gases captured in bombs or bags) are readily collected from large industrial combustors as well.

Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Martin, G C; Upatnicks, A; Dibble, R W; Cheng, S

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W. (Lake Matthews, CA); Scott, Paul B. (Northridge, CA); Park, Chan Seung (Yorba Linda, CA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mixture of micronized coal powder with gaseous fuels for use in internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fuel mixture for use in internal combustion engines is described. This fuel is an intimate mixture of micronized coal, having an average particle size of less than 100 microns, with a gaseous fuel selected from natural gas and coal-derived. The coal can be present from more than 0 percent to less than 100 percent, with generally the lower percentages being preferred. The addition of the coal to the gaseous fuel improves engine efficiency and power rating, and also decreases peak engine pressure allowing for higher compression ratios. An increase in the amount of the coal increases the oxides of sulfur while reducing the oxides of nitrogen in the exhaust. An increase in the amount of gas, on the other hand, increases the oxides of nitrogen but lowers oxides of sulfur. Accordingly, a preferred mixture will depend upon a particular application for the coal/gas fuel and thereby increases user fuel flexibility considerations. Modeling of the fuel mixture for use in a diesel engine is described. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Carpenter, L.K.

1990-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

Preliminary assessment of the gaseous fuels aftermarket conversion industry. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the report is to provide information to be used in assessing the potential impacts of EPA's proposed Gaseous Fuels and Clean Fuel Fleet rulemakings on the aftermarket conversion industry. Therefore, the report will focus on issues germane to determining these impacts (such as financial profiles of companies involved, future trends in industry development and sales, and costs of complying with conversion requirements) rather than assessing the viability of current technologies or the emissions benefits of alternative fuels. Moreover, the report focuses on conversions to CNG and LPG as conversions to these fuels are most viable at this time, even though EPA's proposed conversion regulations could potentially apply to any fuel (e.g., liquid natural gas).

Not Available

1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

(2) Quantities and Prices of Animal Manure and Gaseous Fuels Generated:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this context, we are defining animal manure as the excrement of livestock reared in agricultural operations as well as straw, sawdust, and other residues used as animal bedding. Gaseous fuels may be derived from municipal and industrial landfills (landfill gas) or from animal manure and solid biomass such as crop silage or the organic fraction of MSW (biogas). Both landfill gas and biogas are generated via anaerobic digestion, a multi-stage process whereby bacteria convert carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to methane (Evans 2001). EPA does not consider these materials to be wastes in themselves, when used as fuel, but rather materials derived from wastes.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect

This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High Temperature ESP Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300░C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ║C based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ║C system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 ░C.

Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ESP Performance Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The draft Electric Generating Unit Maximum Achievable Control Technology (EGU MACT) standard currently proposes a total particulate matter (TPM) emission limit of 0.03 lb/106 Btu for existing coal-fired generating units. The study described in this report investigated the variety of upgrade strategies that can be employed to improve existing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) collection efficiency so that the more-stringent limits can be met. The data and information assembled for this report include the r...

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2010 5/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 1 Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels DOE - DOT CNG - H 2 Workshop December 10, 2009 Douglas Horne, PE - CVEF President Rob Adams, P.Eng. - Marathon Technical Services The Facts ´üČ NGVs have been used in North America for over 30 years ´üČ Codes and Standards (C&S) provide opportunity for safe reliable operation of NGVs ´üČ C&S evolve with new technology and field experience ´üČ People make mistakes, continuous training is critical for safe operations ´üČ Cylinders have a limited life -track your cylinders! 2/25/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 2 Incidents in North America ´üČ Since 1984 CVEF has recorded 97 incidents of which 67 involved CNG vehicles - 37 incidents involve either a CNG leak (15) or a

25

Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Performance (ESP) Benchmark It is now generally recognized in the high performance computing community that peak performance does not adequately predict the usefulness...

27

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Design and reliability optimization of a MEMS micro-hotplate for combustion of gaseous fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report will detail the process by which the silicon carbide (SiC) microhotplate devices, manufactured by GE, were imaged using IR microscopy equipment available at Sandia. The images taken were used as inputs to a finite element modeling (FEM) process using the ANSYS software package. The primary goal of this effort was to determine a method to measure the temperature of the microhotplate. Prior attempts to monitor the device's temperature by measuring its resistance had proven to be unreliable due to the nonlinearity of the doped SiC's resistance with temperature. As a result of this thermal modeling and IR imaging, a number of design recommendations were made to facilitate this temperature measurement. The lower heating value (LHV) of gaseous fuels can be measured with a catalyst-coated microhotplate calorimeter. GE created a silicon carbide (SiC) based microhotplate to address high-temperature survivability requirements for the application. The primary goal of this effort was to determine a method to measure the temperature of the microhotplate. Prior attempts to monitor the device's temperature by measuring its resistance had proven to be unreliable due to the non-linearity of the doped SiC's resistance with temperature. In this work, thermal modeling and IR imaging were utilized to determine the operation temperature as a function of parameters such as operation voltage and device sheet resistance. A number of design recommendations were made according to this work.

Manginell, R. P.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Corrosion behavior of stainless steel in solid oxide fuel cell simulated gaseous environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) from {approx}1000 C to {approx} 750 C may permit the replacement of currently used ceramic interconnects by metallic interconnects in planar SOFCs (PSOFC). The use of metallic interconnects will result in a substantial cost reduction of PSOFCs. The interconnects operate in severe gaseous environments, in which one side of the interconnect can be exposed to hydrogen and the other side to air or oxygen at temperatures up to 800 C. Similar environmental conditions can exist in devices used for separating hydrogen from CO after reforming methane and steam. Type 304 stainless steel was selected for this base line study aimed at understanding corrosion processes in dual gas environments. This paper discusses the oxidation resistance of 304 stainless steel exposed to a dual environment gas at 800 C. The dual environment consisted of air on one side of the specimen and 1% hydrogen in nitrogen on the other side. The surface characterization techniques used in this study were optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as various x-ray techniques.

Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Matthes, Steven A.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.; Singh, P.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effective System Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark It is now generally recognized in the high performance computing community that peak performance does not adequately predict the usefulness of a system for a given set of applications. One of the first benchmarks designed to measure system performance in a real-world operational environment was NERSC's Effective System Performance (ESP) test. NERSC introduced ESP in 1999 with the hope that this test would be of use to system managers and would help to spur the community (both researchers and vendors) to improve system efficiency. The discussion below uses examples from the Cray T3E system that NERSC was operating in 1999. Improved MPP System Efficiency Equals Million-Dollar Savings

32

ESP: a system utilization benchmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a new benchmark, called the Effective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designed to measure system-level performance, including such factors as job scheduling efficiency, handling of large jobs and shutdown-reboot times. ...

Adrian T. Wong; Leonid Oliker; William T. C. Kramer; Teresa L. Kaltz; David H. Bailey

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

New ESP additive controls particulates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that a conditioning agent enhanced precipitator performance after plant switched to low-sulfur coal. Firing low-sulfur coal at a power plant designed for medium- or high-sulfur coal will impact the downstream particulate control device. Since the performance of an electro-static precipitator (ESP) is a strong function of the sulfur content in the coal, switching to a low-sulfur coal will severely impact collection efficiency. Particle resistivity is the dominant parameter affecting the performance of an ESP. When the resistivity is too high, the ESP must be increased in size by a factor of two to three, resulting in proportionally increased capital and operating costs. Fly ash from low-sulfur coal is known to have a typical resistivity one or two orders of magnitude above that for ideal collection efficiency in a well-designed ESP. Therefore, when a utility burning a medium- or high-sulfur coal switches to a low-sulfur coal, the increase in particle resistivity resulting from the reduced SO{sub 3} concentration will lead to severe problems in the ESP. There have been many instances where utilities have switched from a high- to a low-sulfur coal, and the problems caused by the increased resistivity have had such a devastating effect on the performance of the ESP that emissions have increased by a factor of 10.

Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Martin, C.E.; Dharmarajan, N.N.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

esp-sc2000.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESP: ESP: A System Utilization Benchmark Adrian T. Wong, Leonid Oliker, William T. C. Kramer, Teresa L. Kaltz and David H. Bailey National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Correspondence: David H. Bailey, dhbailey@lbl.gov Abstract This article describes a new benchmark, called the Effective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designed to measure system-level performance, including such factors as job scheduling efficiency, handling of large jobs and shutdown-reboot times. In particular, this test can be used to study the effects of various scheduling policies and parameters. We present here some results that we have obtained so far on the Cray T3E and IBM SP systems, together with insights obtained from simulations. 1. Introduction The overall performance value of a high performance

35

Use in combustion processes for a new type of gaseous fuel based on hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper approaches a very actual problem worldwide, concerning the replacing, in combustion processes, of classical fossil fuels by clean energy sources, in order to reduce the greenhouse effect gases, as well as for fossil fuels' saving. The experiments ... Keywords: burner, clean energy, energy saving, flame, greenhouse effect gases, hydrogen

Lucian Paunescu; Gheorghe Surugiu; Ion Melinte; Corneliu Dica; Paul Dan Stanescu; Gheorghe Iorga; Horia Necula

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Integrated Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Increased Utilization of Gaseous Opportunity Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The project is addressing barriers to or opportunities for increasing distributed generation (DG)/combined heat and power (CHP) use in industrial applications using renewable/opportunity fuels. This project brings together novel gas quality sensor (GQS) technology with engine management for opportunity fuels such as landfill gas, digester gas and coal bed methane. By providing the capability for near real-time monitoring of the composition of these opportunity fuels, the GQS output can be used to improve the performance, increase efficiency, raise system reliability, and provide improved project economics and reduced emissions for engines used in distributed generation and combined heat and power.

Pratapas, John; Zelepouga, Serguei; Gnatenko, Vitaliy; Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas; Li, Hailin; Getz, Timothy; Mather, Daniel

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Performance Impact of Using ESP to Implement VMMC Firmware  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESP is a language for programmable devices. Unlike C which forces a tradeoff that requires giving up ease of programming and reliability to achieve high performance, ESP is designed to provide all of these three properties simultaneously. This paper measures the performance impact on applications of using ESP to implement VMMC firmware. It compares the performance of an earlier implementation of VMMC firmware that used C with the new implementation that uses ESP. We find that SPLASH2 applications incur a modest performance hit (3.5 % on average) when using the ESP version.

Sanjeev Kumar; Kai Li

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Advanced Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) Power Supplies Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufacturers of new, high-frequency power supplies for electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have continued to push the development of this technology steadily forward since the last EPRI report on the subject was published. The capacity of these new power supplies continues to grow and the reliability issues identified in the early applications are being steadily resolved. This report contains a description of the technology behind the new power supplies and an update on recent applications and future pla...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Effects of Alkaline Sorbents on ESP Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many energy companies need to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO3) emissions and/or sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Injection of an alkaline sorbent into the boiler or into the duct after the air heater is a relatively simple and inexpensive means of meeting this need. These processes can, however, have a negative effect on the performance of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) most plants are equipped with for particulate control. Hence, there is a need to understand and be able to predict the impact of these ...

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

40

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ESP-r  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESP-r ESP-r ESP-r logo. General purpose simulation environment which supports an in-depth appraisal of the factors which influence the energy and environmental performance of buildings. The ESP-r system has been the subject of sustained developments since 1974 and in 2002 converted to the GNU Public License. ESP-r has the objective of simulating building performance in a manner that: a) is realistic and adheres closely to actual physical systems, b) supports early-through-detailed design stage appraisals, and c) enables integrated performance assessments in which no single issue is unduly prominent. ESP-r attempts to simulate the real world as rigorously as possible and to a level which is consistent with current best practice in the international simulation community.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) Upgrade Options: Survey and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance analysis in this interim report is intended to aid in selection of the most effective upgrade technologies, which are identified and discussed in EPRI report 1023077, ESP Performance Optimization. This second in a series of reports contains a new, first-order procedure for evaluating the performance of an existing ESP in order to determine which of the technologies discussed in the earlier report will produce the greatest improvement in ...

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

NIST Calibration of SDO/EVE/ESP Rocket Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information from ESP will be used learn about solar activity and to provide to near real-time predictions of space weather. Description: ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

43

ESP Dust Recovery Process Test Works, Plant Trial, Commissioning ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the volatile arsenic will report to Isasmelt Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) or Waste Heat Boiler dusts where it will form a re-circulating load within theá...

44

The Coupling of ESP-R and Genopt: A Simple Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are available in the public ESP-r repository, future usersTHE COUPLING OF ESP-R AND GENOPT: A SIMPLE CASE STUDY Leenoptimization studies with ESP-r. To address this gap, this

Peeters, Leen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Demonstration of a Last Field Wet ESP Conversion -- Installation Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the conversion of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) on Unit 3 at Mirant's (formerly Potomac Electric Power Company's) Dickerson Generating Station to hybrid, dry-wet operation. This Tailored Collaboration project was undertaken to determine, at full scale, if the conversion of a single field of a conventional dry ESP to wet operation could significantly reduce particulate emissions and provide reliable operation with an acceptable level of maintenance. Specifically, the performan...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

On site ESP repair pays off in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses how extensive production and use of electric submersible pumps (ESPs) in a remote region of Southeast Asia prompted an oil company to establish its own ESP repair facility. The facility has met three defined objectives, and the scope of its work has been expanded. However, several elements must be present before such a remote operation can be successful. This repair facility is at the Kasim Marine Terminal in Irian Jaya.

Haines, J.D. (Southeast Asia Corp., Applied Technics, Skiatook, OK (US)); Langnes, G.L. (Dragon Pacific Offshore Services PTE, Ltd. (SG)); Hadipoetro, H. (Petromer Trend Corp., Kasmim Marine Terminal, Irian Jaya (ID))

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

ESP-The Electrical submersible pump. Part 7. Applying variable frequency drives to ESPs  

SciTech Connect

To keep pace with technology, the oil industry has begun using variable frequency drives on electrical submersible pumps. Applying variable frequency drives on ESPs began seriously in 1977. In March 1983, there were approximately 350 variable frequency drives successfully operating on electrical submersible pumps throughout the world. Three types of variable frequency drives available today are the current source inverter, the pulse width modulation, and the variable voltage source inverter. As all three types have good points and bad, a short discussion of each type is essential to understand why the variable voltage inverter is used most often in oil field applications and why it has been a success. A current source inverter typically uses a phasecontrolled rectifier to generate variable DC current. The phase-controlled rectifier produces the required current which is subsequently filtered by a DC link reactor. The inverter then produces the desired variable frequency current and the motor voltage varies with load.

Watson, A.J.

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Test evaluates high-volume ESP application offshore Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric submersible pump (ESP) test, although shorter than hoped for, indicated that artificial lift with ESPs had potential for replacing gas-lift operations, offshore Mexico. Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) recently preformed this test of a high-volume (10,000 b/d) ESP in the Akal reservoir of the Cantarell field, northeast Marina Region in the Gulf of Mexico. In the Marine Region, gas lift is the main artificial lift method; however, to maintain production on gas lift, sweetened gas requirements for the Akal reservoir would have to increase by about 30 MMscfd. The ESP design was complex because the pump would have to handle 20--40% of free gas at its intake. Installed in September 1996, the ESP had to be pulled from the well in November 1997 because of an electrical short. Actual operating time was about 7 months. The paper describes test objectives, pump environment, pump design, downhole equipment, surface equipment, operating history, production history, and an analysis.

Almazo, S.G. [Pemex, Villahermosa (Mexico); Riling, G. [Cealc, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Successful test of new ESP technology for gassy oil wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems producing high free-gas fractions through electric-submersible-pump (ESP) systems have been well-documented. When fluid flows through an ESP, gas bubbles tend to lag behind the liquid in the lower-pressure area of the impeller and gas accumulates in that area over a period of time. When the gas forms a long continuous column, the pump no longer generates a discharge pressure and the equipment shuts down because of amperage underload. The amount of gas a pump can handle without gas locking depends on stage designs and sizes. Smaller pumps with radial stages have been known to handle 10 to 15 vol% free gas, and larger pumps with mixed-flow staging can tolerate 20 to 25 vol%. Today many ESP applications require smaller pumps to handle 30 to 50 vol% free gas and larger pumps to handle 40 to 60 vol%. Wells in Lake Maracaibo have high gas/oil ratios, and their production by use of a standard ESP configuration was not considered a feasible option. The wells are currently on gas lift, but their production is declining and gas for gas lift is expensive. If a newly developed advanced gas-handling (AGH) system can enable an ESP to handle at least 40 vol% free gas, it would be a production option for these wells.

Castro, E. M.; Kalas, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By:...

51

Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a multi-year test program conducted as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42779, 'Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD.' The objective of this program was to determine the level of mercury removal achievable using sorbent injection for a plant firing Texas lignite fuel and equipped with an ESP and wet FGD. The project was primarily funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. EPRI, NRG Texas, Luminant (formerly TXU), and AEP were project co-funders. URS Group was the prime contractor, and Apogee Scientific and ADA-ES were subcontractors. The host site for this program was NRG Texas Limestone Electric Generating Station (LMS) Units 1 and 2, located in Jewett, Texas. The plant fires a blend of Texas lignite and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Full-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the mercury removal performance of powdered sorbents injected into the flue gas upstream of the ESP (traditional configuration), upstream of the air preheater, and/or between electric fields within the ESP (Toxecon{trademark} II configuration). Phases I through III of the test program, conducted on Unit 1 in 2006-2007, consisted of three short-term parametric test phases followed by a 60-day continuous operation test. Selected mercury sorbents were injected to treat one quarter of the flue gas (e.g., approximately 225 MW equivalence) produced by Limestone Unit 1. Six sorbents and three injection configurations were evaluated and results were used to select the best combination of sorbent (Norit Americas DARCO Hg-LH at 2 lb/Macf) and injection location (upstream of the ESP) for a two-month performance evaluation. A mercury removal rate of 50-70% was targeted for the long-term test. During this continuous-injection test, mercury removal performance and variability were evaluated as the plant operated under normal conditions. Additional evaluations were made to determine any balance-of-plant impacts of the mercury control process, including those associated with ESP performance and fly ash reuse properties. Upon analysis of the project results, the project team identified several areas of interest for further study. Follow-on testing was conducted on Unit 2 in 2009 with the entire unit treated with injected sorbent so that mercury removal across the FGD could be measured and so that other low-ash impact technologies could be evaluated. Three approaches to minimizing ash impacts were tested: (1) injection of 'low ash impact' sorbents, (2) alterations to the injection configuration, and (3) injection of calcium bromide in conjunction with sorbent. These conditions were tested with the goal of identifying the conditions that result in the highest mercury removal while maintaining the sorbent injection at a rate that preserves the beneficial use of ash.

Katherine Dombrowski

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Preliminary Results from the ESO Slice Project (ESP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results of a galaxy redshift survey, ESO Slice Project (ESP), we are accomplishing as an ESO Key-Project over about 30 square degrees in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The limiting magnitude is b_J = 19.4. Observations have been almost completed and about 90% of the data obtained so far has been reduced providing about 3000 galaxy redshifts. We present some preliminary results concerning the large scale galaxy distribution and their luminosity function.

G. Vettolani; E. Zucca; A. Cappi; R. Merighi; M. Mignoli; G. Stirpe; G. Zamorani; H. MacGillivray; C. Collins; C. Balkowski; J. Alimi; A. Blanchard; V. Cayatte; P. Felenbok; S. Maurogordato; D. Proust; G. Chincarini; L. Guzzo; D. Maccagni; R. Scaramella; M. Ramella

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Power Spectrum Analysis of the ESP Galaxy Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the power spectrum of the galaxy distribution in the ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. We develope a technique to describe the survey window function analytically, and then deconvolve it from the measured power spectrum using a variant of the Lucy method. We test the whole deconvolution procedure on ESP mock catalogues drawn from large N-body simulations, and find that it is reliable for recovering the correct amplitude and shape of $P(k)$ at $k> 0.065 h$ Mpc$^{-1}$. In general, the technique is applicable to any survey composed by a collection of circular fields with arbitrary pattern on the sky, as typical of surveys based on fibre spectrographs. The estimated power spectrum has a well-defined power-law shape $k^n$ with $n\\simeq -2.2$ for $k\\ge 0.2 h$ Mpc$^{-1}$, and a smooth bend to a flatter shape ($n\\simeq -1.6$) for smaller $k$'s. The smallest wavenumber, where a meaningful reconstruction can be performed ($k\\sim 0.06 h$ Mpc$^{-1}$), does not allow us to explore the range of scales where other power spectra seem to show a flattening and hints for a turnover. We also find, by direct comparison of the Fourier transforms, that the estimate of the two-point correlation function $\\xi(s)$ is much less sensitive to the effect of a problematic window function as that of the ESP, than the power spectrum. Comparison to other surveys shows an excellent agreement with estimates from blue-selected surveys. In particular, the ESP power spectrum is virtually indistinguishable from that of the Durham-UKST survey over the common range of $k$'s, an indirect confirmation of the quality of the deconvolution technique applied.

E. Carretti; C. Bertoni; A. Messina; E. Zucca; L. Guzzo

2000-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Preliminary Results from the ESO Slice Project (ESP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results of a galaxy redshift survey, ESO Slice Project (ESP), we are accomplishing as an ESO Key--Project over about 40 square degrees in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The limiting magnitude is $b_J = 19.4$. Up to now $\\sim 85\\%$ of the observations has been completed and $\\sim 65\\%$ of the data has been reduced providing $\\sim 2000$ galaxy redshifts. We present some preliminary results concerning the large scale galaxy distribution, the luminosity function and the properties of galaxies with spectra showing prominent emission lines.

G. Vettolani; E. Zucca; A. Cappi; R. Merighi; M. Mignoli; G. Stirpe; G. Zamorani; C. Collins; H. MacGillivray; C. Balkowski; J. Alimi; A. Blanchard; V. Cayatte; P. Felenbok; S. Maurogordato; D. Proust; G. Chincarini; L. Guzzo; D. Maccagni; R. Scaramella; M. Ramella

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

ANL/ALCF/ESP-13/8 Using Multi-scale Dynamic Rupture Models to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Multi-scale Dynamic Rupture Models to Improve Ground Motion Estimates PI: Thomas Jordan ESP Postdoc: Geoffrey Ely Science Overview This project uses dynamic rupture...

56

ANL/ALCF/ESP-13/13 Ab-initio Reaction Calculations for Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Ab-initio Reaction Calculations for Carbon-12 (ESP Technical Report) ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report Argonne Leadership Computing Facility About Argonne National...

57

Development of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tank for Storage and Gaseous Truck Delivery - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Jon Knudsen (Primary Contact), Don Baldwin Lincoln Composites 5117 N.W. 40 th Street Lincoln, NE 68524 Phone: (402) 470-5039 Email: jknudsen@lincolncomposites.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18062 Project Start Date: July 1, 2008 Project End Date: April 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The objective of this project is to design and develop the most effective bulk hauling and storage solution for hydrogen in terms of: Cost * Safety * Weight * Volumetric Efficiency * Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

58

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fuel Systems Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company with divisions focusing on bringing cleaner-burning gaseous fuel (such as propane and natural gas) technology to various types of vehicles. References Fuel Systems...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effects of E-SOx technology on ESP performance. Final report, Aug-Nov 90  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report gives results of an evaluation of the E-SOx process at Ohio Edison's Burger Station. Adequate sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal and acceptable particulate emission levels from the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) were the prime objectives of the investigation. The report describes limited ESP performance testing under both baseline and E-SOx conditions. The ESP data collected under E-SOx conditions, which give the required 50% SO2 removal, show evidence of ESP performance dominated by factors not represented in existing versions of ESP performance models. These analyses and other considerations indicate that the factors which dominate under the conditions tested are a combination of instantaneous reentrainment of low resistivity ash/sorbent particles and deagglomeration of slurry residues within the ESP. These observations may be important to other sorbent injection processes as well as to E-SOx. Improvement of the gas velocity and temperature distributions at the ESP inlet improved the ESP performance, but performance was still dominated by the reentrainment process and was therefore lower than mathematical model predictions.

Marchant, G.H.; Gooch, J.P.; Faulkner, M.G.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

GASEOUS SCINTILLATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gaseous excitation counter for detecting the presence amd measuring the energy of subatomic particles and electromagnetic radiation is described. The counter includes a gas-tight chamber filled with an elemental gas capable of producing ultra-violet excitation quanta when irradiated with subatomic particles and electromagnetic radiation. The gas has less than one in a thousand parts ultra-violet absorbing contamination. When nuclear radiation ps present the ultra-violet light produced by the gas strikes a fluorescent material within the counter, responsive to produce visible excitation quanta, and photo-sensitive counting means detect the visible emission.

Eggler, C.; Huddleston, C.M.

1959-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey: III. The Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey extending over about 23 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is ~85% complete to the limiting magnitude b_J=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with redshift determination. The ESP survey is intermediate between shallow, wide angle samples and very deep, one-dimensional pencil beams; the spanned volume is ~ 5 x 10^4 Mpc^3 at the sensitivity peak (z ~ 0.1). In this paper we present the description of the observations and of the data reduction, the ESP redshift catalogue and the analysis of the quality of the velocity determinations.

G. Vettolani; E. Zucca; R. Merighi; M. Mignoli; D. Proust; G. Zamorani; A. Cappi; L. Guzzo; D. Maccagni; M. Ramella; G. M. Stirpe; A. Blanchard; V. Cayatte; C. Collins; H. MacGillivray; S. Maurogordato; R. Scaramella; C. Balkowski; G. Chincarini; P. Felenbok

1998-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP mercury control In low Sulfur eaStern bItumInouS coal flue GaS Background Full-scale field testing has demonstrated the effectiveness of activated carbon injection (ACI) as a mercury-specific control technology for certain coal-fired power plants, depending on the plant's coal feedstock and existing air pollution control device configuration. In a typical configuration, powdered activated carbon (PAC) is injected downstream of the plant's air heater and upstream of the existing particulate control device - either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter (FF). The PAC adsorbs the mercury from the combustion flue gas and is subsequently captured along with the fly ash in the ESP or FF. ACI can have some negative side

65

Reperforation of North Sea electric submersible pump wells using an ESP/Y-tool/TCP system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the increasing emphasis on reducing operating costs and minimizing deferred production, a new system was designed for the reperforation of wells lifted with Electric Submersible Pumps (ESP's). This paper describes an alternative method that can be used when a Tubing Conveyed Perforating (TCP) system is required for the underbalanced reperforation of an ESP well. The method employs a combined ESP/Y-tool/TCP assembly and can save approximately 24 hours in rig time over conventional methods. Use of the method can avoid substantial deferred or lost production, particularly when other wells requiring workovers are awaiting use of a rig at considerable cost. The system can also be used for the completion of new wells where an ESP is required from the outset.

Dudley, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Brominated Sorbents for Small Cold-Side ESPs, Hot-Side ESPs and Fly Ash Use in Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 16, 2005 through December 31, 2008 on the project entitled ├ó┬?┬?Brominated Sorbents for Small Cold-Side ESPs, Hot-Side ESPs and Fly Ash Use in Concrete├ó┬?┬Ł. The project covers testing at three host sites: Progress Energy H.F. Lee Station and the Midwest Generation Crawford and Will County Stations. At Progress Energy Lee 1, parametric tests were performed both with and without SO{sub 3} injection in order to determine the impact on the mercury sorbent performance. In addition, tests were performed on the hot-side of the air preheater, before the SO{sub 3} is injected, with H-PAC├ó┬?┬ó sorbents designed for use at elevated temperatures. The BPAC├ó┬?┬ó injection provided the expected mercury removal when the SO{sub 3} injection was off. A mercury removal rate due to sorbent of more than 80% was achieved at an injection rate of 8 lb/MMacf. The operation with SO{sub 3} injection greatly reduced the mercury sorbent performance. An important learning came from the injection of H-PAC├ó┬?┬ó on the hot-side of the air preheater before the SO{sub 3} injection location. The H-PAC├ó┬?┬ó injected in this manner appeared to be independent of the SO{sub 3} injection and provided better mercury removal than with injecting on the cold-side with SO{sub 3} injection. Consequently, one solution for plants like Lee, with SO{sub 3} injection, or plants with SO{sub 3} generated by the SCR catalyst, is to inject H-PAC├ó┬?┬ó on the hot-side before the SO{sub 3} is in the flue gas. Even better performance is possible by injecting on the cold-side without the SO{sub 3}, however. During the parametric testing, it was discovered that the injection of B-PAC├ó┬?┬ó (or H-PAC├ó┬?┬ó) was having a positive impact upon ESP performance. It was decided to perform a 3-day continuous injection run with B-PAC├ó┬?┬ó in order to determine whether Lee 1 could operate without SO{sub 3} injection. If the test proved positive, the continuous injection would continue as part of the long-term test. The injection of B-PAC├ó┬?┬ó did allow for the operation of Lee 1 without SO{sub 3} injection and the long-term test was conducted from March 8 through April 7, 2006. The total mercury removal for the 30-day long-term test, excluding the first day when SO{sub 3} was injected and the last day when a plain PAC was used, averaged 85%. The achievement of 85% Hg removal over the 30 days longterm test is another milestone in the history of achievement of the Albemarle Environmental f/k/a Sorbent Technologies Corporation B-PAC├ó┬?┬ó sorbent. A clear indication of the impact of B-PAC├ó┬?┬ó on opacity came at the end of the long-term test. It was hoped that Lee 1 could be operated for several days after the end of the long-term test. It took less than a day before the opacity began to increase. The discovery that B-PAC├ó┬?┬ó can improve ESP performance while capturing a large amount of mercury is another milestone for the B-PAC├ó┬?┬ó mercury sorbent. The parametric testing at the Midwest Generation Crawford Station was divided into two phases; the first using C-PAC├ó┬?┬ó, the concrete friendly sorbent, and the other using nonconcrete friendly materials. The first phase of the parametric tests was conducted before the long-term test. The second phase of the parametric testing was performed after the long-term test in order to avoid contaminating the fly ash containing the concrete friendly sorbents. The parametric test began with an injection rate of 1 lb/MMacf and, after a period to allow the mercury concentration to stabilize, the rate was increased to 3 lb/MMacf. The Hg removal for this test was about 60% due to sorbent and 69% total at the injection rate of 1 lb/MMacf and 80% due to sorbent and 84% total for the 3 lb/MMacf injection rate. The average total vapor phase mercury removal for the first 21 days of the long-term test was 82% at an injection rate o

Ronald Landreth

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Effect of SO3 Sorbents on ESP Performance: A State-of-the-Art Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy companies are discovering a growing need to understand the impact alkaline sorbents have on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance. While some of these sorbents have been used intermittently to control sulfur trioxide (SO3) emissions or reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions, the existing data are insufficient to predict the impact of sorbent addition on balance-of-plant equipment. Sorbent impact on ESP operation and performance is of particular concern because the negative effect has, in the...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

68

The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey: VI Groups of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we identify objectively and analyze groups of galaxies in the recently completed ESP survey. We find 231 groups above the number overdensity threshold delta(rho)/rho=80 in the redshift range 5000ESP galaxies within the same redshift range. The median velocity dispersion (corrected for measurement errors and computed at the redshift of the group) is sigma_{ESP,median} = 194 km/s. We show that our result is reliable in spite of the particular geometry of the ESP survey (two rows of tangent circular fields of radius 15 arcmin), which causes most systems to be only partially surveyed. In general, we find that the properties of ESP groups are consistent with those of groups in shallower (and wider) catalogs (e.g. CfA2N and SSRS2). As in shallower catalogs, ESP groups trace very well the geometry of the large scale structure. Our results are of particular interest because the depth of the ESP survey allows us to sample group properties over a large number of structures. We also compare luminosity function and spectral properties of galaxies that are members of groups with those of isolated galaxies. We find that galaxies in groups have a brighter M* with respect to non--member galaxies; the slope \\alpha is the same, within the errors, in the two cases. We find that 34% of ESP galaxies with detectable emission lines are members of groups. The fraction of galaxies without detectable emission lines in groups is significantly higher: 45%. More generally, we find a gradual decrease of the fraction of emission line galaxies among members of systems of increasing richness. This result confirms that the morphology-density relation found for clusters also extends toward systems of lower density.

M. Ramella; G. Zamorani; E. Zucca; G. M. Stirpe; G. Vettolani; C. Balkowski; A. Blanchard; A. Cappi; V. Cayatte; G. Chincarini; C. Collins; L. Guzzo; H. MacGillivray; D. Maccagni; S. Maurogordato; R. Merighi; M. Mignoli; A. Pisani; D. Proust; R. Scaramella

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

A novel role of the budding yeast separin Esp1 in anaphase spindle elongation: evidence that proper spindle association of Esp1p is regulated by Pds1p  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the metaphaseľ anaphase transition is initiated by the anaphasepromoting complexľdependent degradation of Pds1, whereby Esp1 is activated to promote sister chromatid separation. Although this is a fundamental step in the cell cycle, little is known about the regulation of Esp1 and how loss of cohesion is coordinated with movement of the anaphase spindle. Here, we show that Esp1 has a novel role in promoting anaphase spindle elongation. The localization of Esp1 to the spindle apparatus, analyzed by live cell imaging, is regulated in a manner consistent with a function during anaphase B. The protein accumulates in the nucleus in G2 and is mobilized onto the spindle pole bodies and spindle midzone at anaphase onset, where it persists into midanaphase. Association with Pds1 occurs during S phase and is required for efficient nuclear targeting of Esp1. Spindle association is not fully restored in pds1 mutants expressing an Esp1-nuclear localization sequence fusion protein, suggesting that Pds1 is also required to promote Esp1 spindle binding. In agreement, Pds1 interacts with the spindle at the metaphaseľanaphase transition and a fraction remains at the spindle pole bodies and the spindle midzone in anaphase cells. Finally, mutational analysis reveals that the conserved COOH-terminal region of Esp1 is important for spindle interaction. Key words: cell cycle Ľ Esp1/Pds1 complex Ľ metaphaseľanaphase transition Ľ spindle elongation Ľ budding yeast

Sanne Jensen; Marisa Segal; Duncan J. Clarke; Steven I. Reed

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

PLIF flow visualization of methane gas jet from spark plug fuel injector in a direct injection spark ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Spark Plug Fuel Injection (SPFI), which is a combination of a fuel injector and a spark plug was developed with the aim to convert any gasoline port injection spark ignition engine to gaseous fuel direct injection [1]. A direct fuel injector is combined ... Keywords: air-fuel mixing, direct fuel injection, flow visualization, gaseous fuel, laser-induced fluorescent

Taib Iskandar Mohamad; How Heoy Geok

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project Final Report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41987, 'Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas.' Sorbent injection technology is targeted as the primary mercury control process on plants burning low/medium sulfur bituminous coals equipped with ESP and ESP/FGD systems. About 70% of the ESPs used in the utility industry have SCAs less than 300 ft2/1000 acfm. Prior to this test program, previous sorbent injection tests had focused on large-SCA ESPs. This DOE-NETL program was designed to generate data to evaluate the performance and economic feasibility of sorbent injection for mercury control at power plants that fire bituminous coal and are configured with small-sized electrostatic precipitators and/or an ESP-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) configuration. EPRI and Southern Company were co-funders for the test program. Southern Company and Reliant Energy provided host sites for testing and technical input to the project. URS Group was the prime contractor to NETL. ADA-ES and Apogee Scientific Inc. were sub-contractors to URS and was responsible for all aspects of the sorbent injection systems design, installation and operation at the different host sites. Full-scale sorbent injection for mercury control was evaluated at three sites: Georgia Power's Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of the Southern Company] and Reliant Energy's Shawville Unit 3. Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 has an existing small-SCA cold-side ESP followed by a Chiyoda CT-121 wet scrubber. Yates Unit 2 is also equipped with a small-SCA ESP and a dual flue gas conditioning system. Unit 2 has no SO2 control system. Shawville Unit 3 is equipped with two small-SCA cold-side ESPs operated in series. All ESP systems tested in this program had SCAs less than 250 ft2/1000 acfm. Short-term parametric tests were conducted on Yates Units 1 and 2 to evaluate the performance of low-cost activated carbon sorbents for removing mercury. In addition, the effects of the dual flue gas conditioning system on mercury removal performance were evaluated as part of short-term parametric tests on Unit 2. Based on the parametric test results, a single sorbent (e.g., RWE Super HOK) was selected for a 30-day continuous injection test on Unit 1 to observe long-term performance of the sorbent as well as its effects on ESP and FGD system operations as well as combustion byproduct properties. A series of parametric tests were also performed on Shawville Unit 3 over a three-week period in which several activated carbon sorbents were injected into the flue gas duct just upstream of either of the two Unit 3 ESP units. Three different sorbents were evaluated in the parametric test program for the combined ESP 1/ESP 2 system in which sorbents were injected upstream of ESP 1: RWE Super HOK, Norit's DARCO Hg, and a 62:38 wt% hydrated lime/DARCO Hg premixed reagent. Five different sorbents were evaluated for the ESP 2 system in which activated carbons were injected upstream of ESP 2: RWE Super HOK and coarse-ground HOK, Norit's DARCO Hg and DARCO Hg-LH, and DARCO Hg with lime injection upstream of ESP 1. The hydrated lime tests were conducted to reduce SO3 levels in an attempt to enhance the mercury removal performance of the activated carbon sorbents. The Plant Yates and Shawville studies provided data required for assessing carbon performance and long-term operational impacts for flue gas mercury control across small-sized ESPs, as well as for estimating the costs of full-scale sorbent injection processes.

Carl Richardson; Katherine Dombrowski; Douglas Orr

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Vented nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

Grossman, Leonard N. (Livermore, CA); Kaznoff, Alexis I. (Castro Valley, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

ESP - Data From Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicone Materials - 2009  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Surveillance Project (ESP) funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until ESP funding allowed the restart in FY97. This report will provide data on materials used on various programs and on experimental materials not used in production. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

J. W. Schneider

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Coupling of ESP-R and Genopt: A Simple Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes and demonstrates how to use the optimization program GenOpt with the building energy simulation program ESP-r. GenOpt, a generic optimization program, minimises an objective function that is evaluated by an external simulation program. It has been developed for optimization problems that are computationally expensive and that may have nonsmooth objective functions. ESP-r is a research oriented building simulation program that is well validated and has been used to conduct various building energy analysis studies. In this paper, the necessary file preparations are described and a simple optimization example is presented.

Peeters, Leen; D'haeseleer, William; Ferguson, Alex; Wetter, Michael

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE┬╗ Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

76

EPRIswitch and Other State-of-the-Art Power Supplies and Controllers for ESPs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufacturers of new, high-frequency power supplies for electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) continue to push the development of this technology steadily forward. EPRI continues to support this process through demonstration projects and the development of more flexible advanced power supplies. This report summarizes the latest results from these efforts.

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

ESP 171 Urban and Regional Planning White Paper: Local Government Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ESP 171 Urban and Regional Planning White Paper: Local Government Solutions Topic Description due:50pm Hardcopy of paper due 6/6 at noon Purpose The purpose of a "white paper" is to help policy makers of potential solutions. In this assignment, you will write a 5-page white paper about a local planning issue

Handy, Susan L.

78

The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey: I. Description and First Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey we have recently completed as an ESO Key-Project. The ESP covers 23.3 square degrees in a region close to the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete (85%) to the limiting magnitude b_J=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with reliable redshift determination. In this paper, the first in a series that will present the results of the ESP survey, we describe the main characteristics of the survey and briefly discuss the properties of the galaxy sample. From a preliminary spectral analysis of a large sub-sample of 2550 galaxies we find that the fraction of actively star-forming galaxies increases from a few percent for the brightest galaxies up to about 40% for the galaxies fainter than M= -16.5. The most outstanding feature in the ESP redshift distribution is a very significant peak at z ~ 0.1. The detection of similar peaks, at the same distance, in other surveys in the same region of the sky, suggests the presence of a large bidimensional structure perpendicular to the line of sight. The minimum size of this structure would be of the order of 100 x 50 Mpc, comparable with the size of the Great Wall.

G. Vettolani; E. Zucca; G. Zamorani; A. Cappi; R. Merighi; M. Mignoli; G. M. Stirpe; H. MacGillivray; C. Collins; C. Balkowski; V. Cayatte; S. Maurogordato; D. Proust; G. Chincarini; L. Guzzo; D. Maccagni; R. Scaramella; A. Blanchard; M. Ramella

1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

Use of the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) to Simulate Complex Waste Treatment Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Simulation Program is a process simulator designed for aqueous based chemical processes. ESP, which is produced by OLI Systems, Inc., utilizes sophisticated activity coefficient models and predictive equations that result in the ability to simulate very complex electrolyte systems (OLI, 2002). The software comes with databanks of regressed parameters for a large number of aqueous, vapor, and solid species covering most of the elements. ESP has been used extensively at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site to predict nuclear waste slurry vapor-liquid-solid equilibrium. It has and is being used to model leaching and washing of nuclear waste sludges, evaporation of nuclear waste solutions, crystallization of salts, precipitation of plutonium and other metals from waste solutions, and other processing of dilute and concentrated aqueous solutions, sludges, and slurries. The software is also used extensively to rationalize the characterization of nuclear wastes using limited data from analyses of waste samples. The OLI provided databanks suffer from a legacy interaction model that limits the accuracy when neutral solutes are important. Also, the nitrate-nitrite systems typically found in nuclear wastes are not properly parameterized in ESP databases because of the existence of sodium nitrate and nitrite ion pairs. Properties databanks for ESP have been developed at Flour Federal Services that eliminate the legacy model and provide more accurate simulation results than the OLI supplied databases for such concentrated solutions and slurries.

MacLean, G. T.; Ho, Q. T.; Berger, S. R. K.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 November 2006 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, conducted an inspection of the emergency management program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in August and September 2006. The coordination of emergency plans and procedures among USEC and DOE contractor organizations has successfully integrated the emergency management programs into a single cohesive program for the PORTS site. Other strengths include accurate hazards surveys that identify applicable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Gaseous electrode development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the present study is to optimize the gaseous electrode for use in an MHD generator and to test this optimum configuration in an operating MHD channel. The arc gaseous electrode concept is based on the use of an arc source in the body of the MHD channel electrode, wherein the arc follows a helical path and generates a plasma which flows out of a long, thin slot cut parallel to the cylindrical annulus, to provide a low impedance path for the MHD current through the boundary layer so that electrode erosion due to arcing can be reduced. Bench-scale tests on the arc plasma source were conducted. The effect of the parameters such as magnetic field, yaw angle with respect to the magnetic field, electrode geometry, and arc cathode materials were studied. Based on these studies, an optimum design was selected for testing in the MHD channel. Tests were conducted with the arc gaseous electrode in the cathode wall of a diagonal conducting wall MHD generator at magnetic fields up to 3.83 Tesla, with a supersonic flow of combustion products seeded with 1.0 w/o of potassium. The measured MHD plasma conductivity varied between 12 and 22 S/m. Results are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

Jones, M.S. Jr.; Scannell, E.P.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Thiagarajan, V.; Mallavarpu, R.; Armstrong, A.J.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The ESO Slice Project [ESP] galaxy redshift survey: V. Evidence for a D=3 sample dimensionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The issue of the approximate isotropy and homogeneity of the observable universe is one of the major topics in modern Cosmology: the common use of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker [FWR] metric relies on these assumptions. Therefore, results conflicting with the ``canonical'' picture would be of the utmost importance. In a number of recent papers it has been suggested that strong evidence of a fractal distribution with dimension D~2 exists in several samples, including Abell clusters [ACO] and galaxies from the ESO Slice Project redshift survey [ESP].Here we report the results of an independent analysis of the radial density run,N(ESP and ACO data. For the ESP data the situation is such that the explored volume, albeit reasonably deep, is still influenced by the presence of large structures. Moreover, the depth of the ESP survey (zESP sample is D~3, and the value $D = 2$ is always excluded at the level of at least five (bootstrap) standard deviations. The only way in which we reproduce D~2 is by both unphysically ignoring the galaxy k-correction and using Euclidean rather than FRW cosmological distances. In the cluster case the problems related to the choice of metrics and k-correction are much lessened, and we find that ACO clusters have D_{ACO} = 3.07 +- 0.18 and D_{ACO} = 2.93 +- 0.15 for richness class R \\geq 1 and R \\geq 0, respectively. Therefore D=2 is excluded with high significance also for the cluster data.

R. Scaramella; L. Guzzo; G. Zamorani; E. Zucca; C. Balkowski; A. Blanchard; A. Cappi; V. Cayatte; G. Chincarini; C. Collins; A. Fiorani; D. Maccagni; H. MacGillivray; S. Maurogordato; R. Merighi; M. Mignoli; D. Proust; M. Ramella; G. M. Stirpe; G. Vettolani

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in ôtarget ö channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium ôdriver ö fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing axially elongated electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel, where the spent fuel exit channel passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet at a mixing apparatus, reformable fuel mixture channel passes through the length of the generator chamber and connects with the mixing apparatus, that channel containing entry ports within the generator chamber, where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces, where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports. 2 figures.

Reichner, P.; Dollard, W.J.

1991-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Special ESP configurations designed to test and produce Yemen oil field. [Electric-Submersible Pump  

SciTech Connect

Innovative electric-submersible-pump (ESP) configurations were used in the exploration phase of a Yemen oil field discovered by Canadian Occidental Petroleum Ltd. Because of subnormal reservoir pressure, CanOxy developed the field with ESPs and had to install surface components that could operate at the high, 130 F., ambient temperatures common in Yemen. The field is in a remote area that has seen very little development. The reservoirs produce a medium-to-heavy crude with a low gas/oil ratio, typically less than 20 scf/bbl. Problems faced in evaluating the field included drilling through unconsolidated sands with high flow capacity and subnormal reservoir pressure. CanOxy had to develop the technology to test the wells during the exploration phase, and intends to use new, or at least uncommon technology, for producing the wells. The paper describes testing the wells, the electric generators and variable speed drives, and the use of these pumps on production wells.

Wilkie, D.I. (Canadian Occidental Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

86

High Frequency Effects of Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) on Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variable frequency drives (VFD) and subsea (umbilical) cables are frequently used in electrical submersible pump (ESP) systems for offshore platforms. There are two basic system configurations for ESP systems; VFD can be installed on the platform and the motor is connected to it through an umbilical cable, and VFD and the motor are installed closely and they are connected to the system through an umbilical cable. In this thesis, the pros and cons of each configuration are mentioned, but the focus is on the system with a VFD controlled motor through a long umbilical cable. A 36-pulse VFD is studied. Since multilevel VFDs have high frequency harmonics, high frequency modeling of the umbilical cable is used, and skin effect is also taken into consideration in the cable. The effect of the interactions between the umbilical cable and high frequency harmonics on the motor terminal voltage is explored.

Ozkentli, Esra

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

INCITE and ESP Driven Advances in GAMESS 2013 Early Science Program Invesitgators Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INCITE and ESP Driven Advances in GAMESS INCITE and ESP Driven Advances in GAMESS 2013 Early Science Program Invesitgators Meeting May 15-16th 2013 Old$Analy)c$Gradient$ New$Fully$Analy)c$Gradient$ Fragmentation Methods * Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) methods have become popular in recent years, however, * As system size grows the QM region can get unwieldy * The energy contribution from the environment becomes too large to obtain reasonable accuracy from molecular mechanics * Biomolecules contain hundreds or thousands of atoms, making accurate quantum calculations either very difficult or impossible Fragmentation methods offer a unique solution to accurate calculations on large molecules The Fragment Molecular Orbital Method * Exchange is not long-range in most molecules * Long-range interactions can be treated using just

88

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program...

89

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, March 26, 2010 Consent...

90

Advanced Power Supply Demonstration: High Frequency Power Supplies for Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New, high frequency supplies to power electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are being introduced to the utility industry. These power supplies are smaller, lighter, and more versatile than the 60-Hz supplies they replace. As with so many new technologies, a number of problems have been encountered in some of the early applications. This report describes the principles of operation, the advantages and disadvantages, and the state of development of the new technology.

2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reperforation of North Sea electric-submersible-pump wells with an ESP/Y-Tool/TCP system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the increasing emphasis on reducing operating costs and minimizing deferred production, a new system was designed for the reperforation of wells lifted with electric submersible pumps (ESP's). This paper describes an alternative method that can be used when a tubing-conveyed-perforating (TCP) system is required for the underbalanced reperforation of an ESP well. The method, which uses a combined ESP/Y-Tool/TCP assembly, can save about 24 hours in rig time over conventional methods. Use of the method can avoid substantial deferred or lost production, particularly when other wells requiring workovers are awaiting use of a rig at considerable cost. The system can also be used for the completion of new wells where an ESP is required from the outset and, under certain conditions, has an application during drillstem tests (DST's).

Dudley, R.W.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Fuel Basics Photo of a natural gas fuel pump. Natural gas is an odorless, nontoxic, gaseous mixture of hydrocarbons-predominantly methane (CH4). It accounts for about a quarter

93

Fuel cell having dual electrode anode or cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell that is characterized by including a dual electrode anode that is operable to simultaneously electro-oxidize a gaseous fuel and a liquid fuel. In alternative embodiments, a fuel cell having a single electrode anode is provided with a dual electrode cathode that is operable to simultaneously reduce a gaseous oxidant and a liquid oxidant to electro-oxidize a fuel supplied to the cell.

Findl, Eugene (Coram, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fuel cell having dual electrode anode or cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell that is characterized by including a dual electrode anode that is operable to simultaneously electro-oxidize a gaseous fuel and a liquid fuel. In alternative embodiments, a fuel cell having a single electrode anode is provided with a dual electrode cathode that is operable to simultaneously reduce a gaseous oxidant and a liquid oxidant to electro-oxidize a fuel supplied to the cell.

Findl, E.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 November 5, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the preparedness of the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, contractors at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and selected non-leased facilities to respond to a severe natural phenomena event (NPE). The review was conducted in July and August 2013 by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this

96

Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

Hindin, Saul G. (Mendham, NJ); Roberts, George W. (Westfield, NJ)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

100

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

102

Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

103

Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

104

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

105

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

106

Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

107

Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

108

Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

109

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

110

West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

111

Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

112

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive...

113

Production and Handling Slide 25: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

114

Production and Handling Slide 24: The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Site Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Site Refer to...

115

Combination free electron and gaseous laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Manhattan Project: K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 > Working K-25 into the Mix, Oak Ridge:...

117

Thermally efficient PEM fuel cell that runs on ethanol  

PEM fuel cell with onboard conversion of ethanol into hydrogen fuel Liquid ethanol feedstock eliminates problems with storage and transportation of gaseous hydrogen Control of temperature maximizes selectivity of reformation process and prevents ...

118

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control Activities Prior to Work Execution

119

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel pump is described which offers long life, low susceptibility to radiation damage, and gaseous fission product removal. An inert-gas lubricated bearing supports a journal on one end of the drive shsft. The other end has an impeller and expansion chamber which effect pumping and gas- liquid separation. (T.R.H.)

Cobb, W.G.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey: II. The luminosity function and mean galaxy density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey we have completed as an ESO Key-Project over ~23 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude b_J=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with reliable redshift determination. The ESP survey is intermediate between shallow, wide angle samples and very deep, one-dimensional pencil beams: spanning a volume of ~ 5 x 10^4 Mpc^3 at the sensitivity peak (z ~ 0.1), it provides an accurate determination of the "local" luminosity function and the mean galaxy density. We find that, although a Schechter function is an acceptable representation of the luminosity function over the entire range of magnitudes (M -17. The amplitude and the alpha and M^* parameters of our luminosity function are in good agreement with those of the AUTOFIB redshift survey (Ellis et al. 1996). Viceversa, our amplitude is significantly higher, by a factor ~ 1.6 at M ~ M^*, than that found for both the Stromlo-APM (Loveday et al. 1992) and the Las Campanas (Lin et al. 1996) redshift surveys. Also the faint end slope of our luminosity function is significantly steeper than that found in these two surveys. Large over- and under- densities are clearly seen in our data. In particular, we find evidence for a "local" underdensity (for D < 140 Mpc) and a significant overdensity at z ~ 0.1. When these radial density variations are taken into account, our derived luminosity function reproduces very well the observed counts for b_J < 19.4, including the steeper than Euclidean slope for b_J < 17.

E. Zucca; G. Zamorani; G. Vettolani; A. Cappi; R. Merighi; M. Mignoli; G. M. Stirpe; H. MacGillivray; C. Collins; C. Balkowski; V. Cayatte; S. Maurogordato; D. Proust; G. Chincarini; L. Guzzo; D. Maccagni; R. Scaramella; A. Blanchard; M. Ramella

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant [HIAR-PAD-2011-07-27] The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Argonne National Laboratory - August 2011

124

U.S. Supplemental Gaseous Fuels (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1976 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1977 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1978 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1979 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1980 17 16 16 12 11 10 10 10 10 12 14 16 1981 20 17 17 14 13 12 12 12 12 14 15 19 1982 19 16 15 12 9 9 9 9 9 11 13 14 1983 16 12 12 10 8 8 8 10 10 10 13 16 1984 13 10 10 8 7 7 7 8 8 8 11 13 1985 13 9 8 11 11 10 12 12 9 12 9 13 1986 12 11 11 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 10 15

125

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

126

Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Redshift and Real-Space Correlation Functions from the ESP Galaxy Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the behaviour of the redshift- and real-space correlation functions from the ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. xi(s) for the whole survey is positive out to ~80/h Mpc, with a smooth break from a shallow power law. Comparison to xi(s) from two other wide-angle, moderately deep surveys, the LCRS and Stromlo-APM, shows a very good agreement of all data sets, despite the different selections and geometries. By projecting xi(r_p, pi), we recover the real--space correlation function xi(r), which below 10/h Mpc is reasonably well described by a power law xi(r) = (r/r_o)^{-\\gamma} with r_o=4.15^{+0.20}_{-0.21} /h Mpc and \\gamma=1.67^{+0.07}_{-0.09}. The same analysis, applied to four volume-limited subsamples, evidences a small but significant growth of clustering with luminosity (r_o varies from 3.4 to 5.2/h Mpc when the luminosity threshold is increased from -18. to -20).

L. Guzzo; J. G. Bartlett; A. Cappi

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Real and Redshift-Space Clustering in the ESP Galaxy Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the two-point correlation properties of galaxies in the ESO Slice Project (ESP) redshift survey, both in redshift and real space. The redshift-space correlation function xi(s) for the whole magnitude-limited survey is well described by a power law with \\gamma ~ 1.55 between 3 and ~40/h Mpc, where it smoothly breaks down, crossing the zero value on scales as large as ~80/h Mpc. On smaller scales (0.2-2/h Mpc), the slope is shallower, mostly due to redshift-space depression by virialized structures. This effect is found to be enhanced by the J3 optimal-weighting estimator for xi. We explicitly evidence these effects by computing xi(r_p,pi) and the projected function w_p(r_p). In this way we recover the real-space correlation function xi(r), which we fit below 10/h Mpc with a power-law model. This gives a reasonable fit, with r_o=4.15^{+0.20}_{-0.21} /h Mpc and \\gamma=1.67^{+0.07}_{-0.09}. This results on xi(r) and xi(s), and the comparison with other surveys, clearly confirm how the shape of spatial correlations above ~3/h Mpc is characterised by a significant `shoulder' with respect to the small-scale ~ -1.8 power law, corresponding to a steepening of P(k) near the turnover.

L. Guzzo; J. G. Bartlett; A. Cappi

1998-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Luminosity Function and Mean Galaxy Density from the ESP galaxy Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarise the main results obtained over the last two years by the ESO Slice Project (ESP) redshift survey, concerning the luminosity function and mean density of galaxies, and their implications for the galaxy number counts at bright magnitudes. The bj-band luminosity function is characterised by a steep faint-end, which raises above a "global" Schechter fit for M_bj > -17 + 5log(h) and is well described by a power-law with slope ~ -1.6. This steepening is mostly produced by galaxies with emission lines, with a clear trend for galaxies with larger [OII] equivalent widths to show a steeper faint end (and a fainter M*). The normalization of the luminosity function is about a factor of 1.6 higher that that from the Stromlo-APM survey. We find that, in fact, the mean density can be seen to increase out to ~140/h Mpc. If we take this into account when computing the expected cumulative number counts from the observed luminosity function, we are able to reproduce the observed steep counts at bright (bj<17) magnitudes very accurately.

E. Zucca; G. Zamorani; P. Vettolani

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Decommissioning The decommissioning of Gaseous Diffusion Plant facilities requires accurate, non-destructive assay (NDA) of residual enriched uranium in facility components for safeguards and nuclear criticality safety purposes. Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to multiple factors. Working reference material (WRM) standards and container-specific surrogates are required to verify and validate NDA methods used to support characterization of gaseous diffusion equipment within the D&D project. Because working reference

131

Gaseous Diffusion Plant Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Department of Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plants Phase I: Needs Assessment Robert Wages Oil, Chemical and Atomic Inte national Union Steven Markowitz Mount Sinai School of Medicine Sylvia Kieding Oil, Chemical and Atomic International Union Mark Griffon University of Massachusetts Lowell Elizabeth Averill Samaras Alice Hamilton College October 1, 1997 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number Executive Summary 1 J: OVERVIEW 1. Introduction 2-3 2. Methods 3-8 3. Principal Findings 9-16 4. Need for Medical Surveillance and Risk Communication 16-17 PART II: METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS 4. Exposure Assessment Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 5. Focus Group Results Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C 6. Epidemiology and Other Health Studies EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose We report the results and analysis of a one year needs assessment study evaluating

132

Release of indigenous gases from LWR fuel and the reaction kinetics with Zircaloy cladding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the open literature data to estimate: the rate of gaseous impurity release from oxide fuel, the amount and composition of the gaseous impurities, and their subsequent rate of reaction with the fuel or Zircaloy.

Beyer, C.E.; Hann, C.R.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing axially elongated electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel (46), where the spent fuel exit channel (46) passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) at a mixing apparatus (50), reformable fuel mixture channel (52) passes through the length of the generator chamber (22) and connects with the mixing apparatus (50), that channel containing entry ports (54) within the generator chamber (22), where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces (18), where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports (54).

Reichner, Philip (Plum Borough, PA); Dollard, Walter J. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Thermally efficient PEM fuel cell that runs on ethanol  

onboard conversion of ethanol into hydrogen fuel Liquid ethanol feedstock eliminates problems with storage and transportation of gaseous hydrogen Control of temperature maximizes selectivity of reformation process and prevents membrane fouling ...

135

Band Formation during Gaseous Diffusion in Aerogels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study experimentally how gaseous HCl and NH_3 diffuse from opposite sides of and react in silica aerogel rods with porosity of 92 % and average pore size of about 50 nm. The reaction leads to solid NH_4Cl, which is deposited in thin sheet-like structures. We present a numerical study of the phenomenon. Due to the difference in boundary conditions between this system and those usually studied, we find the sheet-like structures in the aerogel to differ significantly from older studies. The influence of random nucleation centers and inhomogeneities in the aerogel is studied numerically.

M. A. Einarsrud; F. A. Maao; A. Hansen; M. Kirkedelen; J. Samseth

1997-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

136

Emergency fuels utilization guidebook. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic concept of an emergency fuel is to safely and effectively use blends of specification fuels and hydrocarbon liquids which are free in the sense that they have been commandeered or volunteered from lower priority uses to provide critical transportation services for short-duration emergencies on the order of weeks, or perhaps months. A wide variety of liquid hydrocarbons not normally used as fuels for internal combustion engines have been categorized generically, including limited information on physical characteristics and chemical composition which might prove useful and instructive to fleet operators. Fuels covered are: gasoline and diesel fuel; alcohols; solvents; jet fuels; kerosene; heating oils; residual fuels; crude oils; vegetable oils; gaseous fuels.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management ┬╗ History ┬╗ Manhattan Project ┬╗ Signature Operational Management ┬╗ History ┬╗ Manhattan Project ┬╗ Signature Facilities ┬╗ K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Process Building The K-25 plant, located on the southwestern end of the Oak Ridge reservation, used the gaseous diffusion method to separate uranium-235 from uranium-238. Based on the well-known principle that molecules of a lighter isotope would pass through a porous barrier more readily than molecules of a heavier one, gaseous diffusion produced through myriads of repetitions a gas increasingly rich in uranium-235 as the heavier uranium-238 was separated out in a system of cascades. Although producing minute amounts of final product measured in grams, gaseous diffusion required a massive

138

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element comprising a large number og wafers of fissionable material and a protective jacket having compartments holding these wafers is described. The compartments of the jacket aid the removal of heat from the wafers, keep the wafers or fragments thereof from migrating in the jacket, and permit the escape of gaseous fission products.

Carney, K.G. Jr.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biogas to someone by Biogas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Renewable Natural Gas (Biogas) Biogas-also known as biomethane, swamp gas, landfill gas, or digester gas-is the gaseous product of anaerobic digestion (decomposition without oxygen) of organic matter. In addition to providing electricity and heat, biogas is useful as a vehicle fuel. When processed to purity standards,

140

Establishing Measurement Traceability for Gaseous Mercury ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST already provides mercury traceability to the SI for many solid- and liquid-matrix materials, including fossil fuels, through the SRM program, but ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the...

142

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE...

143

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

144

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012...

145

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release...

146

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

147

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

148

,"Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

149

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

150

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

151

The Thermodynamics of Gaseous, Cuprous Chloride Monomer and Trimer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No.W-7405-eng~48B TIiE THERMODYNAMICS OF GASEOUS" CUPROUSCu(s) + HCl::= I Thermodynamics of Vaporization to Monomeric

Brewer, Leo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

Scott Anderson

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE  

SciTech Connect

The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

Scott Anderson

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

154

OLI/ESP Modeling Of The Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant For Estimate Of Campaigns I-IV Simulant Volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four SIPP campaigns have been planned to investigate the effect of recycle streams on the RPP-WTP pretreatment process such as the filter flux rate and other areas of interest. This document describes OLI/ESP modeling work done in support of the planning and operation of the SIPP. An existing OLI/ESP steady-state model was expanded to represent the pretreatment system through to the TLP evaporator for the LAW train and the washed sludge for the HLW train. The model was used to investigate alternative operating scenarios, determine the optimum volumetric waste feed ratio of AP-101 to AY-102, and, for each campaign, estimate the simulant and input recycle volumes corresponding to the target glass production rates of 6MT/day HLW glass and 80MT/day LAW glass and scaled to the target of 140L of Campaign I washed sludge. It was designed to quickly achieve steady state and simulation results indicate this was accomplished by Campaign IV. The alternative operating scenarios modeled differed only in the point at which the AP-101 and AY-102 waste feed streams were introduced to the process. The results showed no difference in the production rate between the scenarios. Therefore, for these specific waste feeds the process should be operated to maximize the energy efficiency and minimize scaling in the evaporator by feeding the AY-102 waste feed to the ultra-filtration feed prep tank, bypassing the waste feed evaporator.

CARL, BARNES

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Enforcement Documents - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Intennech, Inc. - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Intermech, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Anchor Bolts and Pipe Supports at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, INC - March 26, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Geiger Brothers Mechanical Contractors, Inc. related to Installation and Inspection of Penetration Fire Seals at the DUF6 Conversion Building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant March 26, 2010 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to

156

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Gaseous emissions from the landscape can be used to explore for geothermal systems, characterize their lateral extent, or map the trends of concealed geologic structures that may provide important reservoir permeability at depth. Gaseous geochemical signatures vary from system to system and utilization of a multi-gas analytical approach to exploration or characterization should enhance the survey's clarity. This paper describes

157

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - 026 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (026 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is located in south central Ohio, approximately 20 miles north of Portsmouth, Ohio and 70 miles south of Columbus, Ohio. Construction of the PGDP began in late 1952 to expand the Federal Government┬┐s gaseous diffusion program already in place at Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Paducah, Kentucky. The facility was built to increase the production of enriched uranium at rates substantially above the other

158

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The estimated potential energy generation from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25)

159

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Property Type Quantity Description The potential mass of gaseous biopower material for a place. Use this type to express a quantity of magnitude, or an object's resistance to acceleration. The default unit is the kilogram (kg). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Kilograms - 1 kg, kilo, kilogram, kilograms, Kilogram, kilogramme, kilos Grams - 1000 g, gram, gramme, grams Tonnes - 0.001 tonnes, metric tons, Tonnes, Metric Tonnes Pounds - 2.205 lbs, pounds, pound, Pounds, Lbs Stone - 0.1575 stones, st, stone Ounces - 35.27 ounces, oz, Ounces, ounce BDT - 0.001 BDT, Bone Dry Tonnes, bdt Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass"

160

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, July 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Technical and Economic Evaluation of Macroalgae Cultivation for Fuel Production (Draft)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of macroalgae as sources of renewable liquid and gaseous fuels is evaluated. A series of options for production of macroalgae feedstock is considered. Because of their high carbohydrate content, the fuel products for which macroalgae are most suitable are methane and ethanol. Fuel product costs were compared with projected fuel costs in the year 1995.

Feinberg, D. A.; Hock, S. M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Impact study on the use of biomass-derived fuels in gas turbines for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the properties of fuels derived from biomass, both gaseous and liquid, against the fuel requirements of gas turbine systems for gernating electrical power. The report attempts to be quantitative rather than merely qualitative to establish the significant variations in the properties of biomass fuels from those of conventional fuels. Three general categories are covered: performance, durability, and storage and handling.

Moses, C.A.; Bernstein, H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 800 and 3000 psi. This paper will describe the work performed on four commercially available pipeline steels in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at pressures relevant for transport in pipelines. Microstructures and mechanical property performances will be compared. In addition, recommendations for future work related to gaining a better understanding of steel pipeline performance in hydrogen service will be discussed.

Stalheim, Mr. Douglas [DGS Metallurgical Solutions Inc; Boggess, Todd [Secat; San Marchi, Chris [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jansto, Steven [Reference Metals Company; Somerday, Dr. B [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Sofronis, Prof. Petros [University of Illinois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Fuel Prices Find natural gas fuel prices and trends. Natural gas is a domestically produced gaseous fuel, readily available

165

Further investigation of the impact of the co-combustion of tire-derived fuel and petroleum coke on the petrology and chemistry of coal combustion products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Kentucky cyclone-fired unit burns coal and tire-derived fuel, sometimes in combination with petroleum coke. A parallel pulverized combustion (pc) unit at the same plant burns the same coal, without the added fuels. The petrology, chemistry, and sulfur isotope distribution in the fuel and resulting combustion products was investigated for several configurations of the fuel blend. Zinc and Cd in the combustion products are primarily contributed from the tire-derived fuel, the V and Ni are primarily from the petroleum coke, and the As and Hg are probably largely from the coal. The sulfur isotope distribution in the cyclone unit is complicated due to the varying fuel sources. The electrostatic precipitator (ESP) array in the pc unit shows a subtle trend towards heavier S isotopic ratios in the cooler end of the ESP.

Hower, J.C.; Robertson, J.D.; Elswick, E.R.; Roberts, J.M.; Brandsteder, K.; Trimble, A.S.; Mardon, S.M. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Gaseous Detectors: recent developments and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volume with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photo-lithography and micro-processing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high energy physics, MPGD applications has expanded to nuclear physics, UV and visible photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection and medical physics.

Maxim Titov

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

168

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 121 116 93 1970's 79 55 70 71 75 68 61 45 64 49 1980's 41 29 40 55 61 145 234 318 272 254 1990's 300 395 604 513 513 582 603 734 732 879 2000's 586 691 566 647 634 700 794 859 1,008 1,295 2010's 4,578 8,931 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Processing

169

DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati ľ The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky.

170

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition December 19, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 Media Contacts Ben Williams, DOE, (865) 574-4912 Wayne McKinney, UCOR, (865) 576-6284 Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today, the Department of Energy announced that its contractor URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, or UCOR, has completed demolition of the K-25 gaseous diffusion building, the largest facility in the DOE complex. UCOR took over the project in 2011 and has maintained a strong safety record while completing the demolition over one year ahead of its current schedule and approximately $300 million under the current budget. All debris removal is expected to be completed in spring 2014.

171

Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment  

SciTech Connect

The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-Wet FGD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury control for Plants firing Mercury control for Plants firing texas lignite and equiPPed with esP-wet fgd Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. One promising mercury control technology involves the use of sorbents such as powdered activated carbon. Full-scale sorbent injection tests conducted for various combinations of fuel and plant air pollution control devices have provided a good understanding of variables that affect sorbent performance. However, many uncertainties exist regarding long-term performance, and data gaps remain for specific plant configurations. Sorbent injection has not been demonstrated at full-scale for plants firing Texas lignite coal, which are responsible for about 10 percent of annual U.S. power plant

173

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) Apparatus for Nuclear Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RAGS (Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility. Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D A; Velsko, C A; Jedlovec, D R; Yeamans, C B; Moody, K J; Tereshatov, E; Stoeffl, W; Riddle, A

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

Heat-pipe effect on the transport of gaseous radionuclides released from a nuclear waste container  

SciTech Connect

When an unsaturated porous medium is subjected to a temperature gradient and the temperature is sufficiently high, vadose water is heated and vaporizes. Vapor flows under its pressure gradient towards colder regions where it condenses. Vaporization and condensation produce a liquid saturation gradient, creating a capillary pressure gradient inside the porous medium. Condensate flows towards the hot end under the influence of a capillary pressure gradient. This is a heat pipe in an unsaturated porous medium. We study analytically the transport of gaseous species released from a spent-fuel waste package, as affected by a time-dependent heat pipe in an unsaturated rock. For parameter values typical of a potential repository in partially saturated fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, we found that a heat pipe develops shortly after waste is buried, and the heat-pipe`s spatial extent is time-dependent. Water vapor movements produced by the heat pipe can significantly affect the migration of gaseous radionuclides. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Zhou, W.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Joe Hudson 1930 North 13th Street Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

176

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Jeanne Cisco 2288 Wakefield Mound Road Piketon, OH 45661 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the Unitedsteel Workers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and

177

Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 2013 April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - April 2013 April 2013 Review of the Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO). The objective of the Independent Oversight review was to evaluate PPPO's conduct of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase I verification review at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The contractor at PORTS is Fluor-Babcock & Wilcox Portsmouth (FBP). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations

178

Mercury Measurements Characterizing the Impact of SCR on Mercury: Consol Test Site 5 - Eastern Bituminous Coal-Fired Power Plant wi th an SCR, ESP, and Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber 8212 fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining ...

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Mercury Measurements Characterizing the Impact of SCR on Mercury: Consol Site 7 - Eastern Bituminous Coal-Fired Power Plant with an SCR, ESP, and Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercu...

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

Mercury Measurements Characterizing the Impact of SCR on Mercury: Consol Test Site 4 - Eastern Bituminous Coal-Fired Power Plant wit h an SCR, ESP, and Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercu...

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mercury Measurements Characterizing the Impact of SCR on Mercury: Consol Site 6 - Eastern Bituminous Coal-Fired Power Plant with an SCR, ESP, and Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber 8211 fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining ...

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hydrogen Fuel Purity Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metallic, non-metallic, chemical media chemical media Bulk Storage Bulk Storage steel steel composite composite Delivery Delivery Cryogenic Cryogenic Gaseous Gaseous ...

183

Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a composite cladding having a substrate and a metal barrier metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of the substrate so that the metal barrier forms a shield between the substrate and the nuclear fuel material held within the cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a low neutron absorption metal of substantially pure zirconium. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has an improved composite cladding comprised of a moderate purity metal barrier of zirconium metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The metal barrier forms a shield between the alloy tube and a core of nuclear fuel material enclosed in the composite cladding. There is a gap between the cladding and the core. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the composite cladding and has low neutron absorption characteristics. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the alloy tube from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

186

Artificial neural network in gaseous emissions prediction with bioreactor usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The artificial neural network is used more and more often for prediction of processes related with the biowaste management. In this area, composting is one of the most important process of biowaste recycling. However, the gaseous emissions from the composted ... Keywords: composting, data acquisition, emissions, multilayer perceptron, neural modeling, prediction

Piotr Boniecki; Jacek Dach; Krzysztof Pilarski; Aleksander J?dru?; Krzysztof Nowakowski; Hanna Piekarska-Boniecka; Jacek Przyby?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Methods for deacidizing gaseous mixtures by phase enhanced absorption  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

Hu, Liang

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Recent Advances in Laser-based Diagnostics for Gaseous Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-based diagnostic techniques offer unique capabilities for experimentation on gaseous flows. In this paper, we overview recent progress of two concepts: spectrally resolved absorption and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. The absorption ... Keywords: PLIF, absorption spectroscopy, acetone, combustion control, diode laser, hypersonic, supersonic

R. Hanson; D. Baer; C. Morris; M. Thurber; E. Furlong; S. Wehe

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Adaptive high-resolution simulation of realistic gaseous detonation waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The numerical approximation of detonation waves in gaseous combustible mixtures is extremely demanding since a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. A dynamically adaptive high-resolution finite volume method is described that has enabled accurately resolved computational investigations of the transient behavior of regularly oscillating detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in realistic two-dimensional geometry.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Estimation of Carbon-14 in Nuclear Power Plant Gaseous Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants report the amount of radioactivity released through permitted effluent pathways in their plant annual reports. This report provides users with a method for calculating the amount of carbon-14 (14C) generated in a light water reactor (LWR) core and released through plant gaseous effluent pathways.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,127 971 1,334 1970's 1,270 1,217 1,058 878 679 567 520 367 485 1,146 1980's 553 830 831 633 618 458 463 437 811 380 1990's 445 511 416 395 425 377 340 300 495 5,462 2000's 11,377 15,454 16,477 11,430 13,697 14,308 14,662 13,097 10,846 18,354 2010's 18,405 11,221 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

192

Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,499 3,667 3,475 1970's 3,235 2,563 1,197 1,118 952 899 823 674 883 1,308 1980's 1,351 1,327 1,287 1,258 1,200 1,141 1,318 1,275 1,061 849 1990's 800 290 413 507 553 488 479 554 451 431 2000's 377 408 395 320 254 231 212 162 139 168 2010's 213 268 424 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

193

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that <0.5 ppm sulfur can be achieved. Removal of HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Alternative Fuels -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Fischer-Tropsch Fuels SunDiesel fuel This Sun Diesel BTL fuel, made from wood chips, results in lower particulate matter and nitrogen oxide emissions. Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels are synthetic diesel fuels produced by converting gaseous hydrocarbons, such as natural gas and gasified coal or biomass, into liquid fuel. These fuels are commonly categorized into the following groups: Biomass to liquids (BTL) Gas to liquids (GTL) Coal to liquids (CTL) Argonne engineers are investigating the performance and emissions data of F-T fuels for both older and newer vehicles. The goal is to provide this data to the U.S. Department of Energy, the auto industry and energy suppliers. Part of the lab's strategy also includes publishing the data to solicit ideas and input from the fuels and combustion community.

196

TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING ľ A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated charcoal, 3) selective sorption on chemical modified zeolites, or 4) diffusion through membranes with selective permeability are potential technologies to retain the gas.

Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

LPG fuel supply system. [Patent for automotive  

SciTech Connect

A fuel supply system for an internal combustion engine operated on gaseous fuels, for example, liquid petroleum gas (Lpg). The system includes a housing having a chamber for vaporizing liquid gas, including means for heating the vaporizing chamber. Also included in the housing is a mixing chamber for mixing the vaporized gas with incoming air for delivery to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine through a standard carburetor. The fuel supply system includes means for mounting the system on the carburetor, including means for supporting an air filter circumjacent the mixing chamber.

Pierson, W.V.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

The ESO Slice Project (ESP) Galaxy Redshift Survey. VII. The Redshift and Real-Space Correlation Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present analyses of the two-point correlation properties of the ESP galaxy redshift survey. From the redshift-space correlation function xi(s), we see positive clustering out to separations ~50/h Mpc, with a smooth break on larger scales and zero-crossing between 60 and 80/h Mpc. xi(s) is reasonably well described by a shallow power law with \\gamma~1.5 between 3 and 50/h Mpc, while on smaller scales (0.2-2/h Mpc) it has a shallower slope (\\gamma~ 1). We examine the full effect of redshift-space distortions through the two-dimensional correlation function xi(rp,pi), from which we project out the real-space xi(r) below 10/h Mpc. This function is well described by a power-law model (r/r_o)^{-\\gamma}, with r_o=4.15^{+0.20}_{-0.21} h^{-1} Mpc and \\gamma=1.67^{+0.07}_{-0.09}. Comparison to other redshift surveys shows a consistent picture in which clustering remains positive out to separations of 50/h Mpc or larger, in substantial agreement with the results obtained from angular surveys like the APM and EDSGC. Also the shape of the two-point correlation function is remarkably unanimous among these data sets, in all cases requiring more power above 5/h Mpc (a `shoulder'), than a simple extrapolation of the canonical xi(r)=(r/5)^{-1.8}. xi(s) for volume-limited subsamples shows evidence of luminosity segregation only for the most luminous sample with M_{b_J}\\le -20.5. When redshift-space distortions are removed through projection of xi(rp,pi), however, a weak dependence on luminosity is seen at small separations also at fainter magnitudes. This effect is masked in redshift space, as the mean pairwise velocity dispersion experiences a parallel increase, basically erasing the effect of the clustering growth on xi(s).

L. Guzzo; J. G. Bartlett; A. Cappi; S. Maurogordato; E. Zucca; G. Zamorani; C. Balkowski; A. Blanchard; V. Cayatte; G. Chincarini; C. A. Collins; D. Maccagni; H. MacGillivray; R. Merighi; M. Mignoli; D. Proust; M. Ramella; R. Scaramella; G. M. Stirpe; G. Vettolani

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

200

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant State Kentucky Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts of activities at the Site are investigated and appropriate response actions are taken. Parties U.S. DOE; Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet; U.S. EPA Date 2/01/1998 SCOPE * Ensure all releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants are addressed to achieve comprehensive remediation of the site. * Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring response actions in accordance with CERCLA, RCRA, and Kentucky Law. * Facilitate cooperation, exchange of information, and participation of the Parties and

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201

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PORTS-2011-08-03 PORTS-2011-08-03 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/03/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Portsmouth Site Office (PORTS) and the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky, from August 1-3, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's

202

Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaseous Hydrogen Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Breakout Session Name Targets/Objectives More work is needed to better define delivery target metrics Assumptions about targets for costs and energy efficiency need to be qualified Technology improvements likely to lower costs, but may not have major impact on total cost A significant impact on cost would come through permitting policy changes, e.g., use of public land Breakout Session Name Priority Barriers System Issues: need to assess delivery options in context of total system Materials: corrosion, H2 permeability Construction: welding, joining Maintenance and Operation: leak detection Pipeline Safety: odorants, flame visibility

203

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

205

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAD-2011-07-27 PAD-2011-07-27 Site: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Dates of Activity : 07/25/2011 - 07/27/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Paducah Site Office (PAD) from July 25-27, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission

206

Method for diverting a gaseous sand-consolidating fluid  

SciTech Connect

An unconsolidated gas-producing sand in which the permeability is layered and the productivity can be impaired by liquid blocking can be consolidated by wetting the rock surfaces with a limited amount of water, injecting a smoke which selectively reduces the permeability of the most permeable layers by depositing on their faces unconsolidated masses of substantially inert solid particles and injecting a gaseous silicon polyhalide to convert a significant proportion of the rock surface-wettingwater to a grain bonding silica gel.

Davies, D. R.; Richardson, E. A.

1980-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method and apparatus for analyzing particle-containing gaseous suspensions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method and apparatus permit analyses, by optical means, of properties of gaseous suspensions of particles, by measuring radiation that is emitted, transmitted or scattered by the particles. Determinations of composition, size, temperature and spectral emittance can be performed either in-situ or by sampling, and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometric techniques are most effectively used. Apparatus specifically adapted for performing radiation scattering analyses, and for collecting radiation from different sources, are provided. 51 figs.

Solomon, P.R.; Carangelo, R.M.; Best, P.E.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 115,177 140,290 179,117 1970's 193,209 195,072 197,967 206,833 194,329 189,541 172,584 166,392 161,511 165,515 1980's 142,171 142,423 128,858 124,193 132,501 117,736 115,604 124,890 120,092 121,425 1990's 119,405 129,154 132,656 130,336 128,583 146,048 139,841 150,008 144,609 164,794 2000's 164,908 152,862 152,724 124,955 133,434 103,381 105,236 110,745 94,785 95,359 2010's 102,448 95,630 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

209

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,351 3,244 2,705 1970's 2,330 2,013 1,912 1,581 1,921 2,879 6,665 11,494 14,641 15,686 1980's 15,933 14,540 14,182 13,537 12,829 11,129 11,644 10,876 10,483 9,886 1990's 8,317 8,103 8,093 7,012 6,371 6,328 6,399 6,147 5,938 5,945 2000's 5,322 4,502 4,230 3,838 4,199 3,708 3,277 3,094 3,921 2,334 2010's 2,943 2,465 2,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

210

California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,803 32,639 30,334 1970's 29,901 27,585 24,156 17,498 17,201 15,221 14,125 13,567 13,288 10,720 1980's 8,583 7,278 14,113 14,943 15,442 16,973 16,203 15,002 14,892 13,376 1990's 12,424 11,786 12,385 12,053 11,250 11,509 12,169 11,600 10,242 10,762 2000's 11,063 11,060 12,982 13,971 14,061 13,748 14,056 13,521 13,972 13,722 2010's 13,244 12,095 12,755 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

211

Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 11,500 8,573 8,579 1970's 6,574 6,133 6,063 5,441 5,557 5,454 5,231 4,764 6,192 3,923 1980's 6,845 5,638 6,854 6,213 6,516 6,334 4,466 2,003 2,142 1,444 1990's 1,899 2,181 2,342 2,252 2,024 2,303 2,385 2,404 2,263 2,287 2000's 1,416 1,558 1,836 1,463 2,413 1,716 2,252 1,957 2,401 3,270 2010's 4,576 4,684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

212

North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,150 5,428 4,707 1970's 4,490 3,592 3,199 2,969 2,571 2,404 2,421 2,257 2,394 2,986 1980's 3,677 5,008 5,602 7,171 7,860 8,420 6,956 7,859 6,945 6,133 1990's 6,444 6,342 6,055 5,924 5,671 5,327 4,937 5,076 5,481 5,804 2000's 6,021 6,168 5,996 5,818 6,233 6,858 7,254 7,438 7,878 10,140 2010's 11,381 14,182 26,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

213

Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 433,684 457,117 447,325 1970's 466,016 448,288 470,105 466,143 448,993 435,571 428,635 421,110 393,819 352,650 1980's 350,312 345,262 356,406 375,849 393,873 383,719 384,693 364,477 357,756 343,233 1990's 342,186 353,737 374,126 385,063 381,020 381,712 398,442 391,174 388,011 372,566 2000's 380,535 355,860 360,535 332,405 360,110 355,589 373,350 387,349 401,503 424,042 2010's 433,622 481,308 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

214

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,149 48,635 50,484 1970's 52,647 53,810 54,157 55,782 54,986 56,109 61,778 72,484 77,653 62,107 1980's 59,457 60,544 56,857 56,304 58,580 53,953 51,295 65,156 63,355 61,594 1990's 66,626 70,463 75,520 83,193 86,607 85,668 108,341 109,046 106,665 107,850 2000's 110,411 108,958 110,036 111,292 105,412 101,064 99,971 96,250 92,579 94,840 2010's 91,963 90,291 84,562 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

215

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,126 4,546 4,058 1970's 3,405 4,152 4,114 4,674 6,210 9,620 11,944 13,507 13,094 12,606 1980's 12,651 13,427 12,962 11,314 10,771 11,913 10,441 10,195 11,589 13,340 1990's 13,178 15,822 18,149 18,658 19,612 25,225 23,362 28,851 24,365 26,423 2000's 29,105 29,195 31,952 33,650 35,821 34,782 36,317 38,180 53,590 67,607 2010's 82,637 90,801 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

216

Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 236 1970's 225 281 243 199 501 694 661 933 1,967 4,845 1980's 4,371 4,484 4,727 4,709 5,123 5,236 4,836 4,887 4,774 5,022 1990's 4,939 4,997 5,490 5,589 5,647 5,273 5,361 4,637 4,263 18,079 2000's 24,086 13,754 14,826 11,293 15,133 13,759 21,065 19,831 17,222 17,232 2010's 19,059 17,271 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

217

Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

Donck, Harry A. (San Diego, CA); Veca, Anthony R. (San Diego, CA); Snyder, Jr., Harold J. (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Reduced Turbine Emissions Using Hydrogen-Enriched Fuels R.W. Schefer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an effective approach to NOx emissions reduction. In addition to pure hydrogen and air, mixtures of hydrogen-blended capabilities for gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen- blended hydrocarbon fuels in gas turbine applications value fuels containing significant hydrogen are often produced as a by-product in Coal- Gasification

220

MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11, with higher fossil fuel prices, coal IGCC with CCS and biogas CHP are the preferred technologies

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Designing New Transit Bus Garages to be Fuel Flexible  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Designing New Transit Bus Garages to be Fuel Flexible Prepared By: Marathon Technical Services Six Venus Crescent P.O. Box 318 Heidelberg, Ontario, Canada N0B1Y0 Telephone: 519-699-9250 May 12, 2006 ______________________________________________________________________________ DESIGNING NEW TRANSIT BUS GARAGES TO BE FUEL FLEXIBLE Background Information Before discussing the building design features that are recommended for CNG and GH2 buses, it is important to understand what makes these fuels different from gasoline or diesel. The items below summarize the basic differences between the properties of gaseous and liquid fuels that influence the building design changes: 1. Natural Gas and Hydrogen are both lighter-than-air and in gaseous form at atmospheric

222

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

223

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

224

Hydrogen fueling station development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop and demonstrate a hydrogen fueling station for vehicles. Such stations are an essential infrastructural element in the practical application of hydrogen as vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology that is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle.

Edeskuty, F.J.; Daney, D.; Daugherty, M.; Hill, D.; Prenger, F.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Gaseous divertor simulation in an arc-jet device  

SciTech Connect

The first experimental simulation of the gaseous tokamak divertor is presented. Significant results are: (1) neutral gas at a pressure of a few mTorr is sufficient to absorb the entire localized flux of plasma thermal energy and reidstribute it over a wide area; (2) elastic ion-neutral collisions constitute the main energy absorbing process (at T/sub e,i/ less than or equal to 5 eV), and (3) a large pressure difference between divertor and main plasma chamber is maintained by plasma pumping in the connecting channel.

Hsu, W.L.; Yamada, M.; Barrett, P.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Removing gaseous contaminants in {sup 3}He by cryogenic stripping  

SciTech Connect

The Tritium Operations Group at LLNL, Tritium Facility has recently developed a {sup 3}He recovery system to remove argon, xenon, neon, hydrogen, and all other contaminants from the {sup 3}He stream in an Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) experimental apparatus. In this paper the authors will describe in detail the background information, technical requirements, the design approach, and the results of their experimental tests. The authors believe this gas purification system may have other applications as it provides at a reasonable cost an efficient method for purification of gaseous helium.

Benapfl, M.; Biltoft, P.; Coombs, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Tritium Operations Group

1995-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

229

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

230

Carbon dioxide emission index as a mean for assessing fuel quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emission index, defined as the amount of CO{sub 2} released per unit of energy value, was used to rate gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The direct utilization of natural gas is the most efficient option. The conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas for production of liquid fuels represents a significant decrease in fuel value of the former. The fuel value of liquids, such as gasoline, diesel oil, etc. is lower than that of natural gas. Blending gasoline with ethanol obtained either from bio-mass or via synthesis may decrease fuel value of the blend when CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the production of ethanol are included in total emissions. The introduction of liquid fuels produced by pyrolysis and liquefaction of biomass would result in the increase in the CO{sub 2} emissions. The CO{sub 2} emissions from the utilization of coal and petroleum coke are much higher than those from gaseous and liquid fuels. However, for petroleum coke, this is offset by the high value gaseous and liquid fuels that are simultaneously produced during coking. Conversion of low value fuels such as coal and petroleum coke to a high value chemicals via synthesis gas should be assessed as means for replacing natural gas and making it available for fuel applications.

Furimsky, E. [IMAF Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fuel Rod Cooling in Natural Uranium Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of the transfer of heat from a cylindrical fuel rod surrounded by a fast flowing coolant in an annular duct, with maximum power output limited by fuel rod temperatures, coolant pressure drop and pumping power requirements. A method is also presented for comparing and evaluating various liquid and gaseous coolants within these limitations. The report also shows and discusses some calculated results obtained for the systems considred in the study of natural U reactors for the production of Pu and useful power (NAA-SR-137).

Trilling, C.A.

1952-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Solid oxide fuel cell combined cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The integration of the solid oxide fuel cell and combustion turbine technologies can result in combined-cycle power plants, fueled with natural gas, that have high efficiencies and clean gaseous emissions. Results of a study are presented in which conceptual designs were developed for 3 power plants based upon such an integration, and ranging in rating from 3 to 10 MW net ac. The plant cycles are described and characteristics of key components summarized. Also, plant design-point efficiency estimates are presented as well as values of other plant performance parameters.

Bevc, F.P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States). Power Generation Business Unit; Lundberg, W.L.; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

DOE Seeks Proposals for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Technical Services Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati - The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Environmental Technical Services acquisition at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio.

234

Low energy consumption method for separating gaseous mixtures and in particular for medium purity oxygen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the separation of gaseous mixtures such as air and for producing medium purity oxygen, comprising compressing the gaseous mixture in a first compressor to about 3.9-4.1 atmospheres pressure, passing said compressed gaseous mixture in heat exchange relationship with sub-ambient temperature gaseous nitrogen, dividing the cooled, pressurized gaseous mixture into first and second streams, introducing the first stream into the high pressure chamber of a double rectification column, separating the gaseous mixture in the rectification column into a liquid oxygen-enriched stream and a gaseous nitrogen stream and supplying the gaseous nitrogen stream for cooling the compressed gaseous mixture, removing the liquid oxygen-enriched stream from the low pressure chamber of the rectification column and pumping the liquid, oxygen-enriched steam to a predetermined pressure, cooling the second stream, condensing the cooled second stream and evaporating the oxygen-enriched stream in an evaporator-condenser, delivering the condensed second stream to the high pressure chamber of the rectification column, and heating the oxygen-enriched stream and blending the oxygen-enriched stream with a compressed blend-air stream to the desired oxygen concentration.

Jujasz, Albert J. (North Olmsted, OH); Burkhart, James A. (Olmsted Falls, OH); Greenberg, Ralph (New York, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel...

236

Greenhouse warming potential of candidate gaseous diffusion plant coolants  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary estimate has been made of the greenhouse warming potential (GWP) of coolants under consideration as substitutes for CFC-114 in the gaseous diffusion plants. Coolants are not at present regulated on the basis of GWP, but may well be in the future. Use of c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} or n-C{sub 4}F{sub 10} is estimated to have three to four times the greenhouse impact of an equivalent use of CFC-114. Neither of the substitutes, of course, would cause any ozone depletion. HCFC-124 (a probable commercial substitute for CFC-114, but not presently under serious consideration due to its relatively high UF{sub 6} reactivity) would have much less greenhouse and ozone depletion impact than CFC-114. The GWP estimates derive from a simple model that approximately reproduces literature values for similar compounds. The major uncertainty in these estimates lies in the atmospheric lifetime, especially of the perfluorocarbon compounds, for which little reliable information exists. In addition to GWP estimates for coolants, the overall greenhouse impact of the gaseous diffusion plants is calculated, including indirect power-related CO{sub 2} emissions. This result is used to compare greenhouse impacts of nuclear- and coal-produced electricity. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-236, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

HETEROGENEOUS REBURNING BY MIXED FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies of heterogeneous reburning, i.e., reburning involving a coal-derived char, have elucidated its variables, kinetics and mechanisms that are valuable to the development of a highly efficient reburning process. Young lignite chars contain catalysts that not only reduce NO, but they also reduce HCN that is an important intermediate that recycles to NO in the burnout zone. Gaseous CO scavenges the surface oxides that are formed during NO reduction, regenerating the active sites on the char surface. Based on this mechanistic information, cost-effective mixed fuels containing these multiple features has been designed and tested in a simulated reburning apparatus. Remarkably high reduction of NO and HCN has been observed and it is anticipated that mixed fuel will remove 85% of NO in a three-stage reburning process.

Wei-Yin Chen; Benson B. Gathitu

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

16th North American Waste to Energy Conference-May 2008 CO2 Enhanced Steam Gasification of Biomass Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16th North American Waste to Energy Conference-May 2008 CO2 Enhanced Steam Gasification of Biomass of the decomposition of various biomass feedstocks and their conversion to gaseous fuels such as hydrogen. The steam temperatures: above 500o C for the herbaceous and non-wood samples and above 650o C for the wood biomass fuels

242

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Digg

243

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing worldwide demand for premium power, emerging trend towards electric utility deregulation and distributed power generation, global environmental concerns and regulatory controls have accelerated the development of advanced fuel cell based power generation systems. Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy through electrochemical oxidation of gaseous and/or liquid fuels ranging from hydrogen to hydrocarbons. Electrochemical oxidation of fuels prevents the formation of Nox, while the higher efficiency of the systems reduces carbon dioxide emissions (kg/kWh). Among various fuel cell power generation systems currently being developed for stationary and mobile applications, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer higher efficiency (up to 80% overall efficiency in hybrid configurations), fuel flexibility, tolerance to CO poisoning, modularity, and use of non-noble construction materials of low strategic value. Tubular, planar, and monolithic cell and stack configurations are currently being developed for stationary and military applications. The current generation of fuel cells uses doped zirconia electrolyte, nickel cermet anode, doped Perovskite cathode electrodes and predominantly ceramic interconnection materials. Fuel cells and cell stacks operate in a temperature range of 800-1000 *C. Low cost ($400/kWe), modular (3-10kWe) SOFC technology development approach of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative of the USDOE will be presented and discussed. SOFC technology will be reviewed and future technology development needs will be addressed.

Singh, Prabhakar; Pederson, Larry R.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Production Workers Screening Projects Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: James Harbison 2525 Cairo Road Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

245

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

Horak, C.M. [ed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Gaseous diffusion plant transition from DOE to external regulation  

SciTech Connect

After many years of operation as government-owned/contractor-operated facilities, large portions of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, were leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). These facilities are now certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and subject to oversight by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The transition from DOE to NRC regulation was more difficult than expected. The original commitment was to achieve NRC certification in October 1995; however, considerably more time was required and transition-related costs escalated. The Oak Ridge Operations Office originally estimated the cost of transition at $60 million; $240 million has been spent to date. The DOE`s experience in transitioning the GDPs to USEC operation with NRC oversight provides valuable lessons (both positive and negative) that could be applied to future transitions.

Dann, R.K.; Crites, T.R.; Rahm-Crites, L.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Former Workers, Construction Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Ron Bush 1236 Gallia Street Portsmouth, OH 45662 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

248

Extending the Photon Mapping Method for Realistic Rendering of Hot Gaseous Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid dynamics have proved very successful. As a result, diverse physically based fluid animation fluids. In addition to the generation of ap- pealing motions of gaseous fluids, several inter- esting, they are gen- erated within the gaseous fluid, but an energy value is assigned to each one according to the to

Texas at Austin, University of

249

Gaseous Arginine Conformers and Their Unique Intramolecular Interactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive ab initio calculations were employed to characterize stable conformers of gaseous arginine, both canonical and zwitterionic tautomers. Step-by-step geometry optimizations of possible single-bond rotamers at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels yield numerous structures that are more stable than any known ones. The final electronic energies of the conformers were determined at the CCSD/6-31++G(d,p) level. The lowest energies of the canonical and zwitterionic structures are lower than the existing ones by 2.0 and 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The relative energies, rotational constants, dipole moments and harmonic frequencies of the stable conformers were given for future experimental verifications. The conformational distributions at various temperatures, estimated based upon the thermodynamic principles, consist almost exclusively of the newly found structures. One striking feature is the occurrence of the blue-shifting hydrogen bonds in all the six most stable conformers. A unique feature of important conformations is the coexistence of dihydrogen, blue- and red-shifting hydrogen bonds. In addition to the hydrogen bonds, the stereoelectronic effects were also found to be important stabilization factors. The calculated and measured proton affinities agree within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, affirming high quality of our conformational search. The theoretical gas phase basicity of 245.9 kcal/mol is also in good agreement with the experimental value of 240.6 kcal/mol. The extensive searches establish firmly that gaseous arginine exists primarily in the canonical and not the zwitterionic form. Computing resources were available through a Computational Grand Challenge Application grant from the Molecular Sciences Computing Facility in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830.

Ling, Sanliang; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Zhijian; Lin, Zijing; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Gaseous Arginine Conformers and Their Unique Intramolecular Interactions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive ab initio calculations were employed to characterize stable conformers of gaseous arginine, both the canonical and zwitterionic tautomers. Step-by-step geometry optimizations of possible single-bond rotamers at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels yield numerous structures that are more stable than any known ones. The final electronic energies of the conformers were determined at the CCSD/6-31++G(d,p) level. The lowest energies of the canonical and zwitterionic structures are lower than the existing values by 2.0 and 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The relative energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and harmonic frequencies of the stable conformers remain for future experimental verification. The conformational distributions at various temperatures, estimated according to thermodynamic principles, consist almost exclusively of the newly found structures. One striking feature is the occurrence of blueshifting hydrogen bonds in all six of the most stable conformers. A unique feature of important conformations is the coexistence of dihydrogen and blue- and red-shifting hydrogen bonds. In addition to the hydrogen bonds, the stereoelectronic effects were also found to be important stabilization factors. The calculated and measured proton affinities agree within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, affirming the high quality of our conformational search. The theoretical gas-phase basicity of 245.9 kcal/mol is also in good agreement with the experimental value of 240.6 kcal/mol. The extensive searches establish firmly that gaseous arginine exists primarily in the canonical and not the zwitterionic form.

Ling, Sanliang; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Zhijian; Lin, Zijing; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fuel leak detection apparatus for gas cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is disclosed for detecting nuclear fuel leaks within nuclear power system reactors, such as high temperature gas cooled reactors. The apparatus includes a probe assembly that is inserted into the high temperature reactor coolant gaseous stream. The probe has an aperture adapted to communicate gaseous fluid between its inside and outside surfaces and also contains an inner tube for sampling gaseous fluid present near the aperture. A high pressure supply of noncontaminated gas is provided to selectively balance the pressure of the stream being sampled to prevent gas from entering the probe through the aperture. The apparatus includes valves that are operable to cause various directional flows and pressures, which valves are located outside of the reactor walls to permit maintenance work and the like to be performed without shutting down the reactor.

Burnette, Richard D. (San Diego, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions

253

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Motor Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle

254

Fuels Technology - Capabilities - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Fuels Technology Advanced petroleum-based fuels Fuel-borne reductants On-board reforming Alternative fuels...

255

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels by Gaseous and Cathodic Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The commercialization of hydrogen fuel-based technologies will require ... This paper reports on the results of this work to date comparing the effects of ... Return on Investment of Structural Health Monitoring Systems for Windá...

257

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The definition of an alternative fuel includes natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, electricity, hydrogen, fuel mixtures containing not less

258

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

259

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Promotion The Missouri Alternative Fuels Commission (Commission) promotes the continued production and use of alternative transportation fuels in

260

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a biodiesel fueling station. Hundreds of biodiesel fueling stations are available in the United States.

262

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION USE FUEL TAX REGULATIONS Regulation 1301.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel includes any combustible gas or liquid, by whatever name the gas or liquid may be known or sold, of a kind used in an internal combustion engine for the generation of power to propel a motor vehicle on the highways, except fuel that is subject to the tax imposed by the Motor Vehicle Fuel License Tax Law and the Diesel Fuel Tax Law. For example, fuel includes, but is not limited to, liquefied petroleum gases, kerosene, distillate, stove oil, natural gas in liquid or gaseous form, and alcohol fuels. ôAlcohol fuel ö includes: ethanol (ethyl alcohol), methanol, (methyl alcohol), or blends of gasoline and alcohol (including any denaturant) containing 15 percent, or less, gasoline by volume measured at 60 degrees Fahrenheit. ôNatural gas ö means naturally occurring mixtures of hydrocarbon gases and vapors consisting principally of methane whether in gaseous or liquid form. The taxable unit for compressed natural gas (gaseous form) is 100 cubic feet of gas measured at 14.73 pounds of pressure per square inch at 60 degrees Fahrenheit. The taxable unit for liquid natural gas and other liquid fuels is the United States gallon, which is 231 cubic inches. To convert liters to gallons, the quantity of liters shall be multiplied by.26417 to determine the equivalent quantity in gallons. The resulting figure should be rounded to the nearest tenth of a gallon.

unknown authors

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Development of PC 4 dual-fuel engine  

SciTech Connect

Recently, utilization of natural gas, which is considered to be one of most important alternative fuels for petroleum, has been marked. As thermal efficiency of dual-fuel engine is higher than those of other prime movers with gaseous fuel, i.e., spark-ignited gas engine or gas turbine, it is possible to construct fuel-economical gas power plants with dual-fuel engines. However, its horsepower has been limited to the rather lower range. In 1984, NKK succeeded in developing large-sized dual-fuel engines based on the Pielstick PC4 diesel engine. The horsepower is 1200 HP/cyl, i.e. 21,600 HP for 18-cyclinder engine.

Nishikawa, T.; Utsuyama, S.; Maruyama, S.; Ono, T.; Kitahara, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells...

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

266

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

267

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

268

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on AddThis.com... More in this section...

269

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on AddThis.com...

270

Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 3 report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the laboratory efforts to characterize particulate and gaseous exhaust emissions from a passenger vehicle operating on alternative fuels. Tests were conducted at room temperature (nominally 72 F) and 20 F utilizing the chassis dynamometer portion of the FTP for light-duty vehicles. Fuels evaluated include Federal RFG, LPG meeting HD-5 specifications, a national average blend of CNG, E85, and M85. Exhaust particulate generated at room temperature was further characterized to determine polynuclear aromatic content, trace element content, and trace organic constituents. For all fuels except M85, the room temperature particulate emission rate from this vehicle was about 2 to 3 mg/mile. On M85, the particulate emission rate was more than 6 mg/mile. In addition, elemental analysis of particulate revealed an order of magnitude more sulfur and calcium from M85 than any other fuel. The sulfur and calcium indicate that these higher emissions might be due to engine lubricating oil in the exhaust. For RFG, particulate emissions at 20 F were more than six times higher than at room temperature. For alcohol fuels, particulate emissions at 20 F were two to three times higher than at room temperature. For CNG and LPG, particulate emissions were virtually the same at 72 F and 20 F. However, PAH emissions from CNG and LPG were higher than expected. Both gaseous fuels had larger amounts of pyrene, 1-nitropyrene, and benzo(g,h,i)perylene in their emissions than the other fuels.

Whitney, K.A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

272

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

273

,"Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

274

,"California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

275

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

276

,"Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_soh_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_soh_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

277

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

278

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

279

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

280

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

282

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

283

Application of Gaseous Sphere Injection Method for Modeling Under-expanded H2 Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology for modeling gaseous injection has been refined and applied to recent experimental data from the literature. This approach uses a discrete phase analogy to handle gaseous injection, allowing for addition of gaseous injection to a CFD grid without needing to resolve the injector nozzle. This paper focuses on model testing to provide the basis for simulation of hydrogen direct injected internal combustion engines. The model has been updated to be more applicable to full engine simulations, and shows good agreement with experiments for jet penetration and time-dependent axial mass fraction, while available radial mass fraction data is less well predicted.

Whitesides, R; Hessel, R P; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

284

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

285

,"Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sin_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sin_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

286

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

287

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

288

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

289

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1150_stx_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1150_stx_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

291

Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

explored as a fuel for passenger vehicles. It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors or burned in internal combustion engines (ICEs). It is an environmentally...

292

Dispersing the Gaseous Protoplanetary Disc and Halting Type II Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 30 extra-solar Jupiter-like planets have shorter periods than the planet Mercury. It is generally accepted that they formed further out, past the ĺsnow line ĺ (?1 AU), and migrated inwards. In order to be driven by tidal torques from the gaseous disc, the disc exterior to the planet had to contain about a planetary mass. The fact that the planets stopped migrating means that their outer disc was removed. We suggest, following the simulation by Bate et al. (2003), that the outer disc was accreted by the planet. This not only halts migration but removes the outer disc for planets interior to about 2 AU. The disc further out could have been removed by photoevaporation (Matsuyama et al. 2003). Furthermore, as also shown by Bate et al. (op cit) this process also provides an upper limit to planetary masses in agreement with the analysis of observed planetary masses by Zucker & Mazeh (2002). In this scenario, the endgame is a race. The central star is accreting the inner disc and the planet, while the planet is accreting the outer disc. The planet survives if it accretes its outer disc before being accreted by the star. The winner is determined solely by the ratio of the mass of the outer disc to the local surface density of the disc. Some planets are certainly eaten by the central star. Subject headings: extrasolar planets, Jupiter 1.

M. Lecar; D. D. Sasselov

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fusion: an energy source for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fuel cells: A handbook (Revision 3)  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of reaction directly into electrical energy. In a typical fuel cell, gaseous fuels are fed continuously to the anode (negative electrode) compartment and an oxidant (i.e., oxygen from air) is fed continuously to the cathode (positive electrode) compartment; the electrochemical reactions take place at the electrodes to produce an electric current. A fuel cell, although having similar components and several characteristics, differs from a typical battery in several respects. The battery is an energy storage device, that is, the maximum energy that is available is determined by the amount of chemical reactant stored within the battery itself. Thus, the battery will cease to produce electrical energy when the chemical reactants are consumed (i.e., discharged). In a secondary battery, the reactants are regenerated by recharging, which involves putting energy into the battery from an external source. The fuel cell, on the other hand, is an energy conversion device which theoretically has the capability of producing electrical energy for as long as the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the electrodes. In reality, degradation or malfunction of components limits the practical operating life of fuel cells.

Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Stauffer, D.B.; Engleman, R.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders  

SciTech Connect

Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Design of an Unattended Environmental Aerosol Sampling and Analysis System for Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resources of the IAEA continue to be challenged by the rapid, worldwide expansion of nuclear energy production. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) represent an especially formidable dilemma to the application of safeguard measures, as the size and enrichment capacity of GCEPs continue to escalate. During the early part of the 1990's, the IAEA began to lay the foundation to strengthen and make cost-effective its future safeguard regime. Measures under Part II of 'Programme 93+2' specifically sanctioned access to nuclear fuel production facilities and environmental sampling by IAEA inspectors. Today, the Additional Protocol grants inspection and environmental sample collection authority to IAEA inspectors at GCEPs during announced and low frequency unannounced (LFUA) inspections. During inspections, IAEA inspectors collect environmental swipe samples that are then shipped offsite to an analytical laboratory for enrichment assay. This approach has proven to be an effective deterrence to GCEP misuse, but this method has never achieved the timeliness of detection goals set forth by IAEA. Furthermore it is questionable whether the IAEA will have the resources to even maintain pace with the expansive production capacity of the modern GCEP, let alone improve the timeliness in reaching current safeguards conclusions. New safeguards propositions, outside of familiar mainstream safeguard measures, may therefore be required that counteract the changing landscape of nuclear energy fuel production. A new concept is proposed that offers rapid, cost effective GCEP misuse detection, without increasing LFUA inspection access or introducing intrusive access demands on GCEP operations. Our approach is based on continuous onsite aerosol collection and laser enrichment analysis. This approach mitigates many of the constraints imposed by the LFUA protocol, reduces the demand for onsite sample collection and offsite analysis, and overcomes current limitations associated with the in-facility misuse detection devices. Onsite environmental sample collection offers the ability to collect fleeting uranium hexafluoride emissions before they are lost to the ventilation system or before they disperse throughout the facility, to become deposited onto surfaces that are contaminated with background and historical production material. Onsite aerosol sample collection, combined with enrichment analysis, provides the unique ability to quickly detect stepwise enrichment level changes within the facility, leading to a significant strengthening of facility misuse deterence. We report in this paper our study of several GCEP environmental sample release scenarios and simulation results of a newly designed aerosol collection and particle capture system that is fully integrated with the Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) uranium particle enrichment analysis instrument that was developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Anheier, Norman C.; Munley, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

DOE Seeks Quotes for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Technical Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnatiľ The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for an Environmental Technical Services acquisition at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) for the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO).

300

Early Morning Ventilation of a Gaseous Tracer from a Mountain Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important component of a joint Environmental Protection AgencyľDepartment of Energy field experiment in Brush Creek Valley, Colorado in JulyľAugust 1982, was an aircraft sampling task to help verify the early morning ventilation of a gaseous ...

Montie M. Orgill

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Interpolation and Profile Correction (IPC) Method for Shortwave Radiative Transfer in Spectral Intervals of Gaseous Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new interpolation and profile correction (IPC) method for radiance/flux calculations in gaseous absorption bands is presented. The IPC method is designed to allow an arbitrary spectral resolution including monochromatic mode. It features a ...

Alexei I. Lyapustin

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Relaxed Eddy Accumulation System for Measuring Surface Fluxes of Total Gaseous Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system was designed to continuously measure total gaseous mercury (TGM) fluxes over a forest canopy. TGM concentration measurements were measured at 5-min intervals with a Tekran model 2537A mercury analyzer ...

Jesse O. Bash; David R. Miller

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Mercury Measurements Characterizing the Impact of SCR on Mercury: Consol Test Site 10---Eastern-Bituminous Coal-Fired Power Plant w ith an SCR, ESP and Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber ľ fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is to determine mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired faci...

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mercury Measurements Characterizing the Impact of SCR on Mercury: Consol Test Site 3 - Eastern Bituminous Coal-Fired Power Plant Wit h an SCR, ESP, and Wet FGD; Impact of Chloride Addition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber - fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mer...

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

306

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

307

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Emerging Alternative Fuels Several emerging alternative fuels are under development or already developed and may be available in the United States. These fuels may

309

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Animation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on...

310

Infrared Spectroscopy of Atomic Lines in Gaseous Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopy in the infrared provides a means to assess important properties of the plasma in gaseous nebulae. We present some of our own work that illustrates the need for interactions between the themes of this conference - astronomical data, atomic data, and plasma simulations. We undertook Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) observations with the intent of better understanding the effects of density variations in nebulae, particularly planetary nebulae (PNs), by determining average electron densities from the flux ratios of several fine-structure, IR emission lines. Instead, we are able to ascertain only minor density information because of several instances of the observed line flux ratios being out of range of the theoretical predictions using current atomic data. In these cases, the ISO data cannot presently be used to derive electron density, but rather provide direction for needed improvements in the atomic collision strengths. We have detected an unidentified (uid) strong emission line in an ISO/SWS spectrum of the Orion Nebula. The line has a rest wavelength 2.89350$\\pm$0.00003 $\\mu$m. A long-slit UKIRT observation confirms the presence of this line and shows that the emission is spatially extended and appears to be coincident with the brightest part of the ionized region. We do not detect the uid line in our SWS02 spectra of any of the several bright PNs which we observed for a comparable time. The need for basic atomic data, in this case wavelengths to aid species identification, is paramount for future progress. We look toward the future with a brief synopsis of upcoming or planned IR missions.

R. H. Rubin; R. J. Dufour; T. R. Geballe; S. W. J. Colgan; J. P. Harrington; S. D. Lord; A. L. Liao; D. A. Levine

2001-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

Emissions characteristics of Military Helicopter Engines Fueled with JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in aviation activities and more stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations have increased concerns regarding aircraft emissions, due to their harmful health and environmental impacts, especially in the vicinity of airports and military bases. In this study, the gaseous and particulate-matter emissions of two General Electric T701C engines and one T700 engine were evaluated. The T700 series engines power the U.S. Army's Black Hawk and Apache helicopters. The engines were fueled with standard military JP-8 fuel and were tested at three power settings. In addition, one of the T701C engines was operated on a natural-gas-derived Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene jet fuel. Test results show that the T701C engine emits significantly lower particulate-matter emissions than the T700 for all conditions tested. Particulate-matter mass emission indices ranged from 0.2-1.4 g/kg fuel for the T700 and 0.2-0.6 g/kg fuel for the T701C. Slightly higher NOx and lower CO emissions were observed for the T701C compared with the T700. Operation of the T701C with the Fischer-Tropsch fuel rendered dramatic reductions in soot emissions relative to operation on JP-8, due primarily to the lack of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuel. The Fischer-Tropsch fuel also produced smaller particles and slight reductions in CO emissions.

Corporan, E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; DeWitt, M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Klingshirn, Christopher D [ORNL; Striebich, Richard [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Operation of an aircraft engine using liquefied methane fuel  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a reciprocating aircraft engine on methane fuel is demonstrated. Since storage of the methane fuel in the gaseous state would impractical for a flight fuel system, a liquid storage system was used. System valving was configured to deliver only liquid methane to the engine supply line. The equipment description includes photo and diagram illustrations of the liquid methane storage dewar, and photos of the methane heat exchanger, pressure regulator and air-fuel mixer. The engine test results are presented for gasoline and methane in terms of RPM, horsepower, fuel flow, specific energy consumption and standard conditions horsepower. Conclusions include the finding that conversion of an aircraft reciprocating engine to operate on liquified methane is possible with very satisfactory results.

Raymer, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

VENTED FUEL ELEMENT FOR GAS-COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hollow, porous-walled fuel element filled with fissionable fuel and provided with an outlet port through its wall is described. In operation in a gas-cooled reactor, the element is connected, through its outlet port, to the vacuum side of a pump that causes a portion of the coolant gas flowing over the exterior surface of the element to be drawn through the porous walls thereof and out through the outlet port. This continuous purging gas flow sweeps away gaseous fission products as they are released by the fissioning fuel. (AEC) A fuel element for a nuclear reactor incorporating a body of metal of melting point lower than the temperature of operation of the reactor and a nuclear fuel in finely divided form dispersed in the body of metal as a settled slurry is presented. (AEC)

Furgerson, W.T.

1963-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Evaluation of unthrottled combustion system options for light duty applications with future syncrude derived fuels. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental program examining the interaction between several fuel and light duty automotive engine combinations is detailed. Combustion systems addressed covered indirect and direct injection diesel and spark ignited stratified charge. Fuels primarily covered D2, naphtha and intermediate broadcut blends. Low ignition quality diesel fuels were also evaluated. The results indicate the baseline fuel tolerance of each combustion system and enable characteristics of the systems to be compared. Performance, gaseous and particulate emissions aspects were assessed. The data obtained assists in the selection of candidate combustion systems for potential future fuels. Performance and environmental penalties as appropriate are highlighted relative to the individual candidates. Areas of further work for increased understanding are also reviewed.

Needham, J. R.; Cooper, B. M.; Norris-Jones, S. R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fuel elements of thermionic converters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on thermionic nuclear power systems has been performed in Russia within the framework of the TOPAZ reactor program since the early 1960s. In the TOPAZ in-core thermionic convertor reactor design, the fuel element`s cladding is also the thermionic convertor`s emitter. Deformation of the emitter can lead to short-circuiting and is the primary cause of premature TRC failure. Such deformation can be the result of fuel swelling, thermocycling, or increased unilateral pressure on the emitter due to the release of gaseous fission products. Much of the work on TRCs has concentrated on preventing or mitigating emitter deformation by improving the following materials and structures: nuclear fuel; emitter materials; electrical insulators; moderator and reflector materials; and gas-exhaust device. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques that accurately mimic operational conditions and toward the creation of analytical and numerical models that allow operational conditions and behavior to be predicted without the expense and time demands of in-pile tests. New and modified materials and structures for the cores of thermionic NPSs and new fabrication processes for the materials have ensured the possibility of creating thermionic NPSs for a wide range of powers, from tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, with life spans of 5 to 10 years.

Hunter, R.L. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Systems Assessment Dept.; Gontar, A.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.; Schulepov, L.N. [RI SIA Lutch, Podolsk (Russian Federation)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science ┬╗ Materials Science ┬╗ Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Experimental Physical Sciences Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

319

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of $175 per kW, and demonstrating lifetime performance degradation of less than 0.2 percent per

320

Novel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Energy Materials. Presentation Title, Novel Fuel. Author(s), Naum Gosin, Igorá...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for vehicles and electronic devices.

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicles Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on AddThis.com... Fuel Prices As gasoline prices increase, alternative fuels appeal more to vehicle fleet managers and consumers. Like gasoline, alternative fuel prices can fluctuate based on location, time of year, and political climate. Alternative Fuel Price Report

323

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel License Any person acting as an alternative fuels dealer must hold a valid alternative fuel license and certificate from the Wisconsin Department of Administration. Except for alternative fuels that a dealer delivers into a

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel License Alternative fuel providers, bulk users, and retailers, or any person who fuels an alternative fuel vehicle from a private source that does not pay

325

Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium  

SciTech Connect

The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000/sup 0/C (1200 to 1832/sup 0/F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 450 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment A; 200 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 100 ..mu..atm CO, 20 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/, 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O and 5 ..mu..atm CO/sub 2/ for Environment B; 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and < 0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment C; and 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 1.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys.

Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 ▒ 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 ▒ 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 + 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 + 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fuel subassembly leak test chamber for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container with a valve at one end is inserted into a nuclear reactor coolant pool. Once in the pool, the valve is opened by a mechanical linkage. An individual fuel subassembly is lifted into the container by a gripper; the valve is then closed providing an isolated chamber for the subassembly. A vacuum is drawn on the chamber to encourage gaseous fission product leakage through any defects in the cladding of the fuel rods comprising the subassembly; this leakage may be detected by instrumentation, and the need for replacement of the assembly ascertained.

Divona, Charles J. (Santa Ana, CA)

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

329

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Novel carbon-ion fuel cells. Quarterly technical report No. 10, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research to develop an entirely new, fundamentally different class of fuel cell using a solid electrolyte that transports carbon ions. This fuel cell would use solid carbon dissolved in molten metal as a fuel reservoir and anode; expensive gaseous or liquid fuel would not be required. A high temperature fuel cell based on a carbon ion membrane/electrolyte would operate in a way like yttria-doped zirconia solid oxide fuel cells; however, the fuel cell would transport the C ion from a fuel source to O{sub 2} in the atmosphere. Such fuel cells, operating above 1000 C, would produce an exhaust gas that could be fed directly into existing boilers, and could thus act as ``topping cycles`` to existing power plant steam cycles.

Cocks, F.H.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Fuel Electricity Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Electricity Fuel Basics Photo of a plug-in hybrid vehicle fueling. Electricity is considered an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act

332

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The following fuels are defined as alternative fuels by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992: pure methanol, ethanol, and other alcohols; blends of

333

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax A state excise tax is imposed on the use of alternative fuels. Alternative fuels include liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane), compressed natural gas (CNG), and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The current tax rates are as

334

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard RFS Volumes by Year Enlarge illustration The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is a federal program that requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum volume of

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Excise taxes on alternative fuels are imposed on a gasoline gallon equivalent basis. The tax rate for each alternative fuel type is based on the number of motor vehicles licensed in the state that use the specific

336

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Loans Fuel Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Loans The Oregon Department of Energy administers the State Energy Loan Program (SELP) which offers low-interest loans for qualified projects. Eligible alternative fuel projects include fuel production facilities, dedicated

337

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative fuels are subject to an excise tax at a rate of $0.205 per gasoline gallon equivalent, with a variable component equal to at least 5% of the average wholesale price of the fuel. (Reference Senate Bill 454,

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax The excise tax imposed on an alternative fuel distributed in New Mexico is $0.12 per gallon. Alternative fuels subject to the excise tax include liquefied petroleum gas (or propane), compressed natural gas, and liquefied

339

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The Minnesota Department of Revenue imposes an excise tax on the first licensed distributor that receives E85 fuel products in the state and on distributors, special fuel dealers, or bulk purchasers of other alternative

340

esp-sc99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluating System Effectiveness in High Performance Computing Systems Evaluating System Effectiveness in High Performance Computing Systems Adrian T. Wong, Le onid Oliker, William T. C. Kramer, Teresa L. Kaltz and David H. Bailey LBNL Technical Report #44542 DRAFT Date: Nov. 11, 1999 Abstract High performance scientific computer systems traditionally have been compared using individual job performance metrics. However, such metrics tend to ignore high- level system issues, such as how effectively a system can schedule and manage a varied workload, how rapidly the system can launch jobs, and how quickly it can recover from a scheduled or unscheduled system outage. Yet high- level issues such as these are now among the most important factors in the overall ef- fective performance of a system. This article discusses these issues in some detail and then de-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Knight_ESP_PI.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with highest proton conductance; largest effect on productivity. * Water wire, 10-13 molecules, many of which are x-ray resolved. * e-H+ transport driven by heme redox states...

342

ESP: A system utilization benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available T3E and SP systems at NERSC differ considerably insoftware. The Cray T3E at NERSC has recently demonstratedhours on 512 CPUs of the NERSC T3E. This time length was a

Wong, Adrian T.; Oliker, Leonid; Kramer, William T.C.; Kaltz, Teresa L.; Bailey, David H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Assessment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Assessment The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) prepared a report, Opportunities for DOD Use of Alternative and Renewable Fuels, on the use and potential use of

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Blends Production & Distribution Specifications Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be

346

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard At least 2% of all diesel fuel sold in Washington must be biodiesel or renewable diesel. This requirement will increase to 5% 180 days after the

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Fuel Use to Biodiesel Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT) may purchase biodiesel for use in IDOT vehicles through the biodiesel fuel revolving fund created in the state treasury. The fund consists of money received from the sale of Energy

348

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Special fuels, including biodiesel, biodiesel blends, biomass-based diesel, biomass-based diesel blends, and liquefied natural gas, have a reduced tax rate of $0.27 per gallon. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) and

349

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Special Fuel Tax to Special Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Special Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, certain special fuels sold or used to propel motor vehicles are subject to a license tax. Liquefied natural gas is subject to a tax of $0.16 per diesel gallon equivalent. Compressed natural

350

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics to Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials collectively

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use to Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The South Dakota Department of Transportation and employees using state diesel vehicles must stock and use fuel blends containing a minimum of 2% biodiesel (B2) that meets or exceeds the most current ASTM specification

352

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen Fuel Specifications to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Fuel Specifications The California Department of Food and Agriculture, Division of Measurement Standards (DMS) established interim specifications for hydrogen fuels for

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Flexible Fuel Vehicles Photo of a flexible fuel vehicle.

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Use All state employees operating flexible fuel or diesel vehicles as part of the state fleet must use E85 or biodiesel blends whenever reasonably available. Additionally, the Nebraska Transportation Services Bureau and

355

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative fuels used to propel vehicles of any kind on public highways are taxed at a rate determined on a gasoline gallon equivalent basis. The tax rates are posted in the Pennsylvania Bulletin. (Reference Title 75

356

Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

Shang, Jer Y. (McLean, VA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 BEFORE THE OHIO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY In the Matter Of: United States Department of Energy : Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant : Findings and Orders P.O. Box 700 : Piketon, Ohio 45661-0700 : Respondent It is hereby agreed by and among the parties hereto as follows: Table of Contents I. Jurisdiction II. Parties Bound III. Definitions IV. Findings of Fact V. Orders VI. Limitations of Director's Approval VII. Notice VIII. Project Managers IX. Dispute Resolution X. Funding XI. Other Applicable Laws XII. Reservation of Rights XIII. Modification XIV. Termination XV. Other Claims XVI. Signatories XVII. Waiver I. Jurisdiction These Director's Final Findings and Orders ("Orders") are issued to the United States

358

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simulation of VUV electroluminescence in micropattern gaseous detectors: the case of GEM and MHSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electroluminescence produced during avalanche development in gaseous avalanche detectors is an useful information for triggering, calorimetry and tracking in gaseous detectors. Noble gases present high electroluminescence yields, emitting mainly in the VUV region. The photons can provide signal readout if appropriate photosensors are used. Micropattern gaseous detectors are good candidates for signal amplification in high background and/or low rate experiments due to their high electroluminescence yields and radiopurity. In this work, the VUV light responses of the Gas Electron Multiplier and of the Micro-Hole Strip Plate, working with pure xenon, are simulated and studied in detail using a new and versatile C++ toolkit. It is shown that the solid angle subtended by a photosensor placed below the microstructures depends on the operating conditions. The obtained absolute EL yields, determined for different gas pressures and as functions of the applied voltage, are compared with those determined experimentally.

C. A. B. Oliveira; P. M. M. Correia; H. Schindler; A. L. Ferreira; C. M. B. Monteiro; J. M. F. dos Santos; S. Biagi; R. Veenhof; J. F. C. A. Veloso

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

Quasi-monoenergetic protons accelerated by laser radiation pressure and shocks in thin gaseous targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated effective CO{sub 2} laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons from thick gaseous hydrogen target (of thickness tens of laser wavelengths) via hole boring and shock accelerations. We present here an alternative novel acceleration scheme by combining laser radiation pressure acceleration with shock acceleration of protons in a thin gaseous target of thickness several laser wavelengths. The laser pushes the thin gaseous plasma forward while compressing it with protons trapped in it. We demonstrated the combined acceleration with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and obtained quasi-monoenergetic protons {approx}44 MeV in a gas target of thickness twice of the laser wavelength irradiated by circularly polarized CO{sub 2} laser with normalized laser amplitude a{sub 0}=10.

He Minqing; Shao Xi; Liu Chuansheng; Liu Tungchang; Su Jaojang; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z. [East-West Space Science Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Sheng Zhengming [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: K-25 Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Bruce Lawson 133 Raleigh Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Local Medical Clinics: ParkMed 110 S. Illinois Avenue Oak Ridge, TN 37380 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge,

362

IMPACT OF FISSION PRODUCTS IMPURITY ON THE PLUTONIUM CONTENT IN PWR MOX FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a neutronics analysis done in response to the charter IFCA-SAT-2 entitled 'Fuel impurity physics calculations'. This charter specifies that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies (UOX SNF) is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate PWR MOX fuel assemblies. Only non-gaseous FP have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1). This mixture of Pu and FP is called PuFP. Note that, in this preliminary analysis, the FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

Gilles Youinou; Andrea Alfonsi

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Type Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Development Program The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation provides funding for alternative fueling infrastructure...

364

Fuel Chemistry Preprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the following symposia titles: advances in fuel cell research; biorefineries - renewable fuels and chemicals; chemistry of fuels and emerging fuel technologies; fuel processing for hydrogen production; membranes for energy and fuel applications; new progress in C1 chemistry; research challenges for the hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage; SciMix fuel chemistry; and ultraclean transportation fuels.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

Bean, R.W.

1963-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Possible Anisotropy in Blackbody Radiation Viewed through Non-uniform Gaseous Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-local gauge symmetry of a complex scalar field, which can be trivially extended to spinor fields, was demonstrated in a recent paper (Mod.Phys.Lett. A13, 1265 (1998) ; hep-th/9902020). The corresponding covariant Lagrangian density yielded a new, non-local Quantum Electrodynamics. In this letter we show that as a consequence of this new QED, a blackbody radiation viewed through gaseous matter appears to show a slight deviation from the Planck formula, and propose an experimental test to check this effect. We also show that a non-uniformity in this gaseous matter distribution leads to an (apparent) spatial anisotropy in the blackbody radiation.

T K Rai Dastidar

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

Technology and market assessment of gas-fueled vehicles in New York State. Volume III. Institutional barriers and market assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III deals primarily with the institutional barriers and market forces affecting the potential conversion of vehicles in New York State (NYS) to gaseous fuels. The results of a market research survey are presented along wth the current supply conditions for fuels in NYS. The indigenous resources of gaseous fuels in NYS are identified and quantified. The potential number of vehicles in NYS that are favorable candidates for conversion are estimated, and the effect of these potential gaseous-fueled vehicles on NYS gaseous fuels supplies is presented. The market research survey found that fleet managers appear to be more aware of the specifics of LPG vehicles relative to CNG vehicles. In those fleets with some LPG or CNG vehicles, a tentativeness to further conversion was detected. Many fleet managers are deferring conversion plans due to uncertain conversion costs and future fuel prices. The need for fleet manager education about gaseous fuel vehicle (GFV) operation and economics was identified. NYS currently has an excess supply of natural gas and could support a significant GFV population. However, the pipeline system serving NYS may not be able to serve a growing GFV population without curtailment in the future if natural gas demands in other sectors increase. LPG supply in NYS is dependent primarily on how much LPG can be imported into NYS. A widespread distribution system (pipeline and truck transport) exists in NYS and could likely support a signficant LPG vehicle population. It is estimated that about 35% of the passenger cars and 43% of the trucks in NYS are potential candidates for conversion to CNG. For LPG, about 36% and 46% of passenger cars and trucks are potential candidates. Applying a gross economic screen results in an estimated potential liquid fuel displacement of 1.3 billion gallons in 1990. 20 figs., 63 tabs.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate All gasoline sold in the state must be blended with 10% ethanol (E10). Gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or above is exempt from this mandate,

370

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Promotion Recognizing that biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel will be an important part of the state's energy economy and advanced research in

371

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Quality Standards Fuel Quality Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Quality Standards The South Dakota Department of Public Safety may promulgate rules establishing: Standards for the maximum volume percentages of ethanol and methanol

372

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate One year after in-state production has reached 350 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol and sustained this volume for three months, all gasoline

373

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Alternative Fuels Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Promotion The state of Hawaii has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Energy to collaborate to produce 70% of the state's

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The excise tax imposed on compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) used to operate a vehicle can be paid through an annual flat rate sticker tax based on the

375

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Promotion The Texas Bioenergy Policy Council and the Texas Bioenergy Research Committee were established to promote the goal of making biofuels a

376

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard Within six months following the point at which monthly production of denatured ethanol produced in Louisiana equals or exceeds a minimum annualized production volume of 50 million gallons, at least 2% of the

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The state road tax for vehicles that operate on propane (liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG) or natural gas is paid through the purchase of an annual flat fee sticker, and the amount is based on the vehicle's gross

378

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Stations to someone by E-mail Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Fueling Stations Photo of a liquefied petroleum gas fueling station. Thousands of liquefied petroleum gas (propane) fueling stations are

379

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Study Alternative Fuel Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Study As directed by the Nevada Legislature, the Legislative Commission (Commission) conducted an interim study in 2011 concerning the production and use of energy in the state. The study included information on the use

380

Hydrogen Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fuel Economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selling your car? Advertise its fuel economy with our Used Car Label tool. Download a label for on-line ads. Print a label to attach to your car. Did you know? You can purchase...

382

Fuels - Biodiesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Biodiesel * Biodiesel * Butanol * Ethanol * Hydrogen * Natural Gas * Fischer-Tropsch Batteries Cross-Cutting Assessments Engines GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Clean Diesel Fuels Background Reducing our country's dependence on foreign oil and the rising costs of crude oil are primary reasons for a renewed interest in alternative fuels for the transportation sector. Stringent emissions regulations and public concern about mobile sources of air pollution provide additional incentives to develop fuels that generate fewer emissions, potentially reducing the need for sophisticated, expensive exhaust after-treatment devices.

383

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Definition to someone by E-mail Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition Alternative fuel is defined as compressed natural gas, propane, ethanol, or any mixture containing 85% or more ethanol (E85) with gasoline or other

384

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen in a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

Method of absorbing UF.sub.6 from gaseous mixtures in alkamine absorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures employing as an absorbent a liquid composition at least one of the components of which is chosen from the group consisting of ethanolamine, diethanolamine, and 3-methyl-3-amino-propane-diol-1,2.

Lafferty, Robert H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smiley, Seymour H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Radimer, Kenneth J. (Little Falls, NJ)

1976-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Catalytic Cracking of Gaseous Heavy Hydrocarbons by Ceramic Filters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of syngas from waste or biomass gasification to generate electricity is a way which is attracting increasing attention especially with regard to the demands of regenerable energy consumption and to the reduction of waste disposal. In order to feed the syngas to a gas motor or a gas turbine the gas has to be cleaned. In future also the coupling of biomass gasification with a fuel cell will be applied, which needs a very efficient gas cleaning. The decomposition of tars and the removal of particles from the gas are the key issues of gas cleaning. Up to now these two steps are performed in two separate units. Normally, the tars are decomposed in catalytic beds or honeycomb structures. The catalytic decomposition is achieved at temperatures between 750 C and 900 C depending on the catalyst used. Particles are removed by filtration of the hot gas. Filtration at high temperatures and with high efficiencies is possible when using ceramic filter elements. Ceramic hot gas filters are well established in advanced coal gasification, such as the integrated gasification combined cycle process, as well as in waste and biomass gasification and pyrolysis processes. Since the catalytic reaction requires high temperatures the gas has to be reheated after the particles are removed in the filter or the hot unfiltered gas has to flow through the catalytic unit. If the gas is filtered first, reheating of the gas stream is an additional cost factor. Furthermore, pipes downstream of the filter can be plugged, if the temperature of the gas falls below the condensation temperature of the heavy hydrocarbons. Using the second way of hot unfiltered gas flows through the catalytic unit, there is the problem of deactivation of the catalyst by deposition of dust at higher dust concentrations. At worst the catalytic unit can be plugged by dust deposition.

Heidenreich, S.; Nacken, M.; Walch, A.; Chudzinski, S.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The carbonate fuel cell promises highly efficient, cost-effective and environmentally superior power generation from pipeline natural gas, coal gas, biogas, and other gaseous and liquid fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has been engaged in the development of this unique technology, focusing on the development of the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{reg_sign}). The DFC{reg_sign} design incorporates the unique internal reforming feature which allows utilization of a hydrocarbon fuel directly in the fuel cell without requiring any external reforming reactor and associated heat exchange equipment. This approach upgrades waste heat to chemical energy and thereby contributes to a higher overall conversion efficiency of fuel energy to electricity with low levels of environmental emissions. Among the internal reforming options, FuelCell Energy has selected the Indirect Internal Reforming (IIR)--Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) combination as its baseline design. The IIR-DIR combination allows reforming control (and thus cooling) over the entire cell area. This results in uniform cell temperature. In the IIR-DIR stack, a reforming unit (RU) is placed in between a group of fuel cells. The hydrocarbon fuel is first fed into the RU where it is reformed partially to hydrogen and carbon monoxide fuel using heat produced by the fuel cell electrochemical reactions. The reformed gases are then fed to the DIR chamber, where the residual fuel is reformed simultaneously with the electrochemical fuel cell reactions. FuelCell Energy plans to offer commercial DFC power plants in various sizes, focusing on the subMW as well as the MW-scale units. The plan is to offer standardized, packaged DFC power plants operating on natural gas or other hydrocarbon-containing fuels for commercial sale. The power plant design will include a diesel fuel processing option to allow dual fuel applications. These power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed power generation, industrial cogeneration, marine applications and uninterrupted power for military bases. FuelCell Energy operated a 1.8 MW plant at a utility site in 1996-97, the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in North America. This proof-of-concept power plant demonstrated high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power control, and unattended operation capabilities. Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the full-size power plant; FuelCell Energy launched the Product Design Improvement (PDI) program sponsored by government and the private-sector cost-share. The PDI efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program was initiated in December 1994. Year 2000 program accomplishments are discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured and initial investigations at low DME blend ratios (around 5-10 vol%) will begin shortly. They have also performed viscosity measurements on diesel fuel, DME and 50-50 blends of DME in diesel. These tests have verified that DME has a much lower viscosity than the diesel fuel and that the viscosity of the blended fuel is also much lower than the diesel base fuel. This has implications for the injection and atomization of the DME/diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE-MINUTE SOLAR OSCILLATIONS IN THE CORONA USING THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROPHOTOMETER (ESP) ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT (SDO/EVE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the detection of oscillations in the corona in the frequency range corresponding to five-minute acoustic modes of the Sun. The oscillations have been observed using soft X-ray measurements from the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (ESP) of the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The ESP zeroth-order channel observes the Sun as a star without spatial resolution in the wavelength range of 0.1-7.0 nm (the energy range is 0.18-12.4 keV). The amplitude spectrum of the oscillations calculated from six-day time series shows a significant increase in the frequency range of 2-4 mHz. We interpret this increase as a response of the corona to solar acoustic (p) modes and attempt to identify p-mode frequencies among the strongest peaks. Due to strong variability of the amplitudes and frequencies of the five-minute oscillations in the corona, we study how the spectrum from two adjacent six-day time series combined together affects the number of peaks associated with the p-mode frequencies and their amplitudes. This study shows that five-minute oscillations of the Sun can be observed in the corona in variations of the soft X-ray emission. Further investigations of these oscillations may improve our understanding of the interaction of the oscillation modes with the solar atmosphere, and the interior-corona coupling, in general.

Didkovsky, L.; Judge, D.; Wieman, S. [Space Sciences Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Kosovichev, A. G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Woods, T., E-mail: leonid@usc.edu [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle  

SciTech Connect

In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

1961-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Fuel Cells Photo of...

395

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen...

396

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuelcomparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel121, 2011. C. Fischer. Renewable Portfolio Standards: When

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

398

Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Apparatus and method for burning a lean, premixed fuel/air mixture with low NOx emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enabling a burner to stably burn a lean fuel/air mixture. The burner directs the lean fuel/air mixture in a stream. The apparatus comprises an annular flame stabilizer; and a device for mounting the flame stabilizer in the fuel/air mixture stream. The burner may include a body having an internal bore, in which case, the annular flame stabilizer is shaped to conform to the cross-sectional shape of the bore, is spaced from the bore by a distance greater than about 0.5 mm, and the mounting device mounts the flame stabilizer in the bore. An apparatus for burning a gaseous fuel with low NOx emissions comprises a device for premixing air with the fuel to provide a lean fuel/air mixture; a nozzle having an internal bore through which the lean fuel/air mixture passes in a stream; and a flame stabilizer mounted in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture. The flame stabilizer may be mounted in the internal bore, in which case, it is shaped and is spaced from the bore as just described. In a method of burning a lean fuel/air mixture, a lean fuel/air mixture is provided, and is directed in a stream; an annular eddy is created in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture; and the lean fuel/air mixture is ignited at the eddy.

Kostiuk, Larry W. (Edmonton, CA); Cheng, Robert K. (Kensington, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Tribological behavior of near-frictionless carbon coatings in high- and low-sulfur diesel fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur content in diesel fuel has a significant effect on diesel engine emissions, which are currently subject to environmental regulations. It has been observed that engine particulate and gaseous emissions are directly proportional to fuel sulfur content. With the introduction of low-sulfur fuels, significant reductions in emissions are expected. The process of sulfur reduction in petroleum-based diesel fuels also reduces the lubricity of the fuel, resulting in premature failure of fuel injectors. Thus, another means of preventing injector failures is needed for engines operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels. In this study, the authors evaluated a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating (developed at Argonne National Laboratory) as a possible solution to the problems associated with fuel injector failures in low-lubricity fuels. Tribological tests were conducted with NFC-coated and uncoated H13 and 52100 steels lubricated with high- and low- sulfur diesel fuels in a high-frequency reciprocating test machine. The test results showed that the NFC coatings reduced wear rates by a factor of 10 over those of uncoated steel surfaces. In low-sulfur diesel fuel, the reduction in wear rate was even greater (i.e., by a factor of 12 compared to that of uncoated test pairs), indicating that the NFC coating holds promise as a potential solution to wear problems associated with the use of low-lubricity diesel fuels.

Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Ozturk, O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel from a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products, removing at least some coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. The process provides a useful method of mass producing these products from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands. 1 fig.

Shang, Jer Yu.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Refinery byproduct emerges as a viable powerplant fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, the solid residue left after all valuable liquid and gaseous components have been extracted from crude oil, is the major byproduct from the petroleum refining industry. In the past few years, pet coke has become an attractive fuel for utility, independent power, and industrial cogeneration applications. Reasons: (1) trends in the petroleum refining industry and elsewhere have increases the supply, significantly decreasing the price; (2) recent technological advances permit the clean and efficient combustion of coke; and (3) coke has been classified as a waste fuel by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), which means independent power producers (IPPs) burning coke do not require a steam host. This article is an in-depth analysis of where coke comes from, what factors influence its supply and demand, and how to successfully utilize it as a powerplant fuel.

Rossi, R.A. (Combustion Power Co., Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Novel carbon-ion fuel cells. Quarterly technical report No. 9, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research to develop an entirely new, fundamentally different class of fuel cell using a solid electrolyte that transports carbon ions. This fuel cell would use solid carbon dissolved in molten metal as a fuel reservoir and anode; expensive gaseous or liquid fuel would not be required. Thermodynamic factors favor a carbon-ion fuel cell over other fuel cell designs: a combination of enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy makes the reaction of solid carbon and oxygen very efficient, and the entropy change allows this efficiency to slightly increase at high temperatures. The high temperature exhaust of the fuel cell would make it useful as a ``topping cycle``, to be followed by conventional steam turbine systems.

Cocks, F.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

405

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

406

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels. Fuel cells have the potential to replace the internal-combustion engine in...

407

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell ...  

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell Power Industry (ANL-IN-00-030) Argonne National Laboratory. Contact ANL About This ...

408

DIESEL FUEL TANK FOUNDATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Diesel Fuel Tank and Fuel Pumps.

M. Gomez

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition,  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Digg

410

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering database, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical database will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical database to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the field test. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Up to 25 additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology will be provided during field testing. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the field test. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Up to 25 additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fuel Flexible Turbine System (FFTS) Program  

SciTech Connect

In this fuel flexible turbine system (FFTS) program, the Parker gasification system was further optimized, fuel composition of biomass gasification process was characterized and the feasibility of running Capstone MicroTurbine(TM) systems with gasification syngas fuels was evaluated. With high hydrogen content, the gaseous fuel from a gasification process of various feed stocks such as switchgrass and corn stover has high reactivity and high flashback propensity when running in the current lean premixed injectors. The research concluded that the existing C65 microturbine combustion system, which is designed for natural gas, is not able to burn the high hydrogen content syngas due to insufficient resistance to flashback (undesired flame propagation to upstream within the fuel injector). A comprehensive literature review was conducted on high-hydrogen fuel combustion and its main issues. For Capstone?s lean premixed injector, the main mechanisms of flashback were identified to be boundary layer flashback and bulk flow flashback. Since the existing microturbine combustion system is not able to operate on high-hydrogen syngas fuels, new hardware needed to be developed. The new hardware developed and tested included (1) a series of injectors with a reduced propensity for boundary layer flashback and (2) two new combustion liner designs (Combustion Liner Design A and B) that lead to desired primary zone air flow split to meet the overall bulk velocity requirement to mitigate the risk of core flashback inside the injectors. The new injector designs were evaluated in both test apparatus and C65/C200 engines. While some of the new injector designs did not provide satisfactory performance in burning target syngas fuels, particularly in improving resistance to flashback. The combustion system configuration of FFTS-4 injector and Combustion Liner Design A was found promising to enable the C65 microturbine system to run on high hydrogen biomass syngas. The FFTS-4 injector was tested in a C65 engine operating on 100% hydrogen and with the redesigned combustion liner - Combustion Liner Design A - installed. The results were promising for the FFTS program as the system was able to burn 100% hydrogen fuel without flashback while maintaining good combustion performance. While initial results have been demonstrated the feasibility of this program, further research is needed to determine whether these results will be repeated with FFTS-4 injectors installed in all injector ports and over a wide range of operating conditions and fuel variations.

None

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OH OH EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-12 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) is proposed for long-term containment of contaminated materials from the planned Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Acceptable performance of the proposed OSWDF will depend on interactions between engineered landfill features and operations methods that recognize the unique characteristics of the waste stream and site-

415

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Agreement between the Ohio EPA and DOE approving the STP and setting waste treatment milestones Parties DOE; Ohio Department of Environmental Protection Date 10/4/1995 SCOPE * Approve the Compliance Plan Volume of the amended PSTP submitted to Ohio EPA on October 2, 1995, hereafter referred to as "approved STP." * Set forth guidelines for storage and treatment of mixed wastes at the Facility which are not being stored in accordance with the LDR requirements of OAC rule 3745-59- 50. * Establish milestones and target dates for approved STP. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES

416

Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: On-Site Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-16 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility(OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is an active uranium enrichment facility that was placed on the National Priorities List. DOE is required to remediate the PGDP in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is evaluating alternatives to dispose of waste generated from the remedial activities at the PGDP. One option is to construct an on-site disposal facility (OSDF) meeting the CERCLA requirements.

417

Long-range global warming impact of gaseous diffusion plant operation  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is on the Montreal Protocol list of materials scheduled for production curtailment, a substitute must be found. In addition to physical cooling properties, the gaseous diffusion application imposes the unique requirement of chemical inertness to fluorinating agents. This has narrowed the selection of a near-term substitute to two fully fluorinated material, FC-318 and FC-3110, which are likely to be strong, long-lived greenhouse gases. In this document, calculations are presented showing, for a number of plausible scenarios of diffusion plant operation and coolant replacement strategy, the future course of coolant use, greenhouse gas emissions (including coolant and power-related indirect CO{sub 2} emissions), and the consequent global temperature impacts of these scenarios.

Trowbridge, L.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Process and system for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gaseous streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-stage UCSRP process and system for removal of sulfur from a gaseous stream in which the gaseous stream, which contains a first amount of H.sub.2S, is provided to a first stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess SO.sub.2 mode at a first amount of SO.sub.2, producing an effluent gas having a reduced amount of SO.sub.2, and in which the effluent gas is provided to a second stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess H.sub.2S mode, producing a product gas having an amount of H.sub.2S less than said first amount of H.sub.2S.

Basu, Arunabha (Aurora, IL); Meyer, Howard S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA); Leppin, Dennis (Chicago, IL); Wangerow, James R. (Medinah, IL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

D&D of the French High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the D&D program that is being implemented at France's High Enrichment Gaseous Diffusion Plant, which was designed to supply France's Military with Highly Enriched Uranium. This plant was definitively shut down in June 1996, following French President Jacques Chirac's decision to end production of Highly Enriched Uranium and dismantle the corresponding facilities.

BEHAR, Christophe; GUIBERTEAU, Philippe; DUPERRET, Bernard; TAUZIN, Claude

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Synthetic fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1982, the Department of Energy guaranteed a loan for the construction and startup of the Great Plains project. On August 1, 1985, the partnership defaulted on the $1.54 billion loan, and DOE acquired control of, and then title to, the project. DOE continued to operate the plant, through the ANG Coal Gasification Company, and sell synthetic fuel. The DOE's ownership and divestiture of the plant is discussed.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Environmental effects of the construction and operation of a gaseous diffusion plant  

SciTech Connect

The impacts upon the environment resulting from construction, stert-up, and operation of a gaseous dfffusion plant are described. Some of the impacts are typical regardless of location of the plant. Others are atypical and depend upon location; those are presented, by way of example, as they occur at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The various environmental contaminants that may be produced in the operating plant are described. The concentrations of those contaminants are stated; and the adverse biological effects of pertinent conteminants are elucidated. UF/sup 6/ may be enriched in the Portsmouth Gaseous Wffusion Plant to almost any /sup 235/U concentration desired. The environmental impact of the plant varies somewhat according to /sup 235/U concentrations. However, commercial plants are not expected to enrich /sup 235/U in concentrations greater than 4%. for this reason, environmental effects due to Portsmouth operations within that range are emphasized. The study revealed that present discharges from the plants generally have no detrimental effects upon the environment. (auth)

1973-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

424

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

425

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

High Pressure Fuel Storage Cylinders Periodic Inspection and End of Life Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6/2010 6/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 1 High Pressure Fuel Storage Cylinders Periodic Inspection and End of Life Issues DOE Vehicular Tank Workshop April 29, 2010 Douglas Horne, PE The Facts ´üČ High pressure Type 4 gaseous fuel tanks are now designed under standards that specify finite lifetimes of 15, 20 and 25 years based on specific design and testing (the HGV2 standard under development had a life as short as 10 years as an option) ´üČ It is unique within the transportation industry to have a critical device (the fuel tank) with a designated life that may be shorter than the vehicle itself ´üČ Although vehicle owners are told up front of the limited life fuel storage cylinders some tend to forget after 15 years ´üČ A parallel concern is the requirement for these fuel tanks

428

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

California Fuel Cell Partnership Alternative Fuels Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance are both important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department inventories ┬Ě Only need one week of work and fuel sales to get fuel based emissions inventories ┬Ě RSD

431

Joint Test Plan to Identify the Gaseous By-Products of CH3I Loading on AgZ  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this test plan is to describe research to determine the gaseous by-products of the adsorption of CH3I on hydrogen reduced silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ).

R. T. Jubin; N. R. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan; T. M. Nenoff; B. B. Spencer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Use of New Parameterizations for Gaseous Absorption in the CLIRAD-SW Solar Radiation Code for Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new gaseous absorption parameterizations are incorporated in the CLIRAD-SW solar radiation code for models, openly distributed for the scientific community. In the new parameterizations, the magnitude of absorption coefficients in each ...

T. A. Tarasova; B. A. Fomin

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fueling and morphology of central starbursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the mechanisms proposed to bring gaseous fuel into the central starburst regions of a galaxy, non-axisymmetries in the gravitational potential set up by interactions or by bars are among the most promising. Nevertheless, direct observational evidence for a connection between interactions and bars on the one hand, and starburst (as well as AGN) activity on the other, remains patchy. These general issues are reviewed before proceeding to discuss, within this context, massive star formation in the circumnuclear regions of spiral galaxies, in particular star-forming nuclear rings and pseudo-rings. Such rings are common, and are closely linked to the dynamics of their host galaxy, which in almost all cases is barred. The possible existence of a population of nuclear rings on scales which are too small for detection with standard ground- or even space-based techniques will be discussed.

Knapen, J H

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

435

Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review, April 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification Review April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 1

436

Non-pollutant fuel generator and fuel burner with a non-pollutant exhaust and supplementary dc generator. [for use in MHD generator, steam turbine, gas turbine, or fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

A system for generating non-polluting fuel and a burner for using such fuel to produce energy in the form of heat with a non-polluting exhaust, together with means for utilizing such exhaust to produce supplementary direct current power is disclosed. An electrolyzer is operated to produce hydrogen and oxygen in gaseous form which is then stored in suitable fuel tanks. As needed, the fuel is combined with air and supplied under pressure to a combustion chamber where the mixture is burned, producing heat and a pollution free exhaust. The heat so produced may be used as a conventional heat source to generate steam, drive a turbine, or the like, while the combustion gases are directed to a magnetohydrodynamic generator to produce an electrical current which is usable in any desired manner.

Barros, M.J.

1976-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... Fuel Properties Search Fuel Properties Comparison Create a custom chart comparing fuel properties and characteristics for multiple fuels. Select the fuel and properties of interest. Select Fuels Clear all All Fuels Gasoline Diesel (No. 2) Biodiesel Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Electricity Ethanol Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Propane (LPG)

438

Extended Durability Testing of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)  

SciTech Connect

Durability testing was performed on an external fuel processor (EFP) for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power plant. The EFP enables the SOFC to reach high system efficiency (electrical efficiency up to 60%) using pipeline natural gas and eliminates the need for large quantities of bottled gases. LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) is developing natural gas-fired SOFC power plants for stationary power applications. These power plants will greatly benefit the public by reducing the cost of electricity while reducing the amount of gaseous emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides compared to conventional power plants. The EFP uses pipeline natural gas and air to provide all the gas streams required by the SOFC power plant; specifically those needed for start-up, normal operation, and shutdown. It includes a natural gas desulfurizer, a synthesis-gas generator and a start-gas generator. The research in this project demonstrated that the EFP could meet its performance and durability targets. The data generated helped assess the impact of long-term operation on system performance and system hardware. The research also showed the negative impact of ambient weather (both hot and cold conditions) on system operation and performance.

Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula; Mark Scotto

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

439

Pyroprocess for processing spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a pyroprocess for processing spent nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel is chopped into pieces and placed in a basket which is lowered in to a liquid salt solution. The salt is rich in ZrF.sub.4 and containing alkali or alkaline earth fluorides, and in particular, the salt chosen was LiF-50 mol % ZrF.sub.4 with a eutectic melting point of 500.degree. C. Prior to lowering the basket, the salt is heated to a temperature of between 550.degree. C. and 700.degree. C. in order to obtain a molten solution. After dissolution the oxides of U, Th, rare earth and other like oxides, the salt bath solution is subject to hydro-fluorination to remove the oxygen and then to a fluorination step to remove U as gaseous UF.sub.6. In addition, after dissolution, the basket contains PuO.sub.2 and undissolved parts of the fuel rods, and the basket and its contents are processed to remove the Pu.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Lockport, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Rate Reduction...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

& Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane | Propane Vehicles Emerging Fuels Fuel Prices...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels esp gaseous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Fleet Services  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

& Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane | Propane Vehicles Emerging Fuels Fuel Prices...

442

Coal-fueled diesel engines for locomotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GE Transportation Systems (GE/TS) completed a two and one half year study into the economic viability of a coal fueled locomotive. The coal fueled diesel engine was deemed to be one of the most attractive options. Building on the BN-NS study, a proposal was submitted to DOE to continue researching economic and technical feasibility of a coal fueled diesel engine for locomotives. The contract DE-AC21-85MC22181 was awarded to GE Corporate Research and Development (GE/CRD) for a three year program that began in March 1985. This program included an economic assessment and a technical feasibility study. The economic assessment study examined seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal fueled diesels. These areas included impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The results of the study indicated the merits for development of a coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. The technical feasibility study examined the combustion of CWS through lab and bench scale experiments. The major accomplishments from this study have been the development of CWS injection hardware, the successful testing of CWS fuel in a full size, single cylinder, medium speed diesel engine, evaluation of full scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions.

Hsu, B.D.; Najewicz, D.J.; Cook, C.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Spacer Grid Structural Guide Tube End Fitting Fuel Rod Upper Tie Plate ULTRAFLOW Spacer Water Channel Part-length Fuel Rod Lower Tie Plate PWR pressurized water reactor BWR ...

444

Fuel Cell Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Links Fuel Cell Links The links below are provided as additional resources for fuel-cell-related information. Most of the linked sites are not part of, nor affiliated with, fueleconomy.gov. We do not endorse or vouch for the accuracy of the information found on such sites. Fuel Cell Vehicles and Manufacturers Chevrolet General Motors press release about the Chevrolet Fuel Cell Equinox Ford Ford overview of their hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Honda FCX Clarity official site Hyundai Hyundai press release announcing the upcoming Tucson Fuel Cell Mercedes-Benz Ener-G-Force Fuel-cell-powered concept SUV Nissan Nissan TeRRA concept SUV Toyota Overview of Toyota fuel cell technology Hydrogen- and Fuel-Cell-Related Information and Tools Fuel Cell Vehicles Brief overview of fuel cell vehicles provided by DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC)

445

Fuel Guide Economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 MODEL YEAR 2000 FUEL ECONOMY LEADERS IN POPULAR VEHICLE CLASSES Listed below are the vehicles with the highest fuel economy for the most popular classes, including both automatic and manual transmissions and gasoline and diesel vehicles. Please be aware that many of these vehicles come in a range of engine sizes and trim lines, resulting in different fuel economy values. Check the fuel economy guide or the fuel economy sticker on new vehicles to find the values for a particular version of a vehicle. CONTENTS MODEL YEAR 2000 FUEL ECONOMY LEADERS ................. 1 HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE ..................................................... 2 FUEL ECONOMY AND YOUR ANNUAL FUEL COSTS .......... 3 WHY FUEL ECONOMY IS IMPORTANT .................................

446

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...