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1

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dherence to automotive manufacturers' recommended requirements ... in Flexible Fuel Vehicles (FFV) Only ... states, “Consult Vehicle Manufacturer Fuel ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

G. Uniform Engine Fuels, Petroleum Products, and Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1.33. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). ... LNG automotive fuel shall be labeled with its automotive fuel rating in accordance with 16 CFR Part 306. ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3.6. Fuel Oils. 3.6.1. Labeling of Grade Required. – Fuel Oil shall be identified by the grades of No. ... 3.10. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Compatibility of alternative fuels with advanced automotive gas-turbine and Stirling engines. A literature survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of alternative fuels in advanced automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines is discussed on the basis of a literature survey. These alternative engines are briefly described, and the aspects that will influence fuel selection are identified. Fuel properties and combustion properties are discussed, with consideration given to advanced materials and components. Alternative fuels from petroleum, coal, oil shale, alcohol, and hydrogen are discussed, and some background is given about the origin and production of these fuels. Fuel requirements for automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines are developed, and the need for certain research efforts is discussed. Future research efforts planned at Lewis are described. 52 references.

Cairelli, J.; Horvath, D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Experimental hydrogen-fueled automotive engine design data-base project. Volume 1. Executive summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary hydrogen-fueled automotive piston engine design data-base now exists as a result of a research project at the University of Miami. The effort, which is overviewed here, encompassed the testing of 19 different configurations of an appropriately-modified, 1.6-liter displacement, light-duty automotive piston engine. The design data base includes engine performance and exhaust emissions over the entire load range, generally at a fixed speed (1800 rpm) and best efficiency spark timing. This range was sometimes limited by intake manifold backfiring and lean-limit restrictions; however, effective measures were demonstrated for obviating these problems. High efficiency, competitive specific power, and low emissions were conclusively demonstrated.

Swain, M.R.; Adt, R.R. Jr.; Pappas, J.M.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Evaluation of dissociated and steam-reformed methanol as automotive engine fuels  

SciTech Connect

Dissociated and steam reformed methanol were evaluated as automotive engine fuels. Advantages and disadvantages in using methanol in the reformed rather than liquid state are discussed. Engine dynamometer tests were conducted with a four cylinder, 2.3 liter, spark ignition automotive engine to determine performance and emission characteristics operating on simulated dissociated and steam reformed methanol (2H/sub 2/ + CO and 3H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ respectively), and liquid methanol. Results are presented for engine performance and emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, at various throttle settings and engine speeds. Operation on dissociated and steam reformed methanol was characterized by flashback (violent propagation of a flame into the intake manifold) which limited operation to lower power output than was obtainable using liquid methanol. It was concluded that: an automobile could not be operated solely on dissociated or steam reformed methanol over the entire required power range - a supplementary fuel system or power source would be necessary to attain higher powers; the use of reformed methanol, compared to liquid methanol, may result in a small improvement in thermal efficiency in the low power range; dissociated methanol is a better fuel than steam reformed methanol for use in a spark ignition engine; and use of dissociated or steam reformed methanol may result in lower exhaust emissions compared to liquid methanol. 36 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

Lalk, T.R.; McCall, D.M.; McCanlies, J.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Engineering-economic analyses of automotive fuel economy potential in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 25 years more than 20 major studies have examined the technological potential to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks in the US. The majority has used technology/cost analysis, a combination of analytical methods from the disciplines of economics and automotive engineering. In this paper the authors describe the key elements of this methodology, discuss critical issues responsible for the often widely divergent estimates produced by different studies, review the history of its use, and present results from six recent assessments. Whereas early studies tended to confine their scope to the potential of proven technology over a 10-year time period, more recent studies have focused on advanced technologies, raising questions about how best to include the likelihood of technological change. The paper concludes with recommendations for further research.

Greene, D.L.; DeCicco, J.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program  

SciTech Connect

The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Experimental hydrogen-fueled automotive engine design data-base project. Volume 2. Main technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operational performance and emissions characteristics of hydrogen-fueled engines are reviewed. The project activities are reviewed including descriptions of the test engine and its components, the test apparatus, experimental techniques, experiments performed and the results obtained. Analyses of other hydrogen engine project data are also presented and compared with the results of the present effort.

Swain, M.R.; Adt, R.R. Jr.; Pappas, J.M.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Energy Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies

11

Enhanced air/fuel mixing for automotive stirling engine turbulator-type combustors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to the improved combustion of fuel in a combustion chamber of a stirling engine and the like by dividing combustion into primary and secondary combustion zones through the use of a diverter plate.

Riecke, George T. (Ballston Spa, NY); Stotts, Robert E. (Newark, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Integrated automotive exhaust engineering : uncertainty management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global automotive industry has entered a stagnating period. Automotive OEMs and their tier suppliers are struggling for business growth. One of the most important strategies is to improve the engineering efficiency in ...

Fang, Xitian, 1963-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Downsizing assessment of automotive Stirling engines  

SciTech Connect

A 67 kW (90 hp) Stirling engine design, sized for use in a 1984 1440 kg (3170 lb) automobile has been serving as the focal point for developing automotive Stirling engine technology under a current DOE/NASA R and D program. Since recent trends are towards lighter vehicles, an assessment was made of the appicability of the Stirling technology being developed for smaller, lower power engines. Using both the Philips scaling laws and a Lewis Research Center (Lewis) Stirling engine performance code, dimensional and performance characteristics were determined for a 26 kW (35 hp) and a 37 kW (50 hp) engine for use in a nominal 907 kg (2000 lb) vehicle. Key engine elements were sized and stressed and mechanical layouts were made to ensure mechanical fit and integrity of the engines. Fuel economy estimates indicated that the Stirling engine would maintain a 30 to 45 percent fuel economy advantage over comparable spark ignition and diesel powered vehicles in the 1984 time period. In order to maintain the performance advantage, particular attention must be paid to the Stirling engine mechanical losses and, although evaluated in this report, the cold start penalties.

Knoll, R.H.; Tew, R.C. Jr.; Klann, J.L.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program. RESD Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report compiling a summary of the information presented and discussed at the May 1983 Automotive Stirling Engine (AES) Reference Engine System Design (RESD) review held at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The design of the engine and its auxiliaries and controls is described. Manufacturing costs in production quantity are also presented. Engine system performance predictions are discussed and vehicle integration is developed, along with projected fuel economy levels.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Software Engineering for Automotive Systems: A Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first pieces of software were introduced into cars in 1976. By 2010, premium class vehicles are expected to contain one gigabyte of on-board software. We present research challenges in the domain of automotive software engineering.

Alexander Pretschner; Manfred Broy; Ingolf H. Kruger; Thomas Stauner

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mod I automotive Stirling engine mechanical development  

SciTech Connect

The Mod I Stirling engine was the first automotive Stirling engine designed specifically for automotive application. Testing of these engines has revealed several deficiencies in engine mechanical integrity which have been corrected by redesign or upgrade. The main deficiencies uncovered during the Mod I program lie in the combustion, auxiliary, main seal, and heater head areas. This paper will address each of the major area deficiencies in detail, and describe the corrective actions taken as they apply to the Mod I and the next Stirling-engine design, the Upgraded Mod I (a redesign to incorporate new materials for cost/weight reduction and improved performance).

Simetkosky, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Past experiences with automotive external combustion engines  

SciTech Connect

GMR (General Motors Research Laboratories, now GM R and D Center) has a history of improving the internal combustion engine, especially as it relates to automotive use. During the quarter century from 1950--75, considerable effort was devoted to evaluating alternative powerplants based on thermodynamic cycles different from those on which the established spark-ignition and diesel engines are founded. Two of these, the steam engine and the Stirling engine, incorporated external combustion. Research on those two alternatives is reviewed. Both were judged to fall short of current needs for commercial success as prime movers for conventional automotive vehicles.

Amann, C.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Demonstration of dissociated methanol as an automotive fuel: system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of system performance testing of an automotive system devised to provide hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by dissociating methanol on board the vehicle. The dissociation of methanol absorbs heat from the engine exhaust and increases the lower heating value of the fuel by 22%. The engine thermal efficiency is increased by raising the compression ratio and burning with excess air.

Finegold, J. G.; Karpuk, M. E.; McKinnon, J. T.; Passamaneck, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems at Virginia Tech  

SciTech Connect

The Virginia Tech GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems (CAFCS) achieved the following objectives in support of the domestic automotive industry: â?¢ Expanded and updated fuel cell and vehicle technologies education programs; â?¢ Conducted industry directed research in three thrust areas â?? development and characterization of materials for PEM fuel cells; performance and durability modeling for PEM fuel cells; and fuel cell systems design and optimization, including hybrid and plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicles; â?¢ Developed MS and Ph.D. engineers and scientists who are pursuing careers related to fuel cells and automotive applications; â?¢ Published research results that provide industry with new knowledge which contributes to the advancement of fuel cell and vehicle systems commercialization. With support from the Dept. of Energy, the CAFCS upgraded existing graduate course offerings; introduced a hands-on laboratory component that make use of Virginia Techâ??s comprehensive laboratory facilities, funded 15 GATE Fellowships over a five year period; and expanded our program of industry interaction to improve student awareness of challenges and opportunities in the automotive industry. GATE Center graduate students have a state-of-the-art research experience preparing them for a career to contribute to the advancement fuel cell and vehicle technologies.

Nelson, Douglas

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program: A success  

SciTech Connect

The original 5 y Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program has been stretched to a 10 y program due to reduced annual funding levels. With an estimated completion date of April 1988, the technical achievements and the prospectives of meeting the original program objectives are reviewed. Various other applications of this developed Stirling engine technology are also discussed.

Tabata, W.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Status of Automotive Fuel Cell Development: Applicability to Stationary Fuel Cell Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developers of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology -- targeting the automotive as well as the stationary markets -- are making significant strides in performance improvements and cost reductions. In concept, PEMFC systems could either replace internal combustion engine drivetrains or power auxiliary loads that would otherwise be powered by propulsion power plants. This report describes how automotive PEMFC development and stationary power PEMFC development will complement each other.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program Mod I Stirling engine development  

SciTech Connect

The Automotive Stirling Engine (ASE) Development Program was established to enable research and development of alternate propulsion systems. The program was awarded to Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the purpose of developing an automotive Stirling engine, and transferring Stirling-engine technology to the United States. MTI has fabricated and tested four Mod I engines that have accumulated over 1900 test hours to date. The engines evaluated in the test cell have achieved an average of 34.5% efficiency at their maximum efficiency point (2000 rpm), and have developed an average maximum output power (power available to the drive train) level of 54.4 kW (73.2 bhp). All engines are still operating, and are being used to develop components and control strategy for the Upgraded Mod I engine design (predicted to increase maximum power output and efficiency while reducing total engine system weight).

Simetkosky, M.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive and MHE Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

24

10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner 10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner 10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner June 17, 2011 - 3:30pm Addthis Argonne mechanical engineer Thomas Wallner adjusts Argonne's "omnivorous engine," an automobile engine that Wallner and his colleagues have tailored to efficiently run on blends of gasoline, ethanol and butanol. | Courtesy of: Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne mechanical engineer Thomas Wallner adjusts Argonne's "omnivorous engine," an automobile engine that Wallner and his colleagues have tailored to efficiently run on blends of gasoline, ethanol and butanol. | Courtesy of: Argonne National Laboratory. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Meet Thomas Wallner - automotive engineer extraordinaire, who hails from

25

Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNLTM-2013222 Energy and Transportation Science Division Center for Transportation Analysis STATUS AND PROSPECTS OF THE GLOBAL AUTOMOTIVE FUEL CELL INDUSTRY AND PLANS FOR...

26

Automotive Stirling Engine Mod I design review report. Volume III  

SciTech Connect

This volume, No. 3, of the Automotive Stirling Engine Mod 1 Design Review Report contains a preliminary parts list and detailed drawings of equipment for the basic Stirling engine and for the following systems: vehicular Stirling Engine System; external heat system; hot and cold engine systems; engine drive; controls and auxiliaries; and vehicle integration. (LCL)

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the first 3 months effort of the Ford/DOE Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program, specifically Task I which is Fuel Economy Assessment. At the beginning of this contract effort the projected fuel economy of the 4-215 Stirling engine was 21.16 MPG with a confidence level of 29 percent. Since that date, the fuel economy improvement projection of the 4-215 Stirling engine has been increased to 22.11 MPG, with a confidence level of 29 percent. Collection of fuel economy improvement data is directly related to engine durability. Engine durability has been limited. Since September 19, 1977 a total of 47.7 hours of engine running time has been accumulated using two engine builds. Progress is reported in sub-task studies of burners, preheaters, engine drive, blower system, power control, air-fuel ratio control, cooling system, and cycle control. (LCL)

Kitzner, E.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

LPG fuel supply system. [Patent for automotive  

SciTech Connect

A fuel supply system for an internal combustion engine operated on gaseous fuels, for example, liquid petroleum gas (Lpg). The system includes a housing having a chamber for vaporizing liquid gas, including means for heating the vaporizing chamber. Also included in the housing is a mixing chamber for mixing the vaporized gas with incoming air for delivery to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine through a standard carburetor. The fuel supply system includes means for mounting the system on the carburetor, including means for supporting an air filter circumjacent the mixing chamber.

Pierson, W.V.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress April 6, 2006 - 10:12am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Greg. It's always a pleasure to be in a room full of engineers. As an engineer myself, I know there is nothing our profession likes better than plain talk and solving problems. So, I'm going to serve you up some plain talk and then some assignments. Our nation faces big challenges in the energy and transportation arena. The President put it plainly in the State of the Union message when he said America is addicted to oil. To start us on the path to recovery from this addiction, he set out the Advanced Energy Initiative which calls for increasing spending on clean energy programs by 22% in next year's budget.

30

Tribopolymerization: An advanced lubrication concept for automotive engines and systems of the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced lubrication technologies based on the concept of tribopolymerization as a mechanism of boundary lubrication are described. Advantages of this approach as well as potential applications which could have an impact on the design, manufacture, and performance of existing and future automotive engines are presented and discussed. Tribopolymerization, a novel concept of molecular design developed by Furey and Kajdas, involves the continuous formation of thin polymeric films on rubbing surfaces; the protective films formed are self-replenishing. The antiwear compounds developed from this technology are effective with metals as well as ceramics and in the liquid as well as vapor phases. Furthermore, they are ashless and contain no harmful phosphorus or sulfur; and many are biodegradable. Thus, potential applications of this technology are diverse and include a variety of cost/performance/energy/environmental advantages. Examples include the following: (a) machining and cutting applications using thin films to reduce friction and ceramic tool wear; (b) the lubrication of ceramic engines (e.g., low heat rejection diesel engines) or ceramic components; (c) the development of ashless lubricants for existing and future automotive engines to reduce exhaust catalyst poisoning and environmental emissions; (d) ashless antiwear or ``lubricity`` additives for fuels, including gasoline, diesel and jet fuel; (e) vapor phase applications of this technology to high temperature gaseous systems or to fuel injector wear problems associated with the use of natural gas engines; and (f) the use of the concept of tribopolymerization as an enabling technology in the development of new engines and new automotive propulsion systems.

Furey, M.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Kajdas, C. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology, Plock (Poland); Kaltenbach, K.W. [Triad Investors Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor subsystems (fuel reformer, CO cleanup, and exhaust cleanup) that were small enough to integrate on a vehicle and (2) evaluating the fuel processor system performance for hydrogen production, efficiency, thermal integration, startup, durability and ability to integrate with fuel cells. Nuvera carried out a three-part development program that created multi-fuel (gasoline, ethanol, natural gas) fuel processing systems and investigated integration of fuel cell / fuel processor systems. The targets for the various stages of development were initially based on the goals of the DOE's Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) initiative and later on the Freedom Car goals. The three parts are summarized below with the names based on the topic numbers from the original Solicitation for Financial Assistance Award (SFAA).

Nuvera Fuel Cells

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Development of Standards in Support of Hydrogen-Fueled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Society of Automotive Engineers International (SAE) has proposed a Hydrogen Fuel Quality Specification Guideline. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Engine fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

Methods discussed for the conversion of biomass to engine fuels include the production of producer gas, anaerobic fermentation to give biogas, fermentation of sugars and starches to give EtOH, and the production of synthesis gas for conversion to MeOH or hydrocarbons. Also discussed are the suitability of these fuels for particular engines, biomass availability, and the economics of biomass-derived engine fuels.

Parker, H.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels in a high pressure flow reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines the premixed urn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, we must understand the chemical kinetic processes which lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane and isooctane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine-like conditions in a high pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and at 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments and comparisons of experimentally measures and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690- 1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed method.

Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Callahan, C.V.; Dryer, F.L. [Princeton Univ., Areospace Engineering. NJ (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Automotive stirling engine development program. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1978--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report covers the third quarter (April--June, 1978) effort of the Ford/DOE Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program, specifically Task I of that effort which is Fuel Economy Assessment. At the end of the previous quarter (March 31, 1978) the total fourth generation fuel economy projection was 23.7 mpg with a confidence level of 40%. At the end of this quarter (June 30, 1978) the total fourth generation fuel economy projection was 26.12 mpg with a confidence level of 44%. This represents an improvement of 66.4% over the baseline M-H fuel economy of 15.7 mpg. The confidence level for the original 20.6 mpg goal has been increased from 53 to 57%. Engine 3X17 has now accumulated a total of 213 h of variable speed running. A summary of the individual sub-tasks of Task I is presented. The sub-tasks are grouped into two categories: Category 1 consists of those sub-tasks which are directly related to fuel economy and Category 2 consists of those sub-tasks which are not directly related to fuel economy but are an integral part of the Task I effort.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Fuel Control System and Performance Optimization of a Spark-Ignition LPG Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to control air fuel ratio of a Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) automotive engine. The optimization of compression ratio is also described in this paper. HC, CO & NOx emissions of LPG engines can be reduced after the application ... Keywords: control, LPG engine, air fuel ratio, optimization

Hongwei Cui

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the batteries, and to power accessories like the air condi- tioner and heater. Hybrid electric cars can exceed#12;#12;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines MODULE 8: FUEL CELL HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES CONTENTS 8.1 HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES .................................................................................. 8-1 8

38

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines MODULE 11:GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS CONTENTS 11.1 GLOSSARY Cell Engines MODULE 11:GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS OBJECTIVES This module is for reference only. Hydrogen MODULE 11: GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS PAGE 11-1 11.1 Glossary This glossary covers words, phrases

39

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is intended for use in light- to heavy-duty vehicles including ... 2.9. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG). ... Vans, Sport Utility Vehicles, and Light-Duty Trucks ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

40

Feasibility test on compounding the internal combustion engine for automotive vehicles, Task II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The organic Rankine bottoming cycle can be considered for various automobile and truck applications. The most attractive use, however, is in large, heavy-duty diesel trucks for long distance hauling. Here, the engine load and speed requirements are nearly constant over a large portion of the operating hours, and high mileages are accumulated. Thus, the potential fuel savings are sufficient to justify the added cost of a bottoming cycle system. A conceptual design study of compounding the diesel truck engine with an ORCS was made and the results of the study are presented. Based on the results of the conceptual design study which showed a 15 percent fuel economy improvement potential over the duty cycle, an early feasibility demonstration test of the system was initiated. The demonstration system uses a Mack ENDT 676 diesel engine with existing but nonoptimum ORCS hardware made available from an earlier automotive Rankine-cycle program. The results of these feasibility demonstration tests, both steady-state and transient, over the operating range of the diesel engine, are presented.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Predictive algorithm to determine the suitable time to change automotive engine oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, emerging technologies related to various sensors, product identification, and wireless communication give us new opportunities for improving the efficiency of automotive maintenance operations, in particular, implementing predictive maintenance. ... Keywords: Degradation, Engine oil, Mission profile data, Predictive maintenance, Statistical methods

Hong-Bae Jun; Dimitris Kiritsis; Mario Gambera; Paul Xirouchakis

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Trends and new developments in automotive fuel economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The significant improvements in passenger car fuel economy that have been achieved up to the present time are identified, and the changes that have produced these improvements are examined in detail. Included are several comparisons of domestic versus foreign vehicles. The potential for further increases in fuel economy is then reviewed by examining the technological, marketing/economic, and other significant factors that will affect future fuel economy levels. Special attention is given to the effect that changing market mix has on corporate average fuel economy and to the future benefits that may be realized through the use of continuously variable transmissions, adiabatic diesel engines, and improved lubricants.

Simpson, B.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Automotive engineering curriculum development: case study for Clemson University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automotive manufacturing industry has transitioned in the past 20 years from a central technical focus to an integrated and globally distributed supply chain. As car makers outsource not only a greater portion of their manufacturing, but also their ... Keywords: Automotive, Curriculum, Education, Manufacturing, OEM, Supplier

Laine Mears; Mohammed Omar; Thomas R. Kurfess

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report determines cost and performance requirements for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles carrying pure H{sub 2} fuel, to achieve parity with internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. A conceptual design of a near term FCEV (fuel cell electric vehicle) is presented. Complete power system weight and cost breakdowns are presented for baseline design. Near term FCEV power system weight is 6% higher than ICE system, mid-term FCEV projected weights are 29% lower than ICE`s. There are no inherently high-cost components in FCE, and at automotive production volumes, near term FCEV cost viability is closer at hand than at first thought. PEM current vs voltage performance is presented for leading PEM manufacturers and researchers. 5 current and proposed onboard hydrogen storage techniques are critically compared: pressurized gas, cryogenic liquid, combined pressurized/cryogenic, rechargeable hydride, adsorption. Battery, capacitor, and motor/controller performance is summarized. Fuel cell power system component weight and cost densities (threshold and goal) are tabulated.

James, B.D.; Baum, G.N.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Utiization of alternate fuels in diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments during three years entitled The Utilization of Alternate Fuels in Diesel Engines are summarized. Experiments were designed and test equipment set-up for the purpose of evaluating the use of methanol as a fumigant for light-duty Diesel engine service. The major experimental results were obtained from a multicylinder automotive Diesel engine. However, fundamental studies employing a GC/micro-reactor and a constant volume combustion bomb were also started. The purpose of this work was to measure some of the chemical and physical properties of methanol and methanol-air mixtures. The laminar flame velocity for various mixtures has been measured in the combustion bomb and thermal degradation studies have begun in the GC/micro-reactor. An Oldsmobile 5.7 liter V/8 Diesel engine was fumigated with methanol in amounts up to 40% of the fuel energy. The primary objectives of the study were to determine the effect of methanol fumigation on fuel efficiency, smoke, nitric oxide emission, and the occurrence of severe knock. An assessment of the biological activity for samples of the raw exhaust particulate and its soluble organic extract was also made using boh the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test and the B. subtilis Comptest. Generally, methanol fumigation was found to decrease NO emission for all conditions, to have a slight effect on smoke opacity, and to have a beneficial effect on fuel efficiency at higher loads. Also at higher loads, the methanol was found to induce what was defined as knock limited operation. The biological activity of the raw particulate matter was fond to be less than that of its soluble organic extract. However, for both the fumigation of methanol did enhance the biological activity.

Lestz, S.S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

47

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

48

Materials review for improved automotive gas-turbine engine. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced materials are the key to achieving the performance and fuel economy goals of improved automotive gas turbine engines. The potential role of superalloys, refractory alloys, and ceramics in the hottest sections of future engines that may be required to operate with turbine inlet temperatures as high as 1370/sup 0/C (2500/sup 0/F) is examined. These high temperature materials are reviewed. The characteristics of the best modern conventional superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, and tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys are reviewed; and the most promising alloys in each system are compared on the basis of maximum turbine blade temperature capability. The requirements for improved high temperature protective coatings and special fabrication techniques for these advanced alloys are discussed. Chromium, columbium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed. On the basis of properties, cost, availability, and strategic importance, molybdenum alloys are found to be the most suitable refractory material for turbine wheels for mass produced engines. Ceramic material candidates are reviewed and ranked according to their probability of success in particular applications. Various forms of, and fabrication processes for both silicon nitride and silicon carbide, along with SiAlON's are investigated for use in high-stress and medium-stress high temperature environments. Low-stress glass-ceramic regenerator materials are also investigated. Treatment is given to processing requirements, such as coatings for oxidation/corrosion protection, joining methods, and machining technology. Economics of ceramic raw materials, and of various processing methods are discussed. Conclusions are drawn, and recommendations for areas of further research are proposed for consideration and/or adoption.

Belleau, C.; Ehlers, W.L.; Hagen, F.A.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Automotive Powertrain Control - A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper surveys recent and historical publications on automotive powertrain control. Controloriented models of gasoline and diesel engines and their aftertreatment systems are reviewed, and challenging control problems for conventional engines, hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powertrains are discussed. Fundamentals are revisited and advancements are highlighted. A comprehensive list of references is provided. 1

Jeffrey A. Cook; Jing Sun; Julia H. Buckl; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky; Huei Peng; Jessy W. Grizzle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry, Government Policy and Future Opportunities. Fuel cells (FCs)are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several

51

Modeling & Simulation - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCTool Computer Model Helps Focus Fuel Cell Vehicle Research Somewhere near Detroit, an automotive engineer stares at the ceiling, wondering how to squeeze 1% more efficiency out...

52

APS Research Fuels Engineering Interest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5th, 2003 5th, 2003 APS Research Fuels Engineering Interest Award-winning research on the characteristics of fuel sprays from injectors is one of the featured articles in the May 2003 issue of Mechanical Engineering and on the Web site of that magazine. The studies, carried out at APS's X-ray Operation and Research beamline 1-BM and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, revealed startling new information about fuel sprays, including the presence of a shockwave as the spray leaves the injector nozzle. Entitled "Penetrating Vision," the article in Mechanical Engineering, by associate editor John DeGaspari, notes that "an investigative technique using x-rays is causing engine designers to sit up and take notice." In the article, Scott Parrish, General Motors R&D senior research engineer, notes

53

"Ask Argonne" - Dave Grabaskas, Nuclear Engineer, Part 1 | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Ask Argonne" - Dave Grabaskas, Nuclear Engineer, Part 1 Share Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel...

54

Turbocharged engine operations using knock resistant fuel blends for engine efficiency improvements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine downsizing with a turbocharger has become popular these days in automotive industries. Downsizing the engine lets the engine operate in a more efficient region, and the engine boosting compensates for the power loss ...

Jo, Young Suk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wallner and his colleagues have tailored to efficiently run on blends of gasoline, ethanol and butanol. | Courtesy of: Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne mechanical engineer...

56

KIVA: Increases engine efficiency while improving fuel economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in automotive catalytic converters Design of fire suppression systems Pulsed detonation propulsion systems design Benefits: Increases engine efficiency while reducing harmful...

57

Modeling and cold start in alcohol-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Neat alcohol fuels offer several benefits over conventional gasoline in automotive applications. However, their low vapor pressure and high heat of vaporization make it difficult to produce a flammable vapor composition from a neat alcohol fuel during a start under cold ambient conditions. Various methods have been introduced to compensate for this deficiency. In this study, the authors applied computer modeling and simulation to evaluate the potential of four cold-start technologies for engines fueled by near-neat alcohol. The four technologies were a rich combustor device, a partial oxidation reactor, a catalytic reformer, and an enhanced ignition system. The authors ranked the competing technologies by their ability to meet two primary criteria for cold starting an engine at {minus}25 deg C and also by several secondary parameters related to commercialization. Their analysis results suggest that of the four technologies evaluated, the enhanced ignition system is the best option for further development.

Markel, A.J.; Bailey, B.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

Napier, Parhys L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct?hydrogen proton ex

60

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2009 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exch

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

Brown, L.F.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Jennifer Smith, Gabe Stout and Mike Jansen Battelle April 16, 2013 Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Fuel Cells for Material Handling Applications 2 Presentation Outline * Background * Approach * System Design * Fuel Cell Stack Design * Stack, BOP and System Cost Models * System Cost Summary * Results Summary 3 * 10 and 25 kW PEM Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment (MHE) applications Background 5-year program to provide feedback to DOE on evaluating fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent models and cost estimates * Applications - Primary (including CHP) power, backup power, APU, and material handling * Fuel Cell Types - 80°C PEM, 180°C PEM, SOFC technologies

63

Partial oxidation fuel reforming for automotive power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For widespread use of fuel cells to power automobiles in the near future, it is necessary to convert gasoline or other transportation fuels to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. Partial oxidation reforming is particularly suited to this application as it eliminates the need for heat exchange at high temperatures. Such reformers offer rapid start and good dynamic performance. Lowering the temperature of the partial oxidation process, which requires the development of a suitable catalyst, can increase the reforming efficiency. Catalytic partial oxidation (or autothermal) reformers and non-catalytic partial oxidation reformers developed by various organizations are presently undergoing testing and demonstration. This paper summarizes the process chemistries as well as recent test data from several different reformers operating on gasoline, methanol, and other fuels.

Ahmed, S.; Chalk, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Kumar, R.; Milliken, J.

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 4: Low Temperature Fuel Cell System BOP & FUEL Processors For Stationary and Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BREAKOUT GROUP 4: LOW TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL SYSTEM BOP & FUEL PROCESSORS FOR STATIONARY AND AUTOMOTIVE BREAKOUT GROUP 4: LOW TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL SYSTEM BOP & FUEL PROCESSORS FOR STATIONARY AND AUTOMOTIVE PARTICIPANTS O NAME RGANIZATION Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Chris Ainscough NUVERA Rod Borup Los Alamos National Laboratory Vince Contini Battelle Rick Cutright PlugPower LLC David Frank Hydrogenics Jamie Holladay Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Terry Johnson Sandia National Laboratory Sridhas Kanuri UTC Power Ted Krause Argonne National Laboratory Michael McCarthy Protonex Technology Corporation Pinakin Patel FuelCell Energy Inc. Dennis Rapodios Argonne National Laboratory Eric Simpkins IdaTech LLC Anna Stefanopoulou University of Michigan Ken Stroh Los Alamos National Laboratory Olivier Verdu HELION Doug Wheeler National Renewable Energy Laboratory

65

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update March 26, 2009 v.30.2021.052209 Prepared by: Brian D. James & Jeffrey A. Kalinoski One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared for: Contract No. GS-10F-0099J to the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than

66

Effect of automotive electrical system changes on fuel consumption using incremental efficiency methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been a continuous increase in automotive electric power usage. Future projections show no sign of it decreasing. Therefore, the automotive industry has a need to either improve the current 12 Volt automotive ...

Hardin, Christopher William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 °C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTech’s GRAFCELL? resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 °C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the DoE on metal plates. The final result of DTI’s analysis for the high volume manufacturing scenario ($6.85 /kW) came in slightly above the DoE target of $3 to $5/kW. This estimate was derived using a “Best Case Scenario” for many of the production process steps and raw material costs with projections to high volumes. Some of the process improvements assumed in this “Best Case Scenario” including high speed high impact forming and solvent-less resins, have not yet been implemented, but have a high probability of potential success.

Orest Adrianowycz; Julian Norley; David J. Stuart; David Flaherty; Ryan Wayne; Warren Williams; Roger Tietze; Yen-Loan H. Nguyen; Tom Zawodzinski; Patrick Pietrasz

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Solid fuel applications to transportation engines  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of solid fuels as alternatives to liquid fuels for future transportation engines is reviewed. Alternative liquid fuels will not be addressed nor will petroleum/solid fuel blends except for the case of diesel engines. With respect to diesel engines, coal/oil mixtures will be addressed because of the high interest in this specific application as a result of the large number of diesel engines currently in transportation use. Final assessments refer to solid fuels only for diesel engines. The technical assessments of solid fuels utilization for transportation engines is summarized: solid fuel combustion in transportation engines is in a non-developed state; highway transportation is not amenable to solid fuels utilization due to severe environmental, packaging, control, and disposal problems; diesel and open-cycle gas turbines do not appear worthy of further development, although coal/oil mixtures for slow speed diesels may offer some promise as a transition technology; closed-cycle gas turbines show some promise for solid fuels utilization for limited applications as does the Stirling engine for use of cleaner solid fuels; Rankine cycle engines show good potential for limited applications, such as for locomotives and ships; and any development program will require large resources and sophisticated equipment in order to advance the state-of-the-art.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Managing the Proliferation of Digital Technology in the Automotive Industry A Systems Engineering Approach to Embedded Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Managing the Proliferation of Digital Technology in the Automotive Industry A Systems Engineering (1993) Submitted to the System Design and Management Program in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements. Signature of Author Dawn R. Paluszny System Design and Management Program Certified by Nancy G. Leveson

de Weck, Olivier L.

70

Combustion engineering issues for solid fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

The book combines modeling, policy/regulation and fuel properties with cutting edge breakthroughs in solid fuel combustion for electricity generation and industrial applications. This book provides real-life experiences and tips for addressing the various technical, operational and regulatory issues that are associated with the use of fuels. Contents are: Introduction; Coal Characteristics; Characteristics of Alternative Fuels; Characteristics and Behavior of Inorganic Constituents; Fuel Blending for Combustion Management; Fuel Preparation; Conventional Firing Systems; Fluidized-Bed Firing Systems; Post-Combustion Emissions Control; Some Computer Applications for Combustion Engineering with Solid Fuels; Gasification; Policy Considerations for Combustion Engineering.

Bruce Miller; David Tillman [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Survey Evidence on the Willingness of U.S. Consumers to Pay for Automotive Fuel Economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prospect theory, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002, holds that human beings faced with a risky bet will tend to value potential losses about twice as much as potential gains. Previous research has demonstrated that prospect theory could be sufficient to explain an energy paradox in the market for automotive fuel economy. This paper analyzes data from four random sample surveys of 1,000 U.S. households each in 2004, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Households were asked about willingness to pay for future fuel savings as well as the annual fuel savings necessary to justify a given upfront payment. Payback periods inferred from household responses are consistent over time and across different formulations of questions. Mean calculated payback periods are short, about 3 years, but there is substantial dispersion among individual responses. Calculated payback periods do not appear to be correlated with the attributes of respondents. Respondents were able to quantitatively describe their uncertainty about both vehicle fuel economy and future fuel prices. Simulation of loss averse behavior based on this stated uncertainty illustrate how loss aversion could lead consumers to substantially undervalue future fuel savings relative to their expected value.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Evans, David H [Sewanee, The University of the South; Hiestand, John [Indiana University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ENGINE COMBUSTION CONTROL VIA FUEL REACTIVITY ...  

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a ...

73

Design and development of an automotive propulsion system utilizing a Rankine cycle engine (water based fluid). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under EPA and ERDA sponsorship, SES successfully designed, fabricated and tested the first federally sponsored steam powered automobile. The automobile - referred to as the simulator - is a 1975 Dodge Monaco standard size passenger car with the SES preprototype Rankine cycle automotive propulsion system mounted in the engine compartment. In the latter half of 1975, the simulator successfully underwent test operations at the facilities of SES in Watertown, Massachusetts and demonstrated emission levels below those of the stringent federally established automotive requirements originally set for implementation by 1976. The demonstration was accomplished during testing over the Federal Driving Cycle on a Clayton chassis dynamometer. The design and performance of the vehicle are described.

Demler, R.L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Duleep, K.G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Argonne TTRDC - Experts - Engines & Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engines & Fuels Experts Engines & Fuels Experts Click on a name to see a full résumé. Raj Sekar, Section Leader, Engine and Emissions Research phone: 630/252-5101, fax: 630/252-3443, e-mail: rsekar@anl.gov MS, Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin MBA, Research & Development Management, Indiana University 30+ years of experience in engine research (15 years at Cummins Engine Company) 5 patents, 35+ reviewed publications in engine-related technologies Bipin Bihari, Mechanical Engineer phone: 630/252-6492, fax: 630/252-3443, e-mail: bihari@anl.gov PhD, Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur Experience in optical diagnostics techniques and laser spectroscopy Author or co-author of 58+ articles Munidhar S. Biruduganti, Research Engineer phone: 630/252-1765, fax: 630/252-3443, e-mail: mbiruduganti@anl.gov

78

Method of combustion for dual fuel engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and a method of introducing a primary fuel, which may be a coal water slutty, and a high combustion auxiliary fuel, which may be a conventional diesel oil, into an internal combustion diesel engine comprises detecting the load conditions of the engine, determining the amount of time prior to the top dead center position of the piston to inject the main fuel into the combustion chamber, and determining the relationship of the timing of the injection of the auxiliary fuel into the combustion chamber to achieve a predetermined specific fuel consumption, a predetermined combustion efficiency, and a predetermined peak cylinder firing pressure.

Hsu, Bertrand D. (Erie, PA); Confer, Gregory L. (Erie, PA); Shen, Zujing (Erie, PA); Hapeman, Martin J. (Edinboro, PA); Flynn, Paul L. (Fairview, PA)

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method of combustion for dual fuel engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and a method of introducing a primary fuel, which may be a coal water slurry, and a high combustion auxiliary fuel, which may be a conventional diesel oil, into an internal combustion diesel engine comprises detecting the load conditions of the engine, determining the amount of time prior to the top dead center position of the piston to inject the main fuel into the combustion chamber, and determining the relationship of the timing of the injection of the auxiliary fuel into the combustion chamber to achieve a predetermined specific fuel consumption, a predetermined combustion efficiency, and a predetermined peak cylinder firing pressure. 19 figures.

Hsu, B.D.; Confer, G.L.; Zujing Shen; Hapeman, M.J.; Flynn, P.L.

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines was investigated. The optic sensing element consists of two mirrors in an in-line single mode fiber that are separated by some distance. To withstand the harsh conditions inside an engine, the Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FFPI) element was coated with gold and copper. The metal-protected fiber sensor was embedded into a small cut in the metal casing of the spark plug. At first, the sensing element was dipped in liquid gold and cured. Then the gold-coated fiber sensor was electroplated with copper. Finally, the metal-coated fiber sensor was embedded in the spark plug. The spark-plug-embedded FFPI sensor was monitored using a signal conditioning unit. Field tests were carried out in a 3-cylinder automotive engine with a piezoelectric pressure sensor as a reference transducer up to about 3500 rpm. The fiber optic sensor data generally matched those measured by the piezoelectric reference sensor. The use of a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) diode as a light source in an FFPI optic sensor system was investigated. Reflected light from the FFPI sensing element was used to measure the optical path difference. With a 1550nm VCSEL as the light source in a 12mm cavity length Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer, spectral characteristics were examined to determine the proper combination of dc bias current, modulation current amplitude and modulation frequency. Single VCSEL operation and regular fringe patterns were achieved. The laser tuning was -41.2 GHz/mA and was determined from measurements of the shift in the spectral peak of the VCSEL diode output as a function of dc bias current. By testing the fringe movement as the FFPI sensor was heated, the temperature tuning coefficient for the optical length was determined to be 11 x 10-6 �ºC. The results of these experiments indicate that the use of VCSEL diode as a light source for the FFPI sensor offers a viable alternative to the use of Distributed Feedback (DFB) laser diodes for monitoring at a lower bias current and modulating current amplitude.

Bae, Taehan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Utilization of alternative fuels in diesel engines:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thrust of this resarch program has been to determine the effect of various alternative and synthetic fuels on the performance and emissions from Diesel engines. The purpose of research was to investigate the various fuels for extension of existing supplies or as emergency substitutes for Diesel fuels. Thus, the work did not emphasize optimization of the engines for a given fuel;the engines were generally run at manufacturers specifications for conventional fuels. During the various studies, regulated and unregualted emissions were investigated and the biological activity of the soluble organics on the particulate emissions was determined using the Ames test procedure. During the present contract period, three experimental programs were carried out. The first program investigated the utilization of methane and propane in an indirect injection, multicylinder engine. In the other two studies, a single cylinder direct injection Diesel engine was used to investigate the performance and emission characteristics of synthetic fuels derived from tar sands and oil shale and of three fuels derived from coal by the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) process. The body of this report consists of three chapters which summarize the experimental equipment, procedures, and major results from the studies of methane and propane fumigation, of synthetic fuels from oil shale and tar sands and of the coal-derived fuels.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of a Truck- mounted Fuel Cell APU System. Society ofEngine Idling Versus Fuel Cell APUs. ” Society of AutomotiveJr; 2003. Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Investigation and demonstration of a rich combustor cold-start device for alcohol-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have completed a study in which they investigated the use of a rich combustor to aid in cold starting spark-ignition engines fueled with either neat ethanol or neat methanol. The rich combustor burns the alcohol fuel outside the engine under fuel-rich conditions to produce a combustible product stream that is fed to the engine for cold starting. The rich combustor approach significantly extends the cold starting capability of alcohol-fueled engines. A design tool was developed that simulates the operation of the combustor and couples it to an engine/vehicle model. This tool allows the user to determine the fuel requirements of the rich combustor as the vehicle executes a given driving mission. The design tool was used to design and fabricate a rich combustor for use on a 2.8 L automotive engine. The system was tested using a unique cold room that allows the engine to be coupled to an electric dynamometer. The engine was fitted with an aftermarket engine control system that permitted the fuel flow to the rich combustor to be programmed as a function of engine speed and intake manifold pressure. Testing indicated that reliable cold starts were achieved on both neat methanol and neat ethanol at temperatures as low as {minus}20 C. Although starts were experienced at temperatures as low as {minus}30 C, these were erratic. They believe that an important factor at the very low temperatures is the balance between the high mechanical friction of the engine and the low energy density of the combustible mixture fed to the engine from the rich combustor.

Hodgson, J.W.; Irick, D.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ME 374C Combustion Engine Processes ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ME 374C ­ Combustion Engine Processes Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 374C ­ Combustion Engine combustion engines, fuels, carburetion, combustion, exhaust emissions, knock, fuel injection, and factors to an appropriate major sequence in engineering. Textbook(s): Internal Combustion Engines and Automotive Engineering

Ben-Yakar, Adela

85

Investigation of impact of fuel injection strategy and biodiesel fueling on engine emissions and performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Both biodiesel fueling and changes of fuel injection pressure have significant impacts on diesel engine emissions. The investigations of their impacts on engine exhaust NOx… (more)

Ye, Peng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Lean combustion in automotive engines: as assessment of the addition of hydrogen to gasoline as compared to other techniques  

SciTech Connect

An examination was made of the feasibility, practicability, performance, fuel economy, and emissions of the concept of the addition of hydrogen to gasoline for use as an automobile fuel. The specific hydrogen addition concepts evaluated included onboard storage of hydrogen as a bottled gas, as a cryogenic liquid, and as a regenerable gas in a metal hydride storage system, and the onboard generation of hydrogen by the reformation of gasoline in a fuel reformer (or gas generator). Both partial oxidation and steam reforming fuel reformers were considered. For perspective, comparisons were made of the hydrogen addition concept with the conventional spark ignition engine baseline and other lean engine concepts, e.g., advanced lean carbureted engines and stratified charge engines. Hydrogen addition via fuel reformation was found to be a feasible method of achieving ultralean engine operation.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Automobile air pollution: new automotive engines and engine improvements. 1978-March, 1981 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for 1978-March 1981  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography cites reports on new designs of automobile engines. The engine types include gas turbines, stratified charged engines, steam engines, hybrid engines using electric motors or flywheels, and rotary engines. Many of these studies also cover the problem of improving fuel economy while lowering emissions. Retrofit devices are excluded. (This updated bibliography contains 205 citations, 58 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Automobile air pollution: new automotive engines and engine improvements. Volume 1. 1970-1977 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1970-1977  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography cites reports on new designs of automobile engines. The engine types include gas turbines, stratified charge engines, steam engines, hybrid engines using electric motors or flywheels, and rotary engines. Many of these studies also cover the problem of improving fuel economy while lowering emissions. Retrofit devices are excluded. (This updated bibliography contains 176 abstracts, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Habercom, G.E. Jr

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Automobile air pollution: new automotive engines and engine improvements. Volume 2. 1978-March, 1979 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1978-March 1979  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography cites reports on new designs of automobile engines. The engine types include gas turbines, stratified charged engines, steam engines, hybrid engines using electric motors or flywheels, and rotary engines. Many of these studies also cover the problem of improving fuel economy while lowering emissions. Retrofit devices are excluded. (This updated bibliography contains 100 abstracts, 94 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Habercom, G.E. Jr

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Regenerative fuel cell engineering - FY99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report the work conducted by the ESA-EPE Fuel Cell Engineering Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY99 on regenerative fuel cell system engineering. The work was focused on the evaluation of regenerative fuel cell system components obtained through the RAFCO program. These components included a 5 kW PEM electrolyzer, a two-cell regenerative fuel cell stack, and samples of the electrolyzer membrane, anode, and cathode. The samples of the electrolyzer membrane, anode, and cathode were analyzed to determine their structure and operating characteristics. Tests were conducted on the two-cell regenerative fuel cell stack to characterize its operation as an electrolyzer and as a fuel cell. The 5 kW PEM electrolyzer was tested in the Regenerative Fuel Cell System Test Facility. These tests served to characterize the operation of the electrolyzer and, also, to verify the operation of the newly completed test facility. Future directions for this work in regenerative fuel cell systems are discussed.

Michael A. Inbody; Rodney L. Borup; James C. Hedstrom; Jose Tafoya; Byron Morton; Lois Zook; Nicholas E. Vanderborgh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Assessment of methane-related fuels for automotive fleet vehicles: technical, supply, and economic assessments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of methane-related fuels, derived from a variety of sources, in highway vehicles is assessed. Methane, as used here, includes natural gas (NG) as well as synthetic natural gas (SNG). Methanol is included because it can be produced from NG or the same resources as SNG, and because it is a liquid fuel at normal ambient conditions. Technological, operational, efficiency, petroleum displacement, supply, safety, and economic issues are analyzed. In principle, both NG and methanol allow more efficient engine operation than gasoline. In practice, engines are at present rarely optimized for NG and methanol. On the basis of energy expended from resource extraction to end use, only optimized LNG vehicles are more efficient than their gasoline counterparts. By 1985, up to 16% of total petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel could be displaced by large fleets with central NG fueling depots. Excluding diesel vehicles, which need technology advances to use NG, savings of 8% are projected. Methanol use by large fleets could displace up to 8% of petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel from spark-ignition vehicles and another 9% from diesel vehicles with technology advances. The US NG supply appears adequate to accommodate fleet use. Supply projections, future price differential versus gasoline, and user economics are uncertain. In many cases, attractive paybacks can occur. Compressed NG now costs on average about $0.65 less than gasoline, per energy-equivalent gallon. Methanol supply projections, future prices, and user economics are even more uncertain. Current and projected near-term methanol supplies are far from adequate to support fleet use. Methanol presently costs more than gasoline on an equal-energy basis, but is projected to cost less if produced from coal instead of NG or petroleum.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Multi-Dimensional Modeling - Fuel Spray...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primary breakup mechanisms. In a diesel engine, liquid fuel is injected into the combustion chamber near the end of the compression stroke. Following injection, the fuel...

94

Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

Hale, Steve

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski & Kevin N. Baum One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared under: Subcontract No. AGB-0-40628-01 to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to the U.S. Department of Energy Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gasses and pollutants than

96

Fuel effects in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogenous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion is a new method of burning fuel in internal combustion (IC) engines. In an HCCI engine, the fuel and air are premixed prior to combustion, like in a spark-ignition ...

Angelos, John P. (John Phillip)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Ignition Engines Spark Ignition Engines Thomas Wallner and omni engine Thomas Wallner and the omnivorous engine Background Today the United States import more than 60% of its crude oil and petroleum products. Transportation accounts for a major portion of these imports. Research in this field is focused on reducing the dependency on foreign oil by increasing the engine efficiency on the one hand and blending gasoline with renewable domestic fuels, such as ethanol, on the other. Argonne's Research The main focus of research is on evaluation of advanced combustion concepts and effects of fuel properties on engine efficiency, performance and emissions. The platforms used are a single-cylinder research engine as well as an automotive-size four-cylinder engine with direct fuel injection.

98

Fuel-cell engine stream conditioning system  

SciTech Connect

A stream conditioning system for a fuel cell gas management system or fuel cell engine. The stream conditioning system manages species potential in at least one fuel cell reactant stream. A species transfer device is located in the path of at least one reactant stream of a fuel cell's inlet or outlet, which transfer device conditions that stream to improve the efficiency of the fuel cell. The species transfer device incorporates an exchange media and a sorbent. The fuel cell gas management system can include a cathode loop with the stream conditioning system transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell related to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Use of an Engine Cycle Simulation to Study a Biodiesel Fueled Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the GT-Power software, an engine cycle simulation for a biodiesel fueled direct injection compression ignition engine was developed and used to study its performance and emission characteristics. The major objectives were to establish the engine model for simulation and then apply the model to study the biodiesel fueled engine and compare it to a petroleum-fueled engine. The engine model was developed corresponding to a 4.5 liter, John Deere 4045 four-cylinder diesel engine. Submodels for flow in intake/exhaust system, fuel injection, fuel vaporization and combustion, cylinder heat transfer, and energy transfer in a turbocharging system were combined with a thermodynamic analysis of the engine to yield instantaneous in-cylinder parameters and overall engine performance and emission characteristics. At selected engine operating conditions, sensitivities of engine performance and emission on engine load/speed, injection timing, injection pressure, EGR level, and compression ratio were investigated. Variations in cylinder pressure, ignition delay, bsfc, and indicated specific nitrogen dioxide were determined for both a biodiesel fueled engine and a conventional diesel fueled engine. Cylinder pressure and indicated specific nitrogen dioxide for a diesel fueled engine were consistently higher than those for a biodiesel fueled engine, while ignition delay and bsfc had opposite trends. In addition, numerical study focusing on NOx emission were also investigated by using 5 different NO kinetics. Differences in NOx prediction between kinetics ranged from 10% to 65%.

Zheng, Junnian

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

103

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

Leto, Anthony (Franklin Lakes, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.

Johnson, R.N.; Hayden, H.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Cold start fuel management of port-fuel-injected internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate how changes in fueling strategy in the second cycle of engine operation influence the delivered charge fuel mass and engine out hydrocarbon (EOHC) emissions in that and subsequent ...

Cuseo, James M. (James Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Gasoline Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasoline Sprays Gasoline Sprays Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector (simulated environment). Some newer automobiles in the U.S. use gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. These advanced gasoline engines inject the fuel directly into the engine cylinder rather than into the intake port. These engines can achieve higher fuel efficiency, but they depend on a precise fuel/air mixture at the spark plug to initiate ignition. This leads to more stringent requirements on spray quality and reproducibility. GDI also enables new combustion strategies for gasoline engines such as lean burn engines that use less fuel and air. Lean burn engines may achieve efficiencies near those of diesels while producing low emissions. This

110

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Battery and Engine Research Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Battery and Vehicle Battery and Engine Research Tax Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Battery and Engine Research Tax Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Battery and Engine Research Tax Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Battery and Engine Research Tax Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Battery and Engine Research Tax Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Battery and Engine Research Tax Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Battery and Engine Research Tax Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

111

Improving combustion stability in a bi-fuel engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes how a new strategy for ignition timing control can reduce NOx emissions from engines using CNG and gasoline. Until a proper fueling infrastructure is established, a certain fraction of vehicles powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) must have bi-fuel capability. A bi-fuel engine, enjoying the longer range of gasoline and the cleaner emissions of CNG, can overcome the problem of having few CNG fueling stations. However, bi-fuel engines must be optimized to run on both fuels since low CNG volumetric efficiency causes power losses compared to gasoline.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Working towards a future on alternative fuels : the role of the automotive industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complementarity of vehicles and fuels has posed significant barrier for increasing the use of alternative fuels in place of traditional ones. An initial positive number of either alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) users or ...

Chen, Cuicui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The threat posed by climate change and the striving for security of energy supply are issues high on the political agenda these days. Governments are putting strategic plans in motion to decrease primary energy use, take carbon out of fuels and facilitate modal shifts. Taking a prominent place in these strategic plans is hydrogen as a future energy carrier. A number of manufacturers are now leasing demonstration vehicles to consumers using hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (H{sub 2}ICEs) as well as fuel cell vehicles. Developing countries in particular are pushing for H{sub 2}ICEs (powering two- and three-wheelers as well as passenger cars and buses) to decrease local pollution at an affordable cost. This article offers a comprehensive overview of H{sub 2}ICEs. Topics that are discussed include fundamentals of the combustion of hydrogen, details on the different mixture formation strategies and their emissions characteristics, measures to convert existing vehicles, dedicated hydrogen engine features, a state of the art on increasing power output and efficiency while controlling emissions and modeling.

Verhelst, S.; Wallner, T.; Energy Systems; Ghent Univ.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Performance characteristics of automotive engines in the United States. Second Series, Report No. 2: 1976 Chevrolet, 305 CID (5. 0 liters), 2V. Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental data were obtained in dynamometer tests of a 1976 Chevrolet 305-CID V-8 engine to determine fuel consumption and emissions (hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen) at steady-state engine-operating modes. The objective of the program is to obtain engine-performance data for estimating emissions and fuel economy for varied engine service and duty. The intent of the work is to provide basic engine characteristic data required as input for engineering calculations involving ground transportation.

Chamberlain, T.W.; Koehler, D.E.; Stamper, K.R.; Marshall, W.F.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Neural network control of air-to-fuel ratio in a bi-fuel engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a neural network-based control system is proposed for fine control of the intake air/fuel ratio in a bi-fuel engine. This control system is an add-on module for an existing vehicle manufacturer's electronic control units (ECUs). Typically ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, bi-fuel engines, compressed natural gas (CNG), fuel injection control

G. Gnanam; S. R. Habibi; R. T. Burton; M. T. Sulatisky

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H{sub 2}-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO{sub 2}. Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H{sub 2} for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H{sub 2}) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected from exposure to ambient air to prevent re-oxidation of the copper. The activated catalyst must also be protected from the condensation of liquids, for example, during start-up or transient operation. For these reasons, a more thermally rugged catalyst is needed which has sufficient activity to operate at the low temperatures that are thermodynamically necessary to achieve low CO concentrations.

Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of PC 4 dual-fuel engine  

SciTech Connect

Recently, utilization of natural gas, which is considered to be one of most important alternative fuels for petroleum, has been marked. As thermal efficiency of dual-fuel engine is higher than those of other prime movers with gaseous fuel, i.e., spark-ignited gas engine or gas turbine, it is possible to construct fuel-economical gas power plants with dual-fuel engines. However, its horsepower has been limited to the rather lower range. In 1984, NKK succeeded in developing large-sized dual-fuel engines based on the Pielstick PC4 diesel engine. The horsepower is 1200 HP/cyl, i.e. 21,600 HP for 18-cyclinder engine.

Nishikawa, T.; Utsuyama, S.; Maruyama, S.; Ono, T.; Kitahara, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Solid fuel combustion system for gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion system for a gas turbine engine includes a carbonizer outside of the engine for gasifying coal to a low Btu fuel gas in a first fraction of compressor discharge, a pressurized fluidized bed outside of the engine for combusting the char residue from the carbonizer in a second fraction of compressor discharge to produce low temperature vitiated air, and a fuel-rich, fuel-lean staged topping combustor inside the engine in a compressed air plenum thereof. Diversion of less than 100% of compressor discharge outside the engine minimizes the expense of fabricating and maintaining conduits for transferring high pressure and high temperature gas and incorporation of the topping combustor in the compressed air plenum of the engine minimizes the expense of modifying otherwise conventional gas turbine engines for solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion.

Wilkes, Colin (Lebanon, IN); Mongia, Hukam C. (Carmel, IN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Engine Dynamometer Test Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Dynamometer Test Cells Engine Dynamometer Test Cells The ReFUEL Laboratory features two engine dynamometer test cells-one for heavy-duty engines and another for light-duty engines. Heavy-Duty Engine Dynamometer Test Cell Capabilities Photo of heavy-duty engine dynamometer test cell in laboratory setting. Heavy-duty engines are certified as meeting emission regulations by the manufacturer using an engine dynamometer. These protocols, known as the Heavy-Duty Federal Test Procedures (HD-FTP), are highly standardized, and results can be readily compared between laboratories. Because the heavy-duty engine dynamometer test cell performs the HD-FTP on engines up to 600 hp, advanced fuels can be evaluated in a way that is meaningful to the engine-research community. In addition to testing a wide

120

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 77 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel system Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 6.8...

122

Welcome - Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dynamometers bench-top engine exhaust simulators unique diagnostic and measurement tools fuel cell characterization systems There are many ways to work with FEERC including a...

123

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Champion Bus Inc. - CTS - Front Engine Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 32 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

124

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - All American Rear Engine Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 84 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

125

Modeling the effect of engine assembly mass on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, an analytical model is developed to estimate the impact of reducing engine assembly mass (the term engine assembly refers to the moving components of the engine system, including crankshafts, valve train, pistons, and connecting rods) on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy. The relative changes in frictional mean effective pressure and fuel economy are proportional to the relative change in assembly mass. These changes increase rapidly as engine speed increases. Based on the model, a 25% reduction in engine assembly mass results in a 2% fuel economy improvement for a typical mid-size passenger car over the EPA Urban and Highway Driving Cycles.

An, Feng [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report, Appendix B-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Directed Technologies, Inc. has previously submitted a detailed technical assessment and concept design for a mid-size, five-passenger fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV), under contract to the Argonne National Laboratory. As a supplement to that contract, DTI has reviewed the literature and conducted a preliminary evaluation of two energy carriers for the FCEV: hydrogen and methanol. This report compares the estimated fuel efficiency, cost of producing and delivering the fuel, and the resultant life cycle costs of the FCEV when fueled directly by hydrogen and when fueled by methanol with on-board reforming to produce the required hydrogen-rich gas for the fuel cell. This work will be supplemented and expanded under the Ford contract with the Department of Energy to develop the FCEV and its fuel infrastructure.

Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization In an Integrated Concurrent Engineering Framework by Massimo Usan M. S. Aeronautical Engineering of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management at the Massachusetts Institute Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi

128

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Use of alcohol fuel: engine-conversion demonstration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of ethanol as a fuel extender when mixed with gasoline, and the use of both hydrated and anhydrous ethanol as a fuel in gasoline and diesel engines are discussed. Required engine modifications for efficient use of ethanol are described, and include engine compression alterations, carburetor adjustments, and arrangement for fuel preheating. In 1981 and 1982 a demonstration of ethanol use in spark ignition engines was conducted at a major public park in South Carolina. The demonstration included a controlled road test with a pick-up truck and a demonstration of ethanol use in small, air cooled gasoline engines. One problem that was identified was that of contaminated fuel that clogged the fuel system after a few days' operation. (LEW)

Marsh, W.K. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

On the effect of pulsating flow on surge margin of small centrifugal compressors for automotive engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surge is becoming a limiting factor in the design of boosting systems of downsized diesel engines. Although standard compressor flowcharts are used for the selection of those machines for a given application, on-engine conditions widely differ from steady flow conditions, thus affecting compressor behaviour and consequently surge phenomenon. In this paper the effect of pulsating flow is investigated by means of a steady gas-stand that has been modified to produce engine-like pulsating flow. The effect of pressure pulses' amplitude and frequency on the compressor surge line location has been checked. Results show that pulsating flow in the 40-67 Hz range (corresponding to characteristic pulsation when boosting an internal combustion engine) increases surge margin. This increased margin is similar for all the tested frequencies but depends on pulsation amplitude. In a further step, a non-steady compressor model is used for modelling the tests, thus allowing a deeper analysis of the involved phenomena. Model results widely agree with experimental results. (author)

Galindo, J.; Climent, H.; Guardiola, C.; Tiseira, A. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Camino de Vera s/n, E 46022, Valencia (Spain)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Fuzzy Diagnostic Model and Its Application in Automotive Engineering Diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a fuzzy diagnostic model that contains a fast fuzzy rule generation algorithm and a priority rule based inference engine. The fuzzy diagnostic model has been implemented in a fuzzy diagnostic system for the End-of-Line test at ... Keywords: fault diagnosis, fuzzy logic, machine learning

Yi Lu; Tie Qi Chen; Brennan Hamilton

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Multiple fuel supply system for an internal combustion engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple fuel supply or an internal combustion engine wherein phase separation of components is deliberately induced. The resulting separation permits the use of a single fuel tank to supply components of either or both phases to the engine. Specifically, phase separation of a gasoline/methanol blend is induced by the addition of a minor amount of water sufficient to guarantee separation into an upper gasoline phase and a lower methanol/water phase. A single fuel tank holds the two-phase liquid with separate fuel pickups and separate level indicators for each phase. Either gasoline or methanol, or both, can be supplied to the engine as required by predetermined parameters. A fuel supply system for a phase-separated multiple fuel supply contained in a single fuel tank is described.

Crothers, William T. (Sunol, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Microbial fuel cells: novel microbial physiologies and engineering approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of generating electricity with microbial fuel cells has been recognized for some time with minimal negative environmental impact. Producing electricity from organic matter with microbial fuel cellsMicrobial fuel cells: novel microbial physiologies and engineering approaches Derek R Lovley

Lovley, Derek

134

Fuel-flexible partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbons for automotive applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Micro-reactor tests indicate that our partial oxidation catalyst is fuel-flexible and can reform conventional (gasoline and diesel) and alternative (ethanol, methanol, natural gas) fuels to hydrogen rich product gases with high hydrogen selectivity. Alcohols are reformed at lower temperatures (< 600 C) while alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons require slightly higher temperatures. Cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics have also been reformed at relatively low temperatures, however, a different mechanism appears to be responsible for their reforming. Complex fuels like gasoline and diesel, which are mixtures of a broad range of hydrocarbons, require temperatures of > 700 C for maximum hydrogen production.

Ahmed, S.; Carter, J. D.; Kopasz, J. P.; Krumpelt, M.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence. The goal of GATE is to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals to overcome technology...

136

Running out of steam. Part III. Development blues. [Alternatives to automotive internal combustion engines  

SciTech Connect

The history is given of systems that have been looked upon alternately as either strong competitors or engineering curiosities in the revived search to replace the Otto-cycle power plant with a cleaner, more efficient, and equally reliable passenger car engine. These recent efforts are largely attempts to polish up old technologies that were around long before a single model-T rolled off Henry Ford's first assembly line. The first steam vehicle, for example, hit the road more than 200 years ago and over the years has undergone considerable refinement. But, in spite of this long history and with the exception of short bursts of enthusiasm, the development of a steam-powered passenger car has never been high on the automobile industry's list of priorities. Some clues are given as to why this is true and why a number of ''think tank'' reports published over the past few years on the future role of steam-driven cars have ranged from mildly optimistic to forthrightly pessimistic. Electric vehicles have had a somewhat parallel history. They were early competitors with the Otto engine, but, unlike the steam cars, they have never completely disappeared. Indeed, for some special uses, they have outperformed all varieties of internal combustion engines (I.C.E.). Further inroads into the Otto-cycle car market, however, depend upon improved car design and the advancement of battery technology, an area of research that has been painfully slow in yielding results. Were it not for the wide public interest in environmental and resource issues that has been translated into new laws dealing with air pollution and resource management, the auto industry would have been content to sit on its I.C.E. for some time to come.

Reitze, A.W. Jr.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Operation of an aircraft engine using liquefied methane fuel  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a reciprocating aircraft engine on methane fuel is demonstrated. Since storage of the methane fuel in the gaseous state would impractical for a flight fuel system, a liquid storage system was used. System valving was configured to deliver only liquid methane to the engine supply line. The equipment description includes photo and diagram illustrations of the liquid methane storage dewar, and photos of the methane heat exchanger, pressure regulator and air-fuel mixer. The engine test results are presented for gasoline and methane in terms of RPM, horsepower, fuel flow, specific energy consumption and standard conditions horsepower. Conclusions include the finding that conversion of an aircraft reciprocating engine to operate on liquified methane is possible with very satisfactory results.

Raymer, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Automotive component product development enhancement through multi-attribute system design optimization in an integrated concurrent engineering framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive industry is facing a tough period. Production overcapacity and high fixed costs constrain companies' profits and challenge the very same existence of some corporations. Strangulated by the reduced cash availability ...

Usan, Massimo, 1967-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Engineered Biosynthesis of Alternative Biodiesel Fuel - Energy ...  

While biodiesel may perform comparably to fossil-derived fuels, ... Fuel molecule size can be adjusted for either gasoline or diesel compatibility;

140

2000 Annual Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies Fiscal Year (FY) 2000 Annual Progress Report for the Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells Program highlights progress achieved during FY 2000 and comprises 22 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects that were conducted. The report provides an overview of the exciting work being conducted to tackle the tough technical challenges associated with developing clean burning fuels that will enable meeting the performance goals of the Emission Control R and D for Advanced CIDI Engines and the Transportation Fuel Cell Power Systems Programs. The summaries cover the effects of CIDI engine emissions and fuel cell power system performance, the effects of lubricants on engine emissions, the effects of fuel and consumed lubricants on exhaust emission control devices and the health and safety, materials compatibility, and economics of advanced petroleum-based fuels.

Chalk, S.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Experiments and modelling of surge in small centrifugal compressor for automotive engines  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the surge phenomenon in small centrifugal compressors used for turbocharging internal combustion engines is analyzed. The experimental work was focused on the measurement of compressor behaviour within the surge zone by means of a specifically designed facility. The presented model is based on the introduction of a fluid inertia term that accounts for the non quasi steady effects and the use of a compressor map extended to the surge and negative flows zone obtained from experimental tests. The compressor model was implemented in a one-dimensional gas-dynamic model. The comparison of the modelled and measured evolution of instantaneous pressure during deep surge operation shows good agreement. Furthermore, the model is also able to predict the amplitude and frequency of pressure pulses when the compressor operates in surge with different outlet duct lengths. (author)

Galindo, J.; Serrano, J.R.; Climent, H.; Tiseira, A. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E 46071 Valencia (Spain)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Diesel engine lubrication with poor quality residual fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of marine residual fuel is declining. This is being caused by a gradual trend towards production of heavier crudes and increased residuum conversion processes in refineries to meet light product demand while holding down crude runs. Additionally, more stringent inland fuel sulfur regulations have caused the higher sulfur residues to be used for marine residual fuel blending. Engine manufacturers are making major efforts in design so that their engines can burn these fuels at high efficiency with minimum adverse effects. The oil industry is developing improved lubricants to reduce as much as possible the increased wear and deposit formation caused by these poor quality fuels. To guide the development of improved lubricants, knowledge is required about the impact of the main fuel characteristics on lubrication. This paper summarizes work conducted to assess the impact of fuel sulfur, Conradson carbon and asphaltenes on wear and deposit formation in engines representative of full scale crosshead diesel engines and medium speed trunk piston engines. Results obtained with improved lubricants in these engines are reviewed.

Van der Horst, G.W.; Hold, G.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS 2000 ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FUELS F O R ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES A N D FUEL CELLS A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory, Computer Systems Management, Inc., National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and QSS Group, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2000 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI

144

Development of an engine fuel and spark controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop an engine control unit (ECU) for a four cylinder engine to be used in a Formula SAE racers. The ECU must provide effective fuel injection and spark ignition control and provide for easy adjustment by the user for engine tuning purposes. The controller was designed to operate using a speed-throttle fuel map, with acceleration enrich, meet and other fuel compensating factors. A paired double-tiring strategy was adapted to avoid the complications associated with sequential fuel injection. The ECU utilized a Motorola 68HC16 development board, as well as special injector and ignition driver circuits. The software was designed to be primarily interrupt driven, with a task manager to arbitrate among other tasks. A user interface program, which runs on a PC, allows the user to instantly alter operating parameters in the ECU during engine tuning and development. The controller was tested on a Yamaha YZF 600 motorcycle engine with a custom intake manifold and fuel injection system. The fuel and spark maps and other parameters were configured for this engine by using the user interface. Dynamometer testing verities that engine performance with this ECU meets design specifications.

Suter, William Gregory

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs SUMMARY This EIS considers programmatic (DOE-wide) alternative approaches to safely, efficiently, and responsibly manage existing and projected quantities of spent nuclear fuel until the year 2035. This amount of time may be required to make and implement a decision on the ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. DOE's spent nuclear fuel responsibilities include fuel generated by DOE production, research, and development reactors; naval reactors; university and foreign research reactors; domestic non-DOE reactors such as those at the National Institute

146

Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, entitled Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,'' describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

Badgley, P.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Combustion: Sandwiched Between Engines and Fuel (Trying to Make...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion: Sandwiched Between Engines and Fuel (Trying to Make Bread from Combustion) Speaker(s): Robert Dibble Date: March 10, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This seminar will...

148

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane...

149

Alcohol fuel conversion apparatus for internal combustion engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alcohol fuel conversion apparatus is described for internal combustion engines comprising: fuel storage means containing an alcohol fuel; primary heat exchanger means in fluid communication with the fuel storage means for transferring heat to pressurized alcohol contained within the heat exchanger means; a heat source for heating the heat exchange means; pressure relief valve means, in closed fluid communication with the primary heat exchange means, operable to release heated pressurized alcohol into an expansion chamber; converter means, including the expansion chamber, in fluid communication with the pressure relief valve means for receiving the heated pressurized alcohol and for the vaporization of the alcohol; carburetor means in fluid communication with the converter means for metering and mixing vaporized alcohol with air for proper combustion and for feeding the mixture to an internal combustion engine; and pump means for pressurized pumping of alcohol from the fuel storage means to the heat exchanger means, converter means, carburetor means, and to the engine.

Carroll, B.I.

1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Alternative Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sprays Alternative fuel sprays Non-petroleum fuels are gaining popularity in the U.S. Ethanol is being blended with gasoline in varying proportions, and biodiesel is being sold at...

151

Fuel Cycle Technologies Program - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

152

The piston dynamics under knock situation of diesel dual fuel engine: a numerical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compression ignition engine fueled by natural gas or Diesel Dual Fuel (DDF) engine is a promising engine for the future of a high oil price. Unfortunately, the DDF engine knocks easily: this leads to damage of pistons. So, the understanding of the ... Keywords: diesel dual fuel engine, knock, mixed-lubrication, modelling, piston secondary motion, simulation

Krisada Wannatong; Somchai Chanchaona; Surachai Sanitjai

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Future fuels and engines for railroad locomotives. Volume I: summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was made of the potential for reducing the dependence of railroads on petroleum fuel, particularly diesel No. 2. The study takes two approaches: (1) to determine how the use of diesel No. 2 can be reduced through increased efficiency and conservation, and (2) to use fuels other than diesel No. 2 both in diesel and other types of engines. The study consists of two volumes; volume 1 is a summary and volume 2 is the technical document. The study indicates that the possible reduction in fuel usage by increasing the efficiency of the present engine is limited; it is already highly energy efficient. The use of non-petroleum fuels, particularly the oil shale distillates, offers a greater potential. A coal-fired locomotive using any one of a number of engines appears to be the best alternative to the diesel-electric locomotive with regard to life-cycle cost, fuel availability, and development risk. The adiabatic diesel is the second-rated alternative with high thermal efficiency (up to 64%) as its greatest advantage. The risks associated with the development of the adiabatic diesel, however, are higher than those for the coal-fired locomotive. The advantage of the third alternative, the fuel cell, is that it produces electricity directly from the fuel. At present, the only feasible fuel for a fuel cell locomotive is methanol. Synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, probably derived from oil shale, will be needed if present diesel-electric locomotives are used beyond 1995. Because synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are particularly suited to medium-speed diesel engines, the first commercial application of these fuels may be by the railroad industry.

Liddle, S.G.; Bonzo, B.B.; Purohit, G.P.; Stallkamp, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Study of Fuel Property Effects Using Future Low Emissions Heavy Duty Truck Engine Hardware  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel properties have had substantial impact on engine emissions. Fuel impact varies with engine technology. An assessment of fuel impact on future low emission designs was needed as part of an EMAEPA-API study effort

Li, Sharon

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

155

Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

Anand, Krishnasamy [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ra, youngchul [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells (FCs) are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several countries, including the United States, Japan, Germany, and South Korea have established publicly funded R&D and market transformation programs to develop viable domestic FC industries for both automotive and non-automotive applications. Important non-automotive applications include large scale and small scale distributed combined heat and electrical power, backup and uninterruptible power, material handling and auxiliary power units. The U.S. FC industry is in the early stages of development, and is working to establish sustainable markets in all these areas. To be successful, manufacturers must reduce costs, improve performance, and overcome market barriers to new technologies. U.S. policies are assisting via research and development, tax credits and government-only and government-assisted procurements. Over the past three years, the industry has made remarkable progress, bringing both stack and system costs down by more than a factor of two while improving durability and efficiency, thanks in part to government support. Today, FCs are still not yet able to compete in these markets without continued policy support. However, continuation or enhancement of current policies, such as the investment tax credit and government procurements, together with continued progress by the industry, appears likely to establish a viable domestic industry within the next decade.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, K. G. [ICF International; Upreti, Girish [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Elimination of abnormal combustion in a hydrogen-fueled engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the design, construction, and testing of a dedicated hydrogen-fueled engine. Both part-load and full-load data were taken under laboratory conditions. The engine design included a billet aluminum single combustion chamber cylinder-head with one intake valve, two sodium coiled exhaust valves, and two spark plugs. The cylinder-head design also included drilled cooling passages. The fuel-delivery system employed two modified Siemens electrically actuated fuel injectors, The exhaust system included two separate headers, one for each exhaust port. The piston/ring combination was designed specifically for hydrogen operation.

Swain, M.R.; Swain, M.N. [Analytical Technologies, Inc., Miami, FL (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

McTaggart, Paul

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Coal-fueled diesel engines for locomotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GE Transportation Systems (GE/TS) completed a two and one half year study into the economic viability of a coal fueled locomotive. The coal fueled diesel engine was deemed to be one of the most attractive options. Building on the BN-NS study, a proposal was submitted to DOE to continue researching economic and technical feasibility of a coal fueled diesel engine for locomotives. The contract DE-AC21-85MC22181 was awarded to GE Corporate Research and Development (GE/CRD) for a three year program that began in March 1985. This program included an economic assessment and a technical feasibility study. The economic assessment study examined seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal fueled diesels. These areas included impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The results of the study indicated the merits for development of a coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. The technical feasibility study examined the combustion of CWS through lab and bench scale experiments. The major accomplishments from this study have been the development of CWS injection hardware, the successful testing of CWS fuel in a full size, single cylinder, medium speed diesel engine, evaluation of full scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions.

Hsu, B.D.; Najewicz, D.J.; Cook, C.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Emissions characteristics of Military Helicopter Engines Fueled with JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in aviation activities and more stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations have increased concerns regarding aircraft emissions, due to their harmful health and environmental impacts, especially in the vicinity of airports and military bases. In this study, the gaseous and particulate-matter emissions of two General Electric T701C engines and one T700 engine were evaluated. The T700 series engines power the U.S. Army's Black Hawk and Apache helicopters. The engines were fueled with standard military JP-8 fuel and were tested at three power settings. In addition, one of the T701C engines was operated on a natural-gas-derived Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene jet fuel. Test results show that the T701C engine emits significantly lower particulate-matter emissions than the T700 for all conditions tested. Particulate-matter mass emission indices ranged from 0.2-1.4 g/kg fuel for the T700 and 0.2-0.6 g/kg fuel for the T701C. Slightly higher NOx and lower CO emissions were observed for the T701C compared with the T700. Operation of the T701C with the Fischer-Tropsch fuel rendered dramatic reductions in soot emissions relative to operation on JP-8, due primarily to the lack of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuel. The Fischer-Tropsch fuel also produced smaller particles and slight reductions in CO emissions.

Corporan, E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; DeWitt, M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Klingshirn, Christopher D [ORNL; Striebich, Richard [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fuel from Bacteria, CO2, Water, and Solar Energy: Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: Harvard is engineering a self-contained, scalable Electrofuels production system that can directly generate liquid fuels from bacteria, carbon dioxide (CO2), water, and sunlight. Harvard is genetically engineering bacteria called Shewanella, so the bacteria can sit directly on electrical conductors and absorb electrical current. This current, which is powered by solar panels, gives the bacteria the energy they need to process CO2 into liquid fuels. The Harvard team pumps this CO2 into the system, in addition to water and other nutrients needed to grow the bacteria. Harvard is also engineering the bacteria to produce fuel molecules that have properties similar to gasoline or diesel fuel—making them easier to incorporate into the existing fuel infrastructure. These molecules are designed to spontaneously separate from the water-based culture that the bacteria live in and to be used directly as fuel without further chemical processing once they’re pumped out of the tank.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

FUEL INTERCHANGEABILITY FOR LEAN PREMIXED COMBUSTION IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to environmental concerns of NOx emissions, gas turbine manufacturers have developed engines that operate under lean, pre-mixed fuel and air conditions. While this has proven to reduce NOx emissions by lowering peak flame temperatures, it is not without its limitations as engines utilizing this technology are more susceptible to combustion dynamics. Although dependent on a number of mechanisms, changes in fuel composition can alter the dynamic response of a given combustion system. This is of particular interest as increases in demand of domestic natural gas have fueled efforts to utilize alternatives such as coal derived syngas, imported liquefied natural gas and hydrogen or hydrogen augmented fuels. However, prior to changing the fuel supply end-users need to understand how their system will respond. A variety of historical parameters have been utilized to determine fuel interchangeability such as Wobbe and Weaver Indices, however these parameters were never optimized for today’s engines operating under lean pre-mixed combustion. This paper provides a discussion of currently available parameters to describe fuel interchangeability. Through the analysis of the dynamic response of a lab-scale Rijke tube combustor operating on various fuel blends, it is shown that commonly used indices are inadequate for describing combustion specific phenomena.

Don Ferguson; Geo. A. Richard; Doug Straub

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

163

Automotive turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

Gas flow through a turbine is divided, with part of the flow directed to the compressor for the combusion chamber and part directed to the primary power turbine. Division of the gas flow is accomplished by a mixing wheel of novel design. Before passing to the primary power turbine the gas flow passes through a secondary power turbine that drives the compressor for the combustion chamber. Both the secondary power turbine and the compressor rotate independently of the main turbine rotor shaft. The power input to the secondary power turbine is varied in accordance with the pressure differential between the gas pressure at the outlet of the compressor for the combustion chamber and the outlet from the mixing wheel. If the speed of the main turbine shaft slows down more power is put into the secondary power turbine and the combustion chamber compressor is speeded up so as to produce a higher gas pressure than would otherwise be the case.

Wirth, R.E.; Wirth, M.N.

1978-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

Study on the Photogrammetric Application to the Fuel Cell Engine Vibration Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owing to its energy-saving and environment-friendly features, the fuel cell car has become the future trend of vehicle development. To prolong the engine’s life span, the suspension of fuel cell engine needs to be appropriately designed, which ... Keywords: fuel cell engine, vibration testing, close-up photogrammetry, image processing

Chuqi Su; Xiang Lin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fuel property effects on engine combustion processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major obstacle to improving spark ignition engine efficiency is the limitations on compression ratio imposed by tendency of hydrocarbon fuels to knock (autoignite). A research program investigated the knock problem in spark ignition engines. Objective was to understand low and intermediate temperature chemistry of combustion processes relevant to autoignition and knock and to determine fuel property effects. Experiments were conducted in an optically and physically accessible research engine, static reactor, and an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR). Chemical kinetic models were developed for prediction of species evolution and autoignition behavior. The work provided insight into low and intermediate temperature chemistry prior to autoignition of n-butane, iso-butane, n-pentane, 1-pentene, n-heptane, iso-octane and some binary blends. Study of effects of ethers (MTBE, ETBE, TAME and DIPE ) and alcohols (methanol and ethanol) on the oxidation and autoignition of primary reference fuel (PRF) blends.

Cernansky, N.P.; Miller, D.L.

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by weight [6]. The potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

Boehman, Andre L.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Bookmark and Share Much of the NE Division's research is directed toward developing software and performing analyses, system engineering design, and experiments to support the demonstration and optimization of the electrometallurgical

168

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Diesel Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Sprays Diesel Sprays Chris Powell and fuel spray xray beamline Christopher Powell, an engine research scientist, fits a specially designed X-ray pressure window to a high-pressure chamber used in diesel spray research. These windows allow Argonne researchers to use X-rays to probe diesel sprays under the high-density conditions found in diesel engines. Diesel sprays Diesel engines are significantly more fuel-efficient than their gasoline counterparts, so wider adoption of diesels in the U.S. would decrease the nation’s petroleum consumption. However, diesels emit much higher levels of pollutants, especially particulate matter and NOx (nitrogen oxides). These emissions have prevented more manufacturers from introducing diesel passenger cars. Researchers are exploring ways to reduce pollution formation in the engine

169

Coal-fueled diesel technology development: Nozzle development for coal-fueled diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Direct injection of a micronized coal water mixture fuel into the combustion chambers of a diesel engine requires atomizing an abrasive slurry fuel with accurately sized orifices. Five injector orifice materials were evaluated: diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, thermally stabilized diamond, tungsten carbide with cobalt binder, and tungsten carbide with nickel binder with brazed and mechanically mounted orifice inserts. Nozzle bodies were fabricated of Armco 17-4 precipitation hardening stainless steel and Stellite 6B in order to withstand cyclic injection pressures and elevated temperatures. Based on a total of approximately 200 cylinder hours of engine operation with coal water mixture fuel diamond compacts were chosen for the orifice material.

Johnson, R.N.; Lee, M.; White, R.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

High-alcohol microemulsion fuel performance in a diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Incidence of methanol use in diesel engines is increasing rapidly due to the potential to reduce both diesel particulate emissions and petroleum consumption. Because simple alcohols and conventional diesel fuel are normally immiscible, most tests to date have used neat to near-neat alcohol, or blends incorporating surfactants or other alcohols. Alcohol's poor ignition quality usually necssitates the use of often expensive cetane enhancers, full-time glow plugs, or spark assist. Reported herein are results of screening tests of clear microemulsion and micellar fuels which contain 10 to 65% C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohol. Ignition performance and NO emissions were measured for clear, stable fuel blends containing alcohols, diesel fuel and additives such as alkyl nitrates, acrylic acids, and several vegetable oil derivatives. Using a diesel engine calibrated with reference fuels, cetane numbers for fifty four blends were estimated. The apparent cetane numbers ranged from around 20 to above 50 with the majority between 30 and 45. Emissions of nitric oxide were measured for a few select fuels and were found to be 10 to 20% lower than No. 2 diesel fuel. 36 refs., 87 figs., 8 tabs.

West, B.H.; Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Alternative fuels for heavy duty engines: Status of fleet trials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of Annex 3 are to collect, assess and disseminate data on the use of methanol and natural gas in heavy duty compression ignition engines. Originally, the objective was directed at methanol, but in 1990 the mandate of Annex 3 was broadened to include natural gas. This is the latest update on field trials using these two fuels. The report outlines progress being made and identifies major trends. The more important events since the last progress report include: the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Certification of Detroit Diesel Corporation's 6V-92 methanol engine; the introduction of transit buses in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, using DDC methanol engines; an introduction of two DDC engined ethanol fueled transit buses at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada; the testing of catalytic converters, by Detroit Diesel Corporation, with alcohol powered engines; the discontinuance of methanol in MAN engines/buses at Seattle Metro; a tender for over 100 methanol powered transit buses for South Coast Rapid Transit District (SCRTD), Los Angeles, California; the potential purchase of an additional 150 methanol powered buses for SCRTD, in addition to 10 buses for Sacramento Regional Transit District; and, the expanded interest of transit properties in using natural gas in both compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) engines. 21 figs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Gas fuel in a four-stroke engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper refers to the behavior of a four-stroke gasoline engine that is used for the function of a small generator. The generator functioned at different electrical loads 500W, 1000W, 1500W and 2000W. During the use of gas fuel 80%butane -20%propane ... Keywords: biofuels, gas emissions, gas propane-butane mixture

Charalampos Arapatsakos

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

FY2001 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and QSS Group, Inc., for their artistic, editorial and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells

175

Emissions and efficiency of agricultural diesels using low-proof ethanol as supplement fuel. [Tractor engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental investigations were made to evaluate the potential of using low-proof ethanol to supplement diesel fuel in agricultural engines. Fumigation, mechanical emulsification, and chemical emulsifiers were used to introduce a significant amount of alcohol with diesel fuel for engine operation. A total of five diesel tractor engines were tested using each of the fuel systems. Exhaust products and fuel usage were determined at various engine speed/load conditions. 5 references, 12 figures, 14 tables.

Allsup, J.R.; Clingenpeel, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

[Fuel substitution of vehicles by natural gas: Summaries of four final technical reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains summary information on three meetings and highlights of a fourth meeting held by the Society of Automotive Engineers on natural gas fueled vehicles. The meetings covered the following: Natural gas engine and vehicle technology; Safety aspects of alternately fueled vehicles; Catalysts and emission control--Meeting the legislative standards; and LNG--Strengthening the links.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Application of neural network for air-fuel ratio identification in spark ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) is used for Air-Fuel Ratio (AFR) identification in Spark Ignition (SI) engine. AFR identification is difficult due to nonlinear and dynamic behaviour of SI engines. Delays present in the engine ... Keywords: AFR sensors, RNNs, air-fuel ratio control, air-fuel ratio sensors, engine modelling, recurrent neural networks, simulation, spark ignition engines, virtual sensors

Samir Saraswati; Satish Chand

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tracing Fuel Component Carbon in the Emissions from Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The addition of oxygenates to diesel fuel can reduce particulate emissions, but the underlying chemical pathways for the reductions are not well understood. While measurements of particulate matter (PM), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), and carbon monoxide (CO) are routine, determining the contribution of carbon atoms in the original fuel molecules to the formation of these undesired exhaust emissions has proven difficult. Renewable bio-derived fuels (ethanol or bio-diesel) containing a universal distribution of contemporary carbon are easily traced by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). These measurements provide general information about the emissions of bio-derived fuels. Another approach exploits synthetic organic chemistry to place {sup 14}C atoms in a specific bond position in a specific fuel molecule. The highly labeled fuel molecule is then diluted in {sup 14}C-free petroleum-derived stock to make a contemporary petroleum fuel suitable for tracing. The specific {sup 14}C atoms are then traced through the combustion event to determine whether they reside in PM, HC, CO, CO{sub 2}, or other emission products. This knowledge of how specific molecular structures produce certain emissions can be used to refine chemical-kinetic combustion models and to optimize fuel composition to reduce undesired emissions. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique and the lack of appreciable {sup 14}C in fossil fuels, fuels for AMS experiments can be labeled with modern levels of {sup 14}C and still produce a strong signal. Since the fuel is not radioactive, emission tests can be conducted in any conventional engine lab, dynamometer facility, or on the open road.

Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Martin, G C; Cheng, A S E; Dibble, R W; Frantz, B R

2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Eric L. Brosha, Anthony Burrell, Neil Henson, Jonathan Phillips, and Tommy Rockward Los Alamos National Laboratory Timothy Ward, Plamen Atanassov University of New Mexico Karren More Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fuel Cell Technologies Program Kick-off Meeting September 30 - October 1, 2009 Washington DC Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Fuel Cell Technologies Objectives  Develop a ceramic alternative to carbon material supports for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode that exhibits an enhanced resistance to corrosion and Pt coalescence while preserving positive attributes of carbon such as

180

Experimental Study of Air-Fuel Ratio Control Strategy for a Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most attractive combustive features for hydrogen fuel is its wide range of flammability. The wide flammability limits allow hydrogen engine to be operated at extremely lean air–fuel ratios compared to conventional fuels. Concepts for ... Keywords: Hydrogen internal combustion engine, Air/Fuel ratio, Control strategy

Zhong-yu Zhao; Fu-shui Liu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Numerical modeling of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planned use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future introduces new challenges and opportunities, especially to the engine design community. Hydrogen is a bio-friendly fuel that can be produced from renewable resources and has no carbon dioxide combustion products; and in a properly designed ICE, almost zero NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon emissions can be achieved. Because of the unique properties of hydrogen combustion - in particular the highly wrinkled nature of the laminar flame front due to the preferential diffusion instability - modeling approaches for hydrocarbon gaseous fuels are not generally applicable to hydrogen combustion. This paper reports on the current progress to develop a engine design capability based on KIVA family of codes for hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engines in support of the National Hydrogen Program. A turbulent combustion model, based on a modified eddy-turnover model in conjunction with an intake flow valve model, is found to describe well the efficiency and NO{sub x} emissions of this engine satisfy the Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) standard established by the California Resource Board. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Strategic frameworks in automotive systems architecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More often than not, large-scale engineering concepts such as those used by creative automotive manufacturing companies require the incorporation of significant capital outlays and resources for the purposes of implementation ...

Tampi, Mahesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Intelligent Study on Diesel-LNG Dual Fuel Marine Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a diesel engine named "X6170ZC" has been converted into a dual-fuel engine of diesel and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The principle, composition and characteristics of electronic control system for the engine have been introduced. An ... Keywords: engine, dual-fuel, intelligent

Zhang Liang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on AddThis.com... Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search Search our database to find and compare specific vehicles, engines, or hybrid propulsion systems and generate printable reports.

185

Engineered Nanostructured MEA Technology for Low Temperature Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalyst support technology based on unique engineered nanostructures for low temperature fuel cells which: (1) Achieves high catalyst activity and performance; (2) Improves catalyst durability over current technologies; and (3) Reduces catalyst cost. This project is directed at the development of durable catalysts supported by novel support that improves the catalyst utilization and hence reduce the catalyst loading. This project will develop a solid fundamental knowledge base necessary for the synthetic effort while at the same time demonstrating the catalyst advantages in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs).

Zhu, Yimin

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on AddThis.com... Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods To maintain the Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search tool, the National

187

Final report: U.S. competitive position in automotive technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Patent data are presented and analyzed to assess the U.S. competitive position in eleven advanced automotive technology categories, including automotive fuel cells, hydrogen storage, advanced batteries, hybrid electric vehicles and others. Inventive activity in most of the technologies is found to be growing at a rapid pace, particularly in advanced batteries, automotive fuel cells and ultracapacitors. The U.S. is the clear leader in automotive fuel cells, on-board hydrogen storage and light weight materials. Japan leads in advanced batteries, hybrid electric vehicles, ultracapacitors, and appears to be close to overtaking the U.S. in other areas of power electronics.

Albert, Michael B.; Cheney, Margaret; Thomas, Patrick; Kroll, Peter

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

189

Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor physics and fuel cycle analysis is a core competency of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division. The Division has played a major role in the design and analysis of advanced reactors, particularly liquid-metal-cooled reactors. NE researchers have concentrated on developing computer codes for

190

Farm scale biogas-fueled engine/induction generator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3.6 liter spark ignition engine coupled to an induction generator produced 21 kW of electric power at 1260 rpm operating on biogas (55% methane, 45% carbon dioxide). Power output increased by 3.55 kW for a 10 rpm increase in shaft speed. Operating at over 16 kW output, power factor was greater than .8 and generator efficiency was greater than 85%. Engine operation is insensitive to small changes in spark advance. Recommended spark advance for a biogas engine is about 45/sup 0/. Minimum brake specific fuel consumption of 270 g CH/sub 4//kWh occurs at a manifold vacuum of 5 cmHg and an equivalence ratio in the range of .6 to .8.

Stahl, T.; Fischer, J.R.; Harris, F.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Automotive Stirling Engine Market and Industrial Readiness Program (MIRP). Final report for Phase IA, September 15, 1982-July 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect

A brief history of the project is presented. Included in appendices are the scope of work, management and cost plans, major milestones, and the digital engine control spare parts' list. (MHR)

Not Available

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fueling Innovation -- 100 MPGe at a Time | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fueling Innovation -- 100 MPGe at a Time Fueling Innovation -- 100 MPGe at a Time Fueling Innovation -- 100 MPGe at a Time August 4, 2010 - 2:48pm Addthis X Prize contenders take part in on-track testing at Michigan International Speedway | Courtesy of Progressive Automotive X Prize X Prize contenders take part in on-track testing at Michigan International Speedway | Courtesy of Progressive Automotive X Prize John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops the next generation of automotive engineers Showcases innovative approaches for breaking the 100 MPGe barrier With hybrids becoming more commonplace in auto showrooms and electric cars beginning to break into the mainstream market, on streets across the country you can see that the automotive industry is moving toward energy

193

Performance Evaluation and Optimization of Diesel Fuel Properties and Chemistry in an HCCI Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nine CRC fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE fuels) have been evaluated in a simple, premixed HCCI engine under varying conditions of fuel rate, air-fuel ratio, and intake temperature. Engine performance was found to vary mainly as a function of combustion phasing as affected by fuel cetane and engine control variables. The data was modeled using statistical techniques involving eigenvector representation of the fuel properties and engine control variables, to define engine response and allow optimization across the fuels for best fuel efficiency. In general, the independent manipulation of intake temperature and air-fuel ratio provided some opportunity for improving combustion efficiency of a specific fuel beyond the direct effect of targeting the optimum combustion phasing of the engine (near 5 CAD ATDC). High cetane fuels suffer performance loss due to easier ignition, resulting in lower intake temperatures, which increase HC and CO emissions and result in the need for more advanced combustion phasing. The FACE fuels also varied in T90 temperature and % aromatics, independent of cetane number. T90 temperature was found to have an effect on engine performance when combined with high centane, but % aromatics did not, when evaluated independently of cetane and T90.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Eaton, Scott J [ORNL; Crawford, Robert W [Rincon Ranch Consulting

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fuel mixture stratification as a method for improving homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for slowing the heat-release rate in homogeneous charge compression ignition ("HCCI") engines that allows operation without excessive knock at higher engine loads than are possible with conventional HCCI. This method comprises injecting a fuel charge in a manner that creates a stratified fuel charge in the engine cylinder to provide a range of fuel concentrations in the in-cylinder gases (typically with enough oxygen for complete combustion) using a fuel with two-stage ignition fuel having appropriate cool-flame chemistry so that regions of different fuel concentrations autoignite sequentially.

Dec, John E. (Livermore, CA); Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G. (Livermore, CA)

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC (USAMP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC (USAMP) was formed in 1993 as a partnership between Chrysler Corporation, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors Corporation. Since then the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported its activities with funding and technical support. The mission of the USAMP is to conduct vehicle-oriented research and development in materials and materials processing to improve the competitiveness of the U.S. Auto Industry. Its specific goals are: (1) To conduct joint research to further the development of lightweight materials for improved automotive fuel economy; and (2) To work with the Federal government to explore opportunities for cooperative programs with the national laboratories, Federal agencies such as the DOE and universities. As a major component of the DOE's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program (FCVT) collaboration with the USAMP, the Automotive Lightweighting Materials (ALM) program focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. The FCVT was announced in FY 2002 and implemented in FY 2003, as a successor of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), largely addressed under the first Cooperative Agreement. This second USAMP Cooperative Agreement with the DOE has expanded a unique and valuable framework for collaboratively directing industry and government research efforts toward the development of technologies capable of solving important societal problems related to automobile transportation. USAMP efforts are conducted by the domestic automobile manufacturers, in collaboration with materials and manufacturing suppliers, national laboratories, universities, and other technology or trade organizations. These interactions provide a direct route for implementing newly developed materials and technologies, and have resulted in significant technical successes to date, as discussed in the individual project summary final reports. Over 70 materials-focused projects have been established by USAMP, in collaboration with participating suppliers, academic/non-profit organizations and national laboratories, and executed through its original three divisions: the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC), the Automotive Metals Division (AMD), and Auto/Steel Partnership (A/SP). Two new divisions were formed by USAMP in 2006 to drive research emphasis on integration of structures incorporating dissimilar lightweighting materials, and on enabling technology for nondestructive evaluation of structures and joints. These new USAMP divisions are: Multi-Material Vehicle Research and Development Initiative (MMV), and the Non-Destructive Evaluation Steering Committee (NDE). In cooperation with USAMP and the FreedomCAR Materials Technical Team, a consensus process has been established to facilitate the development of projects to help move leveraged research to targeted development projects that eventually migrate to the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) as application engineering projects. Research projects are assigned to one of three phases: concept feasibility, technical feasibility, and demonstration feasibility. Projects are guided through ongoing monitoring and USAMP offsite reviews, so as to meet the requirements of each phase before they are allowed to move on to the next phase. As progress is made on these projects, the benefits of lightweight construction and enabling technologies will be transferred to the supply base and implemented in production vehicles. The single greatest barrier to automotive use of lightweight materials is their high cost; therefore, priority is given to activities aimed at reducing costs through development of new materials, forming technologies, and manufacturing processes. The emphasis of the research projects reported in this document was largely on applied research and evaluation of mass savings opportunities thro

United States Automotive Materials Partnership

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel injector in a combustor apparatus of a gas turbine engine. An outer wall of the injector defines an interior volume in which an intermediate wall is disposed. A first gap is formed between the outer wall and the intermediate wall. The intermediate wall defines an internal volume in which an inner wall is disposed. A second gap is formed between the intermediate wall and the inner wall. The second gap receives cooling fluid that cools the injector. The cooling fluid provides convective cooling to the intermediate wall as it flows within the second gap. The cooling fluid also flows through apertures in the intermediate wall into the first gap where it provides impingement cooling to the outer wall and provides convective cooling to the outer wall. The inner wall defines a passageway that delivers fuel into a liner downstream from a main combustion zone.

Wiebe, David J.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

197

Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: Economic Development, Vehicles Phase: Create a Vision Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.transportation.anl.gov/modeling_simulation/PSAT/autonomie.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: Autonomie[1] Rapidly evaluate new powertrain and propulsion technologies for improving fuel economy through virtual design and analysis in a math-based simulation environment. Argonne has developed a new tool, called Autonomie, to accelerate the

198

Fuel injector nozzle for an internal combustion engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A direct injection fuel injector includes a nozzle tip having a plurality of passages allowing fluid communication between an inner nozzle tip surface portion and an outer nozzle tip surface portion and directly into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. A first group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in a first common plane. A second group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in at least a second common plane substantially parallel to the first common plane. The second group has more passages than the first group.

Cavanagh, Mark S. (Bloomington, IL); Urven, Jr., Roger L. (Colona, IL); Lawrence, Keith E. (Peoria, IL)

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Effects of different fuels on a turbocharged, direct injection, spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following pages describe the experimentation and analysis of two different fuels in GM's high compression ratio, turbocharged direct injection (TDI) engine. The focus is on a burn rate analysis for the fuels - gasoline ...

Negrete, Justin E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the participating students are now contributing to the advancement of automotive technology in this country.

David Holloway

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Automobile Buyer Decisions about Fuel Economy and Fuel Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Throughof the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards. ” EconomicImplications for Fuel Economy Policy. ” Presentation to SAE

Kurani, Ken; Turrentine, Thomas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Flameholding Studies for Lean Premixed Fuel Injectors for Application in Gas Turbine Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to the ever-increasing demand for energy, it is likely that stationary gas turbine engines will require the use of fuels with a diverse range… (more)

Marzelli, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A homogenous combustion catalyst for fuel efficiency improvements in diesel engines fuelled with diesel and biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] The ferrous picrate based homogeneous combustion catalyst has been claimed to promote diesel combustion and improve fuel efficiency in diesel engines. However, the… (more)

Zhu, Mingming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DK, Weiss R: Synthetic biology: new engineering rules for anfrom bugs to synthetic biology to fuels Sung Kuk Lee, Howardengineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for

Kuk Lee, Sung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Fuel injection system and method of operating the same for an engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injector is coupled to an engine. The fuel injector includes an injection opening configured to vary in cross-section between a open state and a fully closed state. The fuel injector is configured to provide a plurality of discrete commanded fuel injections into an engine cylinder by modulating the size of the injection opening without completely closing the opening to the fully closed state.

Topinka, Jennifer Ann (Niskayuna, NY); DeLancey, James Peter (Corinth, NY); Primus, Roy James (Niskayuna, NY); Pintgen, Florian Peter (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Landi-Hartog U. S. A. adjusts to the U. S. market. [Marketing of LPG carburetor systems for using propane as an automotive fuel  

SciTech Connect

Landi-Hartog U.S.A. has adjusted to the U.S. market in providing LPG carburetor systems for passenger cars. Landi-Hartog (LH) had to completely redesign the components on the system to be compatible with U.S. 300-525 cu in. engines. The company has California Air Resources Board approval for 300 cu in. engines and above in dual-fuel service. However, the U.S. market will remain severely restricted unless basic distribution (and the political) changes are made. The U.S. is st

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W. (Lake Matthews, CA); Scott, Paul B. (Northridge, CA); Park, Chan Seung (Yorba Linda, CA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) in the Automotive Industry: Successes and Opportunities. Author(s), Louis Gerard ...

210

CarMA: towards personalized automotive tuning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensing and actuation have been explored in many contexts, but the automotive setting has received relatively little attention. Automobiles have tens of onboard sensors and expose several hundred engine parameters which can be tuned (a ... Keywords: automobile, engine control unit, scanning, tuning

Tobias Flach; Nilesh Mishra; Luis Pedrosa; Christopher Riesz; Ramesh Govindan

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume IV. Energy/economic comparison of coal-based automotive energy supply systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Considerable debate has occurred in recent years about the relative merits of energy analysis versus traditional economic analysis. Some economists assert that energy analysis adds no new information to that in economic analysis; energy analysts claim that the explicit consideration of energy flows is necessary for a complete understanding of the implications of energy supply and use. In comparing the cost and energy consumption figures for the various automotive energy options, certain parallels are evident. Those system components that have the highest costs also require high levels of energy consumption. This is generally due to the severity of the processing conditions required to convert one energy form (e.g., coal) to another (e.g., methanol). These conditions require the use of capital-intensive equipment as well as the consumption of large amounts of energy. For some components that have relatively high costs but low energy requirements (e.g., fuel distribution), the costs are due to the many handling and transfer requirements. Overall, the capital- and energy-intensive energy conversion processes dominate the systems we have examined. Therefore, a comparison of cost with energy consumption for all the fuels considered shows a definite trend - increasing costs imply increasing energy consumption. Thus, decision makers concerned with promoting energy conservative supply options need not worry that their choices will be unduly costly. Rather, they will tend to be the least costly for the types of systems considered here. We caution against extrapolating these results to other systems, however, because systems that do not have the same kinds of capital- and energy-intensive components as those considered here may exhibit different trends.

Steele, R.V.; Sharma, K.J.; Dickson, E.M.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Automotive electronics business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the automotive industry, due to the trend to introduce active safety systems, concerns about protecting the environment, and advances in information technology, key automotive manufacturers are eager to acquire new ...

Hase, Yoshiko, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Effect of in-cylinder liquid fuel films on engine-out unburned hydrocarbon emissions for SI engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly all of the hydrocarbon emissions from a modern gasoline-fueled vehicle occur when the engine is first started. One important contributing factor to this is the fact that, during this time, temperatures throughout ...

Costanzo, Vincent S. (Vincent Stanley), 1979-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

PLIF flow visualization of methane gas jet from spark plug fuel injector in a direct injection spark ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Spark Plug Fuel Injection (SPFI), which is a combination of a fuel injector and a spark plug was developed with the aim to convert any gasoline port injection spark ignition engine to gaseous fuel direct injection [1]. A direct fuel injector is combined ... Keywords: air-fuel mixing, direct fuel injection, flow visualization, gaseous fuel, laser-induced fluorescent

Taib Iskandar Mohamad; How Heoy Geok

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hydrogen engine performance analysis project. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address the problems identified in order to obtain the data-base covering performance, operational characteristics and emissions essential for making a rational decision regarding the selection and design of prototype hydrogen-fueled, air-breathing engines capable of being manufactured for general automotive use. The project program plan calls for investigation of pre-intake valve closing fuel ingestion (Pre IVC) hydrogen-fueled engines during the first two of the three year project. With Pre IVC engines the fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber prior to closing of the intake valve. This is in contrast to Post IVC engines in which fuel is introduced in the cylinder after the intake valve closes. Post IVC engines are to be investigated during the third year according to the project program plan. This quarterly report is a summary of the work accomplished during the first three months of the project.

Adt, R.R. Jr.; Swain, M.R.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

218

Oscar Automotive Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oscar Automotive Ltd Oscar Automotive Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Oscar Automotive Ltd Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product OSCar Automotive is working towards the commercialisation of hydrogen fuel cells in the transport sector. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

219

Racing Ahead in Automotive Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Racing Ahead in Automotive Education Racing Ahead in Automotive Education Racing Ahead in Automotive Education February 18, 2011 - 4:52pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Helps develop the next generation of innovative auto engineers Where will the next generation of automotive innovation come from? That's a question that's driving discussion throughout the auto industry at the moment, and many hope that the answer lies in the next generation of engineers. Unfortunately, while many young engineers are eager to put their talents to work developing breakthrough transportation technologies, not many U.S. universities have multidisciplinary instructional programs that focus on cutting-edge automotive technologies.

220

Measurement of Fuel Dilution of Oil in a Diesel Engine using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique for measuring the fuel dilution of oil in a diesel engine is presented. Fuel dilution can occur when advanced in-cylinder fuel injection techniques are employed for the purpose of producing rich exhaust for lean NOx trap catalyst regeneration. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy is used to monitor the oil in a Mercedes 1.7-liter engine operated on a dynamometer platform. A fluorescent dye suitable for use in diesel fuel and oil systems is added to the engine fuel. The LIF spectra are monitored to detect the growth of the dye signal relative to the background fluorescence of the oil; fuel mass concentration is quantified based on a known sample set. The technique was implemented with fiber optic probes which can be inserted at various points in the oil system of the engine. A low cost 532-nm laser diode was used for excitation of the fluorescence. Measurements of fuel dilution of oil are presented for various in-cylinder injection strategies for rich operation of the diesel engine. Rates of fuel dilution increase for all strategies relative to normal lean operation, and higher fuel dilution rates are observed when extra fuel injection occurs later in the combustion cycle when fuel penetration into the cylinder wall oil film is more likely.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500[degrees]F (815[degrees]C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650[degrees]F (900[degrees]C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

Bornstein, N.S.

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Engine deposit and pour point studies using canola oil as a diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect

Engine tests conducted during previous investigations have established the viability of using canola oil as a substitute for diesel fuel on a short term basis, but also revealed the need to assess possible combustion chamber deposits from long range testing. Low temperature problems in handling vegetable oils has also been recognized as posing a threat to their use in winter operation. This paper reports a procedure involving a direct comparison of running two different fuels in an engine simultaneously to study deposit problems, and also reports on three attempted methods - fuel blending, fuel heating and fuel additives to reduce the pour point of canola oil. 3 figures, 1 table.

Strayer, R.C.; Craig, W.K.; Zoerb, G.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Partial oxidation for improved cold starts in alcohol-fueled engines: Phase 2 topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alcohol fuels exhibit poor cold-start performance because of their low volatility. Neat alcohol engines become difficult, if not impossible, to start at temperatures close to or below freezing. Improvements in the cold-start performance (both time to start and emissions) are essential to capture the full benefits of alcohols as an alternative transportation fuel. The objective of this project was to develop a neat alcohol partial oxidation (POX) reforming technology to improve an alcohol engine`s ability to start at low temperatures (as low as {minus}30 C) and to reduce its cold-start emissions. The project emphasis was on fuel-grade ethanol (E95) but the technology can be easily extended to other alcohol fuels. Ultimately a compact, on-vehicle, ethanol POX reactor was developed as a fuel system component to produce a hydrogen-rich, fuel-gas mixture for cold starts. The POX reactor is an easily controllable combustion device that allows flexibility during engine startup even in the most extreme conditions. It is a small device that is mounted directly onto the engine intake manifold. The gaseous fuel products (or reformate) from the POX reactor exit the chamber and enter the intake manifold, either replacing or supplementing the standard ethanol fuel consumed during an engine start. The combustion of the reformate during startup can reduce engine start time and tail-pipe emissions.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Series 50 propane-fueled Nova bus: Engine development, installation, and field trials  

SciTech Connect

The report describes a project to develop the Detroit Diesel series 50 liquefied propane gas (LPG) heavy-duty engine and to conduct demonstrations of LPG-fuelled buses at selected sites (Halifax Regional Municipality and three sites in the United States). The project included five main elements: Engine development and certification, chassis re-engineering and engine installation, field demonstration, LPG fuel testing, and LPG fuel variability testing. Lessons learned with regard to engine design and other issues are discussed, and recommendations are made for further development and testing.

Smith, B.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Diesel - soy oil blends as fuel in a four stroke engine when the fuel temperatures are different  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the fact that petroleum is decreased in nowadays and also the fact that the environment sustains a lot of damage, it is necessary to be replaced by renewable fuels that can be used in the engines and are friendlily to the environment. This paper ... Keywords: biofuels, gas emissions, soy oil fuel

Charalampos Arapatsakos; Dimitrios Christoforidis; Anastasios Karkanis; Konstantinos Mitroulas; Marianthi Moschou

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis of Durability of MEAs in Automotive PEMFC Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Randal L. Perry E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company Chestnut Run Plaza, 701/209 4417 Lancaster Pike Wilmington, DE 19805 Phone: (302) 999-6545 Email: randal.l.perry @usa.dupont.com DOE Managers HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Thomas Benjamin Phone: (630) 252-1632 Email: Benjamin@anl.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0003772 Subcontractors: * Nissan Technical Center North America, Farmington Hills, MI * Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Chicago, IL Project Start Date: September 1, 2010

229

Method and apparatus for controlling fuel/air mixture in a lean burn engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system for controlling the fuel/air mixture supplied to a lean burn engine when operating on natural gas, gasoline, hydrogen, alcohol, propane, butane, diesel or any other fuel as desired. As specific humidity of air supplied to the lean burn engine increases, the oxygen concentration of exhaust gas discharged by the engine for a given equivalence ratio will decrease. Closed loop fuel control systems typically attempt to maintain a constant exhaust gas oxygen concentration. Therefore, the decrease in the exhaust gas oxygen concentration resulting from increased specific humidity will often be improperly attributed to an excessive supply of fuel and the control system will incorrectly reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engine. Also, the minimum fuel/air equivalence ratio for a lean burn engine to avoid misfiring will increase as specific humidity increases. A relative humidity sensor to allow the control system to provide a more enriched fuel/air mixture at high specific humidity levels. The level of specific humidity may be used to compensate an output signal from a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor for changing oxygen concentrations at a desired equivalence ratio due to variation in specific humidity specific humidity. As a result, the control system will maintain the desired efficiency, low exhaust emissions and power level for the associated lean burn engine regardless of the specific humidity level of intake air supplied to the lean burn engine.

Kubesh, John Thomas (San Antonio, TX); Dodge, Lee Gene (San Antonio, TX); Podnar, Daniel James (San Antonio, TX)

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Van Hool - A300L Fuel Cel Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hydrogen Maximum Seating: 28 Power Source(s): UTC Power - PureMotion Model 120 Fuel Cell System...

231

ENERGY REDUCTION IN AUTOMOTIVE PAINT SHOPS A REVIEW OF HYBRID/ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY MANUFACTURING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Automotive industry is facing fundamental challenges due to the rapid depletion of fossil fuels, energy saving and environmental concerns. The need of sustainable energy development… (more)

Arenas Guerrero, Claudia Patricia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Engineered nano-scale ceramic supports for PEM fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalyst support durability is currently a technical barrier for commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, especially for transportation applications. Degradation and corrosion of the conventional carbon supports leads to losses in active catalyst surface area and, consequently, reduced performance. As a result, the major aim of this work is to develop support materials that interact strongly with Pt, yet sustain bulk-like catalytic activities with very highly dispersed particles. This latter aspect is key to attaining the 2015 DOE technical targets for platinum group metal (PGM) loadings (0.20 mg/cm{sup 2}). The benefits of the use of carbon-supported catalysts to drastically reduce Pt loadings from the early, conventional Pt-black technology are well known. The supported platinum catalyzed membrane approach widely used today for fabrication of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) was developed shortly thereafter these early reports. Of direct relevance to this present work, are the investigations into Pt particle growth in PEM fuel cells, and subsequent follow-on work showing evidence of Pt particles suspended free of the support within the catalyst layer. Further, durability work has demonstrated the detrimental effects of potential cycling on carbon corrosion and the link between electrochemical surface area and particle growth. To avoid the issues with carbon degradation altogether, it has been proposed by numerous fuel cell research groups to replace carbon supports with conductive materials that are ceramic in nature. Intrinsically, these many conductive oxides, carbides, and nitrides possess the prerequisite electronic conductivity required, and offer corrosion resistance in PEMFC environments; however, most reports indicate that obtaining sufficient surface area remains a significant barrier to obtaining desirable fuel ceU performance. Ceramic materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity and necessary stability under fuel cell conditions must also exhibit high surface area as a necessary adjunct to obtaining high Pt dispersions and Pt utilization targets. Our goal in this work is to identify new synthesis approaches together with materials that will lead to ceramic supports with high surface areas and high Pt dispersions. Several strong candidates for use as PEMFC catalyst supports include: transition metal nitrides and substoichiometric titanium oxides, which hither to now have been prepared by other researcher groups with relatively low surface areas (ca. 1-50 m{sup 2}/g typical). To achieve our goals of engineering high surface area, conductive ceramic support for utilization in PEMFCs, a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with experience synthesizing and investigating these materials has been assembled. This team is headed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and includes Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of New Mexico. This report describes our fiscal year 2010 technical progress related to applying advanced synthetiC methods towards the development of new ceramic supports for Pt catalysts for PEM fuel cells.

Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blackmore, Karen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burrell, Anthony K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henson, Neil J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Performance and emission studies on biodiesel-liquefied petroleum gas dual fuel engine with exhaust gas recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel to diesel derived from vegetable oils by transesterification process. It can be used in diesel engines with/without any modification in the engine system. Biodiesel engines emit slightly higher NO x emissions

A. S. Ramadhas; S. Jayaraj; C. Muraleedharan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogenCNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in...

235

Coal-liquid fuel/diesel engine operating compatibility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is intended to assess the possibilities of using coal-derived liquids (CDL) represented by a specific type (SRC II) and shale-derived distillate fuel in blends of petroleum-derived fuels in medium-speed, high-output, heavy-duty diesel engines. Conclusions are as follows: (1) Blends of solvent refined coal and diesel fuel may be handled safely by experienced diesel engine mechanics. (2) A serious corrosion problem was found in the fuel pump parts when operating with solvent refined coal blended with petroleum. It is expected that a metallurgy change can overcome this problem. (3) Proper selection of materials for the fuel system is required to permit handling coal-derived liquid fuels. (4) A medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine can be operated on blends of solvent refined coal and petroleum without serious consequences save the fuel system corrosion previously mentioned. This is based on a single, short durability test. (5) As represented by the product evaluated, 100% shale-derived distillate fuel may be used in a medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine without significant consequences. (6) The shale product evaluated may be blended with petroleum distillate or petroleum residual materials and used as a fuel for medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engines. 7 references, 24 figures, 20 tables.

Hoffman, J.G.; Martin, F.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Preliminary investigation of the effects of coal-water slurry fuels on the combustion in GE coal fueled diesel engine (Task 1. 1. 2. 2. 1, Fuels)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In prior work with the coal fired diesel research engine, a necessity to determine the sensitivity of the engine to a wider range of fuels was resolved and included in the R and D Test Plan submitted on 2/9/89. In general, the economic viability and universal acceptance of the commercial engine will be a factor of its ability to tolerate the widest range of source fuels with minimal fuel beneficiation. As detailed in the R and D Test Plan, a preliminary investigation on the effects of coal-water slurry (CWS) fuels on the combustion in a GE single cylinder test engine was conducted. The following conclusions are obtained from this investigation. All the test CWS fuels were successfully burned in the GE engine combustion system. They include: 3 to 15 microns mean particle size; 0.7 to 2.8% ash level; KY Blue Gem and PA Mariana bituminous coal, WY Kemmer and Spring Creek Sub-Bituminous coal; coal beneficiated with physical and chemical processes; two kinds of additives for OTISCA CWS; and burnout is not effected by ash or particle size within the test range. For each kind of CWS fuel, the detail design parameters of the fuel injection system has to be compatible. With sufficiently high fuel injection pressure, the 3 micron mean particle size OTISCA fuel burns faster than the 5 micron ones. For OTISCA fuel, the burn rate using Ammonium Lignosulfonate as additive is faster than using Ammonium Condensed Naphthalene Sulfonate. Appendices contain data on heat release, fuel characterization reports from two laboratories, general engine test data, and particulate size distribution. 3 refs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Requirements and concepts for future automotive electronic architectures from the view of integrated safety.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this dissertation, concepts of the electronic architecture of automotive Integrated Safety System are developed as a cooperative approach of engineering process, dependable hardware architecture… (more)

Chen, Xi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The design of an automotive cockpit module for European urban electric vehicles for 2015.:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This graduation project focuses on identifying how the development of new electric vehicle (EV) archetypes could affect automotive engineering and design. Changes will occur throughout… (more)

Buskermolen, S.P.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

DEVELOPMENT OF AN AIR?CYCLE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An air?cycle air conditioning system, using a typical automotive turbocharger as the core of the system, was designed and tested. Effects on engine performance were… (more)

Forster, Christopher James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Compression-Ignition - diesel, fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compression Ignition Engines Clean Diesel Technologies for Greener Performance Mechanical engineer Alan Kastengren examines a diesel injection nozzle used in Argonne's X-ray spray...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to develop a pathway to use easily measured ignition properties as metrics for characterizing fuels in advanced combustion engine research--correlate IQT{trademark} measured parameters with engine data. In HCCL engines, ignition timing depends on the reaction rates throughout compression stroke: need to understand sensitivity to T, P, and [O{sub 2}]; need to rank fuels based on more than one set of conditions; and need to understand how fuel composition (molecular species) affect ignition properties.

Taylor, J.; Li, H.; Neill, S.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

AUTOMOTIVE ALLOYS: III: Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal fly ash, an industrial waste by-product, is produced during combustion of ... DIE CASTING FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS--A Status Report: Hubert ...

243

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Champion Bus Inc. - Defender Azure Dynamics - Balance Parallel Hybrid Drive Fuel Type: Hybrid - Gasoline...

244

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Freightliner - M2 106 Hybrid Applications: Tractor, Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric...

245

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Front Load (Contender, Atlantic, Low-Profile) Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 2...

246

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Vision Motor Corp. - Tyrano Eaton - Hybrid Drive System Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric...

247

Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance with meeting DOE technical targets this research was aimed at developing and optimizing new fuel injection technologies and strategies for the combustion of clean burning renewable fuels in diesel engines. In addition a simultaneous minimum 20% improvement in fuel economy was targeted with the aid of this novel advanced combustion system. Biodiesel and other renewable fuels have unique properties that can be leveraged to reduce emissions and increase engine efficiency. This research is an investigation into the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and its impacts on the performance of a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engine, which is a novel engine configuration that incorporates technologies and strategies for simultaneously reducing NOx and particulate emissions while increasing engine efficiency. Generating fundamental knowledge about the properties of biodiesel and blends with petroleum-derived diesel and their impact on in-cylinder fuel atomization and combustion processes was an important initial step to being able to optimize fuel injection strategies as well as introduce new technologies. With the benefit of this knowledge experiments were performed on both optical and metal LTC engines in which combustion and emissions could be observed and measured under realistic conditions. With the aid these experiments and detailed combustion models strategies were identified and applied in order to improve fuel economy and simultaneously reduce emissions.

Chia-fon F. Lee; Alan C. Hansen

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Energy Conservation Potential in Natural Gas Fueled Reciprocating Engines - A Preliminary Market Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was undertaken of the usage rates of both fuel and lubricants in reciprocating engines fueled with natural gas. The study was conducted to determine the potential for energy conservation, if use is made of more fuel efficient natural gas engine oils. Governmental and non-governmental published reports and personal interviews with users, suppliers, and manufacturers were utilized in estimating fuel and lubricant consumption figures for the year 1976. Certain important facts emerged: 1) The installed horsepower of reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas was estimated at 38,800,000 hp. 2) Reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas operated an estimated 115.2 billion brake horsepower - hours. 3) Total natural gas consumed to operate these reciprocating engines in 1976 was estimated at 962 billion cubic feet. 4) The estimated crankcase and cylinder lubricants consumed in natural gas reciprocating engines in 1976 was 33.6 million gallons. This figure represents 2% of the total United States lubricant usage. 5) Widespread use of more fuel efficient crankcase and cylinder lubricants (containing stable colloidal additives) could result in a savings of 28,850,000,000 cubic feet of natural gas each year. The natural gas thus saved would be sufficient to serve all residential customers in the metropolitan Houston area for nine (9) months of each year.

Johnson, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Integrity Automotive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Automotive Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrity Automotive Place Kentucky Product Joint venture between Kentucky businessman Randal Waldman of Integrity Manufacturing and...

250

Coda Automotive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Coda Automotive Place Santa Monica, California Zip 90403 Product California-based electric vehicle company which builds its cars in China. References Coda Automotive1...

251

Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, entitled ``Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,`` describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

Badgley, P.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Spent Nuclear Fuel project systems engineering management plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the WHC Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is to describe the systems engineering approach and methods that will be integrated with established WHC engineering practices to enhance the WHC engineering management of the SNF Project. The scope of the SEMP encompasses the efforts needed to manage the WHC implementation of systems engineering on the SNF Project. This implementation applies to, and is tailored to the needs of the SNF project and all its subprojects, including all current and future subprojects

Womack, J.C.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc.

254

Method and apparatus for minimizing the fuel usage in an internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method is disclosed for minimizing the fuel usage in an internal combustion engine. The subject invention is particularly adapted for use with an engine installation subject to varying loads and which includes a governor for varying fuel flow as a function of load. In operation, the combustibles in the exhaust gas of the engine is continuously monitored. The measured level of combustibles is then compared with a predetermined level corresponding to optimum efficiency. A controller is provided for varying the air/fuel ratio supplied to the engine for maximizing efficiency in correspondence with the preset level. By this arrangement, energy output is increased permitting the governor to further reduce fuel flow, thereby minimizing energy costs.

Smojven, R.R.

1984-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effect of market fuel variation and cetane improvers on CAI combustion in a GDI engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is continued interest in improving the fuel conversion efficiency of internal combustion engines and simultaneously reducing their emissions. One promising technology is that of Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) combustion. ...

Cedrone, Kevin David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Development of HCNG Blended Fuel Engine with Control of NOx Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing concern about energy shortage and environmental protection, research on reducing exhaust emissions, reducing fuel consumption, reducing engine noise and increasing specific outputs has become the major researching aspect in combustion ...

K. R. Patil; P. M. Khanwalkar; S. S. Thipse; K. P. Kavathekar; S. D. Rairikar

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Indirect Methanol Pem Fuel Cell System, SAE 2001, (paperof automotive PEM fuel cell stacks, SAE 2000 (paper numberParasitic Loads in Fuel Cell Vehicles, International Journal

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Minotour Propane Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V8 - CleanFUEL USA liquid propane...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Collins Bus Corp. - NexBus Propane Thomas Built Buses - Minotour Propane General Motors - 6.0L V8 - CleanFUEL USA liquid propane injection (LPI) system Fuel Type: Propane...

262

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Collins Bus Corp. - NexBus Propane Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V8 - CleanFUEL USA liquid propane...

263

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vision Motor Corp. - Tyrano Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hydrogen Power Source(s): Vision Motor Corp. - 65kW Hydrogen Fuel Cell Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Hybrid Drive System...

264

IV. Uniform Regulations G. Uniform Engine Fuels and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... An electrochemical energy conversion device in which fuel and an oxidant react to generate electricity without consumption, physically or ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Freightliner - Cascadia 113 NG Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G...

266

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - W900S Application: Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G...

267

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Elgin Sweeper Company - Broom BearCrosswindEaglePelican General Motors - 3.0L Fuel Type: CNG Displacement: 3...

268

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Volvo - VNM Daycab Application: Tractor Fuel Type: CNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

269

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Trans Tech - ETrans Smith Electric Vehicles - 120kW induction motor with lithium-ion batteries Fuel Type: Electricity...

270

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Hino - 195h Hino - Hino 5L Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic Displacement: 5.0 liters...

271

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Biodiesel: The clean, green fuel for diesel engines (fact sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Natural, renewable resources such as vegetable oils and recycled restaurant greases can be chemically transformed into clean-burning biodiesel fuels. As its name implies, biodiesel is like diesel fuel except that it's organically produced. It's also safe for the environment, biodegradable, and produces significantly less air pollution than diesel fuel.

Tyson, K.S.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

Apparatus for controlling the air-fuel ratio in an internal combustion engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus for controlling the air-fuel ratio in an internal combustion engine to substantially maintain the ratio at a predetermined value while the engine is operating under various load conditions. The engine has a carburetor with an air passageway through which air is drawn into the engine. Fuel is supplied to the carburetor through a fuel system and mixed with air passing through the carburetor. The presence of oxygen in the combustion products, which is a function of the air-fuel ratio of the mixture, is sensed and a first electrical signal representative of the oxygen content is supplied. The first electrical signal is compared with a predetermined reference level which is a function of the predetermined value to produce a second electrical signal having first and second signal elements, a first signal element being produced when the air-fuel ratio of the mixture is greater than the predetermined level and a second signal element being produced when the ratio is less than the level. A control responsive to the second electrical signal supplies to an air metering unit a control signal by which the quantity of air introduced into the fuel system is controlled. A change in the control signal is produced whenever the second electrical signal has a transition from one signal element to the other thereby for the air metering unit to change the quantity of air introduced into the fuel system conduit by an amount necessary to substantially maintain the air-fuel ratio at the predetermined value.

Gantzert, T.R.; Hicks, D.L.; Lindberg, A.W.

1981-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Engineering guidelines for total energy are even more vital during fuel shortage  

SciTech Connect

Large total-energy facilities, from 3 to 20 MW in capacity, are studied, but the guidelines are applicable to small units also. Heat-balance analysis, fuel costs, load factor, load-profile match, and control-system design are engineering parameters for total-energy systems that will improve fuel economy. (MCW)

Kauffmann, W.M.

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Enhanced model and fuzzy strategy of air to fuel ratio control for spark ignition engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various mathematical models for the air to fuel ratio and control for spark ignition (SI) engines have been proposed to satisfy technical specifications. This paper reveals an improvement of the mean value model (MVEM) and a simple yet effective nonlinear ... Keywords: Air-fuel ratio, FOPDDT, Fuzzy control, Internal combustion, Nonlinear control

Anurak Jansri; Pitikhate Sooraksa

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Engine with hydraulic fuel injection and ABS circuit using a single high pressure pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An engine system comprises a hydraulically actuated fuel injection system and an ABS circuit connected via a fluid flow passage that provides hydraulic fluid to both the fuel injection system and to the ABS circuit. The hydraulically actuated system includes a high pressure pump. The fluid control passage is in fluid communication with an outlet from the high pressure pump.

Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Research on the Performance and Emission of a Port Fuel Injection Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2.0L nature aspirate gasoline engine was modified to port fuel injection (PFI) hydrogen internal combustion engine (HICE) and a series dynamometer tests were carried out. The in-cylinder combustion process was analyzed, the performance, thermal efficiency ... Keywords: hydrogen ICE, performance, emission, combustion characteristics

Dawei Sun; Fushui Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Research on the Performance and Emission of a Port Fuel Injection Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2.0L nature aspirate gasoline engine was modified to port fuel injection (PFI) hydrogen internal combustion engine (HICE) and a series dynamometer tests were carried out. The in-cylinder combustion process was analyzed, the performance, thermal efficiency ... Keywords: hydrogen ICE, performance, emission, combustion characteristics

Dawei Sun; Fushui Liu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Future fuels and engines for railroad locomotives. Volume II. Technical document  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was made of the potential for reducing the dependence of railroads on petroleum fuel, particularly Diesel No. 2. The study takes two approaches: (1) to determine how the use of Diesel No. 2 can be reduced through increased efficiency and conservation, and (2) to use fuels other then Diesel No. 2 both in Diesel and other types of engines. The study indicates that the possible reduction in fuel usage by increasing the efficiency of the present engine is limited; it is already highly energy efficient. The use of non-petroleum fuels, particularly the oil shale distillates, offers a greater potential. A coal-fired locomotive using any one of a number of engines appears to be the best alternative to the diesel-electric locomotive with regard to life-cycle cost, fuel availability, and development risk. The adiabatic diesel is the second-rated alternative with high thermal efficiency (up to 64%) as its greatest advantage. The risks associated with the development of the adiabatic diesel, however, are higher than those for the coal-fired locomotive. The advantage of the third alternative, the fuel cell, is that it produces electricity directly from the fuel. At present, the only feasible fuel for a fuel cell locomotive is methanol. Synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, probably derived from oil shale, will be needed if present diesel-electric locomotives are used beyond 1995. Because synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are particularly suited to medium-speed diesel engines, the first commercial application of these fuels may be by the railroad industry.

Liddle, S.G.; Bonzo, B.B.; Purohit, G.P.; Stallkamp, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Automobile manufacturers leading the development of mass-market fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) were interviewed in Japan, Korea, Germany and the United States. There is general agreement that the performance of FCVs with respect to durability, cold start, packaging, acceleration, refueling time and range has progressed to the point where vehicles that could be brought to market in 2015 will satisfy customer expectations. However, cost and the lack of refueling infrastructure remain significant barriers. Costs have been dramatically reduced over the past decade, yet are still about twice what appears to be needed for sustainable market success. While all four countries have plans for the early deployment of hydrogen refueling infrastructure, the roles of government, industry and the public in creating a viable hydrogen refueling infrastructure remain unresolved. The existence of an adequate refueling infrastructure and supporting government policies are likely to be the critical factors that determine when and where hydrogen FCVs are brought to market.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, Gopal [HD Systems

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Injection Timing Effects on Brake Fuel Conversion Efficiency and Engine System's Respones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Societal concerns on combustion-based fuel consumption are ever-increasing. With respect to internal combustion engines, this translates to a need to increase brake fuel conversion efficiency (BFCE). Diesel engines are a relatively efficient internal combustion engine to consider for numerous applications, but associated actions to mitigate certain exhaust emissions have generally deteriorated engine efficiency. Conventionally, diesel engine emission control has centered on in-cylinder techniques. Although these continue to hold promise, the industry trend is presently favoring the use of after-treatment devices which create new opportunities to improve the diesel engine's brake fuel conversion efficiency. This study focuses on injection timing effects on the combustion processes, engine efficiency, and the engine system's responses. The engine in the study is a medium duty diesel engine (capable of meeting US EPA Tier III off road emission standards) equipped with common rail direct fuel injection, variable geometry turbo charging, and interfaced with a custom built engine controller. The study found that injection timing greatly affected BFCE by changing the combustion phasing. BFCE would increase up to a maximum then begin to decrease as phasing became less favorable. Combustion phasing would change from being mostly mixing controlled combustion to premixed combustion as injection timing would advance allowing more time for fuel to mix during the ignition delay. Combustion phasing, in turn, would influence many other engine parameters. As injection timing is advanced, in-cylinder temperatures and pressures amplify, and intake and exhaust manifold pressures deteriorate. Rate of heat release and rate of heat transfer increase when injection timing is advanced. Turbocharger speed falls with the advancing injection timing. Torque, however, rose to a maximum then fell off again even though engine speed and fueling rate were held constant between different injection timings. Interestingly, the coefficient of heat transfer changes from a two peak curve to a smooth one peak curve as the injection timing is advanced further. The major conclusion of the study is that injection advance both positively and negatively influences the diesel engine's response which contributes to the brake fuel conversion efficiency.

McLean, James Elliott

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest has arisen in the development of coal-fired diesel engines for the purpose of efficiently utilizing the extensive coal reserves in the United States, and therefore reducing dependence on foreign oil. One process, which is being considered for use in producing clean coal fuel products involves mild gasification. This process produces by-products which can be further refined and, when blended with neat diesel fuel, used as an engine fuel. The purpose of this task was to test a blend of this coal liquid and diesel fuel (referred to as coal-lite) in an engine, and determine if any detrimental results were observed. This was done by performing a back-to-back performance and emission test of neat diesel fuel and the coal-lite fuel, followed by a 500-hour test of the coal-lite fuel, and completed by a back-to-back performance and emission test of the coal-lite fuel and neat diesel fuel.

Wakenell, J.F.; Fritz, S.G.; Schwalb, J.A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 7, Extended wear testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest has arisen in the development of coal-fired diesel engines for the purpose of efficiently utilizing the extensive coal reserves in the United States, and therefore reducing dependence on foreign oil. One process, which is being considered for use in producing clean coal fuel products involves mild gasification. This process produces by-products which can be further refined and, when blended with neat diesel fuel, used as an engine fuel. The purpose of this task was to test a blend of this coal liquid and diesel fuel (referred to as coal-lite) in an engine, and determine if any detrimental results were observed. This was done by performing a back-to-back performance and emission test of neat diesel fuel and the coal-lite fuel, followed by a 500-hour test of the coal-lite fuel, and completed by a back-to-back performance and emission test of the coal-lite fuel and neat diesel fuel.

Wakenell, J.F.; Fritz, S.G.; Schwalb, J.A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence which spanned from 2005-2012. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program, to provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills to create advanced automotive technologies. The UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence established in 2005 is focused on research, education, industrial collaboration and outreach within automotive technology. UC Davis has had two independent GATE centers with separate well-defined objectives and research programs from 1998. The Fuel Cell Center, administered by ITS-Davis, has focused on fuel cell technology. The Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Design Center (HEV Center), administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, has focused on the development of plug-in hybrid technology using internal combustion engines. The merger of these two centers in 2005 has broadened the scope of research and lead to higher visibility of the activity. UC Davisâ??s existing GATE centers have become the campusâ??s research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

Erickson, Paul

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Prediction of performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fueled with biodiesel produced from waste frying palm oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its fuel properties and compatibility with the petroleum-based diesel fuel (PBDF). Therefore, in this study, the prediction of the engine performance and exhaust emissions is carried ... Keywords: ANN, Biodiesel, Diesel engine, Emissions, Engine performance

Mustafa Canakci; Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Erol Arcaklioglu; Ahmet Erdil

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Integrated Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Increased Utilization of Gaseous Opportunity Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The project is addressing barriers to or opportunities for increasing distributed generation (DG)/combined heat and power (CHP) use in industrial applications using renewable/opportunity fuels. This project brings together novel gas quality sensor (GQS) technology with engine management for opportunity fuels such as landfill gas, digester gas and coal bed methane. By providing the capability for near real-time monitoring of the composition of these opportunity fuels, the GQS output can be used to improve the performance, increase efficiency, raise system reliability, and provide improved project economics and reduced emissions for engines used in distributed generation and combined heat and power.

Pratapas, John; Zelepouga, Serguei; Gnatenko, Vitaliy; Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas; Li, Hailin; Getz, Timothy; Mather, Daniel

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels  

SciTech Connect

The ability to generate microorganisms that can produce biofuels similar to petroleum-based transportation fuels would allow the use of existing engines and infrastructure and would save an enormous amount of capital required for replacing the current infrastructure to accommodate biofuels that have properties significantly different from petroleum-based fuels. Several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of manipulating microbes to produce molecules similar to petroleum-derived products, albeit at relatively low productivity (e.g. maximum butanol production is around 20 g/L). For cost-effective production of biofuels, the fuel-producing hosts and pathways must be engineered and optimized. Advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for metabolic engineers to better understand how to rewire the cell in order to create the desired phenotypes for the production of economically viable biofuels.

Kuk Lee, Sung; Chou, Howard; Ham, Timothy S.; Soon Lee, Taek; Keasling, Jay D.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mixture of micronized coal powder with gaseous fuels for use in internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fuel mixture for use in internal combustion engines is described. This fuel is an intimate mixture of micronized coal, having an average particle size of less than 100 microns, with a gaseous fuel selected from natural gas and coal-derived. The coal can be present from more than 0 percent to less than 100 percent, with generally the lower percentages being preferred. The addition of the coal to the gaseous fuel improves engine efficiency and power rating, and also decreases peak engine pressure allowing for higher compression ratios. An increase in the amount of the coal increases the oxides of sulfur while reducing the oxides of nitrogen in the exhaust. An increase in the amount of gas, on the other hand, increases the oxides of nitrogen but lowers oxides of sulfur. Accordingly, a preferred mixture will depend upon a particular application for the coal/gas fuel and thereby increases user fuel flexibility considerations. Modeling of the fuel mixture for use in a diesel engine is described. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Carpenter, L.K.

1990-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

New Flyer - Xcelsior Applications: Bus - Transit, Trolley Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Electricity, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: varies Power Source(s): Cummins...

292

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Freightliner - Business Class M2 112 Applications: Tractor, Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

114SD Application: Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins Westport - ISX12 G...

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

20 G Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

295

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cargotec - Ottawa 4x2 Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

296

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Volvo - VNL Daycab Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Volvo - D12-LNG...

297

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Peterbilt Motors - 384 Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Maximum Seating: 2 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

298

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ElDorado National - XHF Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Maximum Seating: 39 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

299

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heil Environmental - RapidRail Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 3 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

300

Gas turbine engine control using electrically driven fuel metering pumps.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis, developed in ROLLS ROYCE PLC, has been to investigate the use of an innovative fuel system on aero gas turbine… (more)

BERTOLUCCI, ALESSIO

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - X-rays, Diesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

procedure since the physics of spray atomization and its influence on combustion, pollutant formation and fuel efficiency are not well understood. A deeper...

302

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey XLT Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 50 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Additional Description:...

303

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

86HE Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Paccar - MX-13 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid...

304

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T370 hybrid truck Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 2 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Additional Description:...

305

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Elgin Sweeper Company - Broom BearCrosswindEaglePelican Ford Motor Co. - 2.5L Propane Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 2.5 liters...

306

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Capacity Trucks - TJ5000TJ7000 General Motors - 8.0L V8 Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 8.0 liters...

307

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ElDorado National - Axess Ebus - EBUS22FC New Flyer - Xcelsior Ballard Power Systems - FCvelocity-HD6 fuel cell...

308

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

XE-30 Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Balqon - 200-hp, 230V, AC induction motor with 215kWh, 600V, lithium...

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Champion Bus Inc. - Defender Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: Hybrid - Gasoline Electric Hybrid System(s): Azure Dynamics - Balance Parallel Hybrid Drive Additional...

310

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicles International - EVI-MD Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Electric Vehicles International - 260-hp AC permanent magnet motor...

311

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner C2e Hybrid Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 81...

312

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mule M150 Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Balqon - 200-hp AC induction motor with lithium...

313

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Peterbilt Motors - 320 HLA Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid System(s):...

314

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Motor Coach Industries - D4500 CT Hybrid Commuter Coach Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 57 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport -...

315

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Gillig Corp. - Diesel-Electric Hybrid Bus and CNG Bus Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport -...

316

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Boulder Electric Vehicle - DV-500 Delivery Truck Application: Van Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Boulder Electric Vehicle - AC brushless induction motor with lithium-ion...

317

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Boulder Electric Vehicle - DV-500 Delivery Truck Boulder Electric Vehicle - AC brushless induction motor with lithium-ion batteries Fuel Type: Electricity...

318

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hino - 195h Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Hino - Hino 5L Hybrid System(s): Hino - Hino Hybrid Drive...

319

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ford Motor Co. - Transit Connect Ford Motor Co. - 2.0L I-4 Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Displacement: 2.0 liters...

320

Towards improving dependability of automotive systems by using the EAST-ADL architecture description language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity of embedded automotive systems calls for a more rigorous approach to system development compared to current state of practice. A critical issue is the management of the engineering information that defines the embedded system. Development ... Keywords: architecture description language, automotive systems, systems engineering

Philippe Cuenot; DeJiu Chen; Sébastien Gérard; Henrik Lönn; Mark-Oliver Reiser; David Servat; Ramin Tavakoli Kolagari; Martin Törngren; Matthias Weber

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Methylal and Methylal-Diesel Blended Fuels from Use In Compression-Ignition Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas-to-liquids catalytic conversion technologies show promise for liberating stranded natural gas reserves and for achieving energy diversity worldwide. Some gas-to-liquids products are used as transportation fuels and as blendstocks for upgrading crude derived fuels. Methylal (CH{sub 3}-O-CH{sub 2}-O-CH{sub 3}) also known as dimethoxymethane or DMM, is a gas-to-liquid chemical that has been evaluated for use as a diesel fuel component. Methylal contains 42% oxygen by weight and is soluble in diesel fuel. The physical and chemical properties of neat methylal and for blends of methylal in conventional diesel fuel are presented. Methylal was found to be more volatile than diesel fuel, and special precautions for distribution and fuel tank storage are discussed. Steady state engine tests were also performed using an unmodified Cummins 85.9 turbocharged diesel engine to examine the effect of methylal blend concentration on performance and emissions. Substantial reductions of particulate matter emissions h ave been demonstrated 3r IO to 30% blends of methylal in diesel fuel. This research indicates that methylal may be an effective blendstock for diesel fuel provided design changes are made to vehicle fuel handling systems.

Keith D. Vertin; James M. Ohi; David W. Naegeli; Kenneth H. Childress; Gary P. Hagen; Chris I. McCarthy; Adelbert S. Cheng; Robert W. Dibble

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

An investigation of lean combustion in a natural gas-fueled spark-ignited engine  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to investigate the performance and emission characteristics of natural gas in an original equipment manufacturer (OEM), light-duty, spark-ignited engine being operated in the lean fueling regime and compare the operation with gasoline fueling cases. Data were acquired for several operating conditions of speed, throttle position, air-fuel equivalence ratio, and spark timing for both fuels. Results showed that for stoichiometric fueling, with a naturally aspirated engine, a power loss of 10 to 15 percent can be expected for natural gas over gasoline fueling. For lean operation, however, power increases can be expected for equivalence ratios below about {phi} = 0.80 with natural gas fueling as compared to gasoline. Higher brake thermal efficiencies can also be expected with natural gas fueling with maximum brake torque (MBT) timings over the range of equivalence ratios investigated in this work. Coefficient of variation (COV) data based on the indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) demonstrated that the engine is much less sensitive to equivalence ratio leaning for natural gas fueling as compared to gasoline cases. The lean limit for a COV of 10 percent was about {phi} = 0.72 for gasoline and {phi} = 0.63 for natural gas. Lean fueling resulted in significantly reduced NO{sub x} levels where a lower plateau for NO{sub x} concentrations was reached at {phi} near or below 0.70, which corresponded to about 220 ppm. For natural gas fueling, this corresponded to about 1.21 gm/kW-h. Finally, with MBT timings, relatively short heat release durations were obtained for lean fueling with natural gas compared to gasoline.

Gupta, M.; Bell, S.R.; Tillman, S.T. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Dynamic Imaging of Injector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel injectors in motion Fuel injectors in motion This animated image is a result of the high penetrating power of X-rays which make it possible to permeate the outer steel structure and capture the internal components of fuel injectors in motion. Dynamic Imaging of Injector Operation The high-penetrating, powerful X-rays go through the outer steel structure to get a picture of the fuel injector parts as they move. The high X-ray flux at Argonne's APS makes this possible. These measurements are critical for the development of computational spray models, since they can precisely measure the time-dependent geometry of the fuel passages inside the injector. Injector manufacturers also use these measurements since they can reveal whether a particular component is functioning as designed.

324

Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

DOE Project 18546, AOP Task 1.1, Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in 2011 was focused on diesel range fuels and diesel combustion and fuels evaluated in 2011 included a series of oxygenated biofuels fuels from University of Maine, oxygenated fuel compounds representing materials which could be made from sewage, oxygenated marine diesel fuels for low emissions, and a new series of FACE fuel surrogates and FACE fuels with detailed exhaust chemistry and particulate size measurements. Fuels obtained in late 2011, which will be evaluated in 2012, include a series of oil shale derived fuels from PNNL, green diesel fuel (hydrotreated vegetable oil) from UOP, University of Maine cellulosic biofuel (levulene), and pyrolysis derived fuels from UOP pyrolysis oil, upgraded at University of Georgia. We were able to demonstrate, through a project with University of Wisconsin, that a hybrid strategy for fuel surrogates provided both accurate and rapid CFD combustion modeling for diesel HCCI. In this strategy, high molecular weight compounds are used to more accurately represent physical processes and smaller molecular weight compounds are used for chemistry to speed chemical calculations. We conducted a small collaboration with sp3H, a French company developing an on-board fuel quality sensor based on near infrared analysis to determine how to use fuel property and chemistry information for engine control. We were able to show that selected outputs from the sensor correlated to both fuel properties and to engine performance. This collaboration leveraged our past statistical analysis work and further work will be done as opportunity permits. We conducted blending experiments to determine characteristics of ethanol blends based on the gasoline characteristics used for blending. Results indicate that much of the octane benefits gained by high level ethanol blending can be negated by use of low octane gasoline blend stocks, as allowed by ASTM D5798. This may limit ability to optimize engines for improved efficiency with ethanol fuels. Extensive data from current and previous years was leveraged into participation with several large proposal teams, as our fuels database covers a very wide range of conventional and emerging fuels and biofuels.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Surrogate Fuels for Gasoline and Application to an HCCI Engine  

SciTech Connect

Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons, such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, and cycloalkanes. In this study, a surrogate gasoline reaction mechanism is developed, and it has one representative fuel constituent from each of these classes. These selected constituents are iso-octane, n-heptane, 1-pentene, toluene, and methyl-cyclohexane. The mechanism was developed in a step-wise fashion, adding submechanisms to treat each fuel component. Reactions important for low temperature oxidation (<1000K) and cross-reactions among different fuels are incorporated into the mechanism. The mechanism consists of 1214 species and 5401 reactions. A single-zone engine model is used to evaluate how well the mechanism captures autoignition behavior for conditions corresponding to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine operation. Experimental data are available for both how the combustion phasing changes with fueling at a constant intake temperature, and also how the intake temperature has to be changed with pressure in order to maintain combustion phasing for a fixed equivalence ratio. Three different surrogate fuel mixtures are used for the modeling. Predictions are in reasonably good agreement with the engine data. In addition, the heat release rate is calculated and compared to the data from experiments. The model predicts less low-temperature heat release than that measured. It is found that the low temperature heat-release rate depends strongly on engine speed, reactions of RO{sub 2}+HO{sub 2}, fuel composition, and pressure boost.

Naik, C V; Pitz, W J; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J E; Orme, J; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to characterize coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors. Since the combustion event is a strong function of the fuel spray, full characterization of the spray is a necessity for successful engine design and for modeling of the combustion process. Two experimental facilities were used at TAMU to study the injection of coal slurry fuels. The first experimental facility incorporates General Electric locomotive engine components (injection pump, fuel line, and nozzle) and a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the moving parts of the pump. The second experimental facility is based on an accumulator injector from General Electric. Instrumentation includes instantaneous needle lift and fuel line pressure. A pressurized visualization chamber was used to provide a spray environment which simulated the engine gas density and permitted the use of spray diagnostic techniques. The study was divided into two phases: (1) overall characterization of the spray, and (2) detailed droplet size and size distribution characterization. In addition to this overall characterization of the spray, the second phase of this study characterized the details of the atomization quality.

Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Diesel fuel component contribution to engine emissions and performance. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary diesel fuel is a blend of several refinery streams chosen to meet specifications. The need to increase yield of transportation fuel from crude oil has resulted in converting increased proportions of residual oil to lighter products. This conversion is accomplished by thermal, catalytic, and hydrocracking of high molecular weight materials rich in aromatic compounds. The current efforts to reformulate California diesel fuel for reduced emissions from existing engines is an example of another driving force affecting refining practice: regulations designed to reduce exhaust emissions. Although derived from petroleum crude oil, reformulated diesel fuel is an alternative to current specification-grade diesel fuel, and this alternative presents opportunities and questions to be resolved by fuel and engine research. Various concerned parties have argued that regulations for fuel reformulation have not been based on an adequate data base. Despite numerous studies, much ambiguity remains about the relationship of exhaust parameters to fuel composition, particularly for diesel fuel. In an effort to gather pertinent data, the automobile industry and the oil refiners have joined forces in the Air Quality Improvement Research Program (AUTO/OIL) to address this question for gasoline. The objective of that work is to define the relationship between gasoline composition and the magnitude and composition of the exhaust emissions. The results of the AUTO/OEL program will also be used, along with other data bases, to define the EPA {open_quotes}complex model{close_quotes} for reformulated gasolines. Valuable insights have been gained for compression ignition engines in the Coordinating Research Council`s VE-1 program, but no program similar to AUTO/OIL has been started for diesel fuel reformulation. A more detailed understanding of the fuel/performance relationship is a readily apparent need.

Erwin, J.; Ryan, T.W. III; Moulton, D.S. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Improving the performance and fuel consumption of dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the nature of the combustion processes in a dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engine is described. This work concentrated on understanding the mixing process in the main chamber gases. A specially constructed single cylinder engine was used to both conduct experiments to study mixing effects and to obtain experimental data for the validation of the computer model which was constructed in the theoretical portion of the study. The test procedures are described. Studies were conducted on the effect of fuel injection timing on performance and emissions using the combination of orifice size and prechamber to main chamber flow rate ratio which gave the best overall compromise between emissions and performance. In general, fuel injection gave slightly higher oxides of nitrogen, but considerably lower hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions than the carbureted form of the engine. Experiments with engine intake port redesign to promote swirl mixing indicated a substantial increase in the power output from the engine and, that an equivalent power levels, the nitric oxide emissions are approximately 30% lower with swirl in the main chamber than without swirl. The development of a computer simulation of the combustion process showed that a one-dimensional combustion model can be used to accurately predict trends in engine operation conditions and nitric oxide emissions even though the actual flame in the engine is not completely one-dimensional, and that a simple model for mixing of the main chamber and prechamber intake gases at the start of compression proved adequate to explain the effects of swirl, ignition timing, overall fuel air ratio, volumetric efficiency, and variations in prechamber air fuel ratio and fuel rate percentage on engine power and nitric oxide emissions. (LCL)

Sorenson, S.C.; Pan, S.S.; Bruckbauer, J.J.; Gehrke, G.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. (Telephone: 412.776.4970; E-mail: publications@sae.org)

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nova Bus - LFS HEV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison Transmission -...

332

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nova Bus - LFS Artic HEV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 62 Power Source(s): Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison...

333

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

82 Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Additional Description: A heavy-duty truck designed for regional-haul applications....

334

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

- W900S Freightliner - Cascadia 113 NG Kenworth - T660 Tractor Kenworth - T800 Short Hood Volvo - VNL Daycab Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Displacement: 11.9...

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Axess Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 41 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Ballard Power Systems -...

336

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - 42BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 43 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

337

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T800 Short Hood Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Additional Description: Can be configured to accomplish a variety of...

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T660 Tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Additional Description: A Class 8 heavy-duty truck designed for on-highway...

339

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

CrosswindEaglePelican Applications: Street sweeper, Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Propane Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Ford Motor Co. - 2.5L Propane...

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

60BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 43 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

E-Z Rider II BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 33 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISB 6.7L...

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T440 Tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Additional Description: Can be a Class 7 or a Class 8 truck...

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T470 Tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Additional Description: Can be a Class 7 or a Class 8 truck...

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 3 Power Source(s): Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Eaton -...

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

IC Bus - HC Hybrid Series Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 45 Power Source(s): Navistar - MaxxForce DT Hybrid System(s): Eaton -...

346

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T270 hybrid Applications: Tractor, Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid...

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T270 hybrid Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Peterbilt Motors - 337338 Peterbilt Motors - 330 Hybrid Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic...

348

NREL Engineer Elected to Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy ...  

Keith Wipke of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory was recently elected to the Board of Directors of the Fuel Cell and ...

349

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transit Connect Application: Van Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 2.0L I-4 Additional Description: CNG and propane models are available from contract...

350

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Turtle Top - Van Terra Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 15 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Turtle Top...

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ford Motor Co. - E-Series Cargo VanWagon Application: Van Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Additional Description:...

352

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - CompoBus Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 47 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Capacity Trucks - TJ5000TJ7000 Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Propane Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 General Motors - 8.0L V8...

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

DesignLine Corp. - Eco-Smart 1 Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 28 Power Source(s): Bosch Rexroth - Two 120kW induction motors Additional...

355

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

DesignLine Corp. - EcoSaver IV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: Hybrid - CNG Electric, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Capstone Turbine Corp. -...

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

StarTrans - Senator Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 17 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Additional Description: May...

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

31LFW 35LFW 40LFW Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISL 8.9L...

358

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey XL Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 41 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Available as a Ford F-550...

359

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cutaway and Stripped Chassis Application: Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, Propane, Ethanol Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Additional...

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Enova Systems - Enova Ze step van Application: Van Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Enova Systems - 120kW all-electric drive system Additional Description: Built on a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ebus - EBUS22FC Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: Hydrogen, Hybrid - Gasoline Electric Maximum Seating: 22 Power Source(s): Capstone Turbine Corp. - C30 (30kW) Micro Turbine...

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

LFX Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: Varies Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison...

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Autocar - E3 Hybrid Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid System(s): Parker Hannifin Corp. - RunWise...

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner HDX CNG Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 90 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

365

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 24 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Available as Chevrolet G4500 or...

366

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Goshen Coach - GCIIG-Force Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 33 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V-8 Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional...

367

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

StarTrans - Senator Ford Motor Co. - E-Series Cutaway and Stripped Chassis Ford Motor Co. - E-Series Cargo VanWagon Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Fuel Types: CNG, Propane, Ethanol...

368

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Proterra - EcoRide BE35 Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 35 Power Source(s): UQM - PowerPhase 150kW permanent magnet motor Hybrid System(s):...

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Trans Tech - ETrans Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 52 Power Source(s): Smith Electric Vehicles - 120kW induction motor with lithium-ion...

370

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Balqon - XE-20 Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Balqon - 200-hp, 230V, AC induction motor with 215kWh, 312V, lithium-ion batteries...

371

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Science Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant is a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen/ CNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in Arizona Public Service's fleet. Hydrogen Subsystem The plant's hydrogen system consists of production, compression, storage, and dispensing. The hydrogen produced is suitable for use in fuel cell-powered vehicles, for which the minimum hydrogen purity goal is 99.999%. Hydrogen is produced using an electrolysis process that separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. At present, the hydrogen is

372

Automotive storage of hydrogen as a mixture of methanol and water. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The concept of steam-reforming methanol on-board an automobile was evaluated as a candidate method of storing fuel for the hydrogen engine. This method uses low-temperature, engine waste heat to evaporate a 1:1 molar water-methanol mixture at 373/sup 0/K (212/sup 0/F) and to provide endothermic reaction heat at 505/sup 0/K (450/sup 0/F) to convert this mixture to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. By using engine waste heat, a fuel combustion enrichment of 8% (LHV) or 18% (HHV) is obtained when the reactor effluents are compared with those from the tanked fuel. Defining system efficiency as the product of the generator chemical efficiency (108%) and the engine thermal efficiency (assumed to be 30%) yields a value of 32.4%. Conservative estimates indicate that an additional volume of 44 to 49 liters and an additional weight of 110 to 140 kg would be required, compared with a conventional 20 gal gasoline tank. A 500 hour endurance test of this system with a Girdler G-66B catalyst was conducted at 505/sup 0/K (450/sup 0/F), atmospheric pressure, and low space velocity--compared with automotive requirements--at wide-open-throttle conditions with laboratory-grade methanol; there was no loss of activity. However, when fuel-grade methanol containing small amounts of higher alcohols was substituted for the laboratory-grade methanol, significant catalyst deactivation occurred. (auth)

Kester, F.L.; Konopka, A.J.; Camara, E.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to explore the potential to improve the energy efficiency of spark-ignited engines operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. By taking advantage of the fuel properties of ethanol, such as high compression ratio and high latent heat of vaporization, it is possible to increase efficiency with ethanol blends. Increasing the efficiency with ethanol-containing blends aims to remove a market barrier of reduced fuel economy with E85 fuel blends, which is currently about 30% lower than with petroleum-derived gasoline. The same or higher engine efficiency is achieved with E85, and the reduction in fuel economy is due to the lower energy density of E85. By making ethanol-blends more efficient, the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85 can be reduced. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain components and subsystems as well as overcoming real-world implementation barriers. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise in non-traditional fuels and improving engine system efficiency for the next generation of internal combustion engines. Partnering to combine these knowledge bases was essential towards making progress to reducing the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, usually on a bi-weekly basis, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial hardware support to the project by providing components for the single-cylinder engine experiments, engineering support for hardware modifications, guidance for operational strategies on engine research, and hardware support by providing a flexible multi-cylinder engine to be used for optimizing engine efficiency with ethanol-containing fuels.

Szybist, J.; Confer, K. (Delphi Automotive Systems)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Combustion, Control, and Fuel Effects in a Spark Assisted HCCI Engine Equipped with Variable Valve Timing  

SciTech Connect

Widespread implementation of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines is presently hindered by stability, control, and load range issues. Although the operable HCCI speed/load range is expanding, it is likely that the initial HCCI engines will rely on conventional combustion for part of the operating cycle. In the present study, we have investigated the role of fuel properties and chemistry on the operation of a spark-assisted gasoline HCCI engine. The engine employed is a single cylinder, 500 cc, port fuel injected research engine, operating near lambda = 1.0 and equipped with hydraulic variable valve actuation. HCCI is initiated by early exhaust valve closing to retain exhaust in the cylinder, thereby increasing the cylinder gas temperature. This is also referred to as a 'negative overlap' strategy. A total of 10 custom blended gasolines and three different batches of indolene from two suppliers were run at 5 speed-load combinations and performance was characterized by timing sweeps. Within the quality of the data set, we can say the all fuels provided equivalent combustion and performance characteristics when compared at the same combustion phasing. The fuels did, however, require different degrees of retained exhaust as measured by exhaust valve closing angle to achieve the same combustion phasing. Fuels with higher octane sensitivity were found to ignite more easily or more quickly and to burn more quickly than fuels with lower octane sensitivity. This is an expected result since the engine is naturally aspirated and operates with high compression temperatures due to the high retained exhaust fraction and recompression.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Online learning of a neural fuel control system for gaseous fueled si engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a new type of fuel control algorithm for gaseous fuelled vehicles. Gaseous fuels such as hydrogen and natural gas have been shown to be less polluting than liquid fuels such as gasoline, both at the tailpipe and on a total ...

Travis Kent Wiens

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive 4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology Education DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology Education August 29, 2005 - 2:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the selection of eight universities that will receive $4.7 million to be Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence. The goal of GATE is to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals to overcome technology barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective, high-efficiency vehicles for the U.S. market. "GATE Centers of Excellence are an exciting opportunity to equip a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies," said Douglas L. Faulkner, Acting

377

Conversion of a diesel engine to a spark ignition natural gas engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Requirements for alternatives to diesel-fueled vehicles are developing, particularly in urban centers not in compliance with mandated air quality standards. An operator of fleets of diesel- powered vehicles may be forced to either purchase new vehicles or equip some of the existing fleets with engines designed or modified to run on alternative fuels. In converting existing vehicles, the operator can either replace the existing engine or modify it to burn an alternative fuel. Work described in this report addresses the problem of modifying an existing diesel engine to operate on natural gas. Tecogen has developed a technique for converting turbocharged automotive diesel engines to operate as dedicated spark-ignition engines with natural gas fuel. The engine cycle is converted to a more-complete-expansion cycle in which the expansion ratio of the original engine is unchanged while the effective compression ratio is lowered, so that engine detonation is avoided. The converted natural gas engine, with an expansion ratio higher than in conventional spark- ignition natural gas engines, offers thermal efficiency at wide-open- throttle conditions comparable to its diesel counterpart. This allows field conversion of existing engines. Low exhaust emissions can be achieved when the engine is operated with precise control of the fuel air mixture at stoichiometry with a 3-way catalyst. A Navistar DTA- 466 diesel engine with an expansion ratio of 16.5 to 1 was converted in this way, modifying the cam profiles, increasing the turbocharger boost pressure, incorporating an aftercooler if not already present, and adding a spark-ignition system, natural gas fuel management system, throttle body for load control, and an electronic engine control system. The proof-of-concept engine achieved a power level comparable to that of the diesel engine without detonation. A conversion system was developed for the Navistar DT 466 engine. NOx emissions of 1.5 g/bhp-h have been obtained.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

379

Estimating the impact on fuel tax revenues from a changing light vehicle fleet with increased advanced internal combustion engine vehicles and electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advanced fuel economies in both traditional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEs) and electric vehicles (EVs) have a strong influence on transportation revenue by reducing fuel… (more)

Hall, Andrea Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cummins Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins has studied requirements of the Light Truck Automotive market in the United States and believes that the proposed V-family of engines meets those needs. Design and development of the V-family engine system continues and has expanded. The engine system is a difficult one, since the combined requirements of a very fuel-efficient commercial diesel, and the performance and sociability requirements of a gasoline engine are needed. Results of testing show that the engine can meet requirements for fuel economy and emissions in the Tier 2 interim period from 2004 to 2008. Advanced results show that the full Tier 2 results for 2008 and beyond can be achieved on a laboratory basis.

John H. Stang; David E. Koeberlein; Michael J. Ruth

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hydrogen as a fuel  

SciTech Connect

A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Micronized-coal-water slurry sprays from a diesel engine positive displacement fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted to characterize the sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system for a diesel engine. Diesel fuel water and three concentrations of micronized-coal-water slurry were used in these experiments. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies and still photographs of the sprays were obtained. In addition, instaneous fuel line pressures and needle lifts were obtained. Data were acquired as a function of fluid, nozzle orifice diameter, rack setting and chamber conditions. The high speed movies were used to determine spray penetration and spray growth.

Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.; Seshadri, A.K.; Zicterman, G. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

None

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Annual technical progress report, October 1990--September 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Automotive materials usage trends  

SciTech Connect

The materials composition of US passenger cars is traced from 1960 and projected into 1990's. Sales-weighted average vehicle-weight trends are analyzed in terms of shifts in the large/small car mix, downsizing, and downweighting. The growth in the usage of lightweight materials: -high strength steels, cast/wrought aluminum, plastics and composites - are examined in detail. Usage trends in a host of other materials such as alloy steels, zinc, lead, copper, etc. are also discussed. An approximate quantitative analysis of changes in the usage of steel by the automotive industry worldwide show that about 10% of total decline in Western-World steel consumption is accounted for by the automotive industry. An assessment is presented for automotive industry use of critical materials such as chromium in alloy steels/cast irons and the platinum group metals in exhaust-gas catalysts. 10 references, 13 figures, 9 tables.

Gjostein, N.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hydrogen engine performance analysis. First annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many problems associated with the design and development of hydrogen-air breathing internal combustion engines for automotive applications have been identified by various domestic and foreign researchers. This project addresses the problems identified in the literature, seeks to evaluate potential solutions to these problems, and will obtain and document a design data-base convering the performance, operational and emissions characteristics essential for making rational decisions regarding the selection and design of prototype hydrogen-fueled, airbreathing engines suitable for manufacture for general automotive use. Information is included on the operation, safety, emission, and cost characteristics of hydrogen engines, the selection of a test engine and testing facilities, and experimental results. Baseline data for throttled and unthrottled, carburetted, hydrogen engine configurations with and without exhaust gas recirculation and water injection are presented. In addition to basic data gathering concerning performance and emissions, the test program conducted was formulated to address in detail the two major problems that must be overcome if hydrogen-fueled engines are to become viable: flashback and comparatively high NO/sub x/ emissions at high loads. In addition, the results of other hydrogen engine investigators were adjusted, using accepted methods, in order to make comparisons with the results of the present study. The comparisons revealed no major conflicts. In fact, with a few exceptions, there was found to be very good agreement between the results of the various studies.

Adt, Jr., R. R.; Swain, M. R.; Pappas, J. M.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

(Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system and design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1989-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the diesel engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: Definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; Definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; Determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; Evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and Presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential.

Not Available

1990-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

391

Fabrication of small-orifice fuel injectors for diesel engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel fuel injector nozzles with spray hole diameters of 50-75 {micro}m have been fabricated via electroless nickel plating of conventionally made nozzles. Thick layers of nickel are deposited onto the orifice interior surfaces, reducing the diameter from {approx}200 {micro}m to the target diameter. The nickel plate is hard, smooth, and adherent, and covers the orifice interior surfaces uniformly.

Woodford, J. B.; Fenske, G. R.

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 March 11, 2011 - 4:03pm Addthis The MV-1, a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient vehicle | Photo Courtesy of Vehicle Production Group The MV-1, a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient vehicle | Photo Courtesy of Vehicle Production Group Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy Yesterday, the Department of Energy announced that we've now finalized a loan for nearly $50 million to the Vehicle Production Group - or VPG. The project will support the development and manufacturing of a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient car, the MV-1, that will run on compressed natural gas instead of gasoline, produce low emissions, and create 900 jobs

394

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World April 16, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager What does this project do? Green Racing uses motorsports competition to help educate and promote alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies that can be transferred from the race track to the consumer market. The automotive racing world has a long history of moving the car industry forward through the development and use of new technology. Seeing racing's tremendous promise, the Energy Department, U.S. Environmental

395

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World April 16, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager What does this project do? Green Racing uses motorsports competition to help educate and promote alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies that can be transferred from the race track to the consumer market. The automotive racing world has a long history of moving the car industry forward through the development and use of new technology. Seeing racing's tremendous promise, the Energy Department, U.S. Environmental

396

In-cylinder pressure characteristics of a CI engine using blends of diesel fuel and methyl esters of beef tallow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Cummins N14-410 diesel engine was operated on 12 fuels produced by blending methyl tallowate, methyl soyate, and ethanol with no. 2 diesel fuel. Engine in-cylinder pressure data were used to evaluate engine performance. Peak cylinder pressures for each fuel blend at all engine speeds were lower than peak pressure for diesel fuel with the exception of the 80% diesel, 13% methyl tallowate, and 7% ethanol; and the 80% diesel, 6.5% methyl tallowate, 6.5% methyl soyate and 7% ethanol blends. The indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) values for all fuel blends were less than for diesel fuel. The differences in IMEP values correlated with differences in power output of the engine. Similarly, maximum rates of pressure rise for most fuel blends were less than for diesel fuel. It was concluded that the fuel blends used in this study would have no detrimental long-term effects on engine performance, wear, and knock. 6 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

Ali, Y.; Hanna, M.A.; Borg, J.E. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Performance Characterization of a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine with Bio-Diesel and Petroleum Diesel Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the wake of global warming and fossil fuel depletion, renewed attention has been paid to shifting away from the use of petroleum based fuels. The world?s energy demand is commencing its dependency on alternative fuels. Such alternative fuels in use today consist of bio-alcohols (such as ethanol), hydrogen, biomass, and natural oil/fat derived fuels. However, in this study, the focus will be on the alternative fuel derived from natural oils and fats, namely biodiesel. The following study characterizes the performance of a medium-duty diesel engine fuelled with biodiesel and conventional diesel. The objective is accomplished by taking measurements of manifold pressure and temperature, fuel flow, air flow, and torque. The study first characterizes a John Deere 4.5 liter 4 cylinder direct injection engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), common rail fuel injection, and variable turbo-charging with conventional petroleum diesel to set a reference for comparison. The study then proceeds to characterize the differences in engine performance as a result of using biodiesel relative to conventional diesel. The results show that torque decreases with the use of biodiesel by about 10%. The evaluation of engine performance parameters shows that torque is decreased because of the lower heating value of biodiesel compared to conventional diesel. The insignificant difference between the other performance parameters shows that the ECM demands the same performance of the engine regardless of the fuel being combusted by the engine.

Esquivel, Jason

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

An experimental study of fuel injection strategies in CAI gasoline engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion of gasoline in a direct injection controlled auto-ignition (CAI) single-cylinder research engine was studied. CAI operation was achieved with the use of the negative valve overlap (NVO) technique and internal exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR). Experiments were performed at single injection and split injection, where some amount of fuel was injected close to top dead centre (TDC) during NVO interval, and the second injection was applied with variable timing. Additionally, combustion at variable fuel-rail pressure was examined. Investigation showed that at fuel injection into recompressed exhaust fuel reforming took place. This process was identified via an analysis of the exhaust-fuel mixture composition after NVO interval. It was found that at single fuel injection in NVO phase, its advance determined the heat release rate and auto-ignition timing, and had a strong influence on NO{sub X} emission. However, a delay of single injection to intake stroke resulted in deterioration of cycle-to-cycle variability. Application of split injection showed benefits of this strategy versus single injection. Examinations of different fuel mass split ratios and variable second injection timing resulted in further optimisation of mixture formation. At equal share of the fuel mass injected in the first injection during NVO and in the second injection at the beginning of compression, the lowest emission level and cyclic variability improvement were observed. (author)

Hunicz, J.; Kordos, P. [Department of Combustion Engines and Transport, Lublin University of Technology, Nadbystrzycka 36, 20-618 Lublin (Poland)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Automotive Lightweight Materials Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manufacturing energy by lower energy use and cost during the vehicle operation life cycle stage. It is estimated -1500 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 LifeCycleEnergySavings(MJ/vehicle) Manufacturing Use Recycle's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program (FCVT), Automotive Lightweighting

400

A simulation study of the transmission case line in an automotive factory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transmission is a major component of a car that transmits mechanical power from the engine to the wheels. The transmission shop of an automotive factory consists of five sub-lines. They are the machining line of gears, sleeves, shaft, case and the ... Keywords: automotive, discrete event simulation, manufacturing system design, transmission case

Dug Hee Moon; Te Xu; Seung Geun Baek; Jun Seok Lee; Woo Young Shin

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Standardizing model-based in-vehicle infotainment development in the German automotive industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of existing HMI development processes in the automotive domain, a reference process for software engineering has been developed. This process was used to develop a domain data model and a model-based specification language in order ... Keywords: HMI, automotive, domain data model, interaction design, model-based language, specification, user interface design

Steffen Hess; Anne Gross; Andreas Maier; Marius Orfgen; Gerrit Meixner

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Study of low-temperature-combustion diesel engines as an on-board reformer for intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been recognized as a feasible alternative to current IC engines. A significant technical problem yet to be resolved is the on bound fuel supply before fuel cells can be practically used for vehicles. Use ...

Hahn, Tairin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, 699, Gumho-dong, Gwangyang-si, Jeonnam, 545-090 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Carbon or Graphite Foam Heating Element for Regulating Engine ...  

ORNL 2010-G00640/es UT-B ID 200000861 Carbon or Graphite Foam Heating Element for Regulating Engine Fluids Technology Summary Automotive engines need ...

407

Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc., Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8679 8679 Thursday June 1, 1995 Part III Department of Energy Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc.; Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs: Notice 28680 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 105 / Thursday, June 1, 1995 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy has issued a Record of Decision on Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs. The Record of Decision includes a Department-wide decision to

408

Proceedings of the eighth annual coal-fueled heat engines and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Heat Engines and Gas Stream Cleanup Programs at Morgantown Energy Technology Center is to develop essential technologies so the private sector can commercialize power plants burning coal-derived fuels. The purpose of this annual meeting is to provide a forum for scientists and engineers to present their results, exchange ideas and talk about their plans. Topics discussed were: Heat Engines Commercialization and Proof of Concepts Projects; Components and Testing of Coal-Fueled Gas Turbines; Advances in Barrier Filters; Pulse Combustion/Agglomeration; Advances in Coal-Fueled Diesels; Gas Stream Cleanup; Turbine and Diesel Emissions; and Poster Presentations.

Webb, H.A.; Bedick, R.C.; Geiling, D.W.; Cicero, D.C. (eds.)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

Ives, L.K. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

SciTech Connect

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hydrogen storage via metal hydrides for utility and automotive energy storage applications. [HCl electrolysis for H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently supported by ERDA to develop the technology and techniques for storing hydrogen via metal hydrides. Hydrogen is able to react with a wide variety of metal and metal alloy materials to form hydride compounds of hydrogen and metals. These compounds differ in stability--some are relatively unstable and can be readily formed and decomposed at low temperatures. The use of these systems for hydrogen storage involves the design of heat exchanger and mass transfer systems, i.e., removal of heat during the charging reaction and addition of heat during the discharge reaction. The most notable example of a metal hydride material is iron titanium which shows promise of being economical for a number of near term hydrogen storage applications. Recent work and progress on the development of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage connected with utility energy storage applications and natural gas supplementation are discussed and electric-to-electric storage system is described in some detail. A system of energy storage involving the electrolysis of hydrochloric acid is described which would utilize metal hydrides to store the hydrogen. In addition, the use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in automotive systems is described.

Salzano, F J; Braun, C; Beaufrere, A; Srinivasan, S; Strickland, G; Reilly, J J; Waide, C

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Fuels and Lubricants Research Division of Southwest Research includes extensive engines, fuels and lubricants research,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caterpillar 1K Lubricant Test This test evaluates the piston deposits, liner wear, and oil consumption and oil consumption. The test is proposed for inclusion in the PC-10 category. Mack T8/T8A/T8E Lubricant of Mack engine oil specification EON+ 03, CI-4+ and will be included in PC-10. Mack T12 Lubricant Test

Chapman, Clark R.

413

A design strategy applied to sulfur resistant lean NOx̳ automotive catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst poisoning due to sulfur compounds derived from fuel sulfur presents a major challenge, intractable thus far, to development of many advanced technologies for automotive catalysts such as the lean NOx, trap. Under ...

Tang, Hairong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fuel property effects on engine combustion processes. Annual report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our engine studies have concentrated on 2 areas of interest to autoignition and emissions from engines. In the first, we investigated the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the reactivity and autoignition behavior of 87 PRF. In the second study, we continued work on the effects of blending ethers on the reactivity and autoignition of a primary reference fuel blend, 87 PRF, with emphasis placed on the chemical interactions between ethers and the baseline fuel. The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on the reactivity and autoignition behavior of 87 PRF were examined in our research engine under motored conditions at compression ratios of 5.2 and 8.2. The most significant conclusions of our study are: (1) nitric oxide does interact with the hydrocarbon oxidation at conditions typically experienced by the end gas in a fired engine; (2) the effect is complex and, depending on the reaction environment, the same concentration of NO can produce dramatically different results. These results are particularly important given the fact that residual fractions and recycled exhaust gases in spark ignited engines typically result in about 200--600 ppm of NO in the unburned charge. The octane enhancing ethers, MTBE, ETBE, TAME, and DIPE, were blended into 87 PRF at a constant 0 atom fraction of 1.94% in the fuel mixtures and the mixtures were tested under motored conditions at our new compression ratio of 8.2. This new compression ratio allows studies on autoignition behaviors of 87 PRF with and without ethers. The results showed that, when using 87 PRF/ether mixtures, reactivity was significantly reduced as indicated by the higher inlet temperature required to initiate reactivity, significantly lower maximum CO concentration and the significantly higher inlet temperature required for autoignition.

Cernansky, N.P.

1994-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

Impact of Fuel Interchangeability on dynamic Instabilities in Gas Turbine Engines  

SciTech Connect

Modern, low NOx emitting gas turbines typically utilize lean pre-mixed (LPM) combustion as a means of achieving target emissions goals. As stable combustion in LPM systems is somewhat intolerant to changes in operating conditions, precise engine tuning on a prescribed range of fuel properties is commonly performed to avoid dynamic instabilities. This has raised concerns regarding the use of imported liquefied natural gas (LNG) and natural gas liquids (NGL’s) to offset a reduction in the domestic natural gas supply, which when introduced into the pipeline could alter the fuel BTU content and subsequently exacerbate problems such as combustion instabilities. The intent of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of dynamically unstable test rigs to changes in fuel composition and heat content. Fuel Wobbe number was controlled by blending methane and natural gas with various amounts of ethane, propane and nitrogen. Changes in combustion instabilities were observed, in both atmospheric and pressurized test rigs, for fuels containing high concentrations of propane (> 62% by vol). However, pressure oscillations measured while operating on typical “LNG like” fuels did not appear to deviate significantly from natural gas and methane flame responses. Mechanisms thought to produce changes in the dynamic response are discussed.

Ferguson, D.H.; Straub, D.L.; Richards, G.A.; Robey, E.H.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reducing cold start hydrocarbon emissions from port fuel injected spark ignition engines with improved management of hardware & controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to investigate strategies for reducing cold start hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from port fuel injected (PFI) spark ignition (SI) engines with better use of existing hardware and control ...

Lang, Kevin R., 1980-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

On fuel selection in controlled auto-ignition engines : the link between intake conditions, chemical kinetics, and stratification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to examine the impact fuel selection can have on the high-load limit in a stratified Compression Auto-Ignition (CAI) engine. This was accomplished by first studying the validity of the ...

Maria, Amir Gamal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Comparative analysis of automotive powertrain choices for the near to mid-term future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis attempts a technological assessment of automotive powertrain technologies for the near to mid term future. The powertrain types to be assessed include naturally aspirated gasoline engines, turbocharged gasoline ...

Kasseris, Emmanuel P

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A survey of front end modularity as an automotive architecture and its ability to deliver value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The partitioning of a system can and will dictate the creative space for a designer or engineer. This thesis will analyze how using a new automotive architecture known as a Front End Module (FEM) can affect a limited ...

Mahé, Vincent R. (Vincent Robert)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Transportation fuels and engines for optimum energy utilization: An assessment of energy consumption from resources through end use: Final report, Volume 1, August 1985 for the project, Technical assessment of future engines and alternative fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated to investigate the potential for improving the resource utilization efficiency in the manufacture and end-use of fuels for transportation. While emphasis is placed on the development of fuels from coal and oil shale and on the engine technologies most suitable for those fuels, petroleum-derived fuels are considered as well. A necessary part of this study was to develop information about the energy efficiency of various steps of fuel processing, both with synthetic fuels and petroleum. The configurations of synthetic fuel processes and petroleum refineries are, of course, seemingly endless in number, so, in order to keep the study at a manageable and affordable scope, only a very limited number of synthetic fuel processes were investigated in detail and only major upgrading process operations were included.

Thomas, R.L.; Cornell, J.J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that although higher CN does not significantly alter ignition delay at moderate to high loads it has a dominant influence on the acceptable injection timing range. Apart from CN effects, fuel oxygen content plays an independent role in reducing some emissions. It is therefore recommended that compensation for fuel ignitability and oxygen content be included in combustion control strategies to optimize emissions and performance of future diesel engines.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Szymkowicz, Patrick G. [General Motors Corporation; Northrop, William F [General Motors Corporation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Role of Friction in Materials Selection for Automotive Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an invited article for a special issue of the ASM International monthly magazine that concerns "Automotive Materials and Applications." The article itself overviews frictional considerations in material selection for automobiles. It discusses implications for energy efficiency (engine friction) and safety (brakes) among other topics.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A roadmap for parametric CAD efficiency in the automotive industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D CAD systems are used in product design for simultaneous engineering and to improve productivity. CAD tools can substantially enhance design performance. Although 3D CAD is a widely used and highly effective tool in mechanical design, mastery of CAD ... Keywords: Automotive industry, CAD training strategy, Collaboration, Knowledge integration, PLM, Parametric CAD efficiency

Yannick Bodein, Bertrand Rose, Emmanuel Caillaud

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Soybean and Coconut Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Combustion Characteristics in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the effects of soybean- and coconut-derived biodiesel fuels on combustion characteristics in a 1.7-liter direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five sets of fuels were studied: 2007 ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), 5% and 20% volumetric blends of soybean biodiesel with ULSD (soybean B5 and B20), and 5% and 20% volumetric blends of coconut biodiesel with ULSD (coconut B5 and B20). In conventional diesel combustion mode, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO/dx) emissions were similar for all fuels studied except soybean B20. Soybean B20 produced the lowest PM but the highest NO/dx emissions. Compared with conventional diesel combustion mode, high efficiency clean combustion (HECC) mode, achieved by increased EGR and combustion phasing, significantly reduced both PM and NO/dx emissions for all fuels studied at the expense of higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and an increase in fuel consumption (less than 4%). ULSD, soybean B5, and coconut B5 showed no difference in exhaust emissions. However, PM emissions increased slightly for soybean B20 and coconut B20. NO/dx emissions increased significantly for soybean B20, while those for coconut B20 were comparable to ULSD. Differences in the chemical and physical properties of soybean and coconut biodiesel fuels compared with ULSD, such as higher fuel-borne oxygen, greater viscosity, and higher boiling temperatures, play a key role in combustion processes and, therefore, exhaust emissions. Furthermore, the highly unsaturated ester composition in soybean biodiesel can be another factor in the increase of NO/dx emissions.

Han, Manbae [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Isotopic Tracing of Particulate Matter from a Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Ethanol-in-Diesel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to investigate the relative contribution to diesel engine particulate matter (PM) from the ethanol and diesel fractions of blended fuels. Four test fuels along with a diesel fuel baseline were investigated. The test fuels were comprised of {sup 14}C depleted diesel fuel mixed with contemporary grain ethanol (>400 the {sup 14}C concentration of diesel). An emulsifier (Span 85) or cosolvent (butyl alcohol) was used to facilitate mixing. The experimental test engine was a 1993 Cummins B5.9 diesel rated at 175 hp at 2500 rpm. Test fuels were run at steady-state conditions of 1600 rpm and 210 ft-lbs, and PM samples were collected on quartz filters following dilution of engine exhaust in a mini-dilution tunnel. AMS analysis of the filter samples showed that the ethanol contributed less to PM relative to its fraction in the fuel blend. For the emulsified blends, 6.4% and 10.3% contributions to PM were observed for 11.5% and 23.0% ethanol fuels, respectively. For the cosolvent blends, even lower contributions were observed (3.8% and 6.3% contributions to PM for 12.5% and 25.0% ethanol fuels, respectively).

Cheng, A.S.; Dibble, R.W.; Buchholz, B.

1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

Emissions From Various Biodiesel Sources Compared to a Range of Diesel Fuels in DPF Equipped Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of various sources of petroleum-based and bio-based diesel fuels on regulated emissions and fuel economy in diesel particulate filter (DPF) equipped diesel engines. Two model year 2008 diesel engines were tested with nine fuels including a certification ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), local ULSD, high aromatic ULSD, low aromatic ULSD, and twenty percent blends of biodiesel derived from algae, camelina, soy, tallow, and yellow grease. Regulated emissions were measured over the heavy duty diesel transient test cycle. Measurements were also made of DPF-out particle size distribution and total particle count from a 13-mode steady state test using a fast mobility particle sizer. Test engines were a 2008 Cummins ISB and a 2008 International Maxx Force 10, both equipped with actively regenerated DPFs. Fuel consumption was roughly 2% greater over the transient test cycle for the B20 blends versus certification ULSD in both engines, consistent with the slightly lower energy content of biodiesel. Unlike studies conducted on older model engines, these engines equipped with diesel oxidation catalysts and DPFs showed small or no measurable fuel effect on the tailpipe emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM). No differences in particle size distribution or total particle count were seen in a comparison of certification ULSD and B20 soy, with the exception of engine idling conditions where B20 produced a small reduction in the number of nucleation mode particles. In the Cummins engine, B20 prepared from algae, camelina, soy, and tallow resulted in an approximately 2.5% increase in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compared to the base fuel. The International engine demonstrated a higher degree of variability for NO{sub x} emissions, and fuel effects could not be resolved (p > 0.05). The group of petroleum diesel test fuels produced a range of NO{sub x} emissions very similar to that caused by blending of biodiesel. Test cycles where an active regeneration of the DPF occurred resulted in a nearly threefold increase in NO{sub x} emissions and a 15% increase in fuel consumption. The full quantification of DPF regeneration events further complicates the accurate calculation of fuel impacts on emissions and fuel consumption.

Williams, A.; Burton, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.; Tester, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Final report, September 28, 1990--November 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program was to study the feasibility of operating a Detroit Diesel Series 149 engine at high speeds using a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. The CWS-fueled 149 engine is proposed for the mine-haul off-highway truck and work boat marine markets. Economic analysis studies indicate that, for these markets, the use of CWS fuel could have sufficient operating cost savings, depending upon the future diesel fuel price, emission control system capital and operating costs, and maintenance and overhaul costs. A major portion of the maintenance costs is expected to be due to lower life and higher cost of the CWS injectors. Injection and combustion systems were specially designed for CWS, and were installed in one cylinder of a Detroit Diesel 8V-149TI engine for testing. The objective was to achieve engine operation for sustained periods at speeds up to 1,900 rpm with reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate. A computer simulation predicted autoignition of coal fuel at 1,900 rpm would require an average droplet size of 18 microns and 19:1 compression ratio, so the injection system, and pistons were designed accordingly. The injection system was capable of supplying the required volume of CWS/injection with a duration of approximately 25 crank angle degrees and peak pressures on the order of 100 mpa. In addition to the high compression ratio, the combustion system also utilized hot residual gases in the cylinder, warm inlet air admission and ceramic insulated engine components to enhance combustion. Autoignition of CWS fuel was achieved at 1900 rpm, at loads ranging from 20--80 percent of the rated load of diesel-fuel powered cylinders. Limited emissions data indicates coal burnout rates in excess of 99 percent. NO{sub x} levels were significantly lower, while unburned hydrocarbon levels were higher for the CWS fueled cylinder than for corresponding diesel-fuel powered cylinders.

Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.; Ryan, T.W. III; Schwalb, J.A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, R.P. Jr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Gaseous-fuel safety assessment. Status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory, in support of studies sponsored by the Office of Vehicle and Engine Research and Development in the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a safety assessment of selected gaseous fuels for use in light automotive transportation. The purpose is to put into perspective the hazards of these fuels relative to present day fuels and delineated criteria for their safe handling. Fuels include compressed and liquified natural gas (CNG and LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and for reference gasoline and diesel. This paper is a program status report. To date, physicochemical property data and general petroleum and transportation information were compiled; basic hazards defined; alternative fuels were safety-ranked based on technical properties alone; safety data and vehicle accident statistics reviewed; and accident scenarios selected for further analysis. Methodology for such analysis is presently under consideration.

Krupka, M.C.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Bartlit, J.R.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Direct Injection Compressed Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The underlying goal of this project was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome technological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the US. market. Further, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive technologies. Eight objectives were defined to accomplish this goal: (1) Develop an interdisciplinary internal combustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. (2) Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. (3) Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary curriculum. (4) Promote strong interaction with industry, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. (5) Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. (6) Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. (7) Establish ''off-campus'' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various industrial sites. (8) Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

Carl L. Anderson

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hydrogen engine performance analysis project. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address the problems identified in the literature and in the project proposal in order to obtain the data-base covering performance, operational characteristics and emissions essential for making a rational decision regarding the selection and design of prototype hydrogen-fueled, air-breathing engines capable of being manufactured for general automotive use. The project program plan calls for investigation of pre-intake valve closing fuel ingestion (Pre IVC) hydrogen-fueled engines during the first two of the three year project. With Pre IVC engines the fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber prior to closing of the intake valve. This is in contrast to Post IVC engines in which fuel is introduced in the cylinder after the intake valve closes. Post IVC engines are to be investigated during the third year according to the project program plan. This quartery report is a summary of the work accomplished during the first three months of the project. For completeness it contains information presented in the first two monthly reports.

Adt, R.R. Jr.; Swain, M.R.; Pappas, J.M.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Prospects on fuel economy improvements for hydrogen powered vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell vehicles are the subject of extensive research and development because of their potential for high efficiency and low emissions. Because fuel cell vehicles remain expensive and the demand for hydrogen is therefore limited, very few fueling stations are being built. To try to accelerate the development of a hydrogen economy, some original equipment manufacturers (OEM) in the automotive industry have been working on a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine (ICE) as an intermediate step. Despite its lower cost, the hydrogen-fueled ICE offers, for a similar amount of onboard hydrogen, a lower driving range because of its lower efficiency. This paper compares the fuel economy potential of hydrogen-fueled vehicles to their conventional gasoline counterparts. To take uncertainties into account, the current and future status of both technologies were considered. Although complete data related to port fuel injection were provided from engine testing, the map for the direct-injection engine was developed from single-cylinder data. The fuel cell system data represent the status of the current technology and the goals of FreedomCAR. For both port-injected and direct-injected hydrogen engine technologies, power split and series Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) configurations were considered. For the fuel cell system, only a series HEV configuration was simulated.

Rousseau, A.; Wallner, T.; Pagerit, S.; Lohse-Bush, H. (Energy Systems)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A coal-water slurry fueled internal combustion engine and method for operating same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

McMillian, M.H.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same  

SciTech Connect

An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

McMillian, Michael H. (Fairmont, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Moving Forward With Fuel Economy Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go? (Lee Schipper. Automobile Fuel. Economy and CO 2 Emissions inGraham. The Effect of Fuel Economy Standards on Automobile

Schipper, Lee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Abrasive wear by diesel engine coal-fuel and related particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the work summarized in this report was to obtain a basic understanding of the factors which are responsible for wear of the piston ring and cylinder wall surfaces in diesel engines utilizing coal-fuel. The approach included analytical studies using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses to characterize coal-fuel and various combustion particles, and two different wear tests. The wear tests were a modified pin-on-disk test and a block-on-ring test capable of either unidirectional or reciprocating-rotational sliding. The wear tests in general were conducted with mixtures of the particles and lubricating oil. The particles studied included coal-fuel, particles resulting from the combustion of coal fuel, mineral matter extracted during the processing of coal, and several other common abrasive particle types among which quartz was the most extensively examined. The variables studied included those associated with the particles, such as particle type, size, and hardness; variables related to contact conditions and the surrounding environment; and variables related to the type and properties of the test specimen materials.

Ives, L.K. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Engineering a 70-percent efficient, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle  

SciTech Connect

The authors introduce the natural gas, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20 to 200 megawatt (MW) size range. The NG-IFFC system is a new METC-patented system. This power-plant system links the ambient pressure, carbonate fuel cell in tandem with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations based on Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) simulations show material and energy balances with expected power output. Early results indicated efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed, carbonate fuel-cell steam-bottomed cycles. More recent calculations extended the in-tandem concept to produce near-stoichiometric usage of the oxygen. This is made possible by reforming the anode stream to completion and using all hydrogen fuel in what will need to be a special combustor. The performance increases dramatically to 70%.

Williams, M.C.; Micheli, P.L.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on AddThis.com...

439

Comparative study of heavy-duty engine operation with diesel fuel and ignition-improved methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol can be made suitable for compression ignition engines by ignition-improving additives. The ignition improver demand can be minimized by increasing the compression ratio. The technical suitability of this fuel can be regarded as proven, since most of the problems connected with its use have been solved. Its economic viability, however, has still to be doubted. From an environmental point of view, ignition-improved methanol deserves great interest due to the total absence of soot in the exhaust and the considerably reduced NO/sub x/ emission.

Hardenberg, H.O.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuels automotive engineering" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible D.I. diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection Diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Espey, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."Transition: Designing a Fuel- Cell Hypercar. ” 8th Annual

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Power Modulation Investigation for High Temperature (175-200 degrees Celcius) Automotive Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles were re-introduced in the late 1990s after a century dominated by purely internal combustion powered engines[1]. Automotive players, such as GM, Ford, DaimlerChrysler, Honda, and Toyota, together with major energy producers, such as BPAmoco, were the major force in the development of hybrid electric vehicles. Most notable was the development by Toyota of its Prius, which was launched in Japan in 1997 and worldwide in 2001. The shift to hybrids was driven by the fact that the sheer volume of vehicles on the road had begun to tax the ability of the environment to withstand the pollution of the internal combustion engine and the ability of the fossil fuel industry to produce a sufficient amount of refined gasoline. In addition, the number of vehicles was anticipated to rise exponentially with the increasing affluence of China and India. Over the last fifteen years, major advances have been made in all the technologies essential to hybrid vehicle success, including batteries, motors, power control and conditioning electronics, regenerative braking, and power sources, including fuel cells. Current hybrid electric vehicles are gasoline internal combustion--electric motor hybrids. These hybrid electric vehicles range from micro-hybrids, where a stop/start system cuts the engine while the vehicle is stopped, and mild hybrids where the stop/start system is supplemented by regenerative braking and power assist, to full hybrids where the combustion motor is optimized for electric power production, and there is full electric drive and full regenerative braking. PSA Peugeot Citroen estimates the increased energy efficiency will range from 3-6% for the micro-hybrids to 15-25% for the full hybrids.[2] Gasoline-electric hybrids are preferred in US because they permit long distance travel with low emissions and high gasoline mileage, while still using the existing refueling infrastructure. One of the most critical areas in which technology has been advancing has been the development of electronics that can operate in the high temperature environments present in hybrid vehicles. The temperatures under the hood for a gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle are comparable to those for traditional internal combustion engines. This is known to be a difficult environment with respect to commercial-grade electronics, as there are surface and ambient temperatures ranging from 125 C to 175 C. In addition, some hybrid drive electronics are placed in even harsher environments, such as on or near the brakes, where temperatures can reach 250 C. Furthermore, number of temperature cycles experienced by electronics in a hybrid vehicle is different from that experienced in a traditional vehicle. A traditional internal combustion vehicle will have the engine running for longer periods, whereas a mild or micro-hybrid engine will experience many more starts and stops.[3] This means that hybrid automotive electronics will undergo more cycles of a potential wider temperature cycle than standard automotive electronics, which in turn see temperature cycles of 2 to 3 times the magnitude of the {Delta}T = 50 C-75 C experienced by commercial-grade electronics. This study will discuss the effects of these harsh environments on the failure mechanisms and ultimate reliability of electronic systems developed for gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles. In addition, it will suggest technologies and components that can reasonably be expected to perform well in these environments. Finally, it will suggest areas where further research is needed or desirable. Areas for further research will be highlighted in bold, italic type. It should be noted that the first area where further research is desirable is in developing a clearer understanding of the actual hybrid automotive electronics environment and how to simulate it through accelerated testing, thus: Developing specific mission profiles and accelerated testing protocols for the underhood environment for hybrid cars, as has previously been done for gasoline-powered vehicles, is an important area for further st

McCluskey, F. P.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Effects of engine speed, fueling rate, and combustion phasing on the thermal stratification required to limit HCCI knocking intensity.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal stratification has the potential to reduce pressure-rise rates and allow increased power output for HCCI engines. This paper systematically examines how the amount of thermal stratification of the core of the charge has to be adjusted to avoid excessive knock as the engine speed and fueling rate are increased. This is accomplished by a combination of multi-zone chemical-kinetics modeling and engine experiments, using iso-octane as the fuel. The experiments show that, for a low-residual engine configuration, the pressure traces are self-similar during changes to the engine speed when CA50 is maintained by adjusting the intake temperature. Consequently, the absolute pressure-rise rate measured as bar/ms increases proportionally with the engine speed. As a result, the knocking (ringing) intensity increases drastically with engine speed, unless counteracted by some means. This paper describes how adjustments of the thermal width of the in-cylinder charge can be used to limit the ringing intensity to 5 MW/m2 as both engine speed and fueling are increased. If the thermal width can be tailored without constraints, this enables smooth operation even for combinations of high speed, high load, and combustion phasing close to TDC. Since large alterations of the thermal width of the charge are not always possible, combustion retard is considered to reduce the requirement on the thermal stratification. The results show that combustion retard carries significant potential since it amplifies the benefit of a fixed thermal width. Therefore, the thermal stratification required for operation with an acceptable knocking intensity can be decreased substantially by the use of combustion retard. This enables combinations of high engine speed and high fueling rate even for operation with the naturally occurring thermal stratification. However, very precise control of the combustion phasing will likely be required for such operation.

SjÞoberg, Magnus; Dec, John E.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

AUTOMOTIVE ALLOYS: I: Fundamental Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we have analyzed the tensile behavior of a series candidate .... This analysis provides information which can be used in the die and process ... of aluminum alloys and composite materials used in the automotive market.

447

Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 01 - 1959 - 01 - 1959 Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability Tony Markel and Keith Wipke National Renewable Energy Laboratory Doug Nelson Virginia Polytechnic University and State Institute Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The impacts of fuel cell system power response capability on optimal hybrid and neat fuel cell vehicle configurations have been explored. Vehicle system optimization was performed with the goal of maximizing fuel economy over a drive cycle. Optimal hybrid vehicle design scenarios were derived for fuel cell systems with 10 to 90% power transient response times of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 40 seconds. Optimal neat fuel cell vehicles where generated for responses times of 0, 2, 5, and 7

448

NCWM 2012 Annual Report - SP1160  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants Regulation, Section 1. Definitions, Hydrogen Fuel for Internal Combustion Engines Vehicles and Fuel Cell. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

GATE Center of Excellence at UAB in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments of the UAB GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications. The first Phase of the UAB DOE GATE center spanned the period 2005-2011. The UAB GATE goals coordinated with the overall goals of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicles Technologies initiative and DOE GATE program. The FCVT goals are: (1) Development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost; (2) To provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies. The UAB GATE focused on both the FCVT and GATE goals in the following manner: (1) Train and produce graduates in lightweight automotive materials technologies; (2) Structure the engineering curricula to produce specialists in the automotive area; (3) Leverage automotive related industry in the State of Alabama; (4) Expose minority students to advanced technologies early in their career; (5) Develop innovative virtual classroom capabilities tied to real manufacturing operations; and (6) Integrate synergistic, multi-departmental activities to produce new product and manufacturing technologies for more damage tolerant, cost-effective, and lighter automotive structures.

None

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Gas Mileage of 2013 Vehicles by CODA Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 CODA Automotive Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2013 CODA Automotive CODA Automatic (A1), Electricity Compare 2013...

452

Gas Mileage of 2012 Vehicles by CODA Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 CODA Automotive Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2012 CODA Automotive CODA Automatic (A1), Electricity Compare 2012...

453

Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEMFC technology for transportation must be competitive with internal combustion engine powertrains in a number of key metrics, including performance, life, reliability, and cost. Demonstration of PEMFC cost competitiveness has its own challenges because the technology has not been applied to high volume automotive markets. The key stack materials including membranes, electrodes, bipolar plates, and gas diffusion layers have not been produced in automotive volumes to the exacting quality requirements that will be needed for high stack yields and to the evolving property specifications of high performance automotive stacks. Additionally, balance-of-plant components for air, water, and thermal management are being developed to meet the unique requirements of fuel cell systems. To address the question of whether fuel cells will be cost competitive in automotive markets, the DOE has funded this project to assess the high volume production cost of PEM fuel cell systems. In this report a historical perspective of our efforts in assessment of PEMFC cost for DOE is provided along with a more in-depth assessment of the cost of compressed hydrogen storage is provided. Additionally, the hydrogen storage costs were incorporated into a system cost update for 2004. Assessment of cost involves understanding not only material and production costs, but also critical performance metrics, i.e., stack power density and associated catalyst loadings that scale the system components. We will discuss the factors influencing the selection of the system specification (i.e., efficiency, reformate versus direct hydrogen, and power output) and how these have evolved over time. The reported costs reflect internal estimates and feedback from component developers and the car companies. Uncertainty in the cost projection was addressed through sensitivity analyses.

Eric J. Carlson

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

Nigle N. Clark

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Potential automotive uses of wrought magnesium alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available to improve automotive fuel efficiency. High-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to reduce weight significantly, but substantial additional reductions could be achieved by greater use of low-density magnesium (Mg) and its alloys. Mg alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts, generally limited to die castings (e.g., housings). Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel/aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Mg sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. This study identifies high cost as the major barrier to greatly increased Mg use in autos. Two technical R and D areas, novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, could enable major cost reductions.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its sixth year of operation. During this period the Center has involved thirteen GATE Fellows and ten GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center's focus area: hybrid drive trains and control systems. Eighteen GATE students have graduated, and three have completed their course work requirements. Nine faculty members from three departments in the College of Engineering have been involved in the GATE Center. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as internships, equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resource