Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Causal relationship between fossil fuel consumption and economic growth in the world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuels are major sources of energy, and have several advantages over other primary energy sources. Without extensive dependence on fossil fuels, it is questionable whether our economic prosperity can continue. This paper analyses cointegration and causality between fossil fuel consumption and economic growth in the world over the period 1971 to 2008. The estimation results indicate that fossil fuel consumption and GDP are cointegrated and there exists long-run unidirectional causality from fossil fuel consumption to GDP. This paper also investigates the nexus between non-fossil energy consumption and GDP, and shows that there is no causality between the variables. The conclusions are that reducing fossil fuel consumption may hamper economic growth, and that it is unlikely that non-fossil energy will substantially replace fossil fuels. This paper also examines causal linkages between the variables using a trivariate model, and obtains the same results as those from the bivariate model.

Hazuki Ishida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fuel Consumption and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculating fuel consumption and emissions is a typical offline analysis ... simulations or real trajectory data) and the engine speed (as obtained from gear-shift schemes ... as input and is parameterized by veh...

Martin Treiber; Arne Kesting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Coal consumption: An alternate energy resource to fuel economic growth in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study is an attempt to revisit the causal relationship between coal consumption and economic growth in case of Pakistan. The present study covers the period of 1974–2010. The direction of causality between the variables is investigated by applying the VECM Granger causality approach. Our findings have exposed that there exists bidirectional Granger causality between economic growth and coal consumption. The Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) and Cumulative Sum of Square (CUSUMSQ) diagrams have not found any structural instability over the period of 1974–2010.

Saqlain Latif Satti; Muhammad Shahid Hassan; Haider Mahmood; Muhammad Shahbaz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict Fuel Consumption The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict Fuel Consumption Poster presented at the...

5

Fuel Consumption | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Road Load Equation Jan 15 2014 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Glen E. Johnson Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville Energy and Transportation Science Division Seminar National Transportation Research Center, Room C-04 CONTACT : Email: Andreas Malikopoulos Phone:865.382.7827 Add to Calendar SHARE Ambitious goals have been set to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over the next generation. Starting from first principles, we will derive relations to connect fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions to a vehicle's road load equation. The model suggests approaches to facilitate achievement of future fuel and emissions targets. About the speaker: Dr. Johnson is a 1973 Mechanical Engineering graduate of Worcester

6

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

7

Fuel consumption model for FREFLO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

above, Biggs and Akcelik (1985) proposed a model of the following form: f = fsito + &Pr + z[apr)o o (5) where, Po = total drag power P, = inertia power a = instantaneous acceleration 8, = fuel consumption per unit power 8, = fuel consumption per... that is additional to S, P, . This component is expressed as SzaP, , where &z is considered to be a secondary efficiency parameter that relates fuel to the product of inertia power and acceleration rate, for positive accelerations. This term allows for the effects...

Rao, Kethireddipalli Srinivas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reduction of fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Replacing standard oil pumps with bypass control by regulated oil pumps with variable oil pressure which adapt their variable oil pumping quantity to the engine oil pressure requirements promises reductions in fuel

Dieter Voigt

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

10

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

11

Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring fuel quality on electronically fuel injected engines. Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring...

12

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

13

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

14

Fuel Consumption per Vehicle.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 729 NA 618 628 652 681 Table 9. Fuel Consumption per Vehicle, Selected Survey Years (Gallons) Survey Years Page A-1 of A-5 1983 1985...

15

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

16

Fuel Consumption Monitoring and Diesel Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a perspective to explore how fuel monitoring and diesel engine life are interconnected, it’s necessary to ... touch several issues such as specifics of diesel engines in fuel consumption, the effects of precis...

Anna Antimiichuk

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Two case studies for commercial vehicle...

18

Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combinatio...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors Fact 705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors The National Highway...

19

Fact #706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

6: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Fact 706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards The National Highway Traffic Safety...

20

Impact of Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different Powertrain, Component Sizes and Control Impact of Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different Powertrain,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hydraulic HEV Fuel Consumption Potential | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Consumption Potential Hydraulic HEV Fuel Consumption Potential 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

22

Current Demands on Fuel Consumption Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The general focus on the reduction of greenhouse gases, specifically of CO2..., is also increasingly drawing the attention of engine developers back to the priority of lowering fuel consumption. Fundamental to th...

Karl Köck; Romain Lardet; Rainer Schantl

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

24

Table E7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit:...

25

"Table A2. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected" " Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in...

26

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy...

27

The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

Napier, Parhys L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

29

Colorado Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

30

Fact #704: December 5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for New...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4: December 5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for New Heavy Pickups and Vans Fact 704: December 5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for New Heavy Pickups and Vans In September...

31

HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY CONDITIONS HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING...

32

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steady state engine fuel consumption and emission maps.affecting engine load and consequently fuel consumption. Theand engine speed which it then relates to fuel consumption

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the diesel engines fuel consumption and emissions doEmissions and Fuel Consumption Model engine manufacturersEmissions and Fuel Consumption Model Connection to engine

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Fuel Consumption Modeling Based on Road Load and Power Train Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Injection Diesel Engine Fuel Consumption”, SAE 971142, 11.engine load, engine speed, and fuel consumption. The tirevehicle speed, engine speed, fuel consumption, engine load,

Giannelli, R; Nam, E K; Helmer, K; Younglove, T; Scora, G; Barth, M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Table 6.2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

36

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

37

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

38

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

State Plan to Reduce State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption

39

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5: August 9, 5: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on

40

Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

session part 1- poster nP-03 10PFT047 - NIRIS - DEER elevator 1 2 Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring fuel quality on electronically fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fuel Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI Gasoline Engine Equipped with a Lean-NOx Trap Fuel Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI Gasoline...

42

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Focus Area: Fuel Efficiency Topics: Market Analysis Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuelratings/ratings-search.cfm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadas-fuel-consumption-guide-websit Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This website provides a compilation of fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices

43

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5: December 12, 5: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705:

44

Reducing fishing vessel fuel consumption and NOX emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a growing concern with the impact of marine operations on the environment. This requires reducing fuel consumption and vessel pollution during operation. On-board computers and satellite communications will enable the operator to reduce fuel consumption and NOX emissions during vessel operations. This paper presents the results of a study on this problem and how such an on-board system could be implemented to reduce fuel consumption and engine NOX emissions.

Robert Latorre

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fact #706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently published final fuel consumption standards for heavy vehicles called "vocational" vehicles. A vocational vehicle is generally a single...

46

,"New York Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release...

47

,"New York Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1031...

48

Farm Motorization, Consumption and Prices of Motor Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Development of Farm Motorization and Consumption and Prices of Motor ... of Motor Fuels in Member Countries is the title of a publication recently issued by the Organization for ...

1963-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

49

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

50

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

51

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

52

Hydrogen Consumption Measurement Research Platform for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen consumption measurement research platform is designed for fuel economy test of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicle (PEM FCV). Hardware is constructed with industrial PC (IPC), field bus data acquisition module and device control module. ... Keywords: Hydrogen Consumption Measuremen, LabVIEW, Data Acquisition

Fang Maodong; Chen Mingjie; Lu Qingchun; Jin Zhenhua

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Coal consumption and economic growth in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to re-examine the relationship between coal consumption and real GDP of China with the use of panel data. This paper applies modern panel data techniques to help shed light on the importance of the heterogeneity among different regions within China. Empirical analyses are conducted for the full panel as well as three subgroups of the panel. The empirical results show that coal consumption and GDP are both I(1) and cointegrated in all regional groupings. Heterogeneity is found in the GDP equation of the full panel. The regional causality tests reveal that the coal consumption–GDP relationship is bidirectional in the Coastal and Central regions whereas causality is unidirectional from GDP to coal consumption in the Western region. Thus, energy conservation measures will not adversely affect the economic growth of the Western region but such measures will likely encumber the economy of the Coastal and Central regions, where most of the coal intensive industries are concentrated.

Raymond Li; Guy C.K. Leung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

56

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

57

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

58

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

59

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

60

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fact that the diesel engines fuel consumption and emissionsDiesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model Connection to engineDiesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model unit; 5) engine-

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Growth of Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources

63

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential density on vehicle usage and energy consumption.of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumptionresidential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption*

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus Preprint Robb Barnitt and Jeff Gonder To be presented at the SAE 2011 World Congress...

65

Fuel consumption and emissions of hybrid diesel applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GM Powertrain Europe and the Politecnico di Torino have experimentally assessed the potentialities in terms of fuel consumption reduction and the challenges in terms of ... 1.9 l four-cylinder in-line diesel engine

Prof.-Dr. Andrea Emilio Catania; Prof.-Dr. Ezio Spessa…

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

,"New York Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:26:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570SNY2"...

67

Multiscale Impact of Fuel Consumption on Air Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiscale Impact of Fuel Consumption on Air Quality ... A key element in the technical approaches is the application of air quality and exposure modeling using spatially nested descriptions of atmospheric phenomena. ...

G. M. Hidy

2002-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

68

The relationship between economic growth and biomass energy consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the relationship analysis between biomass energy consumption and economic growth by using Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach of cointegration and vector error-correction models. The cointegration test results show that there is cointegration between the biomasss energy consumption and the economic growth in five of the seven countries (Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia and Guatemala) and there is no cointegration between the biomasss energy consumption and the economic growth in two of the seven countries (Argentina and Jamaica).

Melike E. Bildirici

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electricity consumption and economic growth empirical evidence from Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article uses the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds testing procedure to identify the long run equilibrium relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth. Toda Yamamoto and...

Muhammad Shahbaz; Mete Feridun

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth: The case of Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates the dynamic causal relationships between energy consumption, energy price and economic activity in Saudi Arabia based on a demand side approach. We use a Johansen multivariate cointegration approach and incorporate CO2 emissions as a control variable. The results indicate that there exists at least a long-run relationship between energy consumption, energy price, carbon dioxide emissions, and economic growth. Furthermore, a long-run unidirectional causality stands from energy consumption to economic growth and CO2 emissions, bidirectional causality between carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth, and a long-run unidirectional causality runs from energy price to economic growth and CO2 emissions. In the short-run, there is unidirectional causality running from CO2 emissions to energy consumption and economic output and from energy price to CO2 emissions. Even though, the energy-led growth hypothesis is valid, the share of energy consumption in explaining economic growth is minimal. Energy price is the most important factor in explaining economic growth. Hence, policies aimed at reducing energy consumption and controlling for CO2 emissions may not reduce significantly Saudi?s economic growth. Investing in the use of renewable energy sources like solar and wind power is an urgent necessity to control for fossil fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

Atef Saad Alshehry; Mounir Belloumi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,225 1,736 1,807 1,582 4,278 2,390 2,537 1990's 27,720 36,088 36,741 35,503 37,347 39,116 40,334 40,706 39,601 41,149 2000's 42,519 42,243 44,008 44,762 44,016 43,386 38,938 41,197 40,286 39,447 2010's 37,316 35,339 37,397 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

72

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 121,848 123,993 104,292 102,185 123,008 121,936 134,132 1990's 82,828 83,733 86,623 74,925 66,600 75,845 69,235 71,155 63,368 68,393 2000's 69,174 63,137 63,031 56,018 55,970 45,837 46,205 51,499 42,957 39,002 2010's 40,814 42,633 42,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

73

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 29,750 31,237 31,121 29,705 35,751 40,508 38,392 1990's 39,249 42,166 39,700 39,211 35,432 34,900 35,236 30,370 26,034 25,055 2000's 25,934 28,266 25,525 26,276 27,818 27,380 28,435 28,213 27,161 24,089 2010's 23,238 24,938 27,809 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

74

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,572 16,185 17,090 13,633 16,249 17,446 19,820 1990's 12,182 14,154 13,217 13,051 13,939 14,896 15,409 15,597 16,524 19,272 2000's 20,602 20,991 25,767 28,829 24,053 24,408 23,868 25,276 23,574 25,282 2010's 27,104 28,582 29,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

75

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

76

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,270 1,530 1,924 1970's 2,251 2,419 2,847 2,725 1,649 1,760 3,043 3,210 2,134 2,889 1980's 1,320 1,580 3,278 3,543 5,236 4,575 4,715 5,799 4,983 4,767 1990's 6,031 3,502 3,381 4,145 3,252 3,069 3,299 2,275 1,706 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

77

Alaska Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,603 109,333 62,341 71,104 112,404 151,280 189,702 1990's 166,155 187,106 197,975 202,199 200,809 253,695 255,500 230,578 242,271 224,355 2000's 226,659 229,206 241,469 255,701 237,530 259,829 218,153 227,374 211,878 219,161 2010's 211,918 208,531 214,335 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease

78

Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 183,870 204,390 193,822 189,173 229,053 200,239 163,218 1990's 228,485 125,198 123,111 130,916 139,427 178,827 177,508 144,787 176,262 136,708 2000's 141,785 135,786 114,919 123,585 129,825 134,434 138,558 154,323 166,500 169,631 2010's 157,751 147,268 163,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease

79

Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,582 9,158 8,521 1970's 7,893 5,840 9,153 6,152 5,357 7,894 4,836 4,979 5,421 8,645 1980's 4,428 4,028 7,236 6,632 7,202 6,296 6,562 8,091 7,100 5,021 1990's 7,257 4,585 4,945 4,829 3,632 3,507 3,584 3,652 3,710 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

80

Fuel consumption of a vehicle with power split CVT system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuously variable transmissions have made notable progress, especially in the automotive industry, in recent years. In this work, we study the performance of a mid passenger car provided with an original Power Split CVT (PS-CVT) system. The main advantage of the proposed solution is to improve the efficiency of the CVT by means of a power flow without recirculation using two separate phases of operation. By means of a simulation model we evaluate the vehicle's fuel consumption with the hypothesis to consider the value of transmission ratio speed that minimises the specific fuel consumption. Furthermore the PS-CVT performance is compared with that of traditional CVT.

Giacomo Mantriota

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a more elaborate model on berth allocation considering fuel consumption than before, and overcome the nonlinear complexity by casting it as a mixed integer second order cone programming model. Furthermore, we conduct the vessel emission (in sailing periods) calculation with the widely-used emission factors. Besides, vessel emissions in mooring periods are also analyzed through a post-optimization phase on waiting time. Experimental results demonstrate that the new berth allocation strategy, reflected by the proposed model, is competent to significantly reduce fuel consumption and vessel emissions, while simultaneously retaining the service level of the terminal.

Yuquan Du; Qiushuang Chen; Xiongwen Quan; Lei Long; Richard Y.K. Fung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chapter 14 - Ship Trials: Endurance and fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter is designed to discuss endurance and fuel consumption. In endurance and fuel consumption trials, the vessel is run at Maximum Continuous Rating (MCR) power for a fixed duration, say 6-24 hours. During this period of time, the following information is measured and recorded: fuel consumption in kg/kW hour, propeller and engine rpm, indicated power (Pi) within the engine room, feed water used, and engine oil pressures and temperatures. There are certain factors that the engine room staff need to take care of. On making a group of runs at a given speed, the original engine settings used when first approaching the measured distance should be rigorously maintained throughout the group. When a controllable-pitch propeller is fitted, the pitch settings used when first approaching the measured mile should be left unaltered throughout the group of runs. By fitting diesel machinery in a ship of similar power, displacement, and speed, a saving of about 10% in the daily fuel consumption can be achieved. The differences in the cost of fuel/tonne must be taken into account plus the size of the machinery arrangement installed in the ship.

C.B. Barrass

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

84

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

85

Investigating the impact of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission: A panel data analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the influence of nuclear energy consumption on GDP growth and CO2 emission in 30 major nuclear energy consuming countries. The panel mode was used taking the period 1990–2010. The results of the study indicated that nuclear energy consumption has a positive long run effect on GDP growth while it has no long run effect on CO2 emission. The Granger causality test results also revealed that nuclear energy consumption has a positive short run causal relationship with GDP growth while it has a negative short run causal relationship with CO2 emission. Based on the results of this study, nuclear energy consumption has an important role in increasing GDP growth in the investigated countries with no effect on CO2 emission. Consequently, unlike fossil fuels which also increase GDP growth, nuclear energy consumption causes less damage to the environment. From the results of the study, a number of recommendations were provided for the investigated countries.

Usama Al-mulali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The nexus between electricity consumption and economic growth in Bahrain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper explores the relationship between electricity consumption, foreign direct investment, capital and economic growth in the case of the Kingdom of Bahrain. The Cobb–Douglas production is used over the period of 1980Q1–2010Q4. We have applied the ARDL bounds testing approach and found that cointegration exists among the series. Electricity consumption, foreign direct investment and capital add in economic growth. The VECM Granger causality analysis has exposed the feedback effect between electricity consumption and economic growth and the same is true for foreign direct investment and electricity consumption. This study suggests government authorities to explore new sources of energy to achieve sustainable economic development for the long run.

Helmi Hamdi; Rashid Sbia; Muhammad Shahbaz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

88

Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus 2010 DOE Vehicle...

89

Energy management of HEV to optimize fuel consumption and pollutant emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AVEC'12 Energy management of HEV to optimize fuel consumption and pollutant emissions Pierre Michel, several energy management strategies are proposed to optimize jointly the fuel consumption and pollutant-line strategy are given. Keywords: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV), energy management, pollution, fuel consumption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

91

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

92

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

93

The importance of population growth in future commercial energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper estimates the contribution of population growth to commercial energy consumption, which is considered a major cause of increases in air pollution and greenhouse gases. This paper first summarizes some of the recent estimates of future energy use developed by well-known models. It then develops several alternative scenarios that use different assumptions about population growth and energy use per capita for 122 countries for the years 2020 and 2050. It calculates the relative contribution of population growth to the change in total commercial energy use and demonstrates the sensitivity of the results to different assumptions. Individual country data are separately summed to totals for more-developed countries (MDCs) and less-developed countries (LDCs). Under a business as usual scenario for both MDCs and LDCs, population growth is important, but not the most important factor, in future increases in global energy consumption. Analysis of other scenarios shows that while slower population growth always contributes to a slowing of future global energy consumption, such changes are not as effective as reductions in per capita commercial energy use. Calculations on a global basis are made in two ways: from global aggregates and by summing individual country data. Comparison of the results shows that the first method is misleading because of the heterogeneity of population growth rates and energy consumption rates of individual countries. The tentative conclusions reached in this paper are only small pieces of a much larger puzzle. More work needs to be done to better understand the dynamics of these relationships before the analysis is extended to the broader questions of population growth and environmental change.

Kolsrud, G. [Congress, Washington, DC (United States); Torrey, B.B. [Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fuel consumption rate in a heat-powered unit analyzed as a function of the temperature and consumption ratio of the air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis of fuel consumption for a heat-powered unit in the ... of ceramic materials is given. The heat consumption rate is analyzed as a function of ... generating the working medium, and of the consumption r...

N. A. Tyutin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Virginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sources such as hybrid-electric technologies, bio-ethanol, and hydrogen fuel cells are emergingVirginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing, Moran, Saerens, and Van den Bulck 2 ABSTRACT Existing fuel consumption and emission models suffer from

Rakha, Hesham A.

96

Computer simulation of optimal functioning regimes with minimum fuel consumption for automotives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with computer simulation that allows the calculus of operating regimes with minimum fuel consumption for road vehicles, using engine’s mechanical characteristics for power and consumption, charact...

Salvadore Mugurel Burciu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Potential of Turboprops to Reduce Aviation Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and adoption, is challenged by fuel price uncertainty.Fuel price uncertainty is due fuel and energy priceplanning under such fuel price uncertainty and environmental

Smirti, Megan; Hansen, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Minimising cold start fuel consumption and emissions from a gasoline fuelled engine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Several constrained optimisation problems are considered, in which different tailpipe emissions regulations are the constraints under which the fuel consumption is minimised. The solutions of… (more)

Andrianov, Denis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

by lawn and garden equipment. The fuel used in this equipment accounts for only 1.8% of total gasoline use. Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment, 2008 Bar graph...

100

Mixing Correlations for Smoke and Fuel Consumption of Direct Injection Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mixing of fuel with air in a diesel engine strongly dictates the specific fuel consumption and exhaust smoke. Many experimental studies reported the optimum swirl for a given diesel engine at a given operatin...

P. A. Lakshminarayanan; Yogesh V. Aghav

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Optimisation of gasoline engine performance and fuel consumption through combination of technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasoline engine has undergone intensive development in recent history ... introduction of technologies such as turbocharging and direct fuel injection. In addition to the reduction of part load fuel consumption

Dr.-Ing. Peter Wieske; Bernhardt Lüddecke; Sebastian Ewert…

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cable length optimization for trawl fuel consumption reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A numerical method for optimization of the cable lengths in trawls with respect to the ratio between the estimated trawl drag and the predicted catch efficiency is developed and applied. The trawl cables of interest are warps, bridles, headline and footrope. The optimization algorithm applies an ordered sequential process changing one cable length at the time. It is assumed in the predictions that the catch efficiency of the trawl is proportional with the trawl mouth area. In a case study optimizing a bottom trawl used on a research vessel by applying the new method it is predicted that it would be possible to reduce the ratio between trawl drag and catch efficiency by up to 46% by optimizing the cable lengths. Thus this would enable a considerable reduction in fuel consumption to catch a specific amount of fish. Moreover, we predict an increase in the value of the trawl mouth area leading to better catching efficiency without increase in otter door drag.

Ramez Khaled; Daniel Priour; Jean-Yves Billard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

104

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other petroleum products. Included here are two oil consumption datasets: quarterly petrol consumption by sector (agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial; commercial; residential; transport industry; and international transport), from 1974 to 2010; and oil consumption by fuel type (petrol, diesel, fuel oil, aviation fuels, LPG, and other), also for the years 1974 through 2010. The full 2010 Energy Data File is available: http://www.med.govt.nz/upload/73585/EDF%202010.pdf. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago)

105

Electricity consumption from renewable and non-renewable sources and economic growth: Evidence from Latin American countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study explores the effect of renewable and non-renewable electricity consumption on economic growth in 18 Latin American countries. To achieve the goal of this study a panel Gross Domestic Product (GDP) model was constructed taking the period 1980–2010 into account. From the Pedroni cointegration test results it was found that renewable electricity consumption, non-renewable electricity consumption, labor, gross fixed capital formation, and total trade are cointegrated. Moreover, the panel Dynamic Ordinary Least Squares (DOLS) test results revealed that all above the mentioned variables have a long run positive effect on GDP growth in the investigated countries. The Vector Error-Correction (VEC) Granger causality model results revealed the existence of feedback causality between the variables. The results of the study indicated that renewable electricity consumption is more significant than non-renewable electricity consumption in promoting economic growth in the investigated countries in the long run and the short run. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the investigated countries should increase their investment on renewable energy projects to increase the role of electricity consumption from renewable sources. In addition, it is essential that these countries should reduce their non-renewable electricity consumption by increasing their energy efficiency and implementing energy saving projects. By applying these recommendations, these countries would be able to mitigate global warming and reduce their dependency on fossil fuel to increase their energy security.

Usama Al-mulali; Hassan Gholipour Fereidouni; Janice Y.M. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimal consumption in a growth model with the Cobb-Douglas production function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal consumption in a growth model with the Cobb-Douglas production function Hiroaki Morimoto Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Abstract An optimal consumption problem, and a synthesis of the optimal consumption policy is presented in the feedback form. Key words. Economic growth

107

Emissions and fuel consumption characteristics of an HCNG-fueled heavy-duty engine at idle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The idle performance of an 11-L, 6-cylinder engine equipped with a turbocharger and an intercooler was investigated for both compressed natural gas (CNG) and hydrogen-blended CNG (HCNG) fuels. HCNG, composed of 70% CNG and 30% hydrogen in volume, was used not only because it ensured a sufficient travel distance for each fueling, but also because it was the optimal blending rate to satisfy EURO-6 emission regulation according to the authors' previous studies. The engine test results demonstrate that the use of HCNG enhanced idle combustion stability and extended the lean operational limit from excess air ratio (?) = 1.5 (CNG) to 1.6. A decrease of more than 25% in the fuel consumption rate was achieved in HCNG idle operations compared to CNG. Total hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions decreased when fueled with HCNG at idle because of the low carbon content and enhanced combustion characteristics. In particular, despite hydrogen enrichment, less nitrogen oxides (NOx) were emitted with HCNG operations because the amount of fuel supplied for a stable idle was lower than with CNG operations, which eventually induced lower peak in-cylinder combustion temperature. This low HCNG fuel quantity in idle condition also induced a continuous decrease in \\{NOx\\} emissions with an increase in ?. The idle engine test results also indicate that cold-start performance can deteriorate owing to low exhaust gas temperature, when fueled with HCNG. Therefore, potential solutions were discussed, including combustion strategies such as retardation of spark ignition timing combined with leaner air/fuel ratios.

Sunyoup Lee; Changgi Kim; Young Choi; Gihun Lim; Cheolwoong Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

109

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

110

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

111

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

112

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

113

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:54 PM"

114

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

115

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

116

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1840_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1840_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:44 PM"

117

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:46 PM"

118

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1840_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1840_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:39 PM"

119

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

120

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:51 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

,"California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

122

,"Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sil_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sil_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:21 PM"

123

,"Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sco_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sco_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

124

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:53 PM"

125

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

126

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_stn_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_stn_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

127

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

128

Effect of idling on fuel consumption and emissions of a diesel engine fueled by Jatropha biodiesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An engine running at low load and low rated speed is said to be subject to high idling conditions, a mode which represents one of the major problems currently the transport industry is facing. During this time, the engine can not work at peak operating temperature. This leads to incomplete combustion and emissions level increase due to having fuel residues in the exhaust. Also, idling results in increase in fuel consumption. The purpose of this study is to evaluate fuel consumption and emissions parameters under high idling conditions when diesel blended with Jatropha curcas biodiesel is used to operate a diesel engine. Although biodiesel–diesel blends decrease carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions, they increase nitrogen oxides emissions in high idling modes. Compared to pure diesel fuel, fuel consumption also increases under all high idling conditions for biodiesel–diesel blends, with a further increase occurring as blend percentage rises.

S.M. Ashrafur Rahman; H.H. Masjuki; M.A. Kalam; M.J. Abedin; A. Sanjid; S. Imtenan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A note on “Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Du et al. [Du, Y., Chen, Q., Quan, X., Long, L., Fung, R.Y.K., 2011. Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions. Transportation Research Part E 47, 1021–1037] dealt with a berth allocation problem incorporating ship’ fuel consumption minimization. To address the difficulty posed by the power function between fuel consumption rate and sailing speed, they formulated a tractable mixed-integer second-order cone programming model. We propose two quadratic outer approximation approaches that can handle general fuel consumption rate functions more efficiently. In the static quadratic outer approximation approach, the approximation lines are generated a priori. In the dynamic quadratic outer approximation approach, the approximation lines are generated dynamically. Numerical experiments demonstrate the advantages of the two approaches.

Shuaian Wang; Qiang Meng; Zhiyuan Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

More efficiency in fuel consumption using gearbox optimization based on Taguchi method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automotive emission is becoming a critical threat to today’s human health. Many researchers are studying engine designs leading to less fuel consumption. Gearbox selection plays a key role in an engine design. In...

Masoud Goharimanesh; Aliakbar Akbari…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Characteristic fuel consumption and exhaust emissions in fully mechanized logging operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was done using eight different logging machines (harvesters and forwarders) in clear-felling operations to quantify the associated fuel consumption, and to define the inherent relationship between engine ...

Radomir Klvac; Alois Skoupy

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Fuel consumption reduction through friction optimisation of a four-cylinder gasoline engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Working in co-operation, BMW and PSA have created a completely new fourcylinder gasoline engine family which is presented in detail in ... objective throughout the development phase was to minimise fuel consumption

Wolfgang Meldt; Werner Tripolt; Gerald Gaberscik; Johann Schopp…

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Design features which influence pollutant emissions and fuel consumption in four-stroke engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficiency of an internal-combustion engine and, hence, its specific fuel consumption are largely dependent on the process characteristics ... . As the internal-combustion process in the engine cannot really ...

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Ing. Fred Schäfer…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 - No Data Reported;...

135

Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration published a final rule setting fuel consumption standards for heavy trucks in September 2011. For tractor-trailers, the standards focus on the...

136

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

137

Optimization to reduce fuel consumption in charge depleting mode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powertrain includes an internal combustion engine, a motor utilizing electrical energy from an energy storage device, and a plug-in connection. A Method for controlling the powertrain includes monitoring a fuel cut mode, ceasing a fuel flow to the engine based upon the fuel cut mode, and through a period of operation including acceleration of the powertrain, providing an entirety of propelling torque to the powertrain with the electrical energy from the energy storage device based upon the fuel cut mode.

Roos, Bryan Nathaniel; Martini, Ryan D.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

THE NEXUS BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN OECD COUNTRIES: A DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE NEXUS BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN OECD COUNTRIES: A DECOMPOSITION the impacts of renewable and non-renewable energy consumption on economic activities to find out whether and both renewable and non-renewable energy consumption in the short- and long run. This finding confirms

139

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 383,077 389,525 367,572 348,731 408,115 398,180 429,269 1990's 428,657 456,954 460,571 448,822 423,878 427,853 450,033 426,873 401,314 399,509 2000's 404,059 371,141 382,503 363,903 366,341 355,193 358,985 365,323 355,590 362,009 2010's 368,830 384,248 408,316 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

140

A fuel consumption model for off-road use of mobile machinery in agriculture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Until 2009, the annual reporting of emissions by off-road transport in agriculture in Belgium was based on a 1994 calculation model that needed to be updated. An energy consumption model was established for plant production in Belgium as a backbone for a new emission model. The model starts from agricultural activities involving off-road fuel consumption. Effects of soil type, tractor size, field size and machine load are modelled. Twenty-seven \\{FCIs\\} (fuel consumption indicators) were computed for plant production. \\{FCIs\\} are expressed per year and are used for emission estimates on a regional level. \\{FCIs\\} ranged from 37 to 311 L/ha. Sensitivity analysis showed the highest impact of tractor size with a surplus fuel consumption between 10 and 41% depending on the crop type. Fuel consumption (L) can be further processed into greenhouse gas emissions. \\{FCIs\\} can be adopted in LCA (life cycle assessment) studies. With ?310 L/ha, orchards are most fuel intensive, followed by field vegetables and sugar beets (?150 L/ha). The total off-road energy consumption of field vegetables is high because second cropping is a common practice.

Veerle Van linden; Lieve Herman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand...

142

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2012. Status: 50% complete. Budget FY12 390K (Vehicle System) 50K (Fuel Cell Specific runs) 75K (link with market analysis) Barriers Evaluate the...

143

Simultaneous optimization of propeller–hull systems to minimize lifetime fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In traditional naval architecture design methodologies optimization of the hull and propeller are done in two separate phases. This sequential approach can lead to designs that have sub-optimal fuel consumption and, thus, higher operational costs. This work presents a method to optimize the propeller–hull system simultaneously in order to design a vessel to have minimal fuel consumption. The optimization uses a probabilistic mission profile, propeller–hull interaction, and engine information to determine the coupled system with minimum fuel cost over its operational life. The design approach is tested on a KCS SIMMAN container ship using B-series propeller data and is shown to reduce fuel consumption compared to an optimized traditional design approach.

M. Nelson; D.W. Temple; J.T. Hwang; Y.L. Young; J.R.R.A. Martins; M. Collette

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

145

Measured effect of wind generation on the fuel consumption of an isolated diesel power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Block Island Power Company (BIPCO), on Block Island, Rhode Island, operates an isolated electric power system consisting of diesel generation and an experimental wind turbine. The 150-kW wind turbine, designated MOD-OA by the U.S. Department of Energy is typically operated in parallel with two diesel generators to serve an average winter load of 350 kW. Wind generation serves up to 60% of the system demand depending on wind speed and total system load. Results of diesel fuel consumption measurements are given for the diesel units operated in parallel with the wind turbine and again without the wind turbine. The fuel consumption data are used to calculate the amount of fuel displaced by wind energy. Results indicate that the wind turbine displaced 25,700 lbs. of the diesel fuel during the test period, representing a calculated reduction in fuel consumption of 6.7% while generating 11% of the total electrical energy. The amount of displaced fuel depends on operating conditions and system load. It is also shown that diesel engine throttle activity resulting from wind gusts which rapidly change the wind turbine output do not significantly influence fuel consumption.

Stiller, P.; Scott, G.; Shaltens, R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Recent Trends in Emerging Transportation Fuels and Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several recent trends indicate current developments in energy and transportation fuels. World trade in biofuels is developing in ethanol, wood chips, and vegetable oil / biodiesel with some countries being exp...

B. G. Bunting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Microsoft Word - EVS25_Primary Factors Impact Fuel Consumption of PHEV_FINAL.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 The 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Richard 'Barney' Carlson, Matthew G. Shirk, and Benjamin M. Geller Energy Storage and Transportation Systems Department, Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83401, USA E-mail: richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract- Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption when compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles by utilizing onboard electrical energy storage for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEVs, analysis has shown that fuel consumption of PHEVs is more

148

Prediction of torque and specific fuel consumption of a gasoline engine by using artificial neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents an artificial neural network (ANN) model to predict the torque and brake specific fuel consumption of a gasoline engine. An explicit ANN based formulation is developed to predict torque and brake specific fuel consumption of a gasoline engine in terms of spark advance, throttle position and engine speed. The proposed ANN model is based on experimental results. Experimental studies were completed to obtain training and testing data. Of all 81 data sets, the training and testing sets consisted of randomly selected 63 and 18 sets, respectively. An ANN model based on a back-propagation learning algorithm for the engine was developed. The performance and an accuracy of the proposed ANN model are found satisfactory. This study demonstrates that ANN is very efficient for predicting the engine torque and brake specific fuel consumption. Moreover, the proposed ANN model is presented in explicit form as a mathematical function.

Necla Kara Togun; Sedat Baysec

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document details the Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings in an OIRA Comparison Document.

150

Analysis and Simulation of Fuel Consumption and Energy Throughput on a Parallel Diesel-Electric Hybrid Powertrain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this master thesis is to study the energy throughput and fuel consumption of a parallel diesel-electric hybrid vehicle. This has been done… (more)

Gustafsson, Johanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document details Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings in a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

152

Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,659 2,240 6,864 1970's 4,748 8,459 16,056 15,217 14,402 17,842 15,972 17,336 15,895 12,153 1980's 30,250 15,249 94,232 97,828 111,069 64,148 72,686 116,682 153,670 192,239 1990's 193,875 223,194 234,716 237,702 238,156 292,811 295,834 271,284 281,872 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

153

Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,267 4,027 6,268 1970's 9,184 6,433 4,740 3,000 4,246 4,200 4,049 4,032 3,760 7,661 1980's 1,949 2,549 5,096 5,384 5,922 12,439 9,062 11,990 12,115 11,586 1990's 7,101 1,406 5,838 6,405 4,750 5,551 5,575 6,857 8,385 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

154

New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,793 46,331 45,309 1970's 47,998 46,114 48,803 52,553 43,452 38,604 49,160 43,751 37,880 50,798 1980's 36,859 22,685 55,722 47,630 50,662 46,709 35,615 48,138 41,706 42,224 1990's 65,889 44,766 53,697 49,658 54,786 52,589 81,751 64,458 59,654 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

155

Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,956 1,503 2,113 1970's 633 2,115 1,978 2,435 4,193 7,240 9,150 7,585 8,325 14,123 1980's 7,594 511 5,965 4,538 8,375 9,001 13,289 17,671 16,889 16,211 1990's 19,719 13,738 12,611 12,526 13,273 27,012 27,119 24,619 27,466 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

156

West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,052 2,276 0 1970's 2,551 3,043 3,808 2,160 1,909 1,791 1,490 1,527 1,233 1,218 1980's 2,482 2,515 6,426 5,826 7,232 7,190 6,658 8,835 8,343 7,882 1990's 9,631 7,744 8,097 7,065 8,087 8,045 6,554 7,210 6,893 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

157

Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,668 2,361 2,604 1970's 2,726 3,231 4,676 7,202 5,822 7,673 7,739 9,124 10,619 21,610 1980's 7,041 7,093 13,673 10,000 10,560 10,829 9,397 12,095 11,622 12,221 1990's 17,343 23,883 21,169 24,832 24,347 25,130 27,492 29,585 31,074 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

158

Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,828 1,992 2,277 1970's 2,317 2,212 1,509 1,238 1,206 1,218 1,040 1,107 1,160 1,214 1980's 989 1,040 9,772 8,361 9,038 9,095 6,335 3,254 2,942 2,345 1990's 3,149 2,432 2,812 3,262 2,773 2,647 2,426 2,457 2,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

159

North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 17,133 16,163 14,691 1970's 14,067 13,990 12,773 12,462 11,483 12,008 15,998 13,697 12,218 3,950 1980's 1,017 13,759 3,514 4,100 4,563 4,710 3,974 5,194 4,014 3,388 1990's 6,939 11,583 8,462 8,256 11,306 11,342 11,603 8,572 8,309 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

160

Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,798 2,012 2,074 1970's 3,440 2,145 2,143 2,551 3,194 8,420 7,647 8,022 11,076 14,695 1980's 6,494 3,461 9,699 8,130 8,710 8,195 7,609 9,616 8,250 8,003 1990's 9,094 9,595 7,274 8,171 9,766 9,535 8,489 12,060 9,233 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,842 15,867 17,587 1970's 20,841 27,972 28,183 32,663 35,350 27,212 31,044 29,142 30,491 48,663 1980's 24,521 19,665 41,392 37,901 40,105 42,457 38,885 44,505 45,928 43,630 1990's 40,914 44,614 43,736 56,657 44,611 47,282 49,196 46,846 33,989 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

162

Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 65,167 84,259 103,361 1970's 98,417 101,126 98,784 80,233 80,780 79,728 84,025 77,631 82,046 128,475 1980's 59,934 56,785 91,465 79,230 91,707 88,185 84,200 104,415 100,926 90,225 1990's 111,567 88,366 92,978 99,869 91,039 80,846 73,039 81,412 61,543 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

163

U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 595,172 687,356 598,475 573,793 741,268 697,703 640,633 1990's 807,735 672,314 710,250 723,118 699,842 792,315 799,629 776,306 771,366 679,480 2000's 746,889 747,411 730,579 758,380 731,563 756,324 782,992 861,063 864,113 913,229 2010's 916,797 938,340 987,957 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

164

Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,904 5,188 6,183 1970's 5,091 6,148 5,924 4,281 3,683 2,315 2,754 2,972 2,792 4,796 1980's 3,425 1,832 2,012 1,970 2,069 2,138 1,808 2,088 1,994 1,766 1990's 2,262 1,680 1,871 2,379 2,243 2,238 2,401 2,277 2,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

165

Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,656 3,505 2,879 1970's 3,140 4,302 3,397 3,548 2,957 2,925 2,742 2,814 3,477 22,094 1980's 1,941 1,776 3,671 4,377 5,741 5,442 5,243 5,802 4,869 3,876 1990's 5,129 1,476 1,450 1,366 1,332 1,283 1,230 1,201 1,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

166

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

167

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

168

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth of Guangdong Province in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Guangdong is a province with the most electricity consumption (EC) and the fastest economic growth ... , there has long been a contradiction between electricity supply and demand in Guangdong and this...

Lianhong Lv; Hong Luo; Baoliu Zhang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 645,058 711,720 741,902 1970's 769,500 784,773 802,112 828,139 817,194 763,107 729,946 732,428 757,853 717,462 1980's 536,766 505,322 347,846 307,717 326,662 307,759 302,266 355,765 318,922 291,977 1990's 394,605 297,233 293,845 296,423 298,253 333,548 330,547 301,800 330,228 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

171

Reaction-Diffusion Model for Combustion with Fuel Consumption: I. Dirichlet Boundary Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......9JT, UK Department of Chemistry, University of Leeds...Reaction-Diffusion Model for Combustion with Fuel Consumption...SCOTT Department of Chemistry, University of Leeds...runaway in stockpiles of coal, wool, cellulose...smouldering or fully fledged combustion and their attendant......

G. ZHANG; J. H. MERKIN; S. K. SCOTT

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Berth and quay-crane allocation problem considering fuel consumption and emissions from vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Resolving the berth and quay-crane allocation problem improves the efficiency of seaside operations by optimally allocating berthing spaces and quay cranes to vessels, typically by considering a vessel’s sailing speed and arrival time at a port as constant parameters, while ignoring the impact of arrival times on fuel consumption and emissions when sailing. This work applied a novel nonlinear multi-objective mixed-integer programming model that considered a vessel’s fuel consumption and emissions, and then transformed this model into a second-order mixed-integer cone programming model to solve the problem’s computational intractability. Furthermore, the impact of number of allocated quay cranes on port operational cost, and a vessel’s fuel consumption and emissions was analyzed. Additionally, a vessel’s emissions while moored are also calculated based on wait time. Experimental results demonstrate that the new berth and quay-crane allocation strategy with a vessel’s arrival time as a decision variable can significantly improve vessels’ fuel consumption and emissions, the air quality around ports and utilization of berths and quay cranes without reducing service quality.

Qing-Mi Hu; Zhi-Hua Hu; Yuquan Du

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Genetic programming approach to predict torque and brake specific fuel consumption of a gasoline engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents genetic programming (GP) based model to predict the torque and brake specific fuel consumption a gasoline engine in terms of spark advance, throttle position and engine speed. The objective of this study is to develop an alternative robust formulations based on experimental data and to verify the use of GP for generating the formulations for gasoline engine torque and brake specific fuel consumption. Experimental studies were completed to obtain training and testing data. Of all 81 data sets, the training and testing sets consisted of randomly selected 63 and 18 sets, respectively. Considerable good performance was achieved in predicting gasoline engine torque and brake specific fuel consumption by using GP. The performance of accuracies of proposed GP models are quite satisfactory (R2 = 0.9878 for gasoline engine torque and R2 = 0.9744 for gasoline engine brake specific fuel consumption). The prediction of proposed GP models were compared to those of the neural network modeling, and strictly good agreement was observed between the two predictions. The proposed GP formulation is quite accurate, fast and practical.

Necla Togun; Sedat Baysec

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Berth and quay-crane allocation problem considering fuel consumption and emissions from vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resolving the berth and quay-crane allocation problem improves the efficiency of seaside operations by optimally allocating berthing spaces and quay cranes to vessels, typically by considering a vessel's sailing speed and arrival time at a port as constant ... Keywords: Berth and quay crane allocation problem, Emission, Fuel consumption, Nonlinear optimization, Second-order cone programming

Qing-Mi Hu, Zhi-Hua Hu, Yuquan Du

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 195,990 212,134 273,213 1970's 287,222 292,589 312,145 336,832 347,098 301,816 556,772 591,292 558,877 305,181 1980's 196,033 180,687 337,398 275,698 303,284 258,069 243,283 301,279 272,455 256,123 1990's 258,267 195,526 220,711 222,813 207,171 209,670 213,721 227,542 194,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

176

The dynamic links between CO2 emissions, economic growth and coal consumption in China and India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we employ recent and robust estimation techniques of cointegration to provide more conclusive evidence on the nexus of CO2 emissions, economic growth and coal consumption in China and India. Furthermore, the causal relationships among the variables are further examined using the Granger causality test. Our empirical results suggest that the variables are cointegrated in the case of China but not India. In other words, there is a long-run relationship between CO2 emissions, economic growth and coal consumption in China. Granger causality test for China reveal a strong evidence of uni-directional causality running from economic growth to CO2 emissions. Moreover, there is a bi-directional causality between economic growth and coal consumption as well as CO2 emissions and coal consumption in the short and long run. In the case of India, only a short-run causality is detected. Causality between economic growth and CO2 emissions as well as CO2 emissions and coal consumption are bi-directional. Nonetheless, there is only a uni-directional Granger causality running from economic growth to coal consumption in India. The implications of the results are further discussed.

V.G.R. Chandran Govindaraju; Chor Foon Tang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 10 14 13 13 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 10 16 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 15 22 18 18 10,001 to 25,000 15 24 19 19 25,001 to 50,000 13 25 29 29 50,001 to 100,000 14 27 21 22 100,001 to 200,000 13 36 34 34 200,001 to 500,000 13 37 33 33 Over 500,000 17 51 50 50 Principal Building Activity Education 17 17 16 17 Food Sales and Service 25 36 16 16 Health Care 29 48 47 47 Lodging 27 37 32 32 Mercantile and Service 14 25 26 26 Office 14 19 21 21 Public Assembly 23 46 35 34 Public Order and Safety 28 48 46 46 Religious Worship

178

Short- and long-run relationships between natural gas consumption and economic growth: Evidence from Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the dynamic relationship between natural gas consumption and economic growth in Pakistan using a multivariate model by including capital and labor as control variables for the period between 1972QI and 2011QIV. The results of the ARDL bound testing indicate the presence of cointegration relationships among the variables. The estimated long-run impact of gas consumption on economic growth is greater than other factor inputs suggesting that energy is a critical driver of production and growth in Pakistan. Furthermore, the results of causality test suggest that natural gas consumption and economic growth are complements. Given that natural gas constitutes to the primary source of energy in Pakistan, the implication of this study is that natural gas conservation policies could harm growth and, therefore, requires the policy makers to improve the energy supply efficiency as well as formulate appropriate policies to attract investment and establish public–private partnership initiatives.

Muhammad Shahbaz; Mohamed Arouri; Frédéric Teulon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Spark ignition engine control strategies for minimising cold start fuel consumption under cumulative tailpipe emissions constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposes a methodology for minimising the fuel consumption of a gasoline fuelled vehicle during cold starting. It first takes a validated dynamic model of an engine and its aftertreatment reported in a previous study (Andrianov, Brear, & Manzie, 2012) to identify optimised engine control strategies using iterative dynamic programming. This is demonstrated on a family of optimisation problems, in which fuel consumption is minimised subject to different tailpipe emissions constraints and exhaust system designs. Potential benefits of using multi-parameter optimisation, involving spark timing, air–fuel ratio and cam timing, are quantified. Single switching control policies are then proposed that perform close to the optimised strategies obtained from the dynamic programming but which require far less computational effort.

D.I. Andrianov; C. Manzie; M.J. Brear

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Environmental degradation, economic growth and energy consumption: Evidence of the environmental Kuznets curve in Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper tests for the short and long-run relationship between economic growth, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and energy consumption, using the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) by employing both the aggregated and disaggregated energy consumption data in Malaysia for the period 1980–2009. The Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) methodology and Johansen–Juselius maximum likelihood approach were used to test the cointegration relationship; and the Granger causality test, based on the vector error correction model (VECM), to test for causality. The study does not support an inverted U-shaped relationship (EKC) when aggregated energy consumption data was used. When data was disaggregated based on different energy sources such as oil, coal, gas and electricity, the study does show evidences of the EKC hypothesis. The long-run Granger causality test shows that there is bi-directional causality between economic growth and CO2 emissions, with coal, gas, electricity and oil consumption. This suggests that decreasing energy consumption such as coal, gas, electricity and oil appears to be an effective way to control CO2 emissions but simultaneously will hinder economic growth. Thus suitable policies related to the efficient consumption of energy resources and consumption of renewable sources are required.

Behnaz Saboori; Jamalludin Sulaiman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electricity consumption and economic growth in transition countries: A revisit using bootstrap panel Granger causality analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this paper is to revisit the Granger causal relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth for 15 transition economies for the period 1975–2010 using a bootstrap panel causality approach that allows for both cross-sectional dependency and for heterogeneity across countries. Applying this approach, we found a unidirectional causality running from electricity consumption to economic growth only in Belarus and Bulgaria; from economic growth to electricity consumption in the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and the Russian Federation; bidirectional causality only in Ukraine while no Granger causality in any direction in Albania, Macedonia, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovak Republic and Slovenia. These results show that there is a limited support for the electricity-led growth hypothesis. Nevertheless these different findings provide important implications for energy strategies and policies for transition countries.

Yemane Wolde-Rufael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption . U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Vehicles Vehicle-Miles Traveled Motor Fuel Consumption Motor Fuel Expenditures RSE Row Factor: (million) (percent) (billion) (percent) (billion gallons) (gallon percent) (quadril- lion Btu) (billion dollars) (percent) 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 Household Characteristics Total .................................................... 156.8 100.0 1,793 100.0 90.6 100.0 11.2 104.7 100.0 2.8 Census Region and Division Northeast ........................................... 26.6 17.0 299 16.7 14.5 16.0 1.8 17.2 16.4 5.7 New England ................................... 7.6 4.8 84 4.7 4.1 4.5 0.5 4.8 4.6 13.8 Middle Atlantic

184

Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3 and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development and validation of a simple strategy-based technique using four engine parameters to minimize emissions and fuel consumption

185

Reduction of Heavy-Duty Fuel Consumption and CO2 Generation-- What the Industry Does and What the Government Can Do  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Smart regulations, funding for advanced technologies, and improvements to operations and infrastructure play important roles in reducing fuel consumption

186

Poster Session--Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage--Wright, Ottmar USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 363  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poster Session--Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage--Wright, Ottmar USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 363 Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage Ecosystems1 Clinton S. Wright2 and Roger D. Ottmar2 Introduction Fuel consumption was evaluated for a series

Standiford, Richard B.

187

Fun Fact Friday: Fueling Growth | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fun Fact Friday: Fueling Growth Fun Fact Friday: Fueling Growth Fun Fact Friday: Fueling Growth January 3, 2014 - 1:53pm Addthis Fuel cells, which work like batteries but don’t run down or need recharging, are ideal for powering material handling equipment, like forklifts and airport baggage carts, because they reduce recharging time and cut carbon pollution. Recent Energy Department reports indicate the fuel cell and hydrogen industry is continuing to grow. | Photo courtesy of Plug Power, Inc. Fuel cells, which work like batteries but don't run down or need recharging, are ideal for powering material handling equipment, like forklifts and airport baggage carts, because they reduce recharging time and cut carbon pollution. Recent Energy Department reports indicate the fuel cell and hydrogen industry is continuing to grow. | Photo courtesy of

188

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SLA_2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,34 33419,9 33785,9 34150,8 34515,22

189

,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SFL_2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,7 33785,9 34150,27 34515,68 34880,75

190

,"Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sid_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sid_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SID_2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,6 40224,5 40252,6 40283,6 40313,6 40344,6 40374,6

191

,"Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAL_2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,3 33419,0 33785,3 34150,4 34515,3 34880,4

192

,"California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCA_2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,4 33419,9 33785,27 34150,255 34515,550

193

,"California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sca_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sca_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCA_2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1153 40224,1041 40252,1153 40283,1116

194

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sma_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sma_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SMA_2" "Date","Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,1 33785,2 34150,2

195

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

196

,"Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sal_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sal_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAL_2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,9 40224,8 40252,9 40283,9 40313,9 40344,9

197

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sct_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sct_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCT_2" "Date","Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,2

198

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:57 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSD_2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,2 33785,5 34150,7 34515,5

199

,"Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SKS_2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,10 34880,2

200

,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sfl_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sfl_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SFL_2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,5 40224,5 40252,5 40283,5 40313,5 40344,5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_shi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_shi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SHI_2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 35611,284 35976,0 36341,380 36707,0 37072,0 37437,0 37802,0 38168,0

202

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sla_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sla_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SLA_2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1

203

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssd_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssd_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSD_2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,0 40224,0 40252,0 40283,0 40313,0

204

,"Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sid_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sid_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SID_2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,10 34880,19

205

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

206

,"Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sin_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sin_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SIN_2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,4 40224,4 40252,4 40283,4 40313,4 40344,4

207

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_shi_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_shi_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SHI_2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,0 40224,0 40252,0 40283,0 40313,0 40344,0

208

,"Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sco_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sco_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCO_2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,21 40224,19 40252,21 40283,20 40313,21

209

,"Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_saz_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_saz_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAZ_2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,37 33785,46 34150,44 34515,61 34880,118

210

,"Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sga_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sga_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SGA_2" "Date","Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,78 40224,70 40252,78 40283,75 40313,78

211

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,3 34880,2

212

,"Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sde_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sde_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SDE_2" "Date","Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,1 34880,1

213

,"Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sak_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sak_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAK_2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,2 40224,2 40252,2 40283,2 40313,2 40344,2

214

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssc_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssc_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSC_2" "Date","South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1

215

,"Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sks_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sks_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SKS_2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

216

Life Cycle Inventory Energy Consumption and Emissions for Biodiesel versus Petroleum Diesel Fueled Construction Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Inventory Energy Consumption and Emissions for Biodiesel versus Petroleum Diesel Fueled Construction Vehicles ... In general, LCI emissions of HC and CO are lower if NSPS-compliant soyoil plants are used. ... The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a methodology for characterizing at high resolution the energy use and emissions of a plug-in parallel-hybrid diesel-electric school bus (PHSB) to support assessments of sensitivity to driving cycles and ... ...

Shih-Hao Pang; H. Christopher Frey; William J. Rasdorf

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

217

Simple Indicator To Identify the Environmental Soundness of Growth of Consumption and Technology:? “Eco-velocity of Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506, Japan, Faculty of Economics, Kyushu University, 6-19-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8581, Japan, and Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences, University of Minnesota, 2004 Folwell Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108, and Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. ... Eq 8 thus determined Dt where Yt denotes the quantity of goods and services provided to households as measured in monetary units and Pt is the aggregate CO2 emissions due to Yt. ... The linked IOT defines electricity, petroleum fuels (gasoline, diesel, kerosene, liquid petroleum gas, etc.), and city gas as three separate sectors (commodities) but with no further breakdown of quantitative consumption or the uses to which the respective energy carriers are put, either nationally or at the household level. ...

Keisuke Nansai; Shigemi Kagawa; Sangwon Suh; Rokuta Inaba; Yuichi Moriguchi

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

218

The methodology of variable management of propellant fuel consumption by jet-propulsion engines of a spacecraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, management of propellant fuel consumption on board of a spacecraft is only associated with the operation of jet-propulsion engines (JPE) that are actuator devices of ... systems (MCS). The efficien...

V. S. Kovtun

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Multiple Injection and Boosting Benefits for Improved Fuel Consumption on a Spray Guided Direct Injection Gasoline Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of turbocharging and direct injection offers a significant potential for SI engines to improve fuel consumption, specific power output, raw emissions and ... shows the latest results of the T-SGDI...

Jason King; Oliver Böcker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Assessment of the influence of different cooling system configurations on engine warm-up, emissions and fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the major goals of engine designers is the reduction of fuel consumption and pollutant emissions while keeping or even improving engine performance. In recent years, different technical ... have been inves...

A. J. Torregrosa; A. Broatch; P. Olmeda…

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effect of stratified water injection on exhaust gases and fuel consumption of a direct injection diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct injection Diesel engine with its specific fuel consumption of about 200 g/kWh is one of the most efficient thermal engines. However in case of relatively low CH...x...concentration in the exhaust gas t...

Rainer Pauls; Christof Simon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Two-Dimensional Property Distributions, Ohmic Losses, and Power Consumption within a Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-Dimensional Property Distributions, Ohmic Losses, and Power Consumption within a Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane ... The land provides both mechanical support and electrical contact to the porous transport layer (PTL), while the fuel and oxidant are distributed to the catalyst layer (CL) through the channels, again via the PTL. ... The anisotropic nature of the distributions suggest that there may be localized “hot spots” where an increased rate of power consumption could heat the membrane and cause it to fail. ...

Venkateshwar R. Devulapalli; Aaron V. Phoenix

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effects of Magnetic Field on Fuel Consumption and Exhaust Emissions in Two-Stroke Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy of permanent magnets was used in this research for the treatment of vehicle fuel (Iraqi gasoline), to reducing consumption, as well as reducing the emission of certain pollutants rates. The experiments in current research comprise the using of permanent magnets with different intensity (2000, 4000, 6000, 9000) Gauss, which installed on the fuel line of the two-stroke engine, and study its impact on gasoline consumption, as well as exhaust gases. For the purpose of comparing the results necessitated the search for experiments without the use of magnets. The overall performance and exhaust emission tests showed a good result, where the rate of reduction in gasoline consumption ranges between (9-14) %, and the higher the value of a reduction in the rate of 14% was obtained using field intensity 6000 Gauss as well as the intensity 9000 Gauss. It was found that the percentages of exhaust gas components (CO, HC) were decreased by 30%, 40% respectively, but CO2 percentage increased up to 10%. Absorption Spectrum of infrared and ultraviolet radiation showed a change in physical and chemical properties in the structure of gasoline molecules under the influence of the magnetic field. Surface tension of gasoline exposed to different intensities of magnetic field was measured and compared with these without magnetization.

Ali S. Faris; Saadi K. Al-Naseri; Nather Jamal; Raed Isse; Mezher Abed; Zainab Fouad; Akeel Kazim; Nihad Reheem; Ali Chaloob; Hazim Mohammad; Hayder Jasim; Jaafar Sadeq; Ali Salim; Aws Abas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Energy Consumption and Economic Growth The Case of Australia Hong To a, *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;3 depend on imports of crude oil, natural gas, and coal for their industrial and residential energy needs). A decline in energy use does not, under conditions of economic efficiency, result in a reduction in economic1 Energy Consumption and Economic Growth ­ The Case of Australia Hong To a, * , Albert Wijeweera

226

A parametric study for specific fuel consumption of an intercooled diesel engine using a neural network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turbocharging is a process wherein the amount of oxygen used in a combustion reaction is increased to raise output and decrease specific fuel consumption. On account of this, fuel economy and thermal efficiency are more important for all engines. The use of an intercooler reduces the temperature of intake air to the engine, and this cooler and denser air increases thermal and volumetric efficiency. Most research projects on engineering problems usually take the form of experimental studies. However, experimental research is relatively expensive and time consuming. In recent years, Neural Networks (NNs) have increasingly been used in a diverse range of engineering applications. In this study, various parametric studies are executed to investigate the interrelationship between a single variable and two steadies and two constant parameters on the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC, g/kW h). The variables selected are engine speed, load and Crankshaft Angel (CA). The data used in the present study were obtained from previous experimental research by the author. These data were used to enhance, train and test a NN model using a MATLAB-based program. The results of the NN based model were found to be convincing and were consistent with the experimental results. The trained NN based model was then used to perform the parametric studies. The performance of the NN based model and the results of parametric studies are presented in graphical form and evaluated.

Abdullah Uzun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Modeling effects of vehicle specifications on fuel economy based on engine fuel consumption map and vehicle dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study conducts a vehicle dynamic modeling of gasoline and diesel vehicles by using the AVL commercial program. 10 passenger vehicles were tested for 7 types of driving modes containing city, express and highway driving mode. The various vehicle data (specifications, fuel consumption map, gear shifting curve data, etc.) were collected and implemented as input data. The calculations were conducted with changing driving modes and vehicle types, and prediction accuracy of the calculation results were validated based on chassis dynamometer test data. In order to increase prediction accuracy for a wide vehicle operating range, some modifications regarding gear shifting was also conducted. From these processes, it is confirmed that the prediction accuracy of fuel efficiency and CO2 emissions shows a strong correlations with test results. After ensuring the accuracy of the calculation result, parametric studies were conducted to reveal correlations between vehicle specifications (e.g., vehicle weight and frontal area) on fuel efficiency and CO2 emissions and check which parameters were highly impact on fuel efficiency.

Yunjung Oh; Junhong Park; Jongtae Lee; Myung Do Eom; Sungwook Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Use of electromagnetic clutch water pumps in vehicle engine cooling systems to reduce fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In general, when the internal combustion engine of a vehicle is started, its operationally connected cooling system provides excessive cooling, resulting in unnecessary energy consumption and excessive emission of exhaust gas. If the rotational speed of the engine is high, the excessive cooling causes the combustion efficiency to decrease. Therefore, better control of the operating temperature range of the engine through use of an active cooling system can achieve better fuel economy and reduction of exhaust gas emission. Effective control of the cooling system in accordance with the operating conditions of the engine can be realized by changing the mass flow rate of the coolant. In this study, we designed electromagnetic clutch water pumps that can control the coolant flow. We made two types of water pump: (1) a planetary gear (PG)-type water pump which can reduce the rotation speed of the water pump by 65%, compared with a pulley; and (2) an on/off-type water pump which can completely stop the rotation of the impeller. The performance evaluation of these pumps consisted of a warm-up test and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Warm-up test results showed that the time required to achieve a temperature of approximately 80 °C with the PG water pump and the on/off water pump was improved by 7.3% and 24.7% respectively, compared with that of a conventional water pump. Based on the NEDC results, we determined that the fuel economy of the engine using the PG water pump and the on/off water pump was improved by 1.7% and 4.0% compared with the fuel economy when using the conventional water pump. The application of clutch water pumps is expected to contribute to the improvement of engine cooling system performance, because their effect in reducing the fuel consumption rate is similar to that of an electric water pump.

Yoon Hyuk Shin; Sung Chul Kim; Min Soo Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Economic growth, electricity consumption, urbanization and environmental degradation relationship in United Arab Emirates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study explores the relationship between economic growth, electricity consumption, urbanization and environmental degradation in case of United Arab Emirates (UAE). The study covers the quarter frequency data over the period of 1975–2011. We have applied the ARDL bounds testing approach to examine the long run relationship between the variables in the presence of structural breaks. The VECM Granger causality is applied to investigate the direction of causal relationship between the variables. Our empirical exercise reported the existence of cointegration among the series. Further, we found an inverted U-shaped relationship between economic growth and CO2 emissions i.e. economic growth raises energy emissions initially and declines it after a threshold point of income per capita (EKC exists). Electricity consumption declines CO2 emissions. The relationship between urbanization and CO2 emissions is positive. Exports seem to improve the environmental quality by lowering CO2 emissions. The causality analysis validates the feedback effect between CO2 emissions and electricity consumption. Economic growth and urbanization Granger cause CO2 emissions.

Muhammad Shahbaz; Rashid Sbia; Helmi Hamdi; Ilhan Ozturk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Integrated probabilistic design of marine propulsors to minimize lifetime fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine propellers are typically designed to achieve optimal performance at a single or a few design points. It is well understood that the performance of marine propulsion systems decays at off-design conditions, where the system operates for the majority of its life, where fuel consumption rates are high and the system as a whole operates at lower efficiencies. This paper presents a novel integrated design methodology that considers the propeller, prime mover, and vessel as one integrated system, and considers the probabilistic operational profile of the vessel, to minimize lifetime fuel consumption. The proposed design methodology represents a new approach to evaluate the tradeoffs between different design objectives and constraints by considering the system performance characteristics along with probability of occurrence, and hence allows for global optimization of the propeller geometry. Results are shown for a pair of fixed-pitch propellers designed for a twin-screw naval combatant craft. System performance for a design obtained using the proposed methodology is compared with designs obtained using traditional point-based design approaches. This methodology can be easily extended to investigate the effects of variations in resistance, operational profile or additional performance criteria, such as safety during extreme operations, lifetime carbon emission, and life cycle costs.

Michael R. Motley; Mayer Nelson; Yin L. Young

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The relationship among natural gas energy consumption, capital and economic growth: Bootstrap-corrected causality tests from G-7 countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the relationship between natural gas consumption, economic growth and capital by using G-7 countries data and a bootstrap-corrected causality test for the period 1970–2008. It was found eight significant Granger causality relationships. For Italy, the Granger causality is from natural gas consumption to growth and United Kingdom adverse. For pattern of France, Germany and United States there is two sided Granger causality between natural gas and growth.

Hakan Kum; Oguz Ocal; Alper Aslan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The nexus of electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reexamines the causal link between electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries (i.e., Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) for the period 1990–2010, using panel causality analysis, accounting for dependency and heterogeneity across countries. Regarding the electricity–GDP nexus, the empirical results support evidence on the feedback hypothesis for Russia and the conservation hypothesis for South Africa. However, a neutrality hypothesis holds for Brazil, India and China, indicating neither electricity consumption nor economic growth is sensitive to each other in these three countries. Regarding the GDP–CO2 emissions nexus, a feedback hypothesis for Russia, a one-way Granger causality running from GDP to CO2 emissions in South Africa and reverse relationship from CO2 emissions to GDP in Brazil is found. There is no evidence of Granger causality between GDP and CO2 emissions in India and China. Furthermore, electricity consumption is found to Granger cause CO2 emissions in India, while there is no Granger causality between electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa. Therefore, the differing results for the BRICS countries imply that policies cannot be uniformly implemented as they will have different effects in each of the BRICS countries under study.

Wendy N. Cowan; Tsangyao Chang; Roula Inglesi-Lotz; Rangan Gupta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The implications of using hydrocarbon fuels to generate electricity for hydrogen fuel powered automobiles on electrical capital, hydrocarbon consumption, and anthropogenic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers some of the impacts of adopting hydrogen fuel cell powered electric automobiles in the US. The change will need significant adjustments to the electrical generation industry including additional capital and hydrocarbon fuel consumption as well as impacting anthropogenic greenhouse emissions. Examining the use of three fuels to generate hydrogen fuels, using three production methods, distributed in three geographic scenarios, we determine that while the change reduces anthropogenic greenhouse emissions with minimal additional electrical generation capital expenditures, it accelerates the use of natural gas. Electrolysis provides a sustainable, longer-term solution, but requires more capital investment in electrical generation and yields an increase in anthropogenic greenhouse emissions.

Derek Tittle; Jingwen Qu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reduction of fuel consumption in gasoline engines by introducing HHO gas into intake manifold  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brown’s gas (HHO) has recently been introduced to the auto industry as a new source of energy. The present work proposes the design of a new device attached to the engine to integrate an HHO production system with the gasoline engine. The proposed HHO generating device is compact and can be installed in the engine compartment. This auxiliary device was designed, constructed, integrated and tested on a gasoline engine. Test experiments were conducted on a 197cc (Honda G 200) single-cylinder engine. The outcome shows that the optimal surface area of an electrolyte needed to generate sufficient amount of HHO is twenty times that of the piston surface area. Also, the volume of water needed in the cell is about one and half times that of the engine capacity. Eventually, the goals of the integration are: a 20–30% reduction in fuel consumption, lower exhaust temperature, and consequently a reduction in pollution.

Ammar A. Al-Rousan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Natural gas consumption and economic growth: The role of foreign direct investment, capital formation and trade openness in Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this paper is to reinvestigate the relationship between natural gas consumption and economic growth by including foreign direct investment, capital and trade openness in Malaysia for the period of 1971–2012. The structural break unit root test is employed to investigate the stationary properties of the series. We have applied combined cointegration test to examine the relationship between the variables in the long run. For robustness sake, the ARDL bounds testing method is also employed to test for a possible long run relationship in the presence of structural breaks. We note the validity of cointegration between the variables. Natural gas consumption, foreign direct investment, capital formation and trade openness have positive influence on economic growth in Malaysia. The results support the presence of feedback hypothesis between natural gas consumption and economic growth, foreign direct investment and economic growth, and natural gas consumption and foreign direct investment. The policy implications of these results are provided.

Sakiru Adebola Solarin; Muhammad Shahbaz

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

27% of the total US energy consumption and 72% of theof Figures Figure 2-1 U.S. energy consumption by source andU.S. (FHWA, Figure 2-1 U.S. energy consumption by source and

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

An experimental study of the effect of a homogeneous combustion catalyst on fuel consumption and smoke emission in a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the influence of a ferrous picrate based homogeneous combustion catalyst on fuel consumption and smoke emission of a laboratory diesel engine. The catalyst used in this study was supplied by Fuel Technology Pty. Ltd. The fuel consumption and smoke emission were measured as a function of engine load, speed and catalyst dosing ratio. The brake specific fuel consumption and smoke emission decreased as the dosing ratio of the catalyst doped in the diesel fuel increased. At the catalyst dosing ratio of 1:3200, the brake specific fuel consumption was reduced by from 2.1% to 2.7% and the smoke emission was reduced by from 6.7% to 26.2% at the full engine load at speeds from 2600 rpm to 3400 rpm. The results also indicated that the potential of the fuel saving seems to be greater when the engine was run under light load.

Mingming Zhu; Yu Ma; Dongke Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Real-world fuel consumption and CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions by driving conditions for light-duty passenger vehicles in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The increasing discrepancy between on-road and type-approval fuel consumption for \\{LDPVs\\} (light-duty passenger vehicles) has attracted tremendous attention. We measured on-road emissions for 60 \\{LDPVs\\} in three China's cities and calculated their fuel consumption and CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions. We further evaluated the impacts of variations in area-averaged speed on relative fuel consumption of gasoline \\{LDPVs\\} for the UAB (urban area of Beijing). On-road fuel consumption under the average driving pattern is 10 ± 2% higher than that normalized to the NEDC (new European driving cycle) cycle for all tested vehicles, and the on-road NEDC-normalized fuel consumption is higher by 30 ± 12% compared to type-approval values for gasoline vehicles. We observed very strong correlations between relative fuel consumption and average speed. Traffic control applied to \\{LDPVs\\} driving within the UAB during weekdays can substantially reduce total fleet fuel consumption by 23 ± 5% during restriction hours by limiting vehicle use and improving driving conditions. Our results confirmed that a new cycle for the type approval test for \\{LDPVs\\} with more real-world driving features is of great necessity. Furthermore, enhanced traffic control measures could play an important role in mitigating real-world fuel consumption and CO2 emissions for \\{LDPVs\\} in China.

Shaojun Zhang; Ye Wu; Huan Liu; Ruikun Huang; Puikei Un; Yu Zhou; Lixin Fu; Jiming Hao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Association between maternal seafood consumption before pregnancy and fetal growth: evidence for an association in overweight women. The "EDEN mother-child" cohort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Association between maternal seafood consumption before pregnancy and fetal growth: evidence.1365-3016.2008.00982.x #12;2 SUMMARY Studies, in countries with high seafood consumption, suggested its between seafood consumption in French pregnant women and fetal growth. Pregnant women included in the EDEN

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

Use renewables to be cleaner: Meta-analysis of the renewable energy consumption–economic growth nexus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable energy consumption–economic growth nexus is a growing area of research over the last few years, emanating to mixed results. The aim of the current study is to quantitatively synthesise the empirical literature on the subject using the meta-analysis approach. In particular, a meta-multinomial regression is employed to investigate the sources of variation in the direction of causality between renewable energy consumption and economic growth. This causal relationship takes the form of four hypotheses, namely the feedback, conservation, growth and neutrality hypotheses. To the best of author?s knowledge, this study constitutes the first meta-analysis undertaken on the renewable energy consumption–economic growth nexus. The empirical results reveal that the variation in the supported hypotheses is due to a number of characteristics including model specification, data characteristics, estimation techniques (cointegration methods and causality tests), and development level of the country on which a study was conducted.

Maamar Sebri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1b. Fuel Consumption for Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,116 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 104 109 313 Textile Mills 254 205 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 504 375 445 322 Paper 2,744 2,361 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,622 3,202 3,396 325 Chemicals 3,704 3,769 3,195 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 348 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 969 1,052 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,576 2,123 1,744 332 Fabricated Metal Products 441 387 397

242

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 647 518 619 322 Paper 3,221 2,803 2,833 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,873 3,454 3,657 325 Chemicals 4,851 4,803 4,181 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 691 707 683 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,235 1,331 1,385 331 Primary Metals 3,660 3,100 2,617 332 Fabricated Metal Products 791 706 670 333 Machinery 404 341 416 334 Computer and Electronic Products

243

Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2008a model estimates fuel use for off-highway equipment. Construction and mining equipment using diesel fuel account for the majority of this fuel use....

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive fuel consumption Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization ; Renewable Energy 2 August 2005 Fuel Tank Capacity and Gas Pump...

245

Experimental Investigations on Conventional and Semi-Adiabatic Diesel Engine Using Simarouba Biodiesel as Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In view of fast depletion of fossil fuels and the rapid rate at which the fuel consumption is taking place all over the world, scientists are searching for alternate fuels for maintaining the growth industrially ...

M. U. Ravi; C. P. Reddy; K. Ravindranath

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reduction of Fuel Consumption By Thermodynamical Optimization of the Otto-Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the example of the PORSCHE 924 2-liter Otto engine it was demonstrated that the optimization of ... the compression ratio, combustion chamber shape, air/fuel ratio, and ignition timing is a means to reduce fuel

Dr. D. Gruden; R. Hahn; H. Lörcher

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Renewable and non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth relationship revisited: Evidence from G7 countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to investigate the long-run and causal relationships between renewable and non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth by using classical and augmented production functions, and making a comparison between renewable and non-renewable energy sources in order to determine which type of energy consumption is more important for economic growth in G7 countries for 1980–2009 period. Autoregressive Distributed Lag approach to cointegration was employed for this purpose. Also, causality among energy consumption and economic growth was investigated by employing a recently developed causality test by Hatemi-J (2012). The long-run estimates showed that either renewable or non-renewable energy consumption matters for economic growth and augmented production function is more effective on explaining the considered relationship. On the other hand, although bidirectional causality is found for all countries in case of classical production function, mixed results are found for each country when the production function is augmented.

Can Tansel Tugcu; Ilhan Ozturk; Alper Aslan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Prenatal mercury contamination: relation with maternal seafood consumption during pregnancy and fetal growth in the "EDEN mother-child" cohort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Prenatal mercury contamination: relation with maternal seafood consumption during pregnancy-aline.charles@inserm.fr30 Running title: Hg exposure from seafood and fetal growth inserm-00560924,version1-31Jan2011 Author Background: Maternal seafood intake is of great health interest since it constitutes an important source of n

249

Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Fuel Consumption Modeling Based on Road Load and Power Train Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Engines Using Four Fuels,” Southwest Research Institute, 25. J.B.Heywood, “Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals”,

Giannelli, R; Nam, E K; Helmer, K; Younglove, T; Scora, G; Barth, M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Growth of Carbon Support for Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of Carbon Support for Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell by Pulsed-Laser Deposition (PLDGDL)(catalyst) (pulsed laser deposition PLD) (plasma plume) () #12;III Abstract key word: Fuel CellPulsed Laser. People begin to develop fuel cells for seeking alternative energy sources. Fuel cell use the chemical

251

Table 5.3. U.S. per Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption (gallons) Expenditures (dollars) 1.8 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 Race of Householder White ... 138.6 11.5 581 670 19.8 1.4 Black...

252

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents a next generation model-based engine controller that incorporates real-time fuel efficiency optimization and tested under fully transient engine and vehicle operating conditions.

253

Ultra-Lite Diesel Particulate Filter Cartridge for Reduced Regeneration Time and Fuel Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Self-cleaning ceramic filter cartridges offer the advantage of better fuel economy, faster regeneration time, improved heat transfer, and reduction in manufacturing steps

254

Application of artificial neural network to predict specific fuel consumption and exhaust temperature for a Diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability of an artificial neural network model, using a back propagation learning algorithm, to predict specific fuel consumption and exhaust temperature of a Diesel engine for various injection timings is studied. The proposed new model is compared with experimental results. The comparison showed that the consistence between experimental and the network results are achieved by a mean absolute relative error less than 2%. It is considered that a well-trained neural network model provides fast and consistent results, making it an easy-to-use tool in preliminary studies for such thermal engineering problems.

Adnan Parlak; Yasar Islamoglu; Halit Yasar; Aysun Egrisogut

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department released three new reports showcasing strong growth across the U.S. fuel cell and hydrogen technologies market.

256

U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department has released three new reports showcasing strong growth across the U.S. fuel cell and hydrogen technologies market.

257

Causal relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in G6 countries: Evidence from panel Granger causality tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Looking at the recent nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, the consequences were not just environmental or economic. The accident was a big hit to the reputation and trust in nuclear power generation making a number of countries reconsider the nuclear energy as an option. The recent financial crisis might have limited even more the developed countries from the necessary capital to invest in expensive power options but this might change in the future if the positive environmental effects of the nuclear power can be proven substantial. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the causal link between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth for six developed countries over the period from 1971 to 2011. Granger causality procedure based on Meta-analysis in heterogeneous mixed panels is used to allow for cross-sectional dependency and heterogeneity across countries. The empirical findings for the overall panel support the presence of unidirectional causality running from economic growth to nuclear energy consumption across the G-6 countries. However, in the case of UK we find a bidirectional causality running from nuclear energy consumption to economic growth; while the results for Germany confirm the growth hypothesis and for the rest of the countries the neutrality hypothesis.

T. Chang; F. Gatwabuyege; R. Gupta; R. Inglesi-Lotz; N.C. Manjezi; B.D. Simo-Kengne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

259

Fact #704: December 5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for New Heavy Pickups and Vans  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In September 2011 the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued the final rule to set standards regulating the fuel use of new vehicles heavier than 8,500 lbs. gross vehicle weight....

260

Reduced Energy Consumption through the Development of Fuel-Flexible Gas Turbines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Gas turbines—heat engines that use high-temperature and high-pressure gas as the combustible fuel—are used extensively throughout U.S. industry to power industrial processes. The majority of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Growth of Pt nanoparticle for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at anode side of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. With a Pt loading of 25 g-Pt/cm2 , current, PEM fuel cell, Mass specific power density, Electrochemical active surface area, Oxygen reduction PEMFC Growth of Pt nanoparticle for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells

262

Secretary Chu Announces $41.9 Million to Spur Growth of Fuel Cell Markets |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Secretary Chu Announces $41.9 Million to Spur Growth of Fuel Cell Secretary Chu Announces $41.9 Million to Spur Growth of Fuel Cell Markets Secretary Chu Announces $41.9 Million to Spur Growth of Fuel Cell Markets April 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- To expand the use of clean and renewable energy sources and reduce America's dependence on foreign oil, Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced $41.9 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding for fuel cell technology. These efforts will accelerate the commercialization and deployment of fuel cells and will create jobs in fuel cell manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and support services. The new funding will improve the potential of fuel cells to provide power in stationary, portable and specialty vehicle applications, while cutting carbon emissions and

263

Secretary Chu Announces $41.9 Million to Spur Growth of Fuel Cell Markets |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41.9 Million to Spur Growth of Fuel Cell 41.9 Million to Spur Growth of Fuel Cell Markets Secretary Chu Announces $41.9 Million to Spur Growth of Fuel Cell Markets April 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- To expand the use of clean and renewable energy sources and reduce America's dependence on foreign oil, Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced $41.9 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding for fuel cell technology. These efforts will accelerate the commercialization and deployment of fuel cells and will create jobs in fuel cell manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and support services. The new funding will improve the potential of fuel cells to provide power in stationary, portable and specialty vehicle applications, while cutting carbon emissions and broadening our nation's clean energy technology portfolio.

264

Zhai, H., H.C. Frey, N.M. Rouphail, G.A. Gonalves, and T.L. Farias, "Fuel Consumption and Emissions Comparisons between Ethanol 85 and Gasoline Fuels for Flexible Fuel Vehicles," Paper No. 2007-AWMA-444, Proceedings, 100th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Alternative Fuel Data Center (AFDC) of the U.S. Department of Energy.4 Carbon dioxide (CO2), CO, and nitricZhai, H., H.C. Frey, N.M. Rouphail, G.A. Gonçalves, and T.L. Farias, "Fuel Consumption and Emissions Comparisons between Ethanol 85 and Gasoline Fuels for Flexible Fuel Vehicles," Paper No. 2007-AWMA

Frey, H. Christopher

265

"Cumulated Vehicle Acceleration": An Attribute of GPS Probe Vehicle Traces for On-Line Assessment of Vehicle Fuel Consumption in Traffic and Transportation Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To perform a reliable on-line assessment of fuel consumption in vehicles, we introduce "cumulated vehicle acceleration" as an attribute of GPS probe vehicle traces. The objective of the calculation of the attribute "cumulated vehicle acceleration" in the GPS probe vehicle data is to perform a reliable on-line dynamic traffic assignment for the reduction of vehicle consumption in traffic and transportation networks.

Kerner, Boris S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The effects of financial development, economic growth, coal consumption and trade openness on CO2 emissions in South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper explores the effects of financial development, economic growth, coal consumption and trade openness on environmental performance using time series data over the period 1965–2008 in case of South Africa. The ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration has been used to test the long run relationship among the variables while short run dynamics have been investigated by applying error correction method (ECM). The unit root properties of the variables are examined by applying Saikkonen and Lütkepohl (2002. Econometric Theory 18, 313–348) structural break unit root test. Our findings confirmed long run relationship among the variables. Results showed that a rise in economic growth increases energy emissions, while financial development reduces it. Coal consumption has significant contribution to deteriorate environment in South African economy. Trade openness improves environmental quality by reducing the growth of energy pollutants. Our empirical results also verified the existence of environmental Kuznets curve. This paper opens up new insights for South African economy to sustain economic growth by controlling environment from degrdation through efficient use of energy.

Muhammad Shahbaz; Aviral Kumar Tiwari; Muhammad Nasir

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources such as wind generation.

Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Growth, CO2 consumption and H2 production of Anabaena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and renewable energy sources. Hydrogen, for use in fuel cells, is considered to be an attractive alternative of easily accessible fossil fuel resources are calling for effective CO2 mitigation technologies and clean by cultivation of cyanobacteria in photobioreactors offers a clean and renewable alternative to thermochemical

Pilon, Laurent

269

Fuel System and Fuel Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel management provides optimal solutions to reduce fuel consumption. Merchant vessels, such as container ships, drive at a reduced speed to save fuel since the reduction of the speed from...?1 lowers consumption

Michael Palocz-Andresen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TM TM -2003/171 A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption July 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the followi ng source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

271

Reducing Fuel Consumption through Semi-Automated Platooning with Class 8 Tractor Trailer Combinations (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The NREL study addressed the need for data on American style line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics and over a range of trucking speeds common in the United States.

Lammert, M.; Gonder, J.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Problems of attracting nuclear energy resources in order to provide economical and rational consumption of fossil fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depletion of fossil fuels resources and the gradual increase in cost of their extraction and transportation to the places of their consumption put forward into a line of the most urgent tasks the problem of rational and economical utilization of fuel and energy resources, as well as introduction of new energy sources into various sectors of the national economy. The nuclear energy sources which are widely spread in power engineering have not yet been used to a proper extent in the sectors of industrial technologies and residentidal space heating, which are the most energy consuming sectors in the national economy. The most effective way of solving this problem can be the development and commercialization of high temperature nuclear reactors, as the majority of power consuming industrial processes and those involved in chemico-thermal systems of distant heat transmission demand the temperature of a heat carrier generated by nuclear reactors and assimilated by the above processes to be in the range from 900° to 1000°C.

E.K. Nazarov; A.T. Nikitin; N.N. Ponomarev-Stepnoy; A.N. Protsenko; A.Ya. Stolyarevskii; N.A. Doroshenko

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Gasoline prices, gasoline consumption, and new-vehicle fuel economy: Evidence for a large sample of countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Countries differ considerably in terms of the price drivers pay for gasoline. This paper uses data for 132 countries for the period 1995–2008 to investigate the implications of these differences for the consumption of gasoline for road transport. To address the potential for simultaneity bias, we use both a country's oil reserves and the international crude oil price as instruments for a country's average gasoline pump price. We obtain estimates of the long-run price elasticity of gasoline demand of between ? 0.2 and ? 0.5. Using newly available data for a sub-sample of 43 countries, we also find that higher gasoline prices induce consumers to substitute to vehicles that are more fuel-efficient, with an estimated elasticity of + 0.2. Despite the small size of our elasticity estimates, there is considerable scope for low-price countries to achieve gasoline savings and vehicle fuel economy improvements via reducing gasoline subsidies and/or increasing gasoline taxes.

Paul J. Burke; Shuhei Nishitateno

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

On the causal dynamics between economic growth, renewable energy consumption, CO2 emissions and trade openness: Fresh evidence from BRICS countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current study investigates the causal relationship between economic growth and renewable energy consumption in the BRICS countries over the period 1971–2010 within a multivariate framework. The ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration and vector error correction model (VECM) are used to examine the long-run and causal relationships between economic growth, renewable energy consumption, trade openness and carbon dioxide emissions. Empirical evidence shows that, based on the ARDL estimates, there exist long-run equilibrium relationships among the competing variables. Regarding the VECM results, bi-directional Granger causality exists between economic growth and renewable energy consumption, suggesting the feedback hypothesis, which can explain the role of renewable energy in stimulating economic growth in BRICS countries.

Maamar Sebri; Ousama Ben-Salha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The relationship among oil, natural gas and coal consumption and economic growth in BRICTS (Brazil, Russian, India, China, Turkey and South Africa) countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The causality relationship between economic growth and coal, natural gas and oil consumption was investigated using the ARDL (autoregressive distributed lag bounds) testing approach for the 1980–2011 period in Brazil, Russian, India, China, Turkey and South Africa. According to long-run and strong causality results, there is bi-directional causality between oil energy consumption and Y for all countries. The long-run causality and strong causality results between coal consumption and economic growth indicated that there is bi-directional causality for China and India. According to long-run causality results and a strong causality result, there are bi-directional causality relationships between NGC (natural gas energy consumption) and Y for Brazil, Russia and Turkey.

Melike E. Bildirici; Tahsin Bakirtas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessment of the effect of low viscosity oils usage on a light duty diesel engine fuel consumption in stationary and transient conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regarding the global warming due to CO2 emissions, the crude oil depletion and its corresponding rising prices, \\{OEMs\\} are exploring different solutions to increase the internal combustion engine efficiency, among which, the use of Low Viscosity Oils (LVO) represents one attractive cost-effective way to accomplish this goal. Reported in terms of fuel consumption, the effect of LVO is round 2%, depending on the test conditions, especially if the test has taken place in laboratory or “on road” conditions. This study presents the fuel consumption benefits of a commercial 5W20, compared against higher SAE grade oils, on a light duty diesel engine, when it is running under motored test, stationary fired test and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC).

Vicente Macián; Bernardo Tormos; Vicente Bermúdez; Leonardo Ramírez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

278

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

279

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square...

280

Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk George M. Constantinides that shocks to household consumption growth are negatively skewed, persistent, and countercyclical and play that drives the conditional cross-sectional moments of household consumption growth. The estimated model

Sadeh, Norman M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

International Energy Outlook 2001 - World Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Energy Consumption picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents the Energy Information Administration (EIA) outlook for world energy markets to 2020. Current trends in world energy markets are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of the IEO2001 projections for energy consumption by primary energy source and for carbon emissions by fossil fuel. Uncertainty in the forecast is highlighted by an examination of alternative assumptions about economic growth and their impacts on the

282

A Two-Phase Pressure Drop Model Incorporating Local Water Balance and Reactant Consumption in PEM Fuel Cell Gas Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and directly affects cost and sizing of fuel cell subsystems. Within several regions of PEMFC operating Fuel Cell Gas Channels E. J. See and S. G. Kandlikar Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rochester in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The ability to model two-phase flow and pressure drop

Kandlikar, Satish

283

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

284

Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering Emissions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gas fuels include biogas from animal and agri- cultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills, as well as...

285

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

286

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand)...

287

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace...

288

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

289

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

290

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

291

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace...

292

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total...

293

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to policy makers such as fuel price, GHG emission (bothdimensions, namely, fuel price, GHG emissions and marketa FGIS results in higher fuel price, lower fuel consumption,

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

and alternative fuel vehicles; promotes the development, sale, distribution, and consumption of alternative fuels; promotes the development and use of alternative fuel vehicles...

295

Impact of Real Field Diesel Quality Variability on Engine Emissions and Fuel Consumption Solutions for Onboard Optimisation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A matrix of 10 diesel fuels was prepared and tested to establish an optimized ECU setting and a compensating algorithm for the engine.

296

Growth, innovation, scaling, and the pace of life in cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...characterized by energy consumption rates, growth rates...determine the rates at which energy is delivered to...refers to total energy consumed in households...Shannon Larsen. · Fuel sales by gasoline...put forward by Florida (2), "supercreative...

Luís M. A. Bettencourt; José Lobo; Dirk Helbing; Christian Kühnert; Geoffrey B. West

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. many mechamistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, reearch, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fuel Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI Gasoline Engine Equipped with a Lean-NOx Trap  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lean-burn improves PFI fuel economy by ~3% relative to best stoichiometric VCT/EGR conditions, when used in combination with VCT & EGR.

299

Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

NONE

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Existing Vessels, Reducing Shipboard Fuel Consumption and48 Navy vessels have reported fuel consumption into the Navy

Williams, Charles

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An assessment of operations of oil-exporting countries in terms of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from 16 oil-exporting countries are studied using Data Envelopment Analysis using indicators representing economic growth, energy consumption and emissions. The analysis for 1996 shows that Norway, Gabon and Nigeria are efficient and that Russia is inefficient. Malmquist Productivity Index analysis shows that there is progress in achieving higher values of GDP and non-fossil fuel consumption and in achieving lower values of fossil fuel consumption and carbon emissions in the year 1996 when compared with 1992 for Norway, Russia, Mexico, Algeria, Libya, Gabon and Oman.

Ramakrishnan Ramanathan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of a control-oriented model to optimise fuel consumption and NOX emissions in a DI Diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes a predictive NOX and consumption model, which is oriented to control and optimisation of DI Diesel engines. The model applies the Response Surface Methodology following a two-step process: firstly, the relationship between engine inputs (intake charge conditions and injection settings) and some combustion parameters (peak pressure, indicated mean effective pressure and burn angles) is determined; secondly, engine outputs (NOX and consumption) are predicted from the combustion parameters using NOX and mechanical losses models. Splitting the model into two parts allows using either experimental or modelled combustion parameters, thus enhancing the model flexibility. If experimental in-cylinder pressure is used to obtain combustion parameters, the mean error of predicted NOX and consumption are 2% and 6% respectively, with a calculation time of 5.5 ms. Using modelled parameters reduces the calculation time to 1.5 ms, with a penalty in the accuracy. The model performs well in a multi-objective optimisation, reducing NOX and consumption in different amounts depending on the objective of the optimisation.

S. Molina; C. Guardiola; J. Martín; D. García-Sarmiento

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The causal relationship between energy resources and economic growth in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the causal relationship between clean and non-clean energy consumption and economic growth in Brazil over the period of 1980–2009. Clean energy consumption at aggregated level of total renewable energy consumption and disaggregated levels of hydroelectric, new renewables, and nuclear energy consumption are tested within a production function framework. A cointegration test reveals a long-term equilibrium relationship between real output, capital, labor, and renewable and non-renewable energy consumption at aggregated level, and a long-term equilibrium relationship between real output, capital, labor, and hydroelectric/new renewables/nuclear and fossil fuel energy consumption at disaggregated level. The capital, labor, and new renewables elasticities of real output are positive and statistically significant, other energy consumption item's elasticities are insignificant. The results from error correction model reveal the interdependencies between new renewables, nuclear, fossil fuel, and total non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth, the unidirectional causality from hydroelectric/total renewable consumption to economic growth, the substitutability between new renewables and fossil fuel consumption, and the substitutability between new renewables and nuclear energy consumption. Additionally, nuclear and new renewables energy consumption responds to bring the system back to equilibrium. Overall, aggregated analysis may obscure the relationship between different types of clean energy consumption and economic growth.

Hsiao-Tien Pao; Hsin-Chia Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The effect of electricity consumption from renewable sources on countries? economic growth levels: Evidence from advanced, emerging and developing economies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper uses a sample of 36 countries for the time period 1990–2011 in order to examine the relationship between countries? electricity consumption from renewable sources and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) levels. Several nonparametric techniques are applied to investigate the effect of electricity consumption from several renewable sources including wind, geothermal, solar, biomass and waste on countries? GDP levels. When investigating the whole sample ignoring countries? economic development status, the results reveal an increasing relationship up to a certain GDP level, which after that point the effect of electricity consumption on GDP stabilises. However when analyzing separately the ‘Emerging Markets and Developing Economies’, and, the ‘Advanced-Developed Economies’, the results change significantly. For the case of Emerging Market and Developing Economies the relationship appears to be highly nonlinear (an M-shape form) indicating that on those countries the levels of electricity consumption from renewable sources will not result on higher GDP levels. In contrast for the case of the advanced economies the results reveal an increasing nonlinear relationship indicating that higher electricity consumption levels from renewable sources results to higher GDP levels. This finding is mainly attributed to the fact that in the advanced-developed economies more terawatts from renewable sources are generated and consumed compared to the emerging market and developing economies, which traditionally their economies rely on non-renewable sources for power generation and consumption.

George E. Halkos; Nickolaos G. Tzeremes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Consumption Total primary energy consumption in the AEO2008 reference case increases at an average rate of 0.9 percent per year, from 100.0 quadrillion Btu in 2006 to 123.8 quadrillion Btu in 2030—7.4 quadrillion Btu less than in the AEO2007 reference case. In 2030, the levels of consumption projected for liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal are all lower in the AEO2008 reference case than in the AEO2007 reference case. Among the most important factors resulting in lower total energy demand in the AEO2008 reference case are lower economic growth, higher energy prices, greater use of more efficient appliances, and slower growth in energy-intensive industries. Figure 2. Delivered energy consumption by sector, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

306

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND FUEL CONSUMPTION FOR DIESEL - POWERED NONROAD FORKLIFT ENGINES ,AND FUEL CONSUMPTION FOR DIESEL - POWERED NONROAD FORKLIFT ENGINES ,

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

308

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

309

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

end-use Residential primary energy consumption was 6.6 EJ inof primary energy. Primary energy consumption includes final14 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel (with

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in24 Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel in Commercialbased on total primary energy consumption (source energy),

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liters Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Refrigeratorby Efficiency Class Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Figure 8by Fuel Figure 1 Primary Energy Consumption by End-use)

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013_summer_fuels.pptx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S F l O tl k 2013 Summer Fuels Outlook April 9, 2013 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, pp y g , p y , expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption growth and contribute to modest declines in world crude oil prices. prices. * Brent crude oil prices fall gradually over the forecast, averaging, from $112 per barrel in 2012 to $108 per barrel in g g, $ p $ p 2013 and $101 per barrel in 2014. The discount for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil relative to other world

313

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

314

A new hybrid pneumatic combustion engine to improve fuel consumption of wind–Diesel power system for non-interconnected areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of an optimized Hybrid Pneumatic-Combustion Engine (HPCE) concept that permits reducing fuel consumption for electricity production in non-interconnected remote areas, originally equipped with hybrid Wind–Diesel System (WDS). Up to now, most of the studies on the pneumatic hybridization of Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) have dealt with two-stroke pure pneumatic mode. The few studies that have dealt with hybrid pneumatic-combustion four-stroke mode require adding a supplementary valve to charge compressed air in the combustion chamber. This modification means that a new cylinder head should be fabricated. Moreover, those studies focus on spark ignition engines and are not yet validated for Diesel engines. Present HPCE is capable of making a Diesel engine operate under two-stroke pneumatic motor mode, two-stroke pneumatic pump mode and four-stroke hybrid mode, without needing an additional valve in the combustion chamber. This fact constitutes this study’s strength and innovation. The evaluation of the concept is based on ideal thermodynamic cycle modeling. The optimized valve actuation timings for all modes lead to generic maps that are independent of the engine size. The fuel economy is calculated for a known site during a whole year, function of the air storage volume and the wind power penetration rate.

Tammam Basbous; Rafic Younes; Adrian Ilinca; Jean Perron

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Far East » South Korea Far East » South Korea South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends South Korea, or the Republic of Korea, is the world's tenth largest emitter of CO2 based on 2008 fossil-fuel consumption and cement production with 139 million metric tons of carbon. From 1946-1997 South Korea experienced phenomenal growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions with a growth rate that averaged 11.5%. Initial growth in emissions was due to coal consumption, which still accounts for 46.9% of South Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. Since the late 1960s oil consumption has been a major source of emissions. South Korea is the world's fifth largest importer of crude oil. Natural gas became a significant source of CO2 for the first time in 1987, as South

316

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Low Economic Growth Case Projection  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region Table C1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table C2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

317

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

medium- and heavy-duty vehicles must implement strategies to reduce petroleum consumption and emissions by using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fleet fuel...

318

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption The retail sale, use, storage, and consumption of alternative fuels is exempt from the state retail sales and use tax. (Reference North Carolina...

319

Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the relationship between electrical power consumption per capita and GDP per capita in 130 countries using the data reported by World Bank. We found that an electrical power consumption per capita...

Aki-Hiro Sato

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Logo Full Report - (file size 5.4 MB) pages:531 Selected Sections (PDF format) Contents (file size 56 kilobytes, 10 pages). Overview (file size 597 kilobytes, 11 pages). Chapters 1-3 (file size 265 kilobytes, 9 pages). Chapter 4 (file size 1,070 kilobytes, 15 pages). Appendix A - Detailed Tables Tables A1 - A8 (file size 1,031 kilobytes, 139 pages). Tables A9 - A23 (file size 746 kilobytes, 119 pages). Tables A24 - A29 (file size 485 kilobytes, 84 pages). Tables A30 - A44 (file size 338 kilobytes, 39 pages). Appendix B (file size 194 kilobytes, 24 pages). Appendix C (file size 116 kilobytes, 16 pages).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diesel fuel consumption, lubricant changes, and enginefuel consumption, and costs associated with diesel engineDiesel Idling diesel consumption Diesel fuel cost Lubricant cost Engine

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diesel fuel consumption, lubricant changes, and enginefuel consumption, and costs associated with diesel enginediesel consumption Diesel fuel cost Lubricant cost Engine

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End Use Sector Energy Consumption by End Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 25. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 26. OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. OECD and Non-OECD Commercial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

324

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

325

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-High Economic Growth Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) 7 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table B1. World Total Primary energy consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table B2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

326

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

327

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

328

Waste biomass from production process co-firing with coal in a steam boiler to reduce fossil fuel consumption: A case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Waste biomass is always generated during the production process in industries. The ordinary way to get rid of the waste biomass is to send them to landfill or burn it in the open field. The waste may potentially be used for co-firing with coal to save fossil fuel consumption and also reduce net carbon emissions. In this case study, the bio-waste from a Nicotiana Tabacum (NT) pre-treatment plant is used as the biomass to co-fire with coal. The samples of NT wastes were analysed. It was found that the wastes were of the relatively high energy content which were suitable for co-firing with coal. To investigate the potential and benefits for adding NT wastes to a Fluidised Bed Combustion (FBC) boiler in the plant, detailed modelling and simulation are carried out using the European Coal Liquefaction Process Simulation and Evaluation (ECLIPSE) process simulation package. The feedstock blending ratios of NT waste to coal studied in this work are varied from 0% to 30%. The results show that the addition of NT wastes may decrease the emissions of CO2 and \\{SOx\\} without reducing the boiler performance.

Hongyan Gu; Kai Zhang; Yaodong Wang; Ye Huang; Neil Hewitt; Anthony P Roskilly

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Carbohydrate as Fuel for Foraging, Resource Defense and Colony Growth a Long-term Experiment with the Plant-ant Crematogaster nigriceps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbohydrate as Fuel for Foraging, Resource Defense and Colony Growth ­ a Long-term Experiment of whether excess carbohydrates `fuel' colony acquisition of limiting resources and growth. In a 10-month ARE PERHAPS THE MOST UBIQUITOUS CURRENCY IN MUTUALISMS. Plants, algae, and some insects reward their mutual

Palmer, Todd M.

330

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption forvarious data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption foras international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% of

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Baseline projections of transportation energy consumption by mode: 1981 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive set of activity and energy-demand projections for each of the major transportation modes and submodes is presented. Projections are developed for a business-as-usual scenario, which provides a benchmark for assessing the effects of potential conservation strategies. This baseline scenario assumes a continuation of present trends, including fuel-efficiency improvements likely to result from current efforts of vehicle manufacturers. Because of anticipated changes in fuel efficiency, fuel price, modal shifts, and a lower-than-historic rate of economic growth, projected growth rates in transportation activity and energy consumption depart from historic patterns. The text discusses the factors responsible for this departure, documents the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the modal projections, and compares the projections with other efforts.

Millar, M; Bunch, J; Vyas, A; Kaplan, M; Knorr, R; Mendiratta, V; Saricks, C

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

333

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

334

EIA - Appendix B - High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2009 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table B1. World Total Primary energy consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table B2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

335

EIA - Appendix C - Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2009 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region Table C1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table C2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

336

EIA - Appendix C - Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region Table C1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table C2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

337

Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

861,063 864,113 913,229 916,797 938,340 987,957 1983-2012 861,063 864,113 913,229 916,797 938,340 987,957 1983-2012 Alabama 11,345 11,136 10,460 10,163 10,367 12,389 1983-2012 Alaska 227,374 211,878 219,161 211,918 208,531 214,335 1983-2012 Arizona 20 20 17 19 17 12 1983-2012 Arkansas 1,502 2,521 4,091 5,340 6,173 6,599 1983-2012 California 56,936 64,689 63,127 64,931 44,379 51,154 1983-2012 Colorado 39,347 44,231 64,873 66,083 78,800 76,462 1983-2012 Florida 654 897 94 4,512 4,896 6,080 1983-2012 Gulf of Mexico 115,528 102,389 103,976 108,490 101,217 93,985 1999-2012 Illinois 39 41 62 50 101 122 1983-2012 Indiana 101 161 211 283 433 506 1983-2012 Kansas 10,232 12,803 15,169 13,461 12,781 17,017 1983-2012 Kentucky 2,676 3,914 4,862 5,626 5,925 6,095 1983-2012

338

Fossil Fuel Reserves Versus Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Table 2.1 of Chapter 2, data are presented which reveal that the U.S.’s known and recoverable reserves of petroleum are about 22.5 billion ... 2.2 percent of the known and recoverable reserves of the world. In...

Wendell H. Wiser

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

340

Indexes of Consumption and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Source: Energy Information Administration and Federal Reserve Board. History of Shipments This chart presents indices of 14 years (1980-1994) of historical data of manufacturing production indexes and Purchased (Offsite-Produced) Energy consumption, using 1992 as the base year (1992 = 100). Indexing both energy consumption and production best illustrates the trends in output and consumption. Taken separately, these two indices track the relative growth rates within the specified industry. Taken together, they reveal trends in energy efficiency. For example, a steady increase in output, coupled with a decline in energy consumption, represents energy efficiency gains. Likewise, steadily rising energy consumption with a corresponding decline in output illustrates energy efficiency losses.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Methanol: A Versatile Fuel for Immediate Use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Specific fuel consumption-will certainly...necessitat-ing a larger fuel tank; but specific energy consumption (energy per...found that (i) fuel economy increased...Toyota (1900 cms engine, 85 brake horsepower...of knock and "Diesel operation...

T. B. Reed; R. M. Lerner

1973-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

343

Tobacco Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tobacco consumption is the use of tobacco products in different forms such as , , , water-pipes or tobacco products. Cigarettes and tobacco products containing tobacco are highly engineered so as to creat...

Martina Pötschke-Langer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor and Controls for Advanced Low-Pressure Drop Systems to Reduce Engine Fuel Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

345

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

346

Resource Consumption of Additive Manufacturing Technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The degradation of natural resources as a result of consumption to support the economic growth of humans society represents one of the greatest sustainability challenges.… (more)

Nopparat, Nanond

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EIA - Appendix B - High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) 8 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table B1. World Total Primary energy consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table B2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

348

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012_summer_fuels.pptx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summer Transportation Fuels Summer Transportation Fuels O tl k Outlook April 10, 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * Recovery in Libyan production but lower crude oil exports from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over the level and security of supply from Iran and other countries in the Middle East and North Africa region. * Decline in consumption in OECD countries including the United States but continuing consumption growth in emerging economies. economies. * Continuing discount for West Texas Intermediate crude oil relative to other world crudes. 2 2012 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook World liquid fuels consumption is projected to increase by 0.9

349

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy ConsumptionType Choice, and Fuel Usage Total annual residentialResidential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

EIA - Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables 1990-2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 13 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region, Low Economic Growth Case Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel, Low Economic Growth Case

351

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advancing Alternative Fuel Markets Adoption and Growth  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

352

Annual Energy Outlook 2014 foresees growth of LNG as a fuel for...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

specific to fuel economics as well as operational, financial, regulatory, and mechanical challenges that may constrain the use of LNG to power freight locomotives. Taking...

353

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama ........... 651.0 614.8 156.5 13.4 12.8 304.5 13.4 49.1 549.5 1,815.4 614.8 319.8 Alaska ............... 15.5 337.0 85.1 118.2 1.3 31.9 1.9 28.6 267.1 619.6 337.0 34.6 Arizona ............. 459.9 293.7 151.8 21.5 9.1 297.3 (s) 21.1 500.9 1,254.5 293.7 323.4 Arkansas ........... 306.1 288.6 134.9 5.9 9.4 165.4 0.2 19.8 335.7 930.5 288.6 175.6 California .......... 55.3 2,196.6 567.0 549.7 67.2 1,695.4 186.9 339.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 2,196.6

354

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

355

Alcohol Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different forms of alcohol have different functions: as part of cleaners, fuel, medicine, etc. Worldwide the substance is well known as a component of different alcoholic beverages. These beverages differ no...

Gundula Barsch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

State Agency Petroleum Reduction Plan All state agencies must reduce their fleets' petroleum consumption by increasing vehicle fuel economy and operating efficiency and reducing...

357

Heavy-Duty Trucks Poised to Accelerate Growth of American Alternative Transportation Fuels Market  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Background Background Since 1988, federal and state legislation has mandated the adoption of alternative transportation fuels, primarily because of environmental and energy security concerns. Recently, however, much of the alternative fuels activity has shifted. With the electoral revolution of 1992, Congress is rethinking environmental regulation and cutting federal appro- priations for alternative fueled vehi- cles (AFVs). The U.S. Enviromental Protection Agency (EPA) may delay implementation of stringent emission standards, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has delayed requirements for alternative fuel adoption that were set to go into effect on September 1, 1995. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, as federal and state legislation was being crafted across the country,

358

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

359

Steam thermolysis of discarded tires: testing and analysis of the specific fuel consumption with tail gas burning, steam generation, and secondary waste slime processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the process of steam thermolysis of shredded used tires for obtaining from them liquid fuel and technical carbon carried out in a screw reactor with heating due to the partial burning of obtai...

V. A. Kalitko; Morgan Chun Yao Wu…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Rail Transit and Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Transit and Energy Consumption In a recent issue...D.C. 20418 The Diesel's Advantages It...p. 517). The diesel car, while it has...Other types of engine can be made to meet...catalysts by using leaded fuel because it is 3 to...politically unpopular. The diesel car requires no add-on...

CHARLES A. LAVE

1977-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

that produces up to 5,000 gallons of biodiesel fuel in a calendar year for personal consumption is exempt from the requirement to obtain an Idaho motor fuel distributor's license....

362

Consumption Behavior in Investment/Consumption Problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter we study the consumption behavior of an agent in the dynamic framework of consumption/investment decision making that allows the presence of a subsistence consumption level and the possibility of ...

E. L. Presman

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

364

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

365

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

366

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

367

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

368

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

369

Demand growth to continue for oil, resume for gas this year in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand for petroleum products and natural gas in the US will move up again this year, stimulated by economic growth and falling prices. Economic growth, although slower than it was last year, will nevertheless remain strong. Worldwide petroleum supply will rise, suppressing oil prices. Natural gas prices are also expected to fall in response to the decline in oil prices and competitive pressure from other fuels. The paper discusses the economy, total energy consumption, energy sources, oil supply (including imports, stocks, refining, refining margins and prices), oil demand (motor gasoline, jet fuel, distillate fuel, residual fuel oil, and other petroleum products), natural gas demand, and natural gas supply.

Beck, R.J.

1998-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

370

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, ÂŤEnergy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsÂŽ  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

371

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, ÂŤEnergy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsÂŽ  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

372

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Program Overview - - Program Overview - Sunita Satyapal Program Manager 2012 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting May 14, 2012 Petroleum 37% Natural Gas 25% Coal 21% Nuclear Energy 9% Renewable Energy 8% Transportation Residential & Commercial Industrial Electric Power 2 U.S. Energy Consumption Total U.S. Energy = 98 Quadrillion Btu/yr Source: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2010, Table 1.3 U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Residential 16% Commercial 13% Industrial 22% Transportation 20% Electric Power 29% Share of Energy Consumed by Major Sectors of the Economy, 2010 Fuel Cells can apply to diverse sectors 3 Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean

373

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

374

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

375

Population Dynamics within a Microbial Consortium during Growth on Diesel Fuel in Saline Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MJ Research). The cycle parameters were as follows: 4 min at 94C and 30 cycles of 45 s at 94C, 1 min...with an E.Z.N.A. Cycle-Pure Kit (peqLab Biotechnologie...within this study, general shifts in composition...the key degraders of diesel fuel in the examined...

Sabine Kleinsteuber; Volker Riis; Ingo Fetzer; Hauke Harms; Susann Müller

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

378

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Fuel: Trade-off between NOx, Particulate Emission, and Fuel Consumption of a Heavy Duty Engine.

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Far East » North Korea Far East » North Korea North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions for North Korea, or the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, averaged 11.2% growth from 1950-93, reaching 71 million metric tons of carbon. Since 1993 according to published UN energy statistics, fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have declined 70% to 21.4 million metric tons of carbon. As the world's 14th largest producer of coal, it is no surprise North Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions record is dominated by emissions from coal burning. Coal consumption accounted for 93% of the 2008 CO2 emission total. With no natural gas usage, another 3.4% currently comes from liquid petroleum consumption, and the remainder is from cement

380

Volatility of Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical Fuel Injection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Supercritical dieseline could be used in diesel engines having efficient fuel systems and combustion chamber designs that decrease fuel consumption and mitigate emissions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fuel Conservation and Applied Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the use ofbet-ter engines, better transmissions...1. Effect on energy consumption of specific improvements...Total automotive fuel consumption equals 19 percent ofnational...reduction 3 Adiabatic diesel engine Efficiency increase...

Jerry Grey; George W. Sutton; Martin Zlotnick

1978-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

382

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports All Sectors Change category... All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and

383

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

384

Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oceania » Japan Oceania » Japan Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The history of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from Japan is remarkable for the abrupt change that occurred in 1973. With postwar growth at 9.8% per year from 1950 to 1973, total emissions were virtually constant from 1974-1987. From 1987-96, emissions grew 25.3% reaching 329 million metric tons of carbon. Growth during this period was characterized by a return to mid-1970s consumption levels for liquid petroleum products and increased contributions from coal and natural gas use. Since 1996, Japan's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have vacilated and now total 329 million metric tons of carbon in 2008. Based on United Nations energy trade data for 2008, Japan is the world's largest importer of coal (184 million metric tons) and

385

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engine itself is more efficient, providing potentially more power for a given average fuel consumption.

Schipper, Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Effects of Gossypol Consumption on the Growth Traits of Red Deer Stags and Supplemental Melatonin for Advancement of Estrous Cycles in Red Deer Hinds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiment I studied the effect of dietary gossypol (G) on antler and body growth traits of red deer stags, whereas Experiment II studied the effect of exogenous melatonin on female red deer reproductive traits. Specifically in Experiment I, thirty...

Morgan, Shane

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

MECS Fuel Oil Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel : Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel Figure 1. Percent of Total Purchased Fuel Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS): Consumption of Energy; U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM): Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries: Statistical Abstract of the United States. Note: The years below the line on the "X" Axis are interpolated data--not directly from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey or the Annual Survey of Manufactures. Figure 2: Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Figure 2. Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of

389

Externality of Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Externalities of consumption exist if one individual's consumption of a good or service has positive... utility of another person. A positive externality increases ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

World energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. 0. Number of Establishments that Actually Switched Fuels from Natural Gas to Residual Fuel Oil, by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994 369 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 SIC Residual Fuel Oil Total Code Industry Group and Industry (billion cu ft) Factors (counts) (counts) (percents) (counts) (percents) a Natural Gas Switchable to Establishments RSE Row Able to Switch Actually Switched RSE Column Factors: 1.3 0.1 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.8 20 Food and Kindred Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 14,698 702 4.8 262 1.8 5.6 2011 Meat Packing Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 759 23 3.0 10 1.3 9.0 2033 Canned Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 531 112 21.2 33 6.2 11.6 2037 Frozen Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 232 Q 5.3

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption The retail sale, use, storage, and consumption of alternative fuels is exempt from the state retail sales and use tax. (Reference North Carolina

393

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

394

Population, Consumption & the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/11/2009 1 Population, Consumption & the Environment Alex de Sherbinin Center for International of carbon in 2001 · The ecological footprint, a composite measure of consumption measured in hectares kind of consumption is bad for the environment? 2. How are population dynamics and consumption linked

Columbia University

395

The Effect of Diesel Fuel Properties on Emissions-Restrained...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(varying fuel properties and engine control parameters) were used to optimize fuel consumption subject to emissions and engine performance constraints. deer08kumar.pdf More...

396

Volatility of Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

having efficient fuel systems and combustion chamber designs that decrease fuel consumption and mitigate emissions. p-02anitescu.pdf More Documents & Publications...

397

Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

low-emission operation across a broad range of fuel compositions, including syngas, biogas, natural gas, and refinery fuel gas. Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering...

398

The Effect of Diesel Fuel Properties on Emissions-Restrained Fuel Economy at Mid-Load Conditions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statistical models developed from designed esperiments (varying fuel properties and engine control parameters) were used to optimize fuel consumption subject to emissions and engine performance constraints.

399

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Maryland Conserves Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on AddThis.com... March 5, 2011 Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks L earn how Maryland is reducing fuel consumption, engine noise, and

400

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

motor vehicle on any highway in Indiana is subject to a surcharge tax on the consumption of motor fuel. The tax rate is 0.11 per diesel gallon equivalent for liquefied...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

402

Investigating the Effect of Engine Lubricant Viscosity on Engine Friction and Fuel Economy of a Diesel Engine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fuel economy is affected, both by fuel and engine lubricant quality. Engine lubricant quality plays a vital role in reduction of fuel consumption by effective… (more)

Singh, Devendra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of DOD’s consumption. Marine diesel fuel accounts for 13%. ”fuel savings over currently used simple cycle gas turbine marine

Williams, Charles

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fuel Optimal Thrust Allocation in Dynamic Positioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vessels with diesel-electric power system. In this paper the focus is on using the thrust allocation to make the diesel generators on board the vessel work more fuel efficiently, by reducing the total fuel consumption of all online diesel generators. A static model for the fuel consumption of a diesel generator

Johansen, Tor Arne

405

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

406

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Monitoring and Management of Refinery Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of same other nOl1"operational variables on the energy target. Figure 10 shows the results of the monitoring period in rep;Jrt form. The actual consumption for each utility is listed and converted to energy content. The base target consumption... ===============~===~.========.=.=====.=========~====================~===== ENERGY TOTAL CONTENT ENEF~GY ACTW~L CONSUMPT I ON UI\\lITS BTU/UI\\lIT MMBTU/DAY FUEL G?\\S: 441425.0 SCFH 1401.0 14842.5 FUEL OIL: O.C' BPO 6470000.0 0.0 HP STEAI1: -79344.0 tt/Hf~ 1136. C' -2163.2 MP STEAI1: 48488.0 tt/HR 952.0 1107.9 LP STEAM: BFW...

Pelham, R. O.; Moriarty, R. D.; Hudgens, P. D.

408

Coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of coal based fuel systems such as coal/air and coal water mixtures was an attempt to minimize the use of heavy fuel oils in large scale power generation processes. This need was based on forecasts of fuel reserves and future pricing of fuel oils, therefore economic considerations predominated over environmental benefits, if any, which could result from widespread use of these fuels. Coal continued as the major fuel used in the power generation industry and combustion systems were developed to minimize gaseous emissions, such as NOx. Increasing availability of natural gas led to consideration of its use in combination with coal in fuel systems involving combined cycle or topping cycle operations. Dual fuel coal natural gas operations also offered the possibility of improved performance in comparison to 100% coal based fuel systems. Economic considerations have more recently looked at emulsification of heavy residual liquid fuels for consumption in power generation boiler and Orimulsion has emerged as a prime example of this alternative fuel technology. The paper will discuss some aspects of the burner technology related to the application of these various coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels in the power generation industry.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of coal based fuel systems such as coal/air and coal water mixtures was an attempt to minimise the use of heavy fuel oils in large scale power generation processes. This need was based on forecasts of fuel reserves and future pricing of fuel oils, therefore economic considerations predominated over environmental benefits, if any, which could result from widespread use of these fuels. Coal continued as the major fuel used in the power generation industry and combustion systems were developed to minimise gaseous emissions, such as NO{sub x}. Increasing availability of natural gas led to consideration of its use in combination with coal in fuel systems involving combined cycle or topping cycle operations. Dual fuel coal natural gas operations also offered the possibility of improved performance in comparison to 100% coal based fuel systems. Economic considerations have more recently looked at emulsification of heavy residual liquid fuels for consumption in power generation boiler and Orimulsion has emerged as a prime example of this alternative fuel technology. The next sections of the paper will discuss some aspects of the burner technology related to the application of these various coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels in the power generation industry.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [ABB Combustion Services Limited, Derby (United Kingdom)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Bioavailable copper modulates oxidative phosphorylation and growth of tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...formation of new blood vessels, and copper has been...acid (TCA) cycle and fuels oxidative phosphorylation...ATP (A), glucose consumption (B...which is consumed to fuel rapid proliferation...more invasive. Oxygen consumption is not quantitatively...

Seiko Ishida; Pénélope Andreux; Carole Poitry-Yamate; Johan Auwerx; Douglas Hanahan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fuel Consumption per Vehicle.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

621 621 611 559 548 578 592 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 609 NA 525 523 545 571 New England........................................................ 582 NA 517 541 542 586 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 619 NA 528 517 545 564 Midwest ................................................................. 620 NA 550 554 580 588 East North Central............................................... 627 NA 550 553 574 585 West North Central ............................................. 607 NA 550 557 592 594 South..................................................................... 644 NA 585 566 598 615 South Atlantic.......................................................

412

Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,700 2,790 2,700 2,790 2,790 2,700 1997-2013 ,700 2,790 2,700 2,790 2,790 2,700 1997-2013 Alabama 10 10 10 10 18 17 2010-2013 Alaska 2 2 2 2 1 1 2010-2013 Arizona 190 196 190 196 159 154 2010-2013 Arkansas 2 2 2 2 2 2 2010-2013 California 1,278 1,321 1,278 1,321 1,365 1,321 2010-2013 Colorado 23 24 23 24 26 25 2010-2013 Connecticut 4 4 4 4 3 2 2010-2013 Delaware 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 District of Columbia 83 86 83 86 82 79 2010-2013 Florida 6 6 6 6 8 8 2010-2013 Georgia 86 89 86 89 102 99 2010-2013 Hawaii 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Idaho 7 7 7 7 12 12 2010-2013 Illinois 28 29 28 29 24 24 2010-2013 Indiana 5 5 5 5 2 2 2010-2013 Iowa 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Kansas 1 1 1 1 1 1 2010-2013 Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Louisiana

413

Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,700 2,790 2,700 2,790 2,790 2,700 1997-2013 ,700 2,790 2,700 2,790 2,790 2,700 1997-2013 Alabama 10 10 10 10 18 17 2010-2013 Alaska 2 2 2 2 1 1 2010-2013 Arizona 190 196 190 196 159 154 2010-2013 Arkansas 2 2 2 2 2 2 2010-2013 California 1,278 1,321 1,278 1,321 1,365 1,321 2010-2013 Colorado 23 24 23 24 26 25 2010-2013 Connecticut 4 4 4 4 3 2 2010-2013 Delaware 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 District of Columbia 83 86 83 86 82 79 2010-2013 Florida 6 6 6 6 8 8 2010-2013 Georgia 86 89 86 89 102 99 2010-2013 Hawaii 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Idaho 7 7 7 7 12 12 2010-2013 Illinois 28 29 28 29 24 24 2010-2013 Indiana 5 5 5 5 2 2 2010-2013 Iowa 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Kansas 1 1 1 1 1 1 2010-2013 Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Louisiana

414

Lease Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

861,063 864,113 913,229 916,797 938,340 987,957 1983-2012 861,063 864,113 913,229 916,797 938,340 987,957 1983-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 115,528 102,389 103,976 108,490 101,217 93,985 1999-2012 Alabama 11,345 11,136 10,460 10,163 10,367 12,389 1983-2012 Alaska 227,374 211,878 219,161 211,918 208,531 214,335 1983-2012 Arizona 20 20 17 19 17 12 1983-2012 Arkansas 1,502 2,521 4,091 5,340 6,173 6,599 1983-2012 California 56,936 64,689 63,127 64,931 44,379 51,154 1983-2012 Colorado 39,347 44,231 64,873 66,083 78,800 76,462 1983-2012 Florida 654 897 94 4,512 4,896 6,080 1983-2012 Illinois 39 41 62 50 101 122 1983-2012 Indiana 101 161 211 283 433 506 1983-2012 Kansas 10,232 12,803 15,169 13,461 12,781 17,017 1983-2012 Kentucky 2,676 3,914 4,862 5,626 5,925 6,095 1983-2012

415

Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

365,323 355,590 362,009 368,830 384,248 408,316 1983-2012 365,323 355,590 362,009 368,830 384,248 408,316 1983-2012 Alabama 6,269 6,858 6,470 6,441 6,939 6,616 1983-2012 Alaska 41,197 40,286 39,447 37,316 35,339 37,397 1983-2012 Arkansas 404 470 489 529 423 622 1983-2012 California 2,540 2,318 2,611 2,370 2,253 2,417 1983-2012 Colorado 16,218 18,613 21,288 25,090 28,265 29,383 1983-2012 Florida 671 83 0 0 0 0 1983-2012 Illinois 45 48 41 4,559 4,917 4,896 1983-2012 Kansas 5,439 2,331 2,126 2,102 2,246 2,268 1983-2012 Kentucky 691 587 391 772 278 641 1983-2012 Louisiana 51,499 42,957 39,002 40,814 42,633 42,123 1983-2012 Michigan 2,076 1,982 1,686 1,684 1,303 1,174 1983-2012 Mississippi 1,196 1,140 1,150 1,155 1,042 1,111 1983-2012 Montana 816 788 771 800 604 612 1983-2012

416

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate change/stern_re- view_report.cfm. (2006). RGGI.Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI): An Initia­ tive of theGreenhouse Gas Initia­ tive (RGGI). Currently, Connecticut,

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

,"Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:25:39 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado...

418

,"Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:26:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah...

419

,"Virginia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:26:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia...

420

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:26:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

24,655 25,982 27,262 28,664 29,974 30,056 1997-2012 24,655 25,982 27,262 28,664 29,974 30,056 1997-2012 Alabama 88 84 80 105 192 192 1988-2012 Alaska 28 26 22 20 11 11 1997-2012 Arizona 2,010 1,991 2,096 2,015 1,712 1,717 1988-2012 Arkansas 13 12 11 16 21 21 1988-2012 California 11,015 11,705 12,802 13,572 14,660 14,700 1988-2012 Colorado 141 121 250 249 282 283 1988-2012 Connecticut 89 81 49 41 27 27 1988-2012 Delaware 5 4 1 1 1 1 1988-2012 District of Columbia 61 45 830 883 879 881 1988-2012 Florida 243 137 116 60 84 84 1988-2012 Georgia 1,034 1,074 1,072 915 1,097 1,100 1988-2012 Hawaii 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2012 Idaho 79 60 65 69 131 132 1988-2012 Illinois 244 233 238 294 261 262 1988-2012 Indiana 128 123 77 50 17 17 1988-2012 Iowa

422

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per...

423

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",879.8,5,2.2 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",6416.6,17.5,5.7

424

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

425

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

426

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

427

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

428

State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

430

Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the surveys can be divided into two broad groups: supply surveys, directed to the suppliers and marketers of specific energy sources, that measure the quantities of specific fuels produced for and/or supplied to the market; and consumption surveys, which gather information on the types of energy used by consumer groups along with the consumer characteristics that are associated with energy use. In the transportation sector, EIA's core consumption survey was the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. RTECS belongs to the consumption group because it collects information directly from the consumer, the household. For roughly a decade, EIA fielded the RTECS--data were first collected in 1983. This survey, fielded for the last time in 1994, was a triennial survey of energy use and expenditures, vehicle miles-traveled (VMT), and vehicle characteristics for household vehicles. For the 1994 survey, a national sample of more than 3,000 households that own or use some 5,500 vehicles provided data.

431

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Center to someone by E-mail Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Local Laws and Incentives There are a variety of local laws and incentives that support reducing U.S. petroleum consumption by encouraging or requiring individuals and/or public and private organizations to use alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and strategies to decrease fuel use or increase fuel economy. Local city and county governments create such laws and incentives to ensure people use

432

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

to take actions to promote the growth of domestic alternative fuel sources, such as natural gas, and reduce dependence on foreign oil. (Reference House Concurrent Resolution 132...

433

An Octane-Fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the adoption of fuel cells for applications...not only reduces fuel consumption but also reduces...emission. Although fuel cells can achieve efficiencies...internal combustion engine, and H 2 is more...is, gasoline and diesel, has not been successful...

Zhongliang Zhan; Scott A. Barnett

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

Chapter 4 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this chapter, hydrogen and fuel cell systems are introduced. Hydrogen is closely related to fuel cells because fuel cells are very efficient devices for power generation which when supplied with hydrogen generate non-polluting effluents, mainly water or steam. A hydrogen economy is necessary in the context of continuous growth of population and per-capita energy consumption. In this context, renewable energy solutions—especially solar—become more important and their harvesting requires hydrogen as energy carrier. Therefore the role of hydrogen and fuel cell systems in power generation becomes very important. As detailed in the chapter, these systems are useful for converting the fluctuating and intermittent energy of renewable sources and providing power on demand. Hydrogen and fuel cell systems can work either as grid-connected or as independent power generators. Connection to the grid allows for better load leveling and major savings as well as for reduction of pollution associated with power generation. Hydrogen can also be used to power residences and to cogenerate heat or other commodities. In addition, hydrogen and fuel cell technologies are much required for the transportation sector, where they can contribute to pollution and cost reduction and increased efficiency. Hydrogen production methods are reviewed in this chapter with a focus on electrolysis and thermochemical cycles. These systems appear to be leading technologies for the future. Other revised hydrogen production methods are gasification and reforming, which are very relevant for biomass conversion into hydrogen. Photochemical and photo-biochemical hydrogen production methods are also discussed. All types of fuel cells are introduced; these include alkaline, proton-exchange-membrane, phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, direct methanol, and direct ammonia fuel cells. Construction and specific application for power generation are presented for each type. The modeling and optimization aspects of fuel cells and their systems are explained. Several power generation systems with fuel cells are discussed, in which each type of fuel cells has specific system requirements. The overall system must include various types of separators, pumps, and compressors depending on the case. In aqueous systems water must be recycled, e.g., in the case of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells water must be actually fed in excess so that the membrane is wetted. Also for a direct methanol fuel cell water must be recovered and recycled. In molten carbonate fuel cell systems carbon dioxide must be recovered and recycled. In solid oxide fuel cell systems, the fuel must be supplied in excess and is not completely consumed; therefore it is important to couple these systems with gas turbines.

Ibrahim Dincer; Calin Zamfirescu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

437

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

438

Careers in Fuel Cell Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Careers in Fuel Cell Technologies Careers in Fuel Cell Technologies Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describing job growth potential in existing and...

439

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama ........... 65.0 265.4 155.4 13.4 12.8 319.8 13.4 49.1 563.8 0.0 154.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 303.7 1,352.2 579.1 1,931.3 Alaska ............... 9.5 294.7 81.8 118.2 1.3 34.6 0.4 28.6 265.0 0.0 2.3 0.0 0.2 (s) 21.6 593.2 44.7 637.9 Arizona ............. 10.0 109.8 151.3 21.5 9.1 323.4 (s) 21.1 526.5 0.0 4.4 3.1 0.3 7.9 255.7 917.8 513.7 1,431.5 Arkansas ........... 5.6 179.4 134.5 5.9 9.4 175.6 0.1 19.8 345.4 0.0 82.6 0.0 0.7 0.2 163.5 777.4 339.8 1,117.1 California ..........

440

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 11 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama ............. 0.0 23.5 0.4 124.4 13.4 0.3 2.3 316.3 6.7 463.7 0.0 487.2 0.0 487.2 Alaska ................. 0.0 3.5 0.8 44.4 118.2 (s) 0.4 32.9 0.4 197.2 0.0 200.7 0.0 200.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 15.6 1.0 111.3 21.5 0.8 1.6 318.2 0.0 454.5 0.0 470.1 0.0 470.1 Arkansas ............. 0.0 11.5 0.4 99.7 5.9 0.4 2.0 171.3 0.0 279.8 (s) 291.2 (s) 291.2 California ............ 0.0 25.7 1.9 440.9 549.7 3.8 13.3 1,770.1 186.9 2,966.5 2.8 2,995.1 5.5 3,000.5 Colorado ............. 0.0 14.7 0.6 83.2 58.3 0.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings, and recycling. Alcoa provides the packaging, automotive, aerospace, and construction markets with a variety

442

Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption (RTECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses...

443

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................. 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0

444

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 685 1,185 392 257 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 563 883 293 224 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 899 1,464 485 353 28 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 742 1,199 397 278 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 913 1,579 523 277 29 Q

445

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings* ............................... 436 1,064 309 5,485 12,258 3,393 79.5 86.8 91.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 116 36 922 1,207 538 64.9 96.5 67.8 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 44 103 Q 722 1,387 393 60.5 74.0 Q

446

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ............................... 1,248 2,553 2,721 13,955 32,332 25,371 89.4 79.0 107.3 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7 Food Sales ................................... 144 Q Q 765 467 Q 188.5 Q Q

447

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings* ............................. 1,188 2,208 2,425 13,374 29,260 22,149 88.8 75.5 109.5 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7

448

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings* ............................... 575 381 530 7,837 3,675 7,635 73.4 103.8 69.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 464 871 110.9 94.7 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 60 36 76 879 418 820 68.2 86.7 92.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 53 76 73 1,329 831 1,256 40.2 91.7 58.4

449

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 456 1,241 340 5,680 13,999 3,719 80.2 88.7 91.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 123 37 922 1,283 547 64.9 96.2 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 45 111 27 738 1,468 420 61.6 75.4 63.2

450

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................. 1,271 1,690 1,948 911 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 98.5 98.9 82.9 80.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 118 206 240 108 1,025 1,895 2,533 1,336 115.1 108.5 94.9 80.6 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 102 117 185 112 1,123 1,565 2,658 1,239 90.7 74.7 69.5 90.8

451

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 684 446 617 9,022 4,207 8,613 75.8 106.1 71.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 466 871 110.9 94.8 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 67 39 84 957 465 878 69.7 84.8 95.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 77 91 89 1,555 933 1,429 49.4 97.2 62.4

452

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 345 1,052 1,343 3,452 10,543 12,424 99.8 99.7 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 37 86 147 383 676 986 95.9 127.9 148.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 68 83 369 800 939 106.0 85.4 88.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 121 187 674 1,448 2,113 Q 83.4 88.4

453

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 1,522 3,228 1,772 18,031 33,384 20,243 84.4 96.7 87.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 193 300 193 2,168 2,904 1,850 89.0 103.2 104.2 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 134 263 165 2,032 3,217 1,784 66.0 81.9 92.5 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 241 432 226 3,273 5,679 3,707 73.6 76.1 60.9

454

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 3,533 0.10 3.9 0.11 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,177 0.41 1.4 0.48 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 2,573 0.36 3.0 0.42 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 3,045 0.19 3.6 0.23 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 5,184 0.14 5.6 0.15 1.09 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8,508 0.11 9.3 0.12 1.10 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 12,639 0.09 13.1 0.09 1.03

455

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 672 1,164 386 250 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 516 790 262 209 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 776 1,229 407 309 27 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 673 1,058 350 258 16 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 759 1,223 405 244 26 Q

456

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) XLS Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Estimates in Barrels per Day) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS

457

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Manufacturing Sector Overview 1991-1994 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 xiii Why Do We Investigate Energy Use in the Manufacturing Sector? What Data Do EIA Use To Investigate Energy Use in the Manufacturing Sector? In 1991, output in the manufactur- ing sector fell as the country went into a recession. After 1991, however, output increased as the country slowly came out of the recession. Between 1991 and 1994, manufacturers, especially manu- facturers of durable goods such as steel and glass, experienced strong growth. The industrial production index for durable goods during the period increased by 21 percent. Real gross domestic product for durable goods increased a corre- sponding 16 percent. The growth of nondurables was not as strong-- the production index increased by only 9 percent during this time period.

458

Prediction of electricity energy consumption of Turkey via artificial bee colony: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the worldwide growth of energy consumption, analysis of energy issues and the development ... become an important issue. In this study, electricity energy consumption of Turkey is predicted by artificial b...

Feyza Gürbüz; Celal Öztürk; Panos Pardalos

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the last 30 years, overall energy consumption has grown by about 22 quadrillion Btu. The share of energy consumption by the transportation sector has seen modest growth in that time – from about...

460

Water Consumption Footprint and Land Requirements of Large-Scale Alternative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Consumption Footprint and Land Requirements of Large-Scale Alternative Diesel and Jet Fuel Consumption Footprint and Land Requirements of Large- Scale Alternative Diesel and Jet Fuel Production Mark D and the economic and social implications of policy alternatives. Ronald G. Prinn and John M. Reilly, Program Co

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

462

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C Quality of the Data Appendix C Quality of the Data Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses under- coverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1991 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1991 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics published in this report such as total

463

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Glossary Anthracite: A hard, black, lustrous coal containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter. Often referred to as hard coal. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass: Organic nonfossil material of biological origin constituting a renewable energy source. Bituminous Coal: A dense, black coal, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, with a moisture content usually less than 20 percent. Often referred to as soft coal. It is the most common coal. Blast Furnace: A shaft furnace in which solid fuel (coke) is burned with an air blast to smelt ore in a continuous operation. Blast Furnace Gas: The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to

464

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

465

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C9. Electric Power Sector Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydroelectric Power b Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV d Wind Net Electricity Imports e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste c Alabama ............. 586.1 349.4 1.1 0.0 0.0 1.1 411.8 86.3 4.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,439.3 Alaska ................. 6.0 42.3 3.3 0.0 1.5 4.8 0.0 13.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (s) 66.3 Arizona ............... 449.9 183.9 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.6 327.3 89.1 2.4 0.0 0.8 2.5 1.5 1,057.9 Arkansas ............. 300.5 109.2 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.6 148.5 28.7 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 588.9 California ............ 19.7 630.1 0.4 11.1 (s) 11.5 383.6 413.4 69.0 122.0 8.4 75.3 20.1 1,753.1 Colorado ............. 362.4 88.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 20.2 0.9

466

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama ............. 65.0 179.1 23.9 3.7 3.3 6.7 46.3 83.9 0.0 147.2 0.0 (s) 115.1 590.4 219.5 810.0 Alaska ................. 0.1 253.8 19.2 0.1 1.0 0.0 27.1 47.4 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 4.5 306.0 9.4 315.4 Arizona ............... 10.0 22.0 33.2 1.4 4.6 (s) 18.4 57.6 0.0 1.4 3.1 0.2 42.1 136.5 84.7 221.2 Arkansas ............. 5.6 93.1 31.1 2.6 4.0 0.1 17.4 55.1 0.0 72.7 0.0 (s) 58.0 284.5 120.5 405.0 California ............ 35.6 767.4 77.2 23.9 29.6 (s) 312.5

467

Highway travel and fuel comsumption from 1970 to 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The change in fuel price and availability (1970-80) has had a profound impact on the way and the extent of travel. Within the decade there were two precipitous increases in fuel price among a posture of steadily rising energy costs. In response to these price increases, a number of public policies were enacted. For instance, the 55-mph speed limit was imposed in 1974. At the end of that same year, the Federal Energy Administration and the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) were formulated to prescribe certain conservation guidelines for states to follow in formulating their own programs. Specifically, EPCA established a program for the development of plans designed for the promotion of energy conservation and a reduction of the energy demand growth rate. Parallel to the conservation measures are technological improvements in vehicle fuel consumption. EPCA mandated that automobile manufacturers achieve fuel efficiency incrementally through 1985 to reach an average fuel economy of 27.5 mpg. This article reviews the historical impact of these factors from 1970 through 1980. Its objective is to observe the relative significance of each of these energy-saving alternatives on the growth rate of travel and fuel use. This historical perspective is particularly interesting since it presents the before-and-after effects of two ''crises'' occurring during this 10-year period. 1 figure, 10 tables.

Chan, Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Housing as basis for sustainable consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An important element in the discussion regarding sustainable development in our part of the world is directed towards the large growth in private consumption, and the clash of interests that arises between this growth and sustainable development requirements. A considerable part of private consumption can be related to our houses and the living situations of which they are part. It is of considerable interest to obtain more knowledge about the variations in patterns and volumes of consumption between different living situations, as well as to explore the important factors behind these variations. The acquisition of this type of empirical knowledge is an important aim in the present study. It is based on the superior thesis that it is possible through land use and housing planning to achieve substantial changes in living situations and thus contribute to a development in a direction of ''sustainable production and consumption''. The article first sums up the state-of-art regarding research on relations between physical planning, household consumption and environment. A theoretical framework and the methods applied in a Norwegian research project acquiring new empirical knowledge into these relations are also presented. The project was intended to be finished by the end of year 2000. Parts of the investigations are, however, completed and the material has been analysed. Two different types of urban structure, Oslo and a small rural town, are included in the investigations. The article presents some of the findings and relates them to former research.

Karl Georg Hoyer; Erling Holden

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 6,523 1,342 91.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 685 265 99.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 563 594 80.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 899 1,110 71.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 742 2,843 79.0

470

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8

471

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews...

Adler, J.

472

Spermatophore consumption in a cephalopod  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Animal behaviour 1001 14 70 Spermatophore consumption in a cephalopod Benjamin J. Wegener...provide evidence of ejaculate and sperm consumption in a cephalopod. Through labelling...combination of female spermatophore consumption and short-term external sperm storage...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Food consumption trends and drivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Food consumption trends and drivers John Kearney...Government policy. A picture of food consumption (availability) trends and projections...largely responsible for these observed consumption trends are the subject of this review...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Rice consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural... Economics RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Approved as to style and content by: E, We ey F. Peterson (Chair of Committee) James E. Christiansen (Member) Carl Shaf (Member) Daniel I. Padberg (Head of Department) August 1989...

Lan, Jin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

476

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

477

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

478

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

479

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

480

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels consumption growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

482

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

483

The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict Fuel Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

484

Optimal Pitch, Speed and Fuel Control at Sea Thomas Hellstrom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

largest item (after salaries) on a big vessel's budget. The fuel consumption for a large ferry ranges vessels. The fuel saving is achieved by optimizing control at three levels: low level propeller and main engine control, dy- namic speed control to avoid peeks in the fuel consumption and finally route planning

Hellström, Thomas

485

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Consumption and Efficiency Consumption and Efficiency All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 13 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ox6tpc Average Annual Fuel Use of Major Vehicle Categories Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ox6tpc Comparison of fuel use, miles traveled, and fuel economy among vehicle types Last update April 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-ufdolp Average Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled of Major Vehicle Categories

486

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

487

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

488

Power Production and Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and motor fuels. There appears to be a relative increase in the use of diesel engines in all the major industrial countries, excluding Japan, where curiously there is a pronounced ... with 80 in 1940. The diesel fuel situation shows less improvement, as diesel running costs are kept low by ...

F. D. ROBINSON

1956-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

489

Bus HVAC energy consumption test method based on HVAC unit behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a test method for determination of energy consumption of bus HVAC unit. The energy consumption corresponds to a bus engine fuel consumption increase during the HVAC unit operation period. The HVAC unit energy consumption is determined from the unit input power, which is measured under several levels of bus engine speeds and at different levels of testing heat load in the laboratory environment. Since the bus engine fuel consumption is incrementally induced by powering an HVAC unit, the results are subsequently recalculated to the unit fuel consumption under the defined road cycles in terms of standardized diesel engine. The method is likewise applicable either for classic or electric HVAC units with a main consumer (compressor or high voltage alternator) mechanically driven directly from the bus engine and also for electric HVAC units supplied from an alternative electric energy source in case of hybrid or fully electric buses.

M. Hegar; M. Kolda; M. Kopecka; V. Rajtmajer; A. Ryska

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuels & Infrastructure Fuels & Infrastructure All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 49 results Fuel Trends - Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Average Retail Fuel Prices in the U.S. Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Trend of alternative and traditional motor fuel prices from 2000-2013 Last update December 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-eaiva6 Consumption of Natural Gas in the U.S.

491

A global review of energy consumption, CO2 emissions and policy in the residential sector (with an overview of the top ten CO2 emitting countries)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Climate change and global warming as the main human societies’ threats are fundamentally associated with energy consumption and GHG emissions. The residential sector, representing 27% and 17% of global energy consumption and CO2 emissions, respectively, has a considerable role to mitigate global climate change. Ten countries, including China, the US, India, Russia, Japan, Germany, South Korea, Canada, Iran, and the UK, account for two-thirds of global CO2 emissions. Thus, these countries’ residential energy consumption and GHG emissions have direct, significant effects on the world environment. The aim of this paper is to review the status and current trends of energy consumption, CO2 emissions and energy policies in the residential sector, both globally and in those ten countries. It was found that global residential energy consumption grew by 14% from 2000 to 2011. Most of this increase has occurred in developing countries, where population, urbanization and economic growth have been the main driving factors. Among the ten studied countries, all of the developed ones have shown a promising trend of reduction in CO2 emissions, apart from the US and Japan, which showed a 4% rise. Globally, the residential energy market is dominated by traditional biomass (40% of the total) followed by electricity (21%) and natural gas (20%), but the total proportion of fossil fuels has decreased over the past decade. Energy policy plays a significant role in controlling energy consumption. Different energy policies, such as building energy codes, incentives, energy labels have been employed by countries. Those policies can be successful if they are enhanced by making them mandatory, targeting net-zero energy building, and increasing public awareness about new technologies. However, developing countries, such as China, India and Iran, still encounter with considerable growth in GHG emissions and energy consumption, which are mostly related to the absence of strong, efficient policy.

Payam Nejat; Fatemeh Jomehzadeh; Mohammad Mahdi Taheri; Mohammad Gohari; Muhd Zaimi Abd. Majid

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen & Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Fuel cells produce electricity from a number of domestic fuels, including hydrogen and renewables, and can provide power for virtually any application -- from cars and buses to commercial buildings. This technology, which is similar to a battery, has the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation while reducing carbon pollution and oil consumption.

493

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection Local water management districts are required to establish programs and

494

Habits, Sentiment and Predictable Income in the Dynamics of Aggregate Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Habits, Sentiment and Predictable Income in the Dynamics of Aggregate Consumption Martin Sommer utility: the sensitivity of consumption to lagged consumer sentiment, and to predictable changes in current income. I show that in a habit formation model, the sensitiv- ity of consumption growth

Niebur, Ernst

495

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings* ........................... 990 1,761 1,134 1,213 724 10,622 17,335 11,504 15,739 9,584 93.2 101.6 98.5 77.0 75.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

496

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings ............................ 1,086 1,929 1,243 1,386 879 11,529 18,808 12,503 17,630 11,189 94.2 102.6 99.4 78.6 78.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

497

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

498

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama ............. 0.0 37.2 0.1 0.1 6.0 6.2 6.0 0.1 0.2 112.6 162.2 214.7 376.9 Alaska ................. 0.0 20.5 8.1 0.1 0.5 8.8 1.9 0.1 (s) 7.3 38.6 15.1 53.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 39.1 (s) (s) 5.5 5.5 2.6 (s) 7.9 112.9 168.0 226.8 394.7 Arkansas ............. 0.0 34.2 0.1 (s) 5.2 5.3 8.6 0.7 0.2 64.1 113.1 133.2 246.3 California ............ 0.0 522.4 0.6 0.6 30.9 32.2 33.3 0.2 43.2 301.6 932.9 583.1 1,516.1 Colorado ............. 0.0 134.2 0.1 (s) 12.3 12.4 8.3 0.2 0.7 62.4 216.5 136.5 353.0 Connecticut ......... 0.0 46.0 59.6

499

CALIFORNIA SMART GROWTH ENERGY SAVINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(particularly autos) comprises a large share of total energy consumption, its reduction through more compact in transportation energy consumption resulting from Smart Growth planning. Since energy consumed by transportationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA SMART GROWTH ENERGY SAVINGS MPO SURVEY FINDINGS SEPTEMBER

500

SUPPLEMENT 1 The procedure for calculating the SOx emission factor from fuel sulphur content is given  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is given below. The units are given in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) SC in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) CC = Carbon content of fuel (mass-%) M(C) = MolarSUPPLEMENT 1 The procedure for calculating the SOx emission factor from fuel sulphur content

Meskhidze, Nicholas