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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Instructions for CEC-1250E-4 Biomass and Fossil Fuel Usage Report for Biomass Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instructions for CEC-1250E-4 Biomass and Fossil Fuel Usage Report for Biomass Facilities Biomass energy input basis in the upcoming calendar year? - Please check "yes" or "no." 12. Types of Biomass Fuel Used - Please report the quantity and supplier of the following types of biomass fuel used

2

Report on Activities And Usage Statistics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on Activities And Usage Statistics of Learning Technology Center Services and Facilities And Usage Statistics of Learning Technology Center Services and Facilities 2009-2010 The purpose

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

3

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2010 I Hudson Consulting I October 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2010 I Hudson Consulting I October 2010 Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland Report 2010 #12;Woodfuel Usage Update 2 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2010 I Hudson Consulting I October 2010 Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland Report 2010 www

4

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2012 I Hudson Consulting I November 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2012 I Hudson Consulting I November 2012 Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland Report 2012 #12;Woodfuel Usage Update 2 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2012 I Hudson Consulting I November 2012 Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland Report 2012 www

5

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2011 I Hudson Consulting I September 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2011 I Hudson Consulting I September 2011 Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland Report 2011 #12;Woodfuel Usage Update 2 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2011 I Hudson Consulting I September 2011 Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland Report 2011 www

6

Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced.

Reese, Anthony P. (San Jose, CA); Stachowski, Russell E. (Fremont, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential density on vehicle usage and energy consumption.of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumptionresidential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption*

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced. 10 figs.

Reese, A.P.; Stachowski, R.E.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Demand and Usage in Scotland Update Report to March 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland Update Report to March 2008 #12;Woodfuel Use Update Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland 2008 Contents: 1. The brief 2. Methodology 3. Results 3.1. Operational ­ May 2005" (unpublished report on existing and potential woodfuel usage in the commercial, industrial

10

Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry. Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry. Speaker(s): Philip Henderson Date: October 4, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page There has been much discussion about the use of customer energy usage information to deliver value, such as with benchmarking tools that compare energy use in a building to a peer set, continuous commissioning services that diagnose faults in building systems, and tools that estimate expected savings from upgrades. A utility can use customer information to deliver these kinds of services to its customers directly, but most utilities today do not enable companies to obtain a customer's energy usage information in a systematic, automated way to deliver services to the customer, even if

11

RECS Fuel Oil Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

fuel oil usage for this delivery address between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total...

12

RECS Fuel Oil Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

fuel oil usage for this delivery address between fuel oil usage for this delivery address between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes [Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service charges] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Form EIA 457G OMB No. 1905-0092 Expires 1/31/13 2009 RECS Fuel Oil and Kerosene Usage Form Delivery Address: Account Number: $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / Enter the Amount Delivered in Gallons XXXX Type of Fuel Sold was: 1=Fuel Oil #1 2=Fuel Oil #2 3=Kerosene 4=Other Enter the Price per Gallon $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ XXX.XX $ X.XX (select one) 1 2 3 4 MM/DD/YY Page 1 of 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis

13

Impact of Liquefied Natural Gas usage and payload size on Hybrid Wing Body aircraft fuel efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work assessed Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft in the context of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel usage and payload/range scalability at three scales: H1 (B737), H2 (B787) and H3 (B777). The aircraft were optimized for ...

Mody, Pritesh (Pritesh Chetan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Winter fuels report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

15

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report provides an overview of 2009 trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance.

16

Fuel Cell School Buses: Report to Congress  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Fuel Cell Activities, Progress, and Plans: Report to Congress ii December 2008 Fuel Cell School Buses Report to Congress Fuel Cell School Buses: Report to Congress Preface This...

17

Use of Astronomical Literature - A Report on Usage Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a number of metrics for usage of the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS). Since the ADS is used by the entire astronomical community, these are indicative of how the astronomical literature is used. We will show how the use of the ADS has changed both quantitatively and qualitatively. We will also show that different types of users access the system in different ways. Finally, we show how use of the ADS has evolved over the years in various regions of the world. The ADS is funded by NASA Grant NNG06GG68G.

Edwin A. Henneken; Michael J. Kurtz; Alberto Accomazzi; Carolyn S. Grant; Donna Thompson; Elizabeth Bohlen; Stephen S. Murray

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards Market Analysis Educational Publications Newsletter

19

The Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

New England New England New England New England Central Atlantic Central Atlantic Central Atlantic Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic Lower Atlantic Lower Atlantic Lower Atlantic Gulf Coast Gulf Coast Gulf Coast Gulf Coast West Coast West Coast West Coast West Coast Rocky Mountain Rocky Mountain Rocky Mountain Rocky Mountain Midwest Midwest Midwest Midwest Map of U.S. Regions Map of U.S. Regions Map of U.S. Regions Map of U.S. Regions THE ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT Alternative Fuel Prices Across the Nation March 28, 2002 his is the fifth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the price of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders during the months

20

The Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

December 17, 2001 December 17, 2001 his is the fifth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the price of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders during the weeks of October 15 and October 22, 2001, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report for the week of June 4, 2001. Gasoline and Diesel Prices egular grade gasoline averaged $1.265 per gallon nationwide during the week of October 22, 2001. This represents a decrease of $0.414 per gallon from the previous Price Report (June 2001), as illustrated in the table to the right. Prices for the various regions of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report 2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report This report summarizes 2010 data on fuel cells, including market penetration and industry trends. It...

22

2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

8 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product...

23

CNEA Fresh Fuel Plate Characterization Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization summary report outlining the findings of the fresh fuel examinations of the plates received from CNEA.

D. Keiser; F. Rice

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

October 2008 October 2008 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT OCTOBER 2008 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the October 2008 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between October 2, 2008 and October 16, 2008 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in

25

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

9 9 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT OCTOBER 2009 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the October 2009 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between October 16, 2009 and October 26, 2009 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in

26

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

July 2008 July 2008 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT JULY 2008 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the July 2008 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between July 21, 2008 and July 31, 2008 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in

27

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2009 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT JULY 2009 WELCOME! Welcome to the July 2009 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between July 20, 2009 and July 31, 2009 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in

28

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

April 2009 April 2009 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT APRIL 2009 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the April 2009 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between April 1, 2009 and April 15, 2009 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in

29

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

January 2009 January 2009 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT JANUARY 2009 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the January 2009 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between January 12, 2009 and January 30, 2009 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in

30

Fuel performance: Annual report for 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the tenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1987 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulator Commission evaluations are included. 384 refs., 13 figs., 33 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.; Wu, S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fuel performance annual report for 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the eighth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1985 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.

Bailey, W.J.; Wu, S.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fuel performance annual report for 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the ninth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1986 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included. 550 refs., 12 figs., 31 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.; Wu, S.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fuel performance annual report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the twelfth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1989 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included.

Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Wu, S. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fuel performance annual report for 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the eleventh in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1988 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included. 414 refs., 13 figs., 32 tabs.

Bailey, W.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wu, S. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of Engineering and Systems Technology)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fuel Performance Annual Report for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the third in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance in conmercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel surveillance programs and operating experience, fuel performance problems, and fuel design changes are provided. References to additional, more detailed, information and related NRC evaluation are included.

Bailey, W. J.; Rising, K. H.; Tokar, M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Alternative Fuel Price Report October 2010 Corrected  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report October 2010 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report October 2010 WELCOME! Welcome to the October 2010 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between October 4, 2010 and October 14, 2010 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for

37

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

1 1 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report October 2011 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the October 2011 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between September 30, 2011 and October 14, 2011 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

38

Alternative Fuel Price Report January 2011  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

1 1 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report January 2011 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the January 2011 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between January 24, 2011 and February 7, 2011 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

39

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

0 0 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report January 2010 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the January 2010 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between January 19, 2010 and January 29, 2010 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

40

Alternative Fuel Price Report April 2010  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

0 0 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report April 2010 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the April 2010 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between April 2, 2010 and April 12, 2010 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alternative Fuel Price Report April 2008  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

April 2008 April 2008 8 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT APRIL 2008 WELCOME! Welcome to the April 2008 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between April 1, 2008 and April 11, 2008 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

42

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

1 1 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report April 2011 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the April 2011 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between April 1, 2011 and April 15, 2011 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

43

Alternative Fuel Price Report January 2008  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Jan Jan nuary 2008 8 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT JANUARY 2008 WELCOME! Welcome to the January 2008 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between January 21, 2008 and January 31, 2008 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

44

Alternative Fuel Price Report - September 2005  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

September 2005 September 2005 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT SEPTEMBER 2005 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the September issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected in the month of September 2005 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, DOE Regional Offices, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis.

45

2007 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report 2007 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report The fuel cell industry, which has experienced continued increases in sales, is an emerging clean...

46

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop, Golden, Colorado, June 11-13, 2012 Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report:...

47

Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Summary and presentations from the NREL Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop held April 19,...

48

Usage of Fuel Mixtures Containing Ethanol and Rapeseed Oil Methyl Esters in a Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, its use in the diesel engine cycle is hampered by the poor motor-fueling characteristics of lower alcohols and, primarily, the limited solubility of ethanol in fossil diesel fuel and its low self-ignition characteristics. ... Coefficient ? = Gair/(GfL0) estimates air supply into a diesel engine cylinder (indicator process), taking into account the differences of stoichiometric ratio L0 of the tested fuels, caused by the increase of the E portion in the RME?E mixture (Gair is air consumption, and Gf is fuel consumption). ... Future research will concentrate on the analysis of fuel injection and heat release rate characteristics in a cylinder, while a diesel engine is running on biodiesel fuels RME?E, and also on the operational parameters of diesel engines when fossil diesel fuel is replaced with three-component fuels D?RME?E. ...

Sergejus Lebedevas; Galina Lebedeva; Violeta Makareviciene; Prutenis Janulis; Egle Sendzikiene

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

49

2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT JUNE 2010 2008 FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT i Authors This report was written primarily by Bill Vincent of the Breakthrough Technologies Institute in Washington, DC, with significant assistance from Jennifer Gangi, Sandra Curtin, and Elizabeth Delmont. Acknowledgments This report was the result of hard work and valuable contributions from government staff and the fuel cell industry. The authors especially wish to thank Sunita Satyapal, Nancy Garland, and the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program for their support and guidance in the preparation of this report. The authors also wish to thank Robert Rose and Bud DeFlaviis of the U.S. Fuel Cell Council; Lisa Callaghan-Jerram of Fuel Cell Today; Alison Wise and Rachel Gelman

50

Alternative Fuel Price Report October 2006  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

October 2006 October 2006 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT OCTOBER 2006 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the October 2006 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected in the months of September and October 2006 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, DOE Regional Offices, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for

51

Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Energy Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies

52

2012 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes data compiled in 2013 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2012 with some comparison to previous years.

53

2013 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes data compiled in 2014 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2013 with some comparison to previous years.

54

2011 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report from the US Department of Energy describes data compiled in 2012 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2011 with some comparison to previous years.

55

2011 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report describes data compiled in 2012 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2011 with some comparison to previous years.

56

2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report describes data compiled in 2011 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2010 with some comparison to previous years.

57

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of

58

2011 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2011 FUEL CELL 2011 FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT ii Authors This report was a collaborative effort by staff of the Breakthrough Technologies Institute, Inc., in Washington, DC. Acknowledgement The authors relied upon the hard work and valuable contributions of many men and women in government and in the fuel cell industry. The authors especially wish to thank Sunita Satyapal and the staff of the US Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program for their support and guidance. The authors also wish to thank Rachel Gelman of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the many others who made this report possible. iii Contents List of Figures .....................................................................................................................................................v

59

Cofiring: technological option in Romania for promoting cleaner fossil fuels usage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Co-firing refers to the simultaneous or alternative utilisation of two or more fuels in a combustion unit for the purpose of heat/power generation and it… (more)

Marin, Bogdan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Environmental and economic tradeoffs of feedstock usage for liquid fuels and power production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis is divided into two parts - 1) assessing the energy return on investment for alternative jet fuels, and 2) quantifying the tradeoffs associated with the aviation and non-aviation use of agricultural residues. ...

Trivedi, Parthsarathi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

2010 Annual Progress Report for Fuels Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

annual progress report 2010 Fuels Technologies i FY 2010 Progress Report Fuels Technologies Approved by Kevin Stork Team Leader, Fuels Technologies Vehicle Technologies Program FY 2010 Progress rePort For Fuels technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 February 2011 DOE-FT-2010AR ii Fuels Technologies FY 2010 Progress Report Acknowledgement We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Alliance Technical Services, Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for their technical and artistic contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all the participants for their contributions to the programs and all the

62

Report: Efficiency, Alternative Fuels to Impact Market Through...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency, Alternative Fuels to Impact Market Through 2040 Report: Efficiency, Alternative Fuels to Impact Market Through 2040 February 26, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Fuel efficiency...

63

2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Fuels & Lubricants...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fuels & Lubricants Technologies 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Fuels & Lubricants Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities...

64

Alternative Fuel Price Report - November 26, 2004  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

THE ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT Alternative Fuel Prices Across the Nation November 26, 2004 his is the thirteenth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders between November 8 and November 19, 2004, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in June, 2004. The prices contained within this report are meant to represent retail, at-the-pump sales prices for each fuel. In some cases, prices are collected from utilities or government facilities, where taxes are not included. In

65

Energy Department Announces $4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced up to $4.5 million in funding to expand the use of alternative fuels through the Clean Cities program, which works with nearly 100 local coalitions and thousands of stakeholders across the country to decrease the use of petroleum in transportation.

66

Spent Fuel Background Report Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an overview of current spent nuclear fuel management in the DOE complex. Sources of information include published literature, internal DOE documents, interviews with site personnel, and information provided by individual sites. Much of the specific information on facilities and fuels was provided by the DOE sites in response to the questionnaire for data for spent fuels and facilities data bases. This information is as accurate as is currently available, but is subject to revision pending results of further data calls. Spent fuel is broadly classified into three categories: (a) production fuels, (b) special fuels, and (c) naval fuels. Production fuels, comprising about 80% of the total inventory, are those used at Hanford and Savannah River to produce nuclear materials for defense. Special fuels are those used in a wide variety of research, development, and testing activities. Special fuels include fuel from DOE and commercial reactors used in research activities at DOE sites. Naval fuels are those developed and used for nuclear-powered naval vessels and for related research and development. Given the recent DOE decision to curtail reprocessing, the topic of main concern in the management of spent fuel is its storage. Of the DOE sites that have spent nuclear fuel, the vast majority is located at three sites-Hanford, INEL, and Savannah River. Other sites with spent fuel include Oak Ridge, West Valley, Brookhaven, Argonne, Los Alamos, and Sandia. B&W NESI Lynchburg Technology Center and General Atomics are commercial facilities with DOE fuel. DOE may also receive fuel from foreign research reactors, university reactors, and other commercial and government research reactors. Most DOE spent fuel is stored in water-filled pools at the reactor facilities. Currently an engineering study is being performed to determine the feasibility of using dry storage for DOE-owned spent fuel currently stored at various facilities. Delays in opening the deep geologic repository and the decision to phase out reprocessing of production fuels are extending the need for interim storage. The report describes the basic storage conditions and the general SNF inventory at individual DOE facilities.

Abbott, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2010 Accomplishments Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Accomplishment Report documents the high-level research and development results achieved in fiscal year 2010. The AFC program has been given responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. The science-based approach combines theory, experiments, and multi-scale modeling and simulation aimed at a fundamental understanding of the fuel fabrication processes and fuel and clad performance under irradiation. The scope of the AFC includes evaluation and development of multiple fuel forms to support the three fuel cycle options described in the Sustainable Fuel Cycle Implementation Plan4: Once-Through Cycle, Modified-Open Cycle, and Continuous Recycle. The word “fuel” is used generically to include fuels, targets, and their associated cladding materials. This document includes a brief overview of the management and integration activities; but is primarily focused on the technical accomplishments for FY-10. Each technical section provides a high level overview of the activity, results, technical points of contact, and applicable references.

Lori Braase

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

On-Board Fuel Processing Committee Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON-BOARD FUEL PROCESSING ON-BOARD FUEL PROCESSING GO/NO-GO DECISION DOE DECISION TEAM COMMITTEE REPORT August 2004 (Revised) Table of Contents 1. Executive Summary............................................................................................. 1 2. Introduction.......................................................................................................... 2 3. Background.......................................................................................................... 2 4. Process................................................................................................................. 2 5. Recommendation............................................................................................... 3 6. Rationale ........................................................................................................ 4

69

2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

70

Fuel Cell Systems Annual Progress Report | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Progress Report Fuel Cells For Transportation - 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy Conversion Team Fuel Cells for Transportation - Research and Development: Program Abstracts...

71

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities, Progress, and Plans: Report...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and Fuel Cell Activities, Progress, and Plans: Report to Congress Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities, Progress, and Plans: Report to Congress The Department of Energy is conducting...

72

FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

73

DOE Releases 2013 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Releases 2013 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report DOE Releases 2013 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report November 12, 2014 - 11:13am Addthis The Energy Department today...

74

Fuel Cells for Transportation - FY 2001 Progress Report | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cells for Transportation - FY 2001 Progress Report Fuel Cells for Transportation - FY 2001 Progress Report V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION 159.pdf More Documents &...

75

FY 2005 Progress Report for Fuels Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Progress Report Progress rePort for fuels technologies Less dependence on foreign oil, and eventual transition to an emissions-free, petroleum-free vehicle F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2005 Progress Report for Fuels Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen January 2006 Fuels Technologies FY 2005 Progress Report Contents I Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 II Fuels and Lubricants to Enable High Efficiency Engine Operation while Meeting 2007 - 2010 Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

76

Used Fuel Degradation: Experimental and Modeling Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The report describes the strategy for coupling process level models to produce an integrated Used Fuel Degradation Model (FDM), and addresses fractional degradation rate, instant release fractions, other continuum modeling approaches, and experimental support.

77

Summary report : universal fuel processor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States produces only about 1/3 of the more than 20 million barrels of petroleum that it consumes daily. Oil imports into the country are roughly equivalent to the amount consumed in the transportation sector. Hence the nation in general, and the transportation sector in particular, is vulnerable to supply disruptions and price shocks. The situation is anticipated to worsen as the competition for limited global supplies increases and oil-rich nations become increasingly willing to manipulate the markets for this resource as a means to achieve political ends. The goal of this project was the development and improvement of technologies and the knowledge base necessary to produce and qualify a universal fuel from diverse feedstocks readily available in North America and elsewhere (e.g. petroleum, natural gas, coal, biomass) as a prudent and positive step towards mitigating this vulnerability. Three major focus areas, feedstock transformation, fuel formulation, and fuel characterization, were identified and each was addressed. The specific activities summarized herein were identified in consultation with industry to set the stage for collaboration. Two activities were undertaken in the area of feedstock transformation. The first activity focused on understanding the chemistry and operation of autothermal reforming, with an emphasis on understanding, and therefore preventing, soot formation. The second activity was focused on improving the economics of oxygen production, particularly for smaller operations, by integrating membrane separations with pressure swing adsorption. In the fuel formulation area, the chemistry of converting small molecules readily produced from syngas directly to fuels was examined. Consistent with the advice from industry, this activity avoided working on improving known approaches, giving it an exploratory flavor. Finally, the fuel characterization task focused on providing a direct and quantifiable comparison of diesel fuel and JP-8.

Coker, Eric Nicholas; Rice, Steven F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.; Miller, James Edward; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Pickett, Lyle M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2011 Accomplishments Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major research and development (R&D) areas under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is advanced fuels development. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has the responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY 20) 2011 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section. The order of the accomplishments in this report is consistent with the AFC work breakdown structure (WBS).

Not Listed

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Alternative Fuel Price Report - June 29, 2004  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

June 29, 2004 June 29, 2004 his is the twelfth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders between June 14 and June 25, 2004, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in March, 2004. T The prices contained within this report are meant to represent retail, at-the-pump sales prices for each fuel. In some cases, prices are collected from utilities or government facilities, where taxes are not included. In these instances, though government users may not be required to pay a tax on the fuel, standard federal and

80

Clean Cities: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Price Alternative Fuel Price Report to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report on AddThis.com... Coordinator Basics Outreach Education & Webinars Meetings Reporting Annual Reporting Database Alternative Fuel Price Report Contacts Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report Clean Cities coordinators are required to collect and report local

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fuel Cell School Buses: Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell School Buses: Report to Congress Fuel Cell School Buses: Report to Congress The Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program has examined the potential for a fuel cell...

82

Alternative Fuel Price Report - March 28, 2005  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

March 28, 2005 March 28, 2005 T his is the fourteenth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders between March 8 and March 22, 2005, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in November, 2004. The changes in prices from one reporting period to the next can be attributed not only to price volatility, but also to an inconsistent set of respondents. Thus, differences from one report to the next should not be assumed to reflect trends. The prices contained within this report are meant to represent retail, at-the-pump sales prices for each fuel.

83

2004 Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual report of fuel cell projects sponsored by Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory.

NETL

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Gaseous-fuel safety assessment. Status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory, in support of studies sponsored by the Office of Vehicle and Engine Research and Development in the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a safety assessment of selected gaseous fuels for use in light automotive transportation. The purpose is to put into perspective the hazards of these fuels relative to present day fuels and delineated criteria for their safe handling. Fuels include compressed and liquified natural gas (CNG and LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and for reference gasoline and diesel. This paper is a program status report. To date, physicochemical property data and general petroleum and transportation information were compiled; basic hazards defined; alternative fuels were safety-ranked based on technical properties alone; safety data and vehicle accident statistics reviewed; and accident scenarios selected for further analysis. Methodology for such analysis is presently under consideration.

Krupka, M.C.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Bartlit, J.R.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Transmutation Fuels Campaign FY-09 Accomplishments Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009 (FY-08) accomplishments for the Transmutation Fuels Campaign (TFC). The emphasis is on the accomplishments and relevance of the work. Detailed description of the methods used to achieve the highlighted results and the associated support tasks are not included in this report.

Lori Braase

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fuel performance annual report for 1983. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the sixth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1983 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.

Bailey, W.J.; Dunenfeld, M.S.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reporting Requirement

88

Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's Office of Transportation Technologies Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Progress Report for the Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells Program highlights progress achieved during FY 2000.

89

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy ConsumptionType Choice, and Fuel Usage Total annual residentialResidential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report - April 2012  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

April 2012 April 2012 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report April 2012 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the April 2012 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep Clean Cities coalitions and other interested parties up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the United States. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between March 30, 2012 and April 13, 2012 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were

91

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report Jan 2012  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

January 2012 January 2012 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report January 2012 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the January 2012 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep Clean Cities coalitions and other interested parties up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the United States. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between January 13, 2012 and January 27, 2012 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were

92

Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable electricity, but they could not compete with pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAESReversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Dr. Robert J. Remick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mr. Douglas Wheeler DJW Technology YOU

93

Usage Demographics 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 NERSC Usage Demographics 2010 Academic Usage Usage by Discipline DOE & Other Lab Usage Usage by Institution Type Last edited: 2012-10-30 13:51:35...

94

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section IV. Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W advanced PEM power plant. Approach Figure 1 provides a schematic of the gasoline fuel cell power plantHydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 265 Section IV. Fuel Cells #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 266 #12;Hydrogen

95

Alternative Fuels Price Report July 3, 2001  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

July 3, 2001 July 3, 2001 his is the fourth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the price of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders during the weeks of May 28 and June 4, 2001, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report for the week of October 9, 2000. Gasoline and Diesel Prices asoline averaged $1.679 per gallon nationwide during the week of June 4, 2001. This represents an increase of $0.138 per gallon from the previous Price Report (October 2000), as illustrated in the table to the right. Prices for the various regions of the country are

96

2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Progress Report...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Progress Report Posted 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Progress Report Posted November 10, 2014 - 5:25pm Addthis The...

97

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2007  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2007 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT JULY 2007 WELCOME! Welcome to the July 2007 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between July 3, 2007 and July 13, 2007 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

98

Fuel performance annual report for 1984. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the seventh in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1984 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included. 279 refs., 11 figs., 29 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.; Dunenfeld, M.S.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

100

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas and Propane Reports  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Reports to someone by E-mail Reports to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas and Propane Reports on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas and Propane Reports on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas and Propane Reports on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas and Propane Reports on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas and Propane Reports on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas and Propane Reports on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Natural Gas and Propane Reports The Florida Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability (Office) must complete a report that analyzes the taxation and use of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report March 2007  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Clean Cities Alternative Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report March 2007 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT MARCH 2007 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the March 2007 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between February 21, 2007 and March 2, 2007 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that

102

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report - July 2012  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Clean Cities Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2012 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2012 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the July 2012 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep Clean Cities coalitions and other interested parties up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the United States. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between July 13, 2012 and July 27, 2012 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were

103

Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Retail Sales Reporting  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Retail Sales Retail Sales Reporting to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Retail Sales Reporting on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Retail Sales Reporting on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Retail Sales Reporting on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Retail Sales Reporting on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Retail Sales Reporting on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Retail Sales Reporting on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type E85 Retail Sales Reporting A retailer who dispenses E85 must report to the Indiana Department of State Revenue the total number of gallons of E85 sold from a metered pump.

104

Fuel performance annual report for 1991. Volume 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the fourteenth in a series that provides a compilation of information regarding commercial nuclear fuel performance. The series of annual reports were developed as a result of interest expressed by the public, advising bodies, and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for public availability of information pertaining to commercial nuclear fuel performance. During 1991, the nuclear industry`s focus regarding fuel continued to be on extending burnup while maintaining fuel rod reliability. Utilities realize that high-burnup fuel reduces the amount of generated spent fuel, reduces fuel costs, reduces operational and maintenance costs, and improves plant capacity factors by extending operating cycles. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, high-burnup experience, problem areas, and items of general significance are provided.

Painter, C.L.; Alvis, J.M.; Beyer, C.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Marion, A.L. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Payne, G.A. [Northwest Coll. and Univ. Association for Science, Richland, WA (United States); Kendrick, E.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report October 2007  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

r r Clean C Citie Fue es A l Pri ltern ice R nati Repo ve ort Oc ctober 2007 7 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT OCTOBER 2007 WELCOME! Welcome to the October 2007 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between October 2, 2007 and October 20, 2007 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in

106

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report June 2006  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

June 2006 June 2006 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT JUNE 2006 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the June 2006 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected in the months of May and June 2006 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, DOE Regional Offices, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis.

107

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2010  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

July 2010 July 2010 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2010 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the July 2010 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between July 12, 2010 and July 23, 2010 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

108

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2009 Annual Progress Report - Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Printable Version 2009 Annual Progress Report V. Fuel Cells This section of the 2009 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on fuel cells. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Fuel Cells Program Element Introduction, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 262 KB) A. Analysis/Characterization Fuel Cell Systems Analysis (PDF 560 KB), Rajesh Ahluwalia, Argonne National Laboratory Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell System for Automotive Applications (PDF 1.4 MB), Brian James, Directed Technologies, Inc. Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/Systems (PDF 724 KB), Jayanti Sinha , TIAX LLC Fuel Cell Testing at Argonne National Laboratory (PDF 458 KB), Ira

109

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2008 Annual Progress Report - Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Printable Version 2008 Annual Progress Report V. Fuel Cells This section of the 2008 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on fuel cells. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Fuel Cells Sub-Program Overview, Nancy Garland, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 204 KB) A. Analysis/Characterization Fuel Cell Systems Analysis, Rajesh Ahluwalia, Argonne National Laboratory (PDF 375 KB) Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell System for Automotive Applications, Brian James, Directed Technologies, Inc. (PDF 1.0 MB) Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/Systems, Jayanti Sinha, TIAX LLC (PDF 437 KB) Microstructural Characterization Of PEM Fuel Cell MEAs, Karren More, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (PDF 414 KB)

110

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Request to Report Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on AddThis.com... More in this section...

111

2006 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Workshop report from the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. This report highlights specific aspects of the workshop and reports on general consensus (and dissent) of the joint session. The findings and key recommendations of individual breakout groups from the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop are also reported.

112

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, Colorado June 11-13, 2012 Workshop Proceedings NRELBK-5600-56523 January...

113

2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report, June 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 2010 data on fuel cells, including market penetration and industry trends. It also covers cost, price, and performance trends, along with policy and market drivers and the future outlook for fuel cells.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FUELS FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS 2000 ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FUELS F O R ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES A N D FUEL CELLS A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory, Computer Systems Management, Inc., National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and QSS Group, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2000 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI

115

Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report Â… February 2006  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

February 2006 February 2006 CLEAN CITIES ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT FEBRUARY 2006 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the February 2006 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected in the months of January and February 2006 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, DOE Regional Offices, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices

117

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report - October 2012  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

2 2 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report October 2012 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the October 2012 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep Clean Cities coalitions and other interested parties up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the United States. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between September 28, 2012 and October 12, 2012 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they

118

2012 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The 2012 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2012 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

119

Report: Efficiency, Alternative Fuels to Impact Market Through 2040  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fuel efficiency improvements and increased use of alternative fuels, will shrink gasoline's share of the fuel market 14% by 2040, according to a new report based on analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its Annual Energy Outl

120

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report - April 2013  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

3 3 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report April 2013 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the April 2013 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep Clean Cities coalitions and other interested parties up to date on the prices of alternative and conventional fuels in the United States. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between March 29, 2013 and April 12, 2013 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were requested to provide prices for fuels in their area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, July, 2013  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

3 3 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2013 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the July 2013 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep Clean Cities coalitions and other interested parties up to date on the prices of alternative and conventional fuels in the United States. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between July 12, 2013 and July 26, 2013 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were requested to provide prices for fuels in their areas

122

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report - January 2013  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

3 3 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report January 2013 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the January 2013 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep Clean Cities coalitions and other interested parties up to date on the prices of alternative and conventional fuels in the United States. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between January 10, 2013 and January 25, 2013 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were requested to provide prices for fuels in their area

123

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report Â… October 2013  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

3 3 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report October 2013 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the October 2013 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep Clean Cities coalitions and other interested parties up to date on the prices of alternative and conventional fuels in the United States. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between October 4, 2013 and October 18, 2013 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were requested to provide prices for fuels in their areas

124

2013 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cell (GFC), a modified solid oxide fuel cell, to test in extraction of oil from oil shale. 83 The 4.5 kW natural gas-fueled GFC was designed and built by Delphi for IEP...

125

2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of

126

ALTERNATIVE JET FUEL SCENARIO ANALYSIS Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and considers existing and emerging fuel production technologies. The analysis also forecasts how alternative fuels might contribute to greenhouse gas goals. Based on a review of fuel production companies' stated of the most optimistic demand forecasts and the "product switch" production scenarios leads to North American

127

Joint federal/state motor fuel tax compliance project. Fiscal year 1993 status report. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the next in a series of reports that describe motor fuel tax enforcement activities funded under this program.

NONE

1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities, Progress, and Plans: Report...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

January 2009 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities, Progress, and Plans Report to Congress Preface This Department of Energy report addresses subsection 811(a) of Public Law 109-58,...

129

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report This report addresses the experience of introducing ethanol buses and fuel stations in Nanyang (China). Though the demonstration met initial obstacles, significant data and information was collected. The responses from drivers and passengers show that the ethanol buses were well accepted, and the function and performance of the ethanol buses was satisfactory. How to Use This Tool

130

Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2006 Annual Progress Report - Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Printable Version 2006 Annual Progress Report V. Fuel Cells This section of the 2006 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on fuel cells. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Fuel Cells Sub-Program Overview, Valri Lightner, Fuel Cell Team Lead, DOE Hydrogen Program (PDF 169 KB) A. Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) Integrated Manufacturing for Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies, Emory DeCastro, PEMEAS U.S.A., E-TEK Division (PDF 251 KB) Advanced MEAs for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Mark Debe, 3M (PDF 892 KB) Electrocatalyst Supports and Electrode Structures, Mahlon Wilson, Los Alamos National Laboratory (PDF 1.46 MB) Back to Top B. Membranes and MEAs Poly(p-Phenylene Sulfonic Acid)s with Frozen-in Free Volume for Use

132

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2005 Annual Progress Report - Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Printable Version 2005 Annual Progress Report VII. Fuel Cells This section of the 2005 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on fuel cells. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Fuel Cells Sub-program Overview, Valri Lightner, Department of Energy (PDF 198 KB) A. Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEA) Integrated Manufacturing for Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies, Emory S. De Castro, De Nora N.A., E-TEK Division (PDF 292 KB) Advanced MEAs for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Mark K. Debe, 3M Company (PDF 459 KB) Development of High-temperature Membranes and Improved Cathode Catalysts, Lesia Protsailo, UTC Fuel Cells (PDF 642 KB) Electrocatalyst Supports and Electrode Structures, Eric Brosha, Los

133

Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2014 Accomplishments Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of ATF development is to identify alternative fuel system technologies to further enhance the safety, competitiveness, and economics of commercial nuclear power. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel in the integrated reactor system makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing desirable performance attributes is critical in guiding the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance.

Lori Braase; W. Edgar May

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Ethanol production for automotive fuel usage. Final technical report, July 1979-August 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of ethanol from potatoes, sugar beets, and wheat using geothermal resources in the Raft River area of Idaho was evaluated. The south-central region of Idaho produces approximately 18 million bushels of wheat, 1.3 million tons of sugar beets, and 27 million cwt potatoes annually. A 20-million-gallon-per-year ethanol facility has been selected as the largest scale plant that can be supported with the current agricultural resources. The conceptual plant was designed to operate on each of these three feedstocks for a portion of the year, but could operate year-round on any of them. The processing facility uses conventional alcohol technology and uses geothermal energy for all process heating. There are three feedstock preparation sections, although the liquefaction and saccharification steps for potatoes and wheat involve common equipment. The fermentation, distillation, and by-product handling sections are common to all three feedstocks. Maximum geothermal fluid requirements are approximately 6000 gpm. It is anticipated that this flow will be supplied by nine production wells located on private and BLM lands in the Raft River KGRA. The geothermal fluid will be flashed from 280/sup 0/F in three stages to supply process steam at 250/sup 0/F, 225/sup 0/F, and 205/sup 0/F for various process needs. Steam condensate plus liquid remaining after the third flash will be returned to receiving strata through six injection wells.

Stenzel, R.A.; Yu, J.; Lindemuth, T.E.; Soo-Hoo, R.; May, S.C.; Yim, Y.J.; Houle, E.H.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Microsoft Word - spent nuclear fuel report.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel at the Savannah River Site DOE/IG-0727 May 2006 REPORT ON MANAGEMENT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TABLE OF CONTENTS Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Details of Finding 1 Recommendations 2 Comments 3 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 4 2. Prior Audit Reports 5 3. Management Comments 6 SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL MANGEMENT Page 1 Details of Finding H-Canyon The Department of Energy's (Department) spent nuclear fuel Operations program at the Savannah River Site (Site) will likely require Extended H-Canyon to be maintained at least two years beyond defined operational needs. The Department committed to maintain H-Canyon operational readiness to provide a disposal path for

136

Microsoft Word - Fuel Cycle Subcomm report final v2.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the Fuel Cycle of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 15, 2011 Washington, D.C. Members: Burton Richter (Chairman) Darleane Hoffman Raymond Juzaitis Sekazi Mtingwa Ron Omberg Joy Rempe Dominique Warin Fuel Cycle Subcommittee Report 6/15/2011 2 I. Introduction and Summary The Fuel Cycle subcommittee of NEAC met April 25-26 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The main topics of discussion were the Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) disposal program, the System Study Program's methodology that is to be used to set priorities for R&D on advanced fuel cycles, and the University Programs. In addition to these, we were briefed on the budget, but have no comments other than a hope for a good outcome and restrict ourselves to general advice until more is known. A current complication in the design of the Fuel Cycle R&D FCRD program is the Blue

137

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2004 Annual Progress Report - Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Printable Version 2004 Annual Progress Report IV. Fuel Cells Each individual technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF for easier use. Download Adobe Reader. Fuel Cells Sub-Program Review, Patrick Davis, DOE (PDF 265 KB) A. MEAs and Catalysts Integrated Manufacturing for Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies, Emory DeCastro, De Nora (PDF 486 KB) Development of High-Temperature Membranes and Improved Cathode Catalysts Jeremy Meyers, UTC (PDF 595 KB) Advanced MEAs for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture, Mark Debe, 3M (PDF 372 KB) Back to Top B. Membranes and MEAs High Temperature Polymer Membranes for Fuel Cells, Tom Zawodzinski, Case West Res. University (PDF 356 KB) Electrodes for Hydrogen-Air PEM Fuel Cells, Francisco Uribe, LANL

138

NERSC Usage Demographics 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 NERSC Usage Demographics 2013 2013 NERSC Usage by Institution Type (MPP Hours in Millions) 2013 NERSC Usage by Discipline (MPP Hours in Millions) 2013 DOE & Other Lab Usage at...

139

FY 2012 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

911 911 Fuels & Lubricant Technologies VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE 2012 annual progress report U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2012 PROGRESS REPORT FOR FUEL & LUBRICANT TECHNOLOGIES Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Office Approved by Kevin Stork Team Leader, Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office June 2013 DOE/EE-0911 Acknowledgement We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Alliance Technical Services, Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for their technical and artistic contributions in preparing and publishing this report.

140

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

142

FY2001 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and QSS Group, Inc., for their artistic, editorial and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells

143

Fuel cycle analysis in a thorium fueled reactor using bidirectional fuel movement : correction to report MIT-2073-1, MITNE-51  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report corrects an error discovered in the code used in the study "Fuel Cycle Analysis in a Thorium Fueled Reactor Using Bidirectional Fuel Movement," MIT-2073-1, MITNE-51. The results of the correction show considerable ...

Stephen, James D.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

UC Libraries Academic e-Book Usage Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Libraries Academic e-Book Usage Survey Springer e-Book Pilotnot sure of their e-book usage. Of those reporting not usinge-journals. Variations in e-book usage in academic work are

Li, Chan; Poe, Felicia; Potter, Michele; Quigley, Brian; Wilson, Jacqueline

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Advanced Editor Usage Advanced Editor Usage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Editor Usage Advanced Editor Usage Log in and click the edit icon How to navigate of the events will seek the video to where that event starts Page 1 of 11 #12;Advanced Editor Usage How Editor Usage 3. Type in the new caption name, enter any searchable metadata and click OK (the thumbnail

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

146

2013 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review MeetingTransactions Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is charged with identifying promising sustainable fuel cycles and developing strategies for effective disposition of used fuel and high-level nuclear waste, enabling policymakers to make informed decisions about these critical issues. Sustainable fuel cycles will improve uranium resource utilization, maximize energy generation while minimizing waste, improve safety, and limit proliferation risk. To achieve its mission, FCT has initiated numerous activities in each of the technical campaign areas, of which this report provides a sample.

Not Listed

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Alternative Fuel Price Report December 27, 2002  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

27, 2002 27, 2002 his is the eighth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders during the weeks of October 21, October 28, and November 4, 2002, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in July, 2002. (In cases where respondents reported both October and November prices for a fuel, the November prices were used.) The prices contained within this report are meant to represent retail, at-the-pump sales prices for each fuel. In some cases, prices are collected from utilities or government facilities, where taxes are not included. In

148

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2008/fiscal year 2009.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Microsoft Word - SecureFuelsReport2011_DRAFT2.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Secure Fuels from Domestic Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources ______________________________________________________________________________ Profiles of Companies Engaged in Domestic Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource and Technology Development Prepared by INTEK, Inc. For the U.S. Department of Energy * Office of Petroleum Reserves Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Fifth Edition: September 2011 5 th Edition Secure Fuels From Domestic Resources ii September 2011 Fifth Edition Note to Readers Regarding the Revised Edition (September 2011) This report was originally prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in June 2007. The report and its contents

150

The Alternative Fuel Price Report December 30, 2003  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

December 30, 2003 December 30, 2003 his is the tenth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders during the weeks of December 1 and December 8, 2003, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in February, 2003. The prices contained within this report are meant to represent retail, at-the-pump sales prices for each fuel. In some cases, prices are collected from utilities or government facilities, where taxes are not included. In these instances, though government users may not be required to pay a tax on the fuel, standard federal and

151

The Alternative Fuel Price Report March 3, 2003  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

3, 2003 3, 2003 his is the ninth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders during the weeks of February 3, February 10, and February 17, 2003, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in October, 2002. The prices contained within this report are meant to represent retail, at-the-pump sales prices for each fuel. In some cases, prices are collected from utilities or government facilities, where taxes are not included. In these instances, though government users may not be required to pay a tax on the fuel, standard federal and

152

The Alternative Fuel Price Report - May 10, 2002  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic Gulf Coast West Coast Rocky Mountain Midwest Map of U.S. Regions THE ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT Alternative Fuel Prices Across the Nation May 10, 2002 his is the sixth issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the price of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders during the weeks of April 15 and April 22, 2002, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in February, 2002. Gasoline and Diesel Prices egular grade gasoline averaged $1.404 per gallon nationwide during the week of April

153

The Alternative Fuel Price Report: August 8, 2002  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

August 8, 2002 August 8, 2002 his is the seventh issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders during the weeks of July 15, July 22, and July 29, 2002, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in April, 2002. The prices contained within this report are meant to represent retail, at-the-pump sales prices for each fuel. In some cases, prices are collected from utilities or government facilities, where taxes are not included. In these instances, though government users may not be required to pay a tax on the fuel, standard federal and

154

The Alternative Fuel Price Report March 23, 2004  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

23, 2004 23, 2004 his is the eleventh issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly newsletter keeping you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered from Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders between March 3 and March 17, 2004, with comparisons to the prices in the previous Price Report, which were collected in December, 2003. The prices contained within this report are meant to represent retail, at-the-pump sales prices for each fuel. In some cases, prices are collected from utilities or government facilities, where taxes are not included. In these instances, though government users may not be required to pay a tax on the fuel, standard federal and

155

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 1 addresses the following technical barriers from the Hydrogen Production section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells Photoelectrodes ." #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 2

156

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2010 Annual Progress Report - Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Printable Version 2010 Annual Progress Report XI. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) This section of the 2010 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on the fuel cell technologies America Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Activitites, Sara Dillich, DOE Commercialization Effort for 1 W Consumer Electronics Power Pack, Charles Carlstrom, MTI Micro Fuel Cells, Inc. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxiliary Power Unit Demonstration, Steven Shaffer, Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC Highly Efficient, 5 kW CHP Fuel Cells Demonstrating Durability and Economic Value in Residential and Light Commercial Applications, John

157

National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Electric National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report K. Wipke, S. Sprik, J. Kurtz, T. Ramsden, C. Ainscough, and G. Saur Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-54860 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report K. Wipke, S. Sprik, J. Kurtz, T. Ramsden, C. Ainscough, and G. Saur Prepared under Task No. HT12.8110 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-54860 July 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

158

Liquid Fuels from Lignins: Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This task was initiated to assess the conversion of lignins into liquid fuels, primarily of lignins relevant to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes. The task was composed of a literature review of this area and an experimental part to obtain pertinent data on the conversion of lignins germane to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes.

Chum, H. L.; Johnson, D. K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fuel Cell Forklift Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addresses the DOE’s priorities related to acquiring data from real-world fuel cell operation, eliminating non-technical barriers, and increasing opportunities for market expansion of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. The project involves replacing the batteries in a complete fleet of class-1 electric lift trucks at FedEx Freight’s Springfield, MO parcel distribution center with 35 Plug Power GenDrive fuel cell power units. Fuel for the power units involves on-site hydrogen handling and dispensing equipment and liquid hydrogen delivery by Air Products. The project builds on FedEx Freight’s previous field trial experience with a handful of Plug Power’s GenDrive power units. Those trials demonstrated productivity gains and improved performance compared to battery-powered lift trucks. Full lift truck conversion at our Springfield location allows us to improve the competitiveness of our operations and helps the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and toxic battery material use. Success at this distribution center may lead to further fleet conversions at some of our distribution centers.

Cummings, Clifton C

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

NONE

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 Annual Progress Report 11 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. Hydrogen Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 II.0 Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 II.A Distributed BDL Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 II.A.1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

162

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report from the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop held May 8-9, 2011, in Arlington, Virginia. The body of the report focuses on the discussion that occurred within breakout sessions. The Executive Summary presents a few select highlights from each session.

163

2012 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Report 2012 Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transaction Report The United States must continue to ensure improvements and access to this technology so we can meet our economic, environmental and energy security goals. We rely on nuclear energy because it provides a consistent, reliable and stable source of base load electricity with an excellent safety record in the United States. In order to continue or expand the role for nuclear power in our long- term energy platform, the United States must: Continually improve the safety and security of nuclear energy and its associated technologies worldwide. Develop solutions for the transportation, storage, and long-term disposal of used nuclear fuel and associated wastes.

164

Assessment of the effect of low viscosity oils usage on a light duty diesel engine fuel consumption in stationary and transient conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regarding the global warming due to CO2 emissions, the crude oil depletion and its corresponding rising prices, \\{OEMs\\} are exploring different solutions to increase the internal combustion engine efficiency, among which, the use of Low Viscosity Oils (LVO) represents one attractive cost-effective way to accomplish this goal. Reported in terms of fuel consumption, the effect of LVO is round 2%, depending on the test conditions, especially if the test has taken place in laboratory or “on road” conditions. This study presents the fuel consumption benefits of a commercial 5W20, compared against higher SAE grade oils, on a light duty diesel engine, when it is running under motored test, stationary fired test and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC).

Vicente Macián; Bernardo Tormos; Vicente Bermúdez; Leonardo Ramírez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2011 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Alabama II.K.14 University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa: Protein-Templated Synthesis and Assembly of Nanostructuctures for Hydrogen Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 V.F.1 CFD Research Corporation: Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .814 V.F.1 ESI US R&D: Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .814 Arizona II.C.1 Arizona State University: Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water-Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen

166

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

85 85 FY 2011 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 3M Company V.B.1 Effect of System Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640 V.C.1 Membranes and MEAs for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 662 V.C.6 Novel Approaches to Immobilized Heteropoly Acid (HPA) Systems for High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Polymer-Type Membranes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 685 V.D.1 Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 699 V.D.3 Durable Catalysts for Fuel Cell Protection During Transient Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .714

167

Fuel Storage Facility Final Safety Analysis Report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) is an integral part of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Its purpose is to provide long-term storage (20-year design life) for spent fuel core elements used to provide the fast flux environment in FFTF, and for test fuel pins, components and subassemblies that have been irradiated in the fast flux environment. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and its supporting documentation provides a complete description and safety evaluation of the site, the plant design, operations, and potential accidents.

Linderoth, C.E.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy Department Announces $4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternativ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels Energy Department Announces 4.5 Million to Expand Usage of Alternative Fuels July 16, 2014 - 11:00am Addthis In support of...

170

Estimating Externalities of Natural Gas Fuel Cycles, Report 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes methods for estimating the external costs (and possibly benefits) to human health and the environment that result from natural gas fuel cycles. Although the concept of externalities is far from simple or precise, it generally refers to effects on individuals' well being, that result from a production or market activity in which the individuals do not participate, or are not fully compensated. In the past two years, the methodological approach that this report describes has quickly become a worldwide standard for estimating externalities of fuel cycles. The approach is generally applicable to any fuel cycle in which a resource, such as coal, hydro, or biomass, is used to generate electric power. This particular report focuses on the production activities, pollution, and impacts when natural gas is used to generate electric power. In the 1990s, natural gas technologies have become, in many countries, the least expensive to build and operate. The scope of this report is on how to estimate the value of externalities--where value is defined as individuals' willingness to pay for beneficial effects, or to avoid undesirable ones. This report is about the methodologies to estimate these externalities, not about how to internalize them through regulations or other public policies. Notwithstanding this limit in scope, consideration of externalities can not be done without considering regulatory, insurance, and other considerations because these institutional factors affect whether costs (and benefits) are in fact external, or whether they are already somehow internalized within the electric power market. Although this report considers such factors to some extent, much analysis yet remains to assess the extent to which estimated costs are indeed external. This report is one of a series of reports on estimating the externalities of fuel cycles. The other reports are on the coal, oil, biomass, hydro, and nuclear fuel cycles, and on general methodology.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

CHP Fuel Cell Durability Demonstration - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug Power has managed a demonstration project that has tested multiple units of its high-temperature, PEM fuel cell system in micro-combined heat and power (?-CHP) applications in California. The specific objective of the demonstration project was to substantiate the durability of GenSys Blue, and, thereby, verify its technology and commercial readiness for the marketplace. In the demonstration project, Plug Power, in partnership with the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and Sempra, will execute two major tasks: • Task 1: Internal durability/reliability fleet testing. Six GenSys Blue units will be built and will undergo an internal test regimen to estimate failure rates. This task was modified to include 3 GenSys Blue units installed in a lab at UCI. • Task 2: External customer testing. Combined heat and power units will be installed and tested in real-world residential and/or light commercial end user locations in California.

Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher J

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2005 Annual Progress Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Production Printable Version 2005 Annual Progress Report IV. Production This section of the 2005 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on production. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Hydrogen Production Overview, Peter Devlin, Department of Energy (PDF 158 KB) A. Distributed Reforming Autothermal Cyclic Reforming Based Hydrogen Generating and Dispensing System, Ravi Kumar, GE Global Research (PDF 215 KB) Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station, David E. Guro, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (PDF 209 KB) A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biogas, Greg Tao, Materials and Systems Research Inc. (PDF 336

173

2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Progress Report Posted  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office has posted the 2014 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Progress Report.

174

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Permit holder name/address Permit / N MMSI No. Y / N Present? Usage Water capacity (m3): Fuel capacity: m3 / tonnes Other: Other: Kw all that apply & note types of materials for each) Capacity: Usage Incinerator: Net mensuration Y / N

175

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2004 Annual Progress Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Education Education Printable Version 2004 Annual Progress Report VII. Education Each individual technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF for easier use. Download Adobe Reader. Education Sub-Program Review, Christy Cooper, DOE (PDF 283 KB) Determine Baseline Knowledge of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Tykey Truett , ORNL (PDF 262 KB) Fuel Cell Demonstration with On-site Generation of Hydrogen, Tim Turner, NC State University (PDF 212 KB) Washington State Fuel Cell Education and Demonstration Program, Mira Vowles, Central Washington Univ. (PDF 315 KB) Lansing Community College Alternative Energy Initiative, Ruth Borger, Lansing Community College (PDF 214 KB) Shared Technology Transfer Project, John Griffin, Nicholls State University (PDF 228 KB) Montana Hydrogen Futures Project, Paul Williamson, U. of Montana

176

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Annual Progress Report 1 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) conducts comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. The Program is coordinated across the Department of Energy (DOE or the Department), including activities in the offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE), and Fossil Energy (FE), and it is aligned with DOE's strategic vision and goals-its efforts will help to secure U.S. leadership in clean energy technologies and advance U.S. economic competitiveness and scientific innovation. With emphasis on applications that will most effectively strengthen our nation's energy security

177

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2012 Annual Progress Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manufacturing R&D Manufacturing R&D Printable Version 2012 Annual Progress Report VI. Manufacturing R&D This section of the 2012 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program focuses on manufacturing R&D. Manufacturing R&D Sub-Program Overview, Nancy Garland, U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly Manufacturing R&D, Michael Ulsh, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Manufacturing of Low-Cost, Durable Membrane Electrode Assemblies Engineered for Rapid Conditioning, Colin Busby, W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Adaptive Process Controls and Ultrasonics for High-Temperature PEM MEA Manufacture, Dan Walczyk, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Non-Contact Sensor Evaluation for Bipolar Plate Manufacturing Process Control and Smart Assembly of Fuel Cell Stacks, Eric Stanfield,

178

National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the US DOE’s Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration.

179

BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Second report evaluating a fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL published its first report on the demonstration in February 2014. This report is an update to the previous report; it covers 3 full years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2014 and focuses on the final experiences and lessons learned.

Eudy, L.; Post, M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates a fuel cell electric bus demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This evaluation report covers two years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2013.

Eudy, L.; Post, M.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Spent nuclear fuel project - criteria document spent nuclear fuel final safety analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The criteria document provides the criteria and planning guidance for developing the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, installation acceptance testing, startup, and operation of the SNF Project facilities (K Basins, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and Canister Storage Building).

MORGAN, R.G.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2011 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Printable Version 2011 Annual Progress Report The 2011 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2011. Published in November 2011, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Front Cover and Title Page Table of Contents I. Introduction, Sunita Satyapal, U.S. Department of Energy II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Bio-Derived Liquid Production Biomass Gasification Separations Hydrogen from Coal Electrolysis Hi-Temp Thermochemical Photoelectrochemical Biological Production Analysis Production Basic Energy Sciences III. Hydrogen Delivery IV. Hydrogen Storage Metal Hydride Chemical Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Sorption

184

fuel_oil.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Oil Usage Form Fuel Oil Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed report is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may c

185

Plate-Based Fuel Processing System Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-board reforming of liquid fuels into hydrogen is an enabling technology that could accelerate consumer usage of fuel cell powered vehicles. The technology would leverage the convenience of the existing gasoline fueling infrastructure while taking advantage of the fuel cell efficiency and low emissions. Commercial acceptance of on-board reforming faces several obstacles that include: (1) startup time, (2) transient response, and (3) system complexity (size, weight and cost). These obstacles are being addressed in a variety of projects through development, integration and optimization of existing fuel processing system designs. In this project, CESI investigated steam reforming (SR), water-gas-shift (WGS) and preferential oxidation (PrOx) catalysts while developing plate reactor designs and hardware where the catalytic function is integrated into a primary surface heat exchanger. The plate reactor approach has several advantages. The separation of the reforming and combustion streams permits the reforming reaction to be conducted at a higher pressure than the combustion reaction, thereby avoiding costly gas compression for combustion. The separation of the two streams also prevents the dilution of the reformate stream by the combustion air. The advantages of the plate reactor are not limited to steam reforming applications. In a WGS or PrOx reaction, the non-catalytic side of the plate would act as a heat exchanger to remove the heat generated by the exothermic WGS or PrOx reactions. This would maintain the catalyst under nearly isothermal conditions whereby the catalyst would operate at its optimal temperature. Furthermore, the plate design approach results in a low pressure drop, rapid transient capable and attrition-resistant reactor. These qualities are valued in any application, be it on-board or stationary fuel processing, since they reduce parasitic losses, increase over-all system efficiency and help perpetuate catalyst durability. In this program, CESI took the initial steam reforming plate-reactor concept and advanced it towards an integrated fuel processing system. A substantial amount of modeling was performed to guide the catalyst development and prototype hardware design and fabrication efforts. The plate-reactor mechanical design was studied in detail to establish design guidelines which would help the plate reactor survive the stresses of repeated thermal cycles (from start-ups and shut-downs). Integrated system performance modeling was performed to predict system efficiencies and determine the parameters with the most significant impact on efficiency. In conjunction with the modeling effort, a significant effort was directed towards catalyst development. CESI developed a highly active, sulfur tolerant, coke resistant, precious metal based reforming catalyst. CESI also developed its own non-precious metal based water-gas shift catalyst and demonstrated the catalysts durability over several thousands of hours of testing. CESI also developed a unique preferential oxidation catalyst capable of reducing 1% CO to < 10 ppm CO over a 35 C operating window through a single pass plate-based reactor. Finally, CESI combined the modeling results and steam reforming catalyst development efforts into prototype hardware. The first generation 3kW(e) prototype was fabricated from existing heat-exchanger plates to expedite the fabrication process. This prototype demonstrated steady state operation ranging from 5 to 100% load conditions. The prototype also demonstrated a 20:1 turndown ratio, 10:1 load transient operation and rapid start-up capability.

Carlos Faz; Helen Liu; Jacques Nicole; David Yee

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2004 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Printable Version 2004 Annual Progress Report The 2004 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D and analysis activities and accomplishments for FY 2004. Published in November 2004, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 203 KB) Table of Contents (PDF 432 KB) I. Introduction (PDF 350 KB) II. Hydrogen Production and Delivery Distributed Production Technologies Separations Biomass Gasification/Pyrolysis Photobiological Production Photoelectrochemical Production Electrolysis High-Temperature Thermochemical Processes Hydrogen Delivery Analysis III. Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid H2 Tanks Chemical Hydrides Metal Hydrides

187

Report of the DOE-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report of the DOE-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop Summary and Action Plan Report of the DOE-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop Summary and Action...

188

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy’s Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies program’s 2002 annual progress report.

189

Report Title: The Fossil Fuel Industry in New Mexico: A Comprehensive Impact Analysis Type of Report: Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuels 33 Summary Impacts 40 Works Cited 45 #12;3 List of Tables Table Title Page 1 Tax and Income Data0 Report Title: The Fossil Fuel Industry in New Mexico: A Comprehensive Impact Analysis Type AWARD Number: DE-NT0004397 Name and Address of Submitting Organization: Arrowhead Center New Mexico

Johnson, Eric E.

190

Winter fuels report, week ending November 30, 1990. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cites; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

Computer usage control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Article Computer usage control M. M. Lehman * Department of Computing and Control, Imperial...integrated multiple-computer, multiple operating systems, pricing and usage control mechanism. The original version described in this paper, was......

M. M. Lehman

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Usage Statistics By Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Usage Statistics Usage Statistics Genepool Cluster Statistics Period: daily weekly monthly quarter yearly 2year Utilization By Group Jobs Pending Last edited: 2013-09-26 18:21:13...

193

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2011 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program A Aceves, Salvador . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . III.14, VIII.13 Adams, Michael. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II.K.3 Adams, Thad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . III.6 Adzic, Radoslav . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V.D.6 Ahluwalia, Rajesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IV.E.2, V.A.3 Ahmed, Shabbir. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XI.12 Allen, Philip. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II.K.16 Allendorf, Mark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IV.A.8 Anton, Don . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IV.A.1, IV.D.1 Arif, Muhammad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V.A.5

194

ClearFuels-Rentech Integrated Biorefinery Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project Final Report describes the validation of the performance of the integration of two technologies that were proven individually on a pilot scale and were demonstrated as a pilot scale integrated biorefinery. The integrated technologies were a larger scale ClearFuels’ (CF) advanced flexible biomass to syngas thermochemical high efficiency hydrothermal reformer (HEHTR) technology with Rentech’s (RTK) existing synthetic gas to liquids (GTL) technology.

Pearson, Joshua [Project Director

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Renewable wood fuel: Fuel feed system for a pulverized coal boiler. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates a pilot test program conducted by New York State Gas & Electric Corporation to evaluate the feasibility of co-firing a pulverized coal plant with renewable wood fuels. The goal was to establish that such a co-firing system can reduce air emissions while maintaining good operational procedures and cost controls. The test fuel feed system employed at Greenidge Station`s Boiler 6 was shown to be effective in feeding wood products. Emission results were promising and an economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to pursue further refinements to the equipment and systems. The report recommends further evaluation of the generation and emission impacts using woods of varied moisture contents and at varied Btu input rates to determine if a drying system would be a cost-effective option.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Usage Codes Vessel name  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Vessel name Int'l radio call sign (IRCS) Generator Other: Max hoisting Sonar Power (Kw) KHz: KHz: VMS Usage Y / N GPS: Internal / external KHz: KHz: Ratio Accuracy (m Incinerator: Burned on board: Net sensors Hull mounted / towed Wired / wireless Y / N Y / N Usage Manufacturer

197

Usage Codes Additional Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Additional Information Winches (on deck) Electronics RPM: Max hoistingPresent? Usage Model Ratio Accuracy (m) Type: Electric / Hydraulic / Other _________________ KHz: GPS: Internal Other: Y / N Other: Y / N Y / NOther: Hydrophone Burned on board: Net sensors Usage Manufacturer High

198

Estimating Fuel Cycle Externalities: Analytical Methods and Issues, Report 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities that produce electric power typically range from extracting and transporting a fuel, to its conversion into electric power, and finally to the disposition of residual by-products. This chain of activities is called a fuel cycle. A fuel cycle has emissions and other effects that result in unintended consequences. When these consequences affect third parties (i.e., those other than the producers and consumers of the fuel-cycle activity) in a way that is not reflected in the price of electricity, they are termed ''hidden'' social costs or externalities. They are the economic value of environmental, health and any other impacts, that the price of electricity does not reflect. How do you estimate the externalities of fuel cycles? Our previous report describes a methodological framework for doing so--called the damage function approach. This approach consists of five steps: (1) characterize the most important fuel cycle activities and their discharges, where importance is based on the expected magnitude of their externalities, (2) estimate the changes in pollutant concentrations or other effects of those activities, by modeling the dispersion and transformation of each pollutant, (3) calculate the impacts on ecosystems, human health, and any other resources of value (such as man-made structures), (4) translate the estimates of impacts into economic terms to estimate damages and benefits, and (5) assess the extent to which these damages and benefits are externalities, not reflected in the price of electricity. Each step requires a different set of equations, models and analysis. Analysts generally believe this to be the best approach for estimating externalities, but it has hardly been used! The reason is that it requires considerable analysis and calculation, and to this point in time, the necessary equations and models have not been assembled. Equally important, the process of identifying and estimating externalities leads to a number of complex issues that also have not been fully addressed. This document contains two types of papers that seek to fill part of this void. Some of the papers describe analytical methods that can be applied to one of the five steps of the damage function approach. The other papers discuss some of the complex issues that arise in trying to estimate externalities. This report, the second in a series of eight reports, is part of a joint study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commission of the European Communities (EC)* on the externalities of fuel cycles. Most of the papers in this report were originally written as working papers during the initial phases of this study. The papers provide descriptions of the (non-radiological) atmospheric dispersion modeling that the study uses; reviews much of the relevant literature on ecological and health effects, and on the economic valuation of those impacts; contains several papers on some of the more complex and contentious issues in estimating externalities; and describes a method for depicting the quality of scientific information that a study uses. The analytical methods and issues that this report discusses generally pertain to more than one of the fuel cycles, though not necessarily to all of them. The report is divided into six parts, each one focusing on a different subject area.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

HTGR Fuel Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the technical accomplishments of the HTGR Fuel Technology Program at GA Technologies Inc. during the first half of FY 83. The activities include the fuel process, fuel materials, fuel cycle, fission product transport, core component verification, and core technology transfer tasks necessary to support the design and development of a steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ris Energy Report 3 Interest in the hydrogen economy and in fuel cells has  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Risø Energy Report 3 Interest in the hydrogen economy and in fuel cells has increased used for natural gas. Existing fuel cells can convert hydrogen efficiently into electric power. Emerging fuel cell technologies can do the same for other hydrogen-rich fuels, while generating little

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluation of coal-derived liquids as boiler fuels. Volume 1. Comprehensive report. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived liquid (CDL) fuels was conducted on a utility boiler located at the Plant Sweatt Electric Generating Station of Mississippi Power Company in Meridian, Mississippi. The test program was conducted in two phases which are distinguished by the level of the test effort. The first phase included the combustion tests of the two conventional fuels used at the station (natural gas and No. 6 fuel oil) and three coal-derived liquid fuels (Solvent Refined Coal-II full range distillate, H-Coal heavy distillate and H-Coal blended distillate). Boiler performance monitoring included measurements for fuel steam and flue gas flow, pressure, temperature, and heat absorption, resulting in a calculated combustion efficiency, boiler efficiency, and heat rate. Emissions measurements included oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, sulfur trioxide, acid dewpoint, particulate mass, size distribution and morphology, chlorides, and opacity. In general, no adverse boiler performance effects were encountered with the combustion of the CDL fuels. The test program demonstrated the general suitability of CDL fuels for use in existing oil-fired utility boilers. No significant boiler tube surface modifications will be required. With the exception of NO/sub x/ emissions, the CDL fuels will be expected to have lower levels of stack emissions compared to a conventional No. 6 fuel oil. NO/sub x/ emissions will be controllable to EPA standards with the application of conventional combustion modification techniques. Volume 1, of a five-volume report, contains a comprehensive report of the entire test program. 43 figs., 19 tabs.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Characterization of Fuel Cell Materials - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Karren L. More Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 1 Bethel Valley Rd. Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 Phone: (865) 574-7788 Email: morekl1@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov Contributors: * David Cullen (ORNL) * Miaofang Chi (ORNL) * Kelly Perry (ORNL) Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) Year 1999 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop and/or apply novel preparation, imaging, and * analytical methods to characterize fuel cell materials and architectures in the as-processed (fresh) state, during

203

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2010 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Printable Version 2010 Annual Progress Report The 2010 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2010. Published in February 2011, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Front Cover Table of Contents I. Introduction, Sunita Satyapal, U.S. Department of Energy II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Bio-Derived Liquid Production Biomass Gasification Separations Hydrogen from Coal Electrolysis Hi-Temp Thermochemical Photoelectrochemical Biological Production Cross-Cutting/Production III. Hydrogen Delivery IV. Hydrogen Storage Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence

204

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2009 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Printable Version 2009 Annual Progress Report The 2009 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2009. Published in November 2009, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 1.2 MB) Table of Contents (PDF 318 KB) I. Introduction, Sunita Satyapal, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 1.5 MB) II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids Biomass Gasification Separations Hydrogen from Coal Electrolysis Hi-Temp Thermochemical Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Photoelectrochemical Biological Cross-Cutting/Production III. Hydrogen Delivery IV. Hydrogen Storage Metal Hydride Center of Excellence

205

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2008 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 Printable Version 2008 Annual Progress Report The 2008 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2008. Published in November 2008, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 1.2 MB) Table of Contents (PDF 180 KB) I. Introduction, JoAnn Milliken, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 980 KB) II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids Electrolysis Separations Biomass Gasification Photoelectrochemical Biological Production Hydrogen From Coal Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Hi-Temp Thermochemical Cross-Cutting Basic Energy Sciences III. Hydrogen Delivery IV. Hydrogen Storage

206

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2007 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Printable Version 2007 Annual Progress Report The 2007 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2007. Published in November 2007, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 711 KB) Table of Contents (PDF 236 KB) I. Introduction, JoAnn Milliken, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 821 KB) II. Hydrogen Production Distributed Production from Natural Gas Distributed Production from Bio-Derived Liquids Electrolysis Separations Central Biomass Gasification Solar Hi-Temp Thermochemical Water Splitting Photoelectrochemical Biological Production Hydrogen from Coal Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative

207

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2006 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Printable Version 2006 Annual Progress Report The 2006 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments for FY 2006. Published in November 2006, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 226 KB) Table of Contents (PDF 346 KB) I. Introduction, JoAnn Milliken, Acting Program Manager, DOE Hydrogen Program (PDF 369 KB) II. Production Distributed Reforming Hydrogen from Coal Separations Biomass Reforming Biological Production Photoelectrochemical Nuclear Energy Electrolysis High-Temperature Thermochemical III. Delivery Pipelines Liquefaction Analysis Storage Tanks Cross-Cutting IV. Storage Metal Hydrides

208

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2005 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Printable Version 2005 Annual Progress Report The 2005 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D and analysis activities and accomplishments for FY 2005. Published in November 2005, the full document is very large; each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Front Cover (PDF 127 KB) Table of Contents (PDF 401 KB) I. Introduction, Steve Chalk, Department of Energy (PDF 911 KB) II. Basic Research, Harriet Kung, Department of Energy (PDF 1.46 MB) III. Systems Analysis IV. Production Distributed Reforming Hydrogen from Coal Separations Biomass Reforming Biological Production Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen from Nuclear Energy Electrolysis High-temperature Thermochemical

209

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2006 Annual Progress Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Education Education Printable Version 2006 Annual Progress Report IX. Education This section of the 2006 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on education. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Education Sub-Program Overview, Christy Cooper, Education Team Lead, DOE Hydrogen Program (PDF 173 KB) Baseline Knowledge Assessment of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Tykey Truett, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (PDF 77 KB) Hydrogen/Alternative Energy Center, Ruth Borger, Lansing Community College (PDF 96 KB) Hydrogen Futures Park at University of Montana, Paul Williamson, University of Montana (PDF 158 KB) Hydrogen Technology and Energy Curriculum (HyTEC), Barbara Nagle, Univeristy of California, Berkeley (PDF 359 KB)

210

Microsoft Word - Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2011 8-17-11  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

July 2011 July 2011 Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report July 2011 Page 2 WELCOME! Welcome to the July 2011 issue of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, a quarterly report designed to keep you up to date on the prices of alternative fuels and conventional fuels in the U.S. This issue summarizes prices that were collected between July 14, 2011 and July 29, 2011 from Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other Clean Cities stakeholders. METHODOLOGY In order to collect price information for both alternative fuels and conventional fuels from areas across the country, Clean Cities Coordinators, fuel providers, and other key stakeholders were contacted to request that they provide prices for fuels in their area on a voluntary basis. Prices were

211

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities and progress are reported in: liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction (enhanced recovery of oil and gas), processing (of petroleum and alternate fuels), utilization (transportation and energy conversion), and systems integration. BETC publications and finances are listed in appendices. (DLC)

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fact #591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel Economy by Speed  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Seven vehicles were tested by Consumer Reports recently to determine the fuel economy of the vehicles at a given speed. For these vehicles, the decline in fuel economy from a speed of 55 miles per...

213

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group The Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation IV goals and (2) identify key fuel cycle issues associated with Generation IV goals. This included examination of "fuel resource inputs and waste outputs for the range of potential Generation IV fuel cycles, consistent with projected energy demand scenarios." This report summarizes the results of the studies. The membership of the FCCG comprised 8 US members and 7 members from Generation IV International Forum (GIF) countries including members from

214

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

Pivovar, B.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Problems 1) Explain why the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle is not as efficient as the reported "tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Problems 1) Explain why the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle is not as efficient as the reported "tank to wheel" efficiencies would suggest. Hydrogen must be produced, stored, and transported to heat and leaking of hydrogen in the atmosphere. Additionally it takes power to produce hydrogen

Bowen, James D.

216

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This is the first National Report prepared under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Managementi hereafter referred to as the "Joint Convention". This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management - May 2003

217

APS LOM Shop Usage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOM Shop Usage User Shop Access - Policies and Procedures User Shop Orientation User Shop Authorization Certification Form User Shop Access List LOM Shop Monthly Inspection Record...

218

Interpreting Standard Usage Empirically.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Writers, editors, and everyday language users look to dictionaries, style guides, usage guides, and other published works to help inform their language decisions. They want… (more)

Frandsen, Jacob F.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Winter fuels report: Week ending October 19, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on the US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 pm on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB).

Not Available

1990-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Fuel Cell Report to the Congress (ESECS EE-1973) February 2003...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cell Report to the Congress (ESECS EE-1973) February 2003 Fuel Cell Report to the Congress (ESECS EE-1973) February 2003 This report is one of two that Congress has asked the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC The Fuel Cycle subcommittee of NEAC met April 25-26 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The main topics of discussion were the Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) disposal program, the System Study Program's methodology that is to be used to set priorities for R&D on advanced fuel cycles, and the University Programs. In addition to these, we were briefed on the budget, but have no comments other than a hope for a good outcome and restrict ourselves to general advice until more is known. A current complication in the design of the Fuel Cycle R&D FCRD program is the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) which has been created to address the issues involved in long term disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and any of

222

June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC June 2011, Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC The Fuel Cycle subcommittee of NEAC met April 25-26 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The main topics of discussion were the Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) disposal program, the System Study Program's methodology that is to be used to set priorities for R&D on advanced fuel cycles, and the University Programs. In addition to these, we were briefed on the budget, but have no comments other than a hope for a good outcome and restrict ourselves to general advice until more is known. A current complication in the design of the Fuel Cycle R&D FCRD program is the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) which has been created to address the issues involved in long term disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and any of

223

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This second National Report updates the first National Report published on May 3, 2003, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel (SF) and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel

224

Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location.

225

Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes operations at Alameda-Contra Costa Transit district for three protoype fuel cell buses and six diesel buses operating from the same location.

226

Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program progress report, 1 October-31 December 1979. [HEF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported in four areas: process research and development, engineering research, engineering systems, technical support, and HTGR fuel reprocessing. (DLC)

Unger, W.E. (comp.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel-Cell Commercialization Working Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

Penner, S.S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department released three new reports showcasing strong growth across the U.S. fuel cell and hydrogen technologies market.

229

Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report- Appendices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes operations at Alameda-Contra Costa Transit district for three protoype fuel cell buses and six diesel buses operating from the same location.

230

Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report 113 V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1 A. High-Performance, Matching PEM Fuel Cell Components and Integrated Pilot Manufacturing Processes Mark K polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell components and pilot manufacturing processes to facilitate

231

New Report Describes Joint Opportunities for Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Markets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sandia National Laboratories, supported by the DOE’s Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Offices, recently released the workshop report “Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles.” Held in September 2014, the workshop considered common opportunities and challenges in expanding the use of hydrogen and natural gas as transportation fuels.

232

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth December 19, 2013 - 11:36am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department released three new reports today showcasing strong growth across the U.S. fuel cell and hydrogen technologies market - continuing America's leadership in clean energy innovation and providing U.S. businesses more affordable, cleaner transportation and power options. According to these reports, the United States continues to be one of the world's largest and fastest growing markets for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. In 2012, nearly 80 percent of total investment in the global fuel cell industry was made in U.S.

233

Winter fuels report week ending, October 22, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`S; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2011 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program α-AlH 3 Alpha polymorph of aluminum hydride ~ Approximately @ At °C Degrees Celsius °F Degrees Fahrenheit Δ Change, delta ΔG Gibbs free energy of reaction ΔH Enthalpy of reaction, Enthalpy of hydrogenation ΔH° f standard heat of formation ΔK Stress intensity factor ΔP Pressure drop, pressure change ≈ Equals approximately > Greater than ≥ Greater than or equal to < Less than ≤ Less than or equal to µCHX Microscale combustor/heat exchanger µc-Si Microcrystalline silicon µm Micrometer(s), micron(s) η Viscosity # Number Ω Ohm(s) Ω/cm 2 Ohm(s) per square centimeter Ω-cm 2 Ohm-square centimeter % Percent ® Registered trademark $ United States dollars 11 B-NMR Boron 11 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

235

Winter fuels report, week ending October 4, 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for PADD's 1, 2, and 3; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 37 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Winter fuels report week ending February 1, 1991. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) 1, 2 and 3; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United states and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United states and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 34 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1991-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

238

Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Stephen Grot Ion Power Incorporated 720 Governor Lea Rd New Castle, DE 19720-5501 Phone: (302) 832 9550 Email: s.grot@ion-power.com DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Thomas Benjamin Phone: (630) 252-1632 Email: benjamin@anl.gov Subcontractors: * Graftech International Holdings Inc., Parma, OH * General Motors Corporation, Flint, MI Contract Number: DE-EE0000462 Project Start Date: September 1, 2010 Project End Date: February 28, 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives

239

FY 2012 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies  

Energy Savers [EERE]

For example, oil-sand-derived fuels from Canada, Fischer-Tropsch fuels made from natural gas, and biofuels derived from fats and vegetable oils will play increasingly important...

240

FY 2010 Annual Report Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FY 2010 Annual Report FY 2010 Annual Report Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program I. IntroductIon 2 Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program FY 2010 Annual Report 3 FY 2010 Annual Report Office of Fossil Energy Fuel Cell Program Competitive Innovation: Accelerating Technology Development The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and in collaboration with private industry, universities and national laboratories, has forged Government-industry partnerships under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) to reduce the cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This fuel cell technology shall form the basis for integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems utilizing coal for clean and efficient

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report, November 2010, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2009 FUEL CELL 2009 FUEL CELL MARKET REPORT NOVEMBER 2010 Authors This report was written primarily by Bill Vincent of the Breakthrough Technologies Institute in Washington, DC, with significant assistance from Jennifer Gangi, Sandra Curtin, and Elizabeth Delmont. Acknowledgement This report was the result of hard work and valuable contributions from government staff and the fuel cell industry. The authors especially wish to thank Sunita Satyapal, Nancy Garland and the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program for their support and guidance in the preparation of this report. The authors also wish to thank Robert Rose and Robert Wichert of the U.S. Fuel Cell Council, Lisa Callaghan-Jerram of Fuel Cell Today Consulting, Rachel Gelman of the National

242

Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Derivative Usage and Performance Volatility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Derivative usage that reduces return volatility is frequently termed hedging, and derivative usage that increases return volatility is called speculation. ... reduce or increase their return volatility with deriv...

Weiying Jia; Yi Kang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - Monitoring System Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), along with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Pubic Service (APS), is monitoring the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant to determine the costs to produce hydrogen fuels (including 100% hydrogen as well as hydrogen and compressed natural gas blends) for use by fleets and other operators of advanced-technology vehicles. The hydrogen fuel cost data will be used as benchmark data by technology modelers as well as research and development programs. The Pilot Plant can produce up to 18 kilograms (kg) of hydrogen per day by electrolysis. It can store up to 155 kg of hydrogen at various pressures up to 6,000 psi. The dispenser island can fuel vehicles with 100% hydrogen at 5,000 psi and with blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas at 3,600 psi. The monitoring system was designed to track hydrogen delivery to each of the three storage areas and to monitor the use of electricity on all major equipment in the Pilot Plant, including the fuel dispenser island. In addition, water used for the electrolysis process is monitored to allow calculation of the total cost of plant operations and plant efficiencies. The monitoring system at the Pilot Plant will include about 100 sensors when complete (50 are installed to date), allowing for analysis of component, subsystems, and plant-level costs. The monitoring software is mostly off-the-shelve, with a custom interface. The majority of the sensors input to the Programmable Automation Controller as 4- to 20-mA analog signals. The plant can be monitored over of the Internet, but the control functions are restricted to the control room equipment. Using the APS general service plan E32 electric rate of 2.105 cents per kWh, during a recent eight-month period when 1,200 kg of hydrogen was produced and the plant capacity factor was 26%, the electricity cost to produce one kg of hydrogen was $3.43. However, the plant capacity factor has been increasing, with a recent one-month high of 49%. If a plant capacity factor of 70% can be achieved with the present equipment, the cost of electricity would drop to $2.39 per kg of hydrogen. In this report, the power conversion (76.7%), cell stack (53.1%), and reverse osmosis system (7.14%) efficiencies are also calculated, as is the water cost per kg of hydrogen produced ($0.10 per kg). The monitoring system has identified several areas having the potential to lower costs, including using an reverse osmosis system with a higher efficiency, improving the electrolysis power conversion efficiency, and using air cooling to replace some or all chiller cooling. These activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory for the AVTA, which is part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort; Dimitri Hochard

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Fourth United States of America (U.S.) National Report updates the Third Report published in October 2008, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the U.S. through June 2011. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the U.S.

246

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Third United States National Report updates the second National Report published in October 2005, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management 1(Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the United States through September 2008. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within

247

Robotics and Energy Usage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is commonly assumed that the use of robots in an industrial plant will cut energy usage, because robots require no heat, light, or air conditioning in their work space. However, in analyzing industrial installations, we have found that...

Hershey, R. L.; Fenton, S. E.; Letzt, A. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Storage Project Fuel Basket Handling Grapple Design Development Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acceptance testing of the SNF Fuel Basket Lift Grapple was accomplished to verify the design adequacy. This report shows the results affirming the design. The test was successful in demonstrating the adequacy of the grapple assembly's inconel actuator shaft and engagement balls for in loads excess of design basis loads (3200 pounds), 3X design basis loads (9600 pounds), and 5X design basis loads (16,000 pounds). The test data showed that no appreciable yielding for the inconel actuator shaft and engagement balls at loads in excess of 5X Design Basis loads. The test data also showed the grapple assembly and components to be fully functional after loads in excess of 5X Design Basis were applied and maintained for over 10 minutes. Following testing, each actuator shaft (Item 7) was liquid penetrant inspected per ASME Section 111, Division 1 1989 and accepted per requirements of NF-5350. This examination was performed to insure that no cracking had occurred. The test indicated that no cracking had occurred. The examination reports are included as Appendix C to this document. From this test, it is concluded that the design configuration meets or exceeds the requirements specified in ANSI N 14 6 for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10,000 Pounds (4500 kg) or More.

CHENAULT, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A proliferation resistant hexagonal tight lattice BWR fueled core for increased burnup and reduced fuel storage requirements. Annual progress report: August, 1999 to July, 2000 [DOE NERI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

(OAK/B204) A proliferation resistant hexagonal tight lattice BWR fueled core for increased burnup and reduced fuel storage requirements. Annual progress report: August, 1999 to July, 2000 [DOE NERI

Hiroshi Takahashi; Upendra Rohatgi; T.J. Downar

2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

252

Calculating and reporting changes in net heat of combustion of wood fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is often confusion when reporting net heat of combustion changes in wood fuel due to changes in moisture content (MC) of the fuel. This paper was written to identify and clarify the bases on which changes in net heat of combustion can be calculated. Formulae for calculating changes in net heat of combustion of wood fuel due to MC changes are given both on a per unit weight of fuel basis and on an actual gain basis. Examples which illustrate the difference in the two reporting approaches, as well as the importance of both approaches, are presented. (Refs. 7).

Harris, R.A.; McMinn, J.W.; Payne, F.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

254

Annual Report: Advanced Energy Systems Fuel Cells (30 September 2013)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The comprehensive research plan for Fuel Cells focused on Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) programmatic targets and included objectives in two primary and focused areas: (1) investigation of degradation modes exhibited by the anode/electrolyte/cathode (AEC), development of computational models describing the associated degradation rates, and generation of a modeling tool predicting long term AEC degradation response; and (2) generation of novel electrode materials and microstructures and implementation of the improved electrode technology to enhance performance. In these areas, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Regional University Alliance (RUA) team has completed and reported research that is significant to the SECA program, and SECA continued to engage all SECA core and SECA industry teams. Examination of degradation in an operational solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) requires a logical organization of research effort into activities such as fundamental data gathering, tool development, theoretical framework construction, computational modeling, and experimental data collection and validation. Discrete research activity in each of these categories was completed throughout the year and documented in quarterly reports, and researchers established a framework to assemble component research activities into a single operational modeling tool. The modeling framework describes a scheme for categorizing the component processes affecting the temporal evolution of cell performance, and provides a taxonomical structure of known degradation processes. The framework is an organizational tool that can be populated by existing studies, new research completed in conjunction with SECA, or independently obtained. The Fuel Cell Team also leveraged multiple tools to create cell performance and degradation predictions that illustrate the combined utility of the discrete modeling activity. Researchers first generated 800 continuous hours of SOFC experimental data capturing operational degradation. The data were matched by a 3D multi-physics simulation of SOFC operational performance assuming that the entire performance loss related to coarsening of the cathode triple phase boundary (3PB). The predicted 3PB coarsening was then used to tune the mobility parameters of a phase field model describing microstructural evolution of the lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM)/ yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) system. Once calibrated, the phase field model predicted continuous microstructural coarsening processes occurring over the operating period, which could be extrapolated to performance periods of longer duration and also used to produce 3D graphical representations. NETL researchers also completed significant electrode engineering research complimented by 3D multi-physics simulations. In one key activity researchers generated an illustration demonstrating that control of infiltrate deposition can provide cell manufacturers with significant additional operational and engineering control over the SOFC stack. Specifically, researchers demonstrated that by engineering the deposition of electrocatalyst inside the cathode, the distribution of overpotential across the cell could be controlled to either decrease the average cell overpotential value or minimize cross-cell overpotential gradient. Results imply that manufacturers can establish improved engineering control over stack operation by implementing infiltration technology in SOFC cathodes.

Gerdes, Kirk; Richards, George

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, October, 2014  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

calculation uses the nominal lower heating values in BTUs per gallon of fuel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Transportation Energy Data Book. 5 Prices for the...

256

Title: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, July, 2014  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

calculation uses the nominal lower heating values in BTUs per gallon of fuel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Transportation Energy Data Book. 5 Prices for the...

257

Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report ? January 2014  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

calculation uses the nominal lower heating values in BTUs per gallon of fuel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Transportation Energy Data Book. 4 Prices for the...

258

Title: Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Price Report, April, 2014  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

calculation uses the nominal lower heating values in BTUs per gallon of fuel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Transportation Energy Data Book. 5 Prices for the...

259

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alcohol Fuel Applications and Power Ranges Application Description Power Range Military Remote sensor <10 W Soldier power 20-50 W Battery charger 300 W Commercial Consumer...

260

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle (FC) Subcommittee of NEAC met February 7-8, 2012 in Washington (Drs. Hoffmann and Juzaitis were unable to attend). While the meeting was originally scheduled to occur after the submission of the President's FY 2013 budget, the submission was delayed a week; thus, we could have no discussion on balance in the NE program. The Agenda is attached as Appendix A. The main focus of the meeting was on accident tolerant fuels, an important post Fukushima issue, and on issues related to the report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) as related to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Final Progress Report, Renewable and Logistics Fuels for Fuel Cells at the Colorado School of Mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to advance the current state of technology of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to improve performance when operating on renewable and logistics hydrocarbon fuel streams. Outcomes will include: 1.) new SOFC materials and architectures that address the technical challenges associated with carbon-deposit formation and sulfur poisoning; 2.) new integration strategies for combining fuel reformers with SOFCs; 3.) advanced modeling tools that bridge the scales of fundamental charge-transfer chemistry to system operation and control; and 4.) outreach through creation of the Distinguished Lecturer Series to promote nationwide collaboration with fuel-cell researchers and scientists.

Sullivan, Neal P

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

A portal for visualizing grid usage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a framework for measuring the use of Grid services and exposing simple summary data to an authorized set of Grid users through a JSR168-enabled portal. The sensor framework has been integrated into the Globus Toolkit and allows Grid administrators to have access to a mechanism helping with report and usage statistics. Although the original focus was the reporting of actions in relationship to GridFTP services, the usage service has been expanded to report also on the use of other Grid services.

von Laszewski, G.; DiCarlo, J.; Allcock, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

2007-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Compare All CBECS Activities: Fuel Oil Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of fuel oil in 1999. Only six building types had any statistically significant fuel oil usage, with education buildings using the most total fuel oil. Figure showing total fuel oil...

264

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report This report summarizes the introduction and utilization of E95 buses and E95 pumps in the region of La Spezia (Italy) within the framework of the BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST) project. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Avoid - Cut the need for travel Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies

265

Simulated coal-gas fueled carbonate fuel cell power plant system verification. Final report, September 1990--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed under U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) Contract DE-AC-90MC27168 for September 1990 through March 1995. Energy Research Corporation (ERC), with support from DOE, EPRI, and utilities, has been developing a carbonate fuel cell technology. ERC`s design is a unique direct fuel cell (DFC) which does not need an external fuel reformer. An alliance was formed with a representative group of utilities and, with their input, a commercial entry product was chosen. The first 2 MW demonstration unit was planned and construction begun at Santa Clara, CA. A conceptual design of a 10OMW-Class dual fuel power plant was developed; economics of natural gas versus coal gas use were analyzed. A facility was set up to manufacture 2 MW/yr of carbonate fuel cell stacks. A 100kW-Class subscale power plant was built and several stacks were tested. This power plant has achieved an efficiency of {approximately}50% (LHV) from pipeline natural gas to direct current electricity conversion. Over 6,000 hours of operation including 5,000 cumulative hours of stack operation were demonstrated. One stack was operated on natural gas at 130 kW, which is the highest carbonate fuel cell power produced to date, at 74% fuel utilization, with excellent performance distribution across the stack. In parallel, carbonate fuel cell performance has been improved, component materials have been proven stable with lifetimes projected to 40,000 hours. Matrix strength, electrolyte distribution, and cell decay rate have been improved. Major progress has been achieved in lowering stack cost.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This FY 2003 Progress Report presents a description of the fuel cell and hydrogen research conducted by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program in fiscal year 2003 (FY 2003), projects to be implemented in FY 2004, and the research priorities for FY 2004.

267

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

268

BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

energy: 47 kWh Accessories Electrical Fuel storage Eight roof mounted, Dynetek, type 3 tanks; 5,000 psi rated; 56 kg hydrogen (useful) Range 5 337-381 km (210-237 miles) Bus...

269

BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

energy: 47 kWh Accessories Electrical Fuel storage Eight roof mounted, Dynetek, type 3 tanks; 5,000 psi rated; 56 kg hydrogen (useable) Range 7 337-381 km (210-237 miles) Bus...

270

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XVII-1 XVII-1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Alabama V.F.5 CFD Research Corporation: Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V-226 V.F.5 ESI US R&D: Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V-226 Arizona VI.3 Arizona State University: Adaptive Process Controls and Ultrasonics for High-Temperature PEM MEA Manufacture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VI-17 Arkansas XII.4 FedEx Freight: Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck FedEx Freight Fleet Deployment .

271

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

272

2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report, June 2011, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT JUNE 2011 i Authors This report was a collaborative effort by staff of the Breakthrough Technologies Institute, Inc., in Washington, DC. Acknowledgement The authors relied upon the hard work and valuable contributions of many men and women in government and in the fuel cell industry. The authors especially wish to thank Sunita Satyapal, Nancy Garland and the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program for their support and guidance in the preparation of this report. The authors also wish to thank Lisa Callaghan- Jerram of Pike Research and Rachel Gelman of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the many others who made this report possible. ii Contents List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................... iv

273

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee Biennial Report to the Secretary of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Fuel Cell and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee Biennial Report to the Secretary of Energy A Letter Report Prepared by the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee Covering Activities of October 2006 to August 2007 Fulfilling the Requirements of the 2005 Energy Policy Act, Section 807 of Title VIII, Hydrogen September 10, 2007 September 10, 2007 The Honorable Samuel W. Bodman Secretary of Energy 7A-257 Forrestal Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Secretary: On behalf of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC or Committee), we are pleased to submit for your consideration our first report. This letter report summarizes the Committee's findings and recommendations developed during the period October 2006 -

274

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the progress over the course of 2013 made on the research and development projects funded by the Fuel and Lubricants subprogram in the Vehicle Technologies Office.

275

EM Prepares Report for Convention on Safety of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM supported DOE in its role as the lead technical agency to produce a report recently for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management.

276

Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress accomplished for the quarter ending December 1982 is reported for the following research areas: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (technology assessment, gas research, oil research); liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); utilization; and project integration and technology transfer. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth December 19, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The Energy Department released three new reports today showcasing...

278

Final Technical Report: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration by the Delaware County Electric Cooperative, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This demonstration project contributes to the knowledge base in the area of fuel cells in stationary applications, propane fuel cells, edge-of-grid applications for fuel cells, and energy storage in combination with fuel cells. The project demonstrated that it is technically feasible to meet the whole-house electrical energy needs of a typical upstate New York residence with a 5-kW fuel cell in combination with in-home energy storage without any major modifications to the residence or modifications to the consumption patterns of the residents of the home. The use of a fuel cell at constant output power through a 120-Volt inverter leads to system performance issues including: • relatively poor power quality as quantified by the IEEE-defined short term flicker parameter • relatively low overall system efficiency Each of these issues is discussed in detail in the text of this report. The fuel cell performed well over the 1-year demonstration period in terms of availability and efficiency of conversion from chemical energy (propane) to electrical energy at the fuel cell output terminals. Another strength of fuel cell performance in the demonstration was the low requirements for maintenance and repair on the fuel cell. The project uncovered a new and important installation consideration for propane fuel cells. Alcohol added to new propane storage tanks is preferentially absorbed on the surface of some fuel cell reformer desulfurization filters. The experience on this project indicates that special attention must be paid to the volume and composition of propane tank additives. Size, composition, and replacement schedules for the de-sulfurization filter bed should be adjusted to account for propane tank additives to avoid sulfur poisoning of fuel cell stacks. Despite good overall technical performance of the fuel cell and the whole energy system, the demonstration showed that such a system is not economically feasible as compared to other commercially available technologies such as propane reciprocating engine generators.

Mark Hilson Schneider

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel cells for transportation program: FY1997 national laboratory annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cells for Transportation Program is structured to effectively implement the research and development (R and D) required for highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems to be a viable replacement for the internal combustion engine in automobiles. The Program is part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry initiative aimed at development of an 80 mile-per-gallon vehicle. This Annual Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of the laboratories during 1997. Participants include: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). During 1997, the laboratory R and D included one project on solid oxide fuel cells; this project has since been terminated to focus Department resources on PEM fuel cells. The technical component of this report is divided into five key areas: fuel cell stack research and development; fuel processing; fuel cell modeling, testing, and evaluation; direct methanol PEM fuel cells; and solid oxide fuel cells.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Durable Catalysts for Fuel Cell Protection during Transient Conditions - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Radoslav T. Atanasoski (Primary Contact), George D. Vernstrom, Gregory M. Haugen, Jimmy Wong, Theresa M. Watschke, Ljiljana L. Atanasoska, Amy E. Hester Fuel Cell Components Program, 3M Company 3M Center, Building 201-2N-05 St. Paul, MN 55144-1000 Phone: (651) 733-9441 Email: rtatanasoski@mmm.com Timothy C. Crowtz, Jessie E. Harlow, Robbie J. Sanderson, David A. Stevens, Jeff R. Dahn Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada David A. Cullen, Karren L. More, Shawn Reeves Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Deborah J. Myers, Xiaoping Wang, Ramachandran Subbaraman, Vojislav R. Stamenkovic, Nenad M. Markovic Argonne National Laboratory, LeMont, IL Sumit Kundu, Wendy Lee AFCC Automotive Fuel Cell Cooperation, Burnaby,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3704 Email: todd.ramsden@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Oorja Protonics, Inc., Fremont, CA Project Start Date: June 1, 2010 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Operate and maintain fuel-cell-powered material * handling equipment (MHE) using direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. Compile operational data of DMFCs and validate their * performance under real-world operating conditions. Provide an independent technology assessment that * focuses on DMFC system performance, operation, and

282

Hydrogen Fuel Quality Research and Development - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Tommy Rockward (Primary Contact), C. Quesada, K. Rau, E. Brosha, F. Garzon, R. Mukundan, and C. Padró Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 667-9587 Email: trock@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2015 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel * contaminants in support of the development of science- based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] TC197 WG-12). Validate the ASTM International test method for * determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

283

Hydrogen by Wire - Home Fueling System - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Luke T. Dalton Proton Energy Systems 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2128 Email: ldalton@protonenergy.com DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0001149 Project Start Date: August 15, 2010 Project End Date: August 14, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop enabling technologies for 350-bar hydrogen * home fueling Design key electrolysis cell stack and system components * Fabricate, inspect and assemble prototype components * Demonstrate prototype 350-bar hydrogen generation * Demonstrate prototype 350-bar home fueling technologies * Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

284

SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report-- Appendices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

285

SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

286

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Accelerating Acceptance of Fuel Cell Backup Power Systems - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2001, Plug Power has installed more than 800 stationary fuel cell systems worldwide. Plug Power’s prime power systems have produced approximately 6.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity and have accumulated more than 2.5 million operating hours. Intermittent, or backup, power products have been deployed with telecommunications carriers and government and utility customers in North and South America, Europe, the United Kingdom, Japan and South Africa. Some of the largest material handling operations in North America are currently using the company’s motive power units in fuel cell-powered forklifts for their warehouses, distribution centers and manufacturing facilities. The low-temperature GenSys fuel cell system provides remote, off-grid and primary power where grid power is unreliable or nonexistent. Built reliable and designed rugged, low- temperature GenSys delivers continuous or backup power through even the most extreme conditions. Coupled with high-efficiency ratings, low-temperature GenSys reduces operating costs making it an economical solution for prime power requirements. Currently, field trials at telecommunication and industrial sites across the globe are proving the advantages of fuel cells—lower maintenance, fuel costs and emissions, as well as longer life—compared with traditional internal combustion engines.

Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

288

Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting system: Phase 3, Report. [Navy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The world oil scenarios were analyzed using the NMFFS. The linear programming models of the NMFFS have great value in the analysis of petroleum resource allocation and refining. The results of the general market analysis indicated that all disruptions resulted in reduced crude oil supply, higher prices, and reduced demand in the world. In a major Persian Gulf disruption, US refining capability appeared adequate to satisfy normal US military fuel requirements, including those supplied by foreign refiners. However, this would be at the expense of civilian fuels production. Mobilization fuel requirements during a major disruption that curtailed most Persian Gulf and Venezuelan crude exports resulted in significant competition in the production of civil versus military jet fuels, particularly in Texas Gulf Coast and West Coast refineries. In all disruption scenarios studied, the Middle East emerged as a potentially important refiner of both civil and military jet fuels. With SPR drawdown and the IEA agreements in effect, the impacts of the disruptions on the production of refined products were significantly reduced, particularly in the United States, compared to the impacts without these programs. The IEA agreement caused a redistribution of the regional demand levels among IEA countries in favor of the major oil consuming countries like the United States, Canada, and some of the European countries. The results of the RYM analysis of refinery regions focused on the availability and quality of JP-5 production in key Navy supply regions. Several findings potentially important to the Navy are listed.

Hadder, G.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Davis, R.M.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Intron Length and Codon Usage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The correlation was shown between the length of introns and the codon usage of the coding sequences of the corresponding ... longer introns show the higher bias of codon usage. It is most pronounced in baker's...

Alexander E. Vinogradov

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Use of RDF as a kiln fuel. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refuse derived fuel (RDF) has been experimented with and/or proposed for use in kilns for the production of portland cement, lime, and expanded shale (a form of lightweight aggregate). Technological issues affecting the use of RDF in kilns are reviewed as are the results of trials in which RDF has been used as a kiln fuel. Three future research/demonstration projects for addressing the major unresolved issues are discussed. These projects are: a lime plant trial; a trial in a pre-calcining furnace; and an extended trial in a cement kiln.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Nuclear Power Reactor Sites December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Washington, D.C. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel The picture on the cover is the Connecticut Yankee Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation site in Haddam, Connecticut, with 43 dry storage NRC-licensed dual-purpose (storage and transport) casks. ii Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The House Appropriations Committee Print that accompanied the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, requests that the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department):

292

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Usage by Job Size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Usage by Job Usage by Job Size Table Usage by Job Size Table page loading animation Usage Query Interface System All Hopper Edison Carver Planck Matgen Franklin Hopper 1 Magellan Dirac Bassi Jacquard Seaborg User Account (Repo) Execution Queue All Debug Interactive Premium Regular Short Regular Long Regular Small Regular Medium Regular Big Regular Extra Big Killable Low Transfer IO Task Special System Serial Big Memory Westmere === Inactive === Magellan Serial Magellan Short Magellan Small Magellan Medium Magellan Big Magellan Long Regular 1 Regular 1 Long Regular 16 Regular 32 Regular 48 Full Config Seaborg Serial Batch 16 Batch 32 Batch 64 Submit Queue all interactive debug premium regular low DOE Office all ASCR BER BES FES HEP NP Summary for jobs that completed after Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 @ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 : 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

294

Estimating Externalities of Hydro Fuel Cycles, Report 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three major objectives of this hydropower study: (1) to implement the methodological concepts that were developed in the background document (ORNL/RFF 1992) as a means of estimating the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles and, by so doing, to demonstrate their application to the hydroelectric fuel cycle (different fuel cycles have unique characteristics that need to be addressed in different ways); (2) to develop, given the time and resources, the best range of estimates of externalities associated with hydroelectric projects, using two benchmark projects at two reference sites in the US; and (3) to assess the state of the information that is available to support the estimation of externalities associated with the hydroelectric fuel cycle and, by so doing, to assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and in setting future research agendas. The main consideration in defining these objectives was a desire to have more information about externalities and a better method for estimating them. As set forth in the agreement between the US and the EC, the study is explicitly and intentionally not directed at any one audience. This study is about a methodology for estimating externalities. It is not about how to use estimates of externalities in a particular policy context.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Final Scientific Report - "Improved Fuel Efficiency from Nanocomposite Tire Tread"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rolling resistance, a measure of the energy lost as a tire rotates while moving, is a significant source of power and fuel loss. Recently, low rolling resistant tires have been formulated by adding silica to tire tread. These "Green Tires" (so named from the environmental advantages of lower emissions and improved fuel economy) have seen some commercial success in Europe, where high fuel prices and performance drive tire selection. Unfortunately, the higher costs of the silica and a more complicated manufacturing process have prevented significant commercialization - and the resulting fuel savings - in the U.S. In this project, TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) prepared an inexpensive alternative to silica that leads to tire components with lower rolling resistance. These new tire composite materials were processed with traditional rubber processing equipment. We prepared specially designed nanoparticle additives, based on a high purity, inorganic mineral whose surface can be easily modified for compatibility with tire tread formulations. Our nanocomposites decreased energy losses to hysteresis, the loss of energy from the compression and relaxation of an elastic material, by nearly 20% compared to a blank SBR sample. We also demonstrated better performance than a leading silica product, with easier production of our final rubber nanocomposite.

Dr. Andrew Myers

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Combustion characteristics of dry coal-powder-fueled adiabatic diesel engine: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at investigating the combustion characteristics of dry coal powder fueled diesel engine. During this program, significant achievements were made in overcoming many problems facing the coal-powder-fueled engine. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept was used to enhance the combustion of coal powder fuel. The major coal-fueled engine test results and accomplishments are as follows: design, fabrication and engine testing of improved coal feed system for fumigation of coal powder to the intake air; design, fabrication and engine testing of the TICS chamber made from a superalloy material (Hastelloy X); design, fabrication and engine testing of wear resistant chrome oxide ceramic coated piston rings and cylinder liner; lubrication system was improved to separate coal particles from the contaminated lubricating oil; control of the ignition timing of fumigated coal powder by utilizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and variable TICS chamber temperature; coal-fueled engine testing was conducted in two configurations: dual fuel (with diesel pilot) and 100% coal-fueled engine without diesel pilot or heated intake air; cold starting of the 100% coal-powder-fueled engine with a glow plug; and coal-fueled-engine was operated from 800 to 1800 rpm speed and idle to full load engine conditions.

Kakwani, R.M.; Kamo, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels: Technical progress report, July 1994--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are five tasks within this project on thermally stable coal-based jet fuels. Progress on each of the tasks is described. Task 1, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, has 3 subtasks which are described: Pyrolysis of n-alkylbenzenes; Thermal decomposition of n-tetradecane in near-critical region; and Re-examining the effects of reactant and inert gas pressure on tetradecane pyrolysis--Effect of cold volume in batch reactor. Under Task 2, Investigation of incipient deposition, the subtask reported is Uncertainty analysis on growth and deposition of particles during heating of coal-derived aviation gas turbine fuels; under Task 3, Investigation of the quantitative degradation chemistry of fuels, is subtask, Effects of high surface area activated carbon and decalin on thermal degradation of jet A-1 fuel and n-dodecane; under Task 4, Coal-based fuel stabilization studies, is subtask, Screening potential jet fuel stabilizers using the model compound dodecane; and under Task 5, Exploratory studies on the direct conversion of coal to high quality jet fuels, is subtask, Shape-selective naphthalene hydrogenation for production of thermally stable jet fuels. 25 refs., 64 figs., 22 tabs.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Boehman, A.; Coleman, M.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ethanol Production for Automotive Fuel Usage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conceptual design of the 20 million gallon per year anhydrous ethanol facility a t Raft River has been completed. The corresponding geothermal gathering, extraction and reinjection systems to supply the process heating requirement were also completed. The ethanol facility operating on sugar beets, potatoes and wheat will share common fermentation and product recovery equipment. The geothermal fluid requirement will be approximately 6,000 gpm. It is anticipated that this flow will be supplied by 9 supply wells spaced at no closer than 1/4 mile in order to prevent mutual interferences. The geothermal fluid will be flashed in three stages to supply process steam at 250 F, 225 F and 205 F for various process needs. Steam condensate plus liquid remaining after the third flash will all be reinjected through 9 reinjection wells. The capital cost estimated for this ethanol plant employing all three feedstocks is $64 million. If only a single feedstock were used (for the same 20 mm gal/yr plant) the capital costs are estimated at $51.6 million, $43.1 million and $40. 5 million for sugar beets, potatoes and wheat respectively. The estimated capital cost for the geothermal system is $18 million.

Lindemuth, T.E.; Stenzel, R.A.; Yim, Y.J.; Yu, J.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Usage Forecasts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Quick and easy web-based tool that provides free 14-day ahead energy usage forecasts based on the degree day forecasts for 1,200 stations in the U.S. and Canada. The user enters the daily non-weather base load and the usage per degree day weather factor; the tool applies the degree day forecast and displays the total energy usage forecast. Helpful FAQs explain the process and describe various options for the calculation of the base load and weather factor. Historical degree day reports and 14-day ahead degree day forecasts are available from the same site. Keywords degree days, historical weather, mean daily temperature, load calculation, energy simulation Validation/Testing Degree day data provided by AccuWeather.com, updated daily at 0700.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

302

Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee (FCSC) of NEAC met in Washington, August 17- 19, 2010. DOE's new science-based approach to all matters related to nuclear energy is being implemented. The general approach was outlined to NEAC in the briefing on the NE Roadmap. There are many new directions being considered, and this meeting of the FCSC was to brief the Subcommittee on new directions in nuclear energy that might go beyond our present 4.5% enriched LWRs. The goal is to develop new concepts that have advantages over present systems in some combination of cost, passive safety, proliferation resistance, sustainability, and used fuel disposition.

303

Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee (FCSC) of NEAC met in Washington, August 17- 19, 2010. DOE's new science-based approach to all matters related to nuclear energy is being implemented. The general approach was outlined to NEAC in the briefing on the NE Roadmap. There are many new directions being considered, and this meeting of the FCSC was to brief the Subcommittee on new directions in nuclear energy that might go beyond our present 4.5% enriched LWRs. The goal is to develop new concepts that have advantages over present systems in some combination of cost, passive safety, proliferation resistance, sustainability, and used fuel disposition.

304

Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research continued on thermally stable jet fuel from coal liquids and petroleum distillates. The oxidative and thermal stabilities of ten fuels have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and in microautoclave reactors. The compositions of the stressed fuels (as well as the unreacted fuels) were characterized by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, simulated distillation curves were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The product distributions and reaction mechanisms for the thermal decomposition of n-alkanes in near-critical and supercritical regions were studied. The emphasis of the work in this reporting period has been placed on reaction mechanisms and product distributions. Work is continuing on obtaining additional {sup 13}C-labeled jet fuel components for future thermal stressing studies. Compounds of current interest include 6-{sup 13}C-dodecane and 1-cyclohexyl-1-{sup 13}C-hexane. Further analysis of the formation of solids from the thermal stressing of decane and decalin has been performed.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Boehman, A.; Song, C. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimating Externalities of Coal Fuel Cycles, Report 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The agreement between the US DOE and the EC established the specific objectives of the study: (a) to develop a methodological framework that uses existing data and models to quantify the external costs and benefits of energy; (b) to demonstrate the application of the framework to estimate the externalities of the coal, biomass, oil, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, photovoltaic, and wind fuel cycles (by agreement with the EC, the US addressed the first six of these); and (c) to identify major gaps in the availability of information to quantify impacts, damages, benefits, and externalities of fuel cycles; and to suggest priorities for future research. The main consideration in defining these objectives was a desire to have more information about externalities, and a better method for estimating them.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fuel Cycle Technologies Annual Review Meeting Transactions Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program supports the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) mission to: “Enhance U.S. security and economic growth through transformative science, technology innovation, and market solutions to meet our energy, nuclear security, and environmental challenges.” Goal 1 of DOE’s Strategic Plan is to innovate energy technologies that enhance U.S. economic growth and job creation, energy security, and environmental quality. FCT does this by investing in advanced technologies that could transform the nuclear fuel cycle in the decades to come. Goal 2 of DOE’s Strategic Plan is to strengthen national security by strengthening key science, technology, and engineering capabilities. FCT does this by working closely with the National Nuclear Security Administration and the U.S Department of State to develop advanced technologies that support the Nation’s nuclear nonproliferation goals.

Lori Braase; W. Edgar May

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY13 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) the SNAP demonstration was enhanced with respect to query and navigation usability issues.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FY 2012 Annual Progress Report FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-1 II. Hydrogen Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II-1 II.0 Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .II-3 II.A Distributed Biomass-Derived Liquids Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-11 II.A.1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

311

Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report primarily covers in-house oil, gas, and synfuel research and lists the contracted research. The report is broken into the following areas: liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction, processing, utilization, and project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are listed. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report and Appendices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fourth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from April 2008 through October 2008.

313

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO, usually containing CO{sub 2}) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Final Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Project Report Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL Nuclear Engineering Education Research Program (grant # DE-FG07-99ID13767) Rodney C. Ewing (co-PI) Lumin Wang (co-PI) October 30,2002 For the Period of 07/01/1999 to 06/30/2002 Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1 1. Background Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (239Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241Am, Cm and 237Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burn- up of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-

316

The economic burden of sunscreen usage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Burden of Sunscreen Usage Ritika Johal 1 , Michaelprice per ounce. Sunscreen Usage To estimate the daily use

Johal, Ritika; Leo, Michael S; Ma, Brian; Sivamani, Raja K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of research activities at Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for the quarter ending March 1982 are summarized. Major research areas are: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (resource assessment and enhanced production); processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); utilization; and product integration and technology transfer. Special reports include: EOR data base - major new industry tool; properties of crude oils available via telephone hookup; alternative fuels data bank stresses transportation. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Alternative Fuel Cell Membranes for Energy Independence - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Robson F. Storey (Primary Contact), Daniel A. Savin, Derek L. Patton The University of Southern Mississippi 118 College Drive #5050 Hattiesburg, MS 30406 Phone: (601) 266-4879 Email: Robson.Storey@usm.edu DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO88106 Project Start Date: August 1, 2009 Project End Date: May 31, 2012 *Congressionally directed project Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Synthesize novel, low-cost hydrocarbon fuel cell * membrane polymers with high-temperature performance and long-term chemical/mechanical durability.

319

Accelerating Acceptance of Fuel Cell Backup Power Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Petrecky Plug Power 968 Albany Shaker Road Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 782-7700 ext: 1799 Email: james_petrecky@plugpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Subcontractor: IdaTech LLC, Bend, OR Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 15, 2013 Objectives Quantify the performance of 20 low-temperature fuel * cell systems at two locations Optimize the maintenance of the systems and data * collection practices The project is intended to increase distributed power * generation, improve reliability and efficiency of

320

Stationery and Emerging Market Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Kathya Mahadevan (Primary Contact), VinceContini, Matt Goshe, and Fritz Eubanks Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 Phone: (614) 424-3197 Email: mahadevank@battelle.org DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005250/001 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives To assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent cost models and costs estimates for manufacture and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development of Kilowatt-Scale Coal Fuel Cell Technology - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Steven S.C. Chuang (Primary Contact), Tritti Siengchum, Jelvehnaz Mirzababaei, Azadeh Rismanchian, and Seyed Ali Modjtahedi The University of Akron 302 Buchtel Common Akron, OH 44310-3906 Phone: (330) 972-6993 Email: schuang@uakron.edu DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-08GO0881114 Project Start Date: June 1, 2008 Project End Date: May 31, 2012 *Congressionally directed project Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives To develop a kilowatt-scale coal-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology. The outcome of this research effort

322

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY12 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building on previous internal investments and leveraging ongoing advancements in semantic technologies, PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In developing this proof of concept prototype, the utility and relevancy of semantic technologies to the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D) has been better understood.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.; Neorr, Peter A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

NONE

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs Fifth Annual Report to Congress - 1996  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Abstract Abstract This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the U.S. Department of Energy's alterna- tive fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6374, et seq.). These programs, which comprise the most compre- hensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transporta- tion fuels and alternative fuel vehi- cles, are beginning their sixth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Even though present interest in electric vehicles is quite high, they are not currently included in these vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs, and the annual report does not include information on them.

325

Fuel cell power systems for remote applications. Phase 1 final report and business plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Fuel Cell Power Systems for Remote Applications project is to commercialize a 0.1--5 kW integrated fuel cell power system (FCPS). The project targets high value niche markets, including natural gas and oil pipelines, off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Phase 1 includes the market research, technical and financial analysis of the fuel cell power system, technical and financial requirements to establish manufacturing capability, the business plan, and teaming arrangements. Phase 1 also includes project planning, scope of work, and budgets for Phases 2--4. The project is a cooperative effort of Teledyne Brown Engineering--Energy Systems, Schatz Energy Research Center, Hydrogen Burner Technology, and the City of Palm Desert. Phases 2 through 4 are designed to utilize the results of Phase 1, to further the commercial potential of the fuel cell power system. Phase 2 focuses on research and development of the reformer and fuel cell and is divided into three related, but potentially separate tasks. Budgets and timelines for Phase 2 can be found in section 4 of this report. Phase 2 includes: Task A--Develop a reformate tolerant fuel cell stack and 5 kW reformer; Task B--Assemble and deliver a fuel cell that operates on pure hydrogen to the University of Alaska or another site in Alaska; Task C--Provide support and training to the University of Alaska in the setting up and operating a fuel cell test lab. The Phase 1 research examined the market for power systems for off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Also included in this report are summaries of the previously conducted market reports that examined power needs for remote locations along natural gas and oil pipelines. A list of highlights from the research can be found in the executive summary of the business plan.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1994--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research continued on coal-based, thermally stable, jet fuels. Significant progress has been made on the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in highly stressed fuels, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection. Gas chromatography is not able to detect compounds with {>=}6 fused aromatic rings, but such compounds can be identified using the HPLC method. The concentration of such compounds is low in comparison to aromatics of 1-3 rings, but the role of the large compounds in the formation of solid deposits may be crucial in determining the thermal stability of a fuel. The unusual properties of fluid fuels in the near-critical region appear to have significant effects on their thermal decomposition reactions. This issue has been investigated in the present reporting period using n-tetradecane as a model compound for fuel decomposition. Temperature-programmed retention indices are very useful for gas chromatographic and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of coal and petroleum derived jet fuels. We have demonstrated this in the identification of components in two JP-8 fuels and their liquid chromatographic fractions. The role of activated carbon surfaces as catalysts in the thermal stressing of jet fuel was investigated using n-dodecane and n-octane as model compounds. In some cases the reactions were spiked with addition of 5% decalin to test the ability of the carbon to catalyze the transformation of decalin to naphthalene. We have previously shown that benzyl alcohol and 1,4-benzenedimethanol are effective stabilizers at temperatures {>=}400{degrees}C for jet fuels and the model compound dodecane. The addition of ethanol to hydrocarbon/benzyl alcohol mixtures has a significant effect on the thermal stabilization of jet fuels above 400{degrees}C. Ethanol appears to function by reducing the benzaldehyde formed during the degradation of the benzyl alcohol. This reduction regenerates the benzyl alcohol.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program. Topical report: Cathode compatibility tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

Johnson, W.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Clean Fuel Advanced Technology Public Education Campaign: Billboards According to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 2013 alternative fuel price report, the price of propane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Department of Energy's July 2013 alternative fuel price report, the price of propane (LPG) in North Carolina.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, gas mileage decreases rapidly above 50 MPH fuel, regardless of vehicle type. · According to the U.S. Department of Energy (and based on North

329

Forecasting and Capturing Emission Reductions Using Industrial Energy Management and Reporting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 7- 2008 Full Year Performance Table 2 - 2008 Annual Fuel Usage Performance presents the fuel usage statistics with an increase of bark usage by 2.9%, a reduction of fossil fuel usage by 5.6%, a net energy reduction of 2.3%, and an overall... Figure 7- 2008 Full Year Performance Table 2 - 2008 Annual Fuel Usage Performance presents the fuel usage statistics with an increase of bark usage by 2.9%, a reduction of fossil fuel usage by 5.6%, a net energy reduction of 2.3%, and an overall...

Robinson, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Industrial Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kriston P. Brooks (Primary Contact), Siva P. Pilli, Dale A. King Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 372-4343 Email: kriston.brooks@pnnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Subcontractor: ClearEdge Power, Portland, OR Project Start Date: May 2010 Project End Date: September 2012

331

Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report P. Zelenay (Primary Contact), H. Chung, C.M. Johnston, Y.S. Kim, Q. Li, D. Langlois, D. Spernjak, P. Turner, G. Wu Materials Physics and Applications Division Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 667-0197 Email: zelenay@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * R.R. Adzic (PI), S. Bliznakov, M. Li, P. Liu, K. Sasaki, M.-P. Zhou Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY * Y. Yan (PI), S. Alia, J. Zheng University of Delaware, Newark, DE

332

Fuel Cell Fundamentals at Low and Subzero Temperatures - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 11 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Adam Z. Weber Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 70-108B Berkeley, CA 94720 Phone: (510) 486-6308 Email: azweber@lbl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM * United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT * 3M Company, St Paul, MN * The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA Project Start Date: September 21, 2009 Project End Date: September 30, 2013

333

Sustainable Hydrogen Fueling Station, California State University, Los Angeles - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report David Blekhman California State University Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90032 Phone: (323) 343-4569 Email: blekhman@calstatela.edu DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000443 Subcontractors: * General Physics Corporation, Elkridge, MD * Weaver Construction, Anaheim, CA Project Start Date: January, 2009 Project End Date: December, 2012 *Congressionally directed project Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Procure core equipment for the California State *

334

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:46am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 As Federal agencies work to identify opportunities for right-sizing the fleet and replacing inefficient vehicles with new, efficient, and/or alternatively fueled models to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, they should flag potential mission constraints associated with vehicle usage. This may involve further data collection to understand the mission considerations associated with individual vehicles. For instance, in Figure 1, Vehicle 004 appears to be underutilized, having both a low user-to-vehicle ratio and a relatively low time in use per day. However,

335

Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.'' was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled ``Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.`` was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

Tao, Thomas

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2008 Annual Progress Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Education Education Printable Version 2008 Annual Progress Report IX. Education This section of the 2008 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on education. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Education Sub-Program Overview, Christy Cooper, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 181 KB) Hydrogen Knowledge and Opinions Assessment, Rick Schmoyer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (PDF 257 KB) Hydrogen Safety: First Responder Education, Marylynn Placet, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PDF 270 KB) Hydrogen Education for Code Officials, Melanie Caton, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (PDF 261 KB) Increasing "H2IQ": A Public Information Program , Henry Gentenaar, The Media Network (PDF 70 KB)

339

HPSS Usage Examples at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Examples Advanced Usage Examples Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Once you have set up your automatic HPSS authentication you can access HPSS within batch scripts. Read More ...

340

Memory Usage Considerations on Franklin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Memory Considerations Memory Considerations Memory Usage Considerations on Franklin Each Franklin compute node has 8 GB (8192 MB) of physical memory, but, not all that memory is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fuel Cell Report to the Congress (ESECS EE-1973) February 2003  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8, 2003 8, 2003 The Honorable Charles H. Taylor Chairman Subcommittee on Interior and Related Agencies Committee on Appropriations U.S. House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 Dear Mr. Chairman: Enclosed is the Fuel Cell Report to Congress. The Conference Report (House Report 107-234, page 120) accompanying Public Law 107-63, enacted November 2001, making appropriations for the Department of the Interior and Related Agencies, requests the Department of Energy to report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, on the technical and economic barriers to the use of fuel cells in transportation, potable power, stationary, and distributed generation applications. The Conference Report also requested that the Department provide an interim assessment that describes preliminary findings about the need for public

342

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SunLine Transit Agency SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report L. Eudy and K. Chandler Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-57560 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report L. Eudy and K. Chandler Prepared under Task No. HT12.8210 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-57560 January 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

343

National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and

344

Market Transformation Activities - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program IntroductIon The Market Transformation sub-program is conducting activities to help promote and implement commercial and pre-commercial hydrogen and fuel cell systems in real-world operating environments and to provide feedback to research programs, U.S. industry manufacturers, and potential technology users. One of the sub-program's goals is to achieve sufficient manufacturing volumes in emerging commercial applications that will enable cost reductions through economies of scale, which will help address the current high cost of fuel cells (currently the capital and installation costs of fuel cells are from five to six times higher than

345

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XVIII-1 XVIII-1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 3M Company II.D.5 Low-Cost Large-Scale PEM Electrolysis for Renewable Energy Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II-46 V.D.1 Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V-84 V.D.3 Durable Catalysts for Fuel Cell Protection during Transient Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V-100 V.D.5 Nanosegregated Cathode Catalysts with Ultra-Low Platinum Loading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V-111 V.F.2 Fuel Cell Fundamentals at Low and Subzero Temperatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V-211 Acumentrics Corporation V.J.2 Development of a Low-Cost 3-10 kW Tubular SOFC Power System .

346

Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Second semiannual report, July-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. In the current report period the nuclear design of the demonstration was begun. The design calls for 132 bundles of barrier fuel to be inserted into the core of Quad Cities Unit 2 at the beginning of Cycle 6. Laboratory and in-reactor tests were started to evaluate the stability of Zr-liner fuel which remains in service after a defect has occurred which allows water to enter the rod. Results to date on intentionally defected fuel indicate that the Zr-liner fuel is not rapidly degraded despite ingress of water.

Rosenbaum, H.S. (comp.)

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report, Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2009/FY 2010 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2009/fiscal year 2010.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Evaluation of coal-derived liquids as boiler fuels. Volume 2: boiler test results. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived liquid (CDL) fuels was conducted on a utility boiler located at the Plant Sweatt Electric Generating Station of Mississippi Power Company in Meridian, Mississippi. The test program was conducted in two phases. The first phase included the combustion tests of the two conventional fuels (natural gas and No. 6 fuel oil) and three coal-derived liquid fuels (Solvent Refined Coal-II full range distillate, H-Coal heavy distillate and H-Coal blended distillate). The second phase involved the evaluation of three additional CDL fuels (H-Coal light distillate, Exxon Donor Solvent full range distillate and Solvent Refined Coal-II middle distillate). The test boiler was a front wall-fired Babcock and Wilcox unit with a rated steam flow of 425,000 lb/h and a generating capacity of 40 MW. Boiler performance and emissions were evaluated with baseline and CDL fuels at 15, 25, 40 MW loads and at various excess air levels. Low NO/sub x/ (staged) combustion techniques were also implemented. Boiler performance monitoring included measurements for fuel steam and flue gas flow, pressure, temperature, and heat absorption, resulting in a calculated combustion efficiency, boiler efficiency, and heat rate. Emissions measurements included oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, sulfur trioxide, acid dewpoint, particulate mass, size distribution and morphology, chlorides, and opacity. The test program demonstrated the general suitability of CDL fuels for use in existing oil-fired utility boilers. No significant boiler tube surface modifications will be required. The CDL fuels could be handled similarly to No. 2 oil with appropriate safety procedures and materials compatibility considerations. Volume 2 of a five-volume report contains the detailed boiler test results. 96 figs., 26 tabs.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

[Research and workshop on alternative fuels for aviation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University was granted U. S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funds for research and development to improve the efficiency in ethanol powered aircraft, measure performance and compare emissions of ethanol, Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) and 100 LL aviation gasoline. The premise of the initial proposal was to use a test stand owned by Engine Components Inc. (ECI) based in San Antonio, Texas. After the grant was awarded, ECI decided to close down its test stand facility. Since there were no other test stands available at that time, RAFDC was forced to find additional support to build its own test stand. Baylor University provided initial funds for the test stand building. Other obstacles had to be overcome in order to initiate the program. The price of the emission testing equipment had increased substantially beyond the initial quote. Rosemount Analytical Inc. gave RAFDC an estimate of $120,000.00 for a basic emission testing package. RAFDC had to find additional funding to purchase this equipment. The electronic ignition unit also presented a series of time consuming problems. Since at that time there were no off-the-shelf units of this type available, one had to be specially ordered and developed. FAA funds were used to purchase a Super Flow dynamometer. Due to the many unforeseen obstacles, much more time and effort than originally anticipated had to be dedicated to the project, with much of the work done on a volunteer basis. Many people contributed their time to the program. One person, mainly responsible for the initial design of the test stand, was a retired engineer from Allison with extensive aircraft engine test stand experience. Also, many Baylor students volunteered to assemble the. test stand and continue to be involved in the current test program. Although the program presented many challenges, which resulted in delays, the RAFDC's test stand is an asset which provides an ongoing research capability dedicated to the testing of alternative fuels for aircraft engines. The test stand is now entirely functional with the exception of the electronic ignition unit which still needs adjustments.

NONE

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Selective Usage of D-Type Cyclins by Ewing’s Tumors and Rhabdomyosarcomas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Gene Usage and (Super)-antigen Drive in Chronic...chain variable 3-23 (IGHV3-23) gene usage in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL...of CLL and reports that IGHV3-23 gene usage may have prognostic value independent of...

Jingsong Zhang; Siwen Hu; Deborah E. Schofield; Poul H. B. Sorensen; Timothy J. Triche

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report, December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Space and Terrestrial Systems Division of the US Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Bronisz, S.E. (comp.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report, February 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Space and Terrestrial Systems Division of the US Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Bronisz, S.E. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Alternative Fuel Price Report 5_5_00  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Nation May 5, 2000 Nation May 5, 2000 his is the premiere issue of what the Clean Cities Program envisions as a monthly newsletter keeping you up to date on the price of alternative fuels in the U.S. and their relation to gasoline and diesel prices. This issue discusses prices that were gathered during the week of April 10, 2000. Gasoline and Diesel Prices asoline averaged $1.516 per gallon nationwide during the week of April 10, 2000. This represents a drop of $0.023 per gallon from the previous month (March 2000), as illustrated in the table to the right. Prices for the various regions of the country are also illustrated in this table. (A map of the regions is shown at the bottom of this page.) During the week of April 10, prices ranged from a low of $1.439 in the Midwest to a high of $1.752 on the West Coast. Between March 6 and April 10, gasoline prices fell slightly in

354

Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:42am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Once a Federal agency has identified its most important mobile greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources overall, it can work with individual sites to determine vehicle usage and refueling trends. Agencies can compare the results of this analysis to internal standards and requirements to identify GHG mitigation opportunities for assets that are underperforming or underutilized. Two examples of this type of analysis focus on: Alternative fuel consumption Vehicle utilization. Figure 1 - An image of a vertical, stacked bar chart titled 'Alternative Fuel Use in AFVs.' The frequency data axis is labeled 'Gallons of Gasoline Equivalent' with a scale of 0-1,400,000 in increments of 200,000. The stacked bar labeled 'CNG Dual Fuel Vehicles' shows CNG from 0-300,000 gallons and Gasoline from 300,000-800,000 gallons. The stacked bar labeled 'E-85 Flex Fuel Vehicles' shows E85 from 0-1,000,000 gallons and Gasoline from 1,000,000-1,250,000 gallons.

355

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop, Golden, Colorado, June 11-13, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, Colorado June 11-13, 2012 Workshop Proceedings NREL/BK-5600-56523 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, Colorado June 11-13, 2012 Prepared under Task No. H279.1710 Workshop Proceedings NREL/BK-5600-56523

356

Process Refinements - Reporting of Public Use of Diesel Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Based on FHWA's reassessment of the reporting and attribution process and on the GAO study, several specific issues were identified. These issues were published in a Federal Register notice for public response.3 Sixteen States provided comments on the issues provided in the Federal Register. Two additional issues were also raised by commenters. The comments may be found at http://dmses.dot.gov; search for docket number FHWA-2000-7635. All of the issues are discussed below. Certain process refinements are required to address these issues; these changes are explained in the following sections. Based on FHWA's reassessment of the reporting and attribution process and on the GAO study, several specific issues were identified. These issues were published in a Federal Register notice for public response.3 Sixteen States provided comments on the issues provided in the Federal Register. Two additional issues were also raised by commenters. The comments may be found at http://dmses.dot.gov; search for docket number FHWA-2000-7635. All of the issues are discussed below. Certain process refinements are required to address these issues; these changes are explained in the following sections. Some of the issues concern the data reported by the States. Because of differences in State laws, States collect different types of data. Chapter 2 of A Guide to Reporting Highway Statistics4 provides instructions for completing Forms FHWA-551M and FHWA-556.

357

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report II.D Electrolytic Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% higher than separated PV electrolysis devices, and analysis work has shown that the cost of PEC hydrogenHydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 125 II.D Electrolytic Processes II.D.1 Photoelectrochemical Systems for Hydrogen Production Ken Varner, Scott Warren, J.A. Turner

358

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section III. Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hydrogen Storage #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 200 #12 square inch (psi) 7.5 wt % and 8.5 wt% Type IV composite hydrogen storage tanks of specified sizes for DOE Future Truck and Nevada hydrogen bus programs · Demonstrate 10,000 psi storage tanks Approach

359

2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report Posted  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program has posted the 2014 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report, which summarizes the comments of expert peer reviewers at the 2014 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR) held June 16–20, 2014, in Washington, D.C.

360

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report IV.E Air Management Subsystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the motor driven compressor/expander and evaluated performance, weight and cost projection data. As comparedHydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report 490 IV.E Air and by improving upon previous project results. · Reduce turbocompressor/motor controller costs while increasing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Evaluation of coal-derived liquids as boiler fuels. Volume 3. Emissions test results. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived fuels was conducted on a utility boiler located at the plant, Sweatt Electric Generating Station of Mississippi Power Company, in Meridian, Mississippi. Volume 1, of a 5 volume report, contains a comprehensive report of the whole test program - see abstract of Volume 1 for a detailed abstract of the whole program. Volume 3 contains detailed emissions testing results. 41 figs., 6 tabs. (LTN)

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems: Subscale combustion testing. Topical report, Task 3.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report on the Subscale Combustor Testing performed at Textron Defense Systems` (TDS) Haverhill Combustion Laboratories for the Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. This program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1986 as an R&D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular staged, rich-lean-quench, Toroidal Vortex Slogging Combustor (TVC) concept. Fuel-rich conditions in the first stage inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen; molten coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed, tapped and quenched from the combustion gases by inertial separation in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The primary objective of this work was to verify the feasibility of a direct coal-fueled combustion system for combustion turbine applications. This has been accomplished by the design, fabrication, testing and operation of a subscale development-type coal-fired combustor. Because this was a complete departure from present-day turbine combustors and fuels, it was considered necessary to make a thorough evaluation of this design, and its operation in subscale, before applying it in commercial combustion turbine power systems.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

EIA - Gasoline and Diesel Fuel report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued after EIA's 1994 survey. Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991, is based on data from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). Focusing on vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and energy enduse consumption and expenditures by households for personal transportation, the 1991 RTECS is

364

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report IV.D Fuel Cell Stack Subsystem and Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Tolerant PEM Fuel Cell Stack System Tim Rehg (Primary Contact), Nguyen Minh (Program Manager) Honeywell electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack system comprised of a PEM fuel cell stack and the supporting gas, thermal, and water management subsystems. The PEM fuel cell stack system will be capable of integration

365

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

869 * November 2010 869 * November 2010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses NREL Team: Hydrogen Technology Validation, Leslie Eudy Accomplishment: NREL recently reported an increase in durability and reliability for fuel cell systems demonstrated in transit service (first reported in July 2010). Context: The transit industry provides an excellent test-bed for developing and optimizing advanced transportation technologies, such as fuel cells. In coordination with the Federal Transit Administration, the Department of Energy (DOE) funds the evaluation of fuel cell buses (FCBs) in real-world service. Under this funding, NREL has collected and analyzed data on nine early generation FCBs operated by four transit agencies in the United States.

366

Best available practices for lng fueling of fleet vehicles. Topical report, March-November 1995, tasks 85 and 86  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides essential information on the design and operation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) fueling stations for fleet vehicles. The report serves to evaluate current practices in LNG fleet vehicle fueling station designs, and provide fleet operators with a tool for use in discussions with permitting agencies, engineering firms, fabricators, and contractors who permit, design, or construct LNG fueling stations. Representative sites (i.e., LNG fueling stations) were evaluated for technical feasibility, customer satisfaction, economics, operating and maintenance history, problems encountered/overcome, and regulatory environment. The compiled information in this report reveals that LNG fueling stations have advanced to the point where LNG is a viable alternative to gasoline and/or diesel fuel.

Midgett, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Endurance testing of a high-efficiency steam reformer for fuel cell power plants: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report documents the results from demonstration and endurance tests, conducted in 1987 and 1988, of the Haldor Topsoe Heat Exchange Reformer. The primary objectives of this EPRI project were to develop, test and verify fuel processing components suitable for use in a Westinghouse Electric Corporation 7.5-MW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. EPRI's project is part of a larger national program sponsored by the Department of Energy to develop the technology and systems which are technically and economically viable for electric utility power generation applications. 26 figs., 11 tabs.

Udengaard, N.R.; Christiansen, L.J.; Summers, W.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Microsoft Word - Fuel Cell Cathode Report_WhiteBurke_v09 050713.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recent Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Recent Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Studies Tools, Results, and Novel Concepts for Making Better Cells May 9, 2013 DOE/NETL-2013/1618 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

369

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: Second Results Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 new fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. The first results report was published in August 2011, describing operation of these new FCEBs from September 2010 through May 2011. New results in this report provide an update through April 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Third Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published two previous reports, in August 2011 and July 2012, describing operation of these buses. New results in this report provide an update covering eight months through October 2013.

Eudy, L.; Post, M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Technical Assistance to Developers - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program T. Rockward and R.L. Borup (Primary Contacts), F. Garzon, R. Mukundan, and D. Spernjak Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 667-9587 and (505) 667-2823 Emails: trock@lanl.gov, borup@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2003 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Objectives Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell * component and system developers Assess fuel cell materials and components and give * feedback to developers Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the * development of various new material durability testing

372

Alternative fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE`s LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts. The paper reports the progress on the following tasks: engineering and modifications: AFDU shakedown, operations, deactivation and disposal; and research and development on new processes for DME, chemistry and catalyst development, and oxygenates via synthesis gas.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Phase 1 feasibility study of an integrated hydrogen PEM fuel cell system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluated in the report is the use of hydrogen fueled proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells for devices requiring less than 15 kW. Metal hydrides were specifically analyzed as a method of storing hydrogen. There is a business and technical part to the study that were developed with feedback from each other. The business potential of a small PEM product is reviewed by examining the markets, projected sales, and required investment. The major technical and cost hurdles to a product are also reviewed including: the membrane and electrode assembly (M and EA), water transport plate (WTP), and the metal hydrides. It was concluded that the best potential stationary market for hydrogen PEM fuel cell less than 15 kW is for backup power use in telecommunications applications.

Luczak, F.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Stationary Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Bryan Pivovar Phone: (303) 275-3809 Email: bryan.pivovar@nrel.gov Sub-Contract Number No: AGB-0-40628-01 under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308 Project Start Date: July 8, 2010 Project End Date: September 7, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Perform Design for Manufacturing and Assembly * (DFMA ® ) cost analysis for low-temperature (LT)

375

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxiliary Power Unit Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dan Hennessy (Primary Contact), Jim Banna Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC 300 University Drive m/c 480-300-385 Auburn Hills, MI 48326 Phone: (248) 732-0656 Email: daniel.t.hennessy@delphi.com DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000478 Subcontractors: * Electricore, Inc., Valencia, CA * PACCAR, Inc., Bellevue, WA * TDA Research, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO Project Start Date: August 1, 2009 Project End Date: April 30, 2013 Objectives

376

Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2010 Annual Progress Report - Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Analysis Systems Analysis Printable Version 2010 Annual Progress Report VII. Systems Analysis This section of the 2010 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on systems analysis. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Systems Analysis Sub-Program Overview, Fred Joseck, DOE Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) Model, Brian Bush, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis of Energy Infrastructures and Potential Impacts from an Emergent Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure, David Reichmuth, Sandia National Laboratories Agent-Based Model of the Transition to Hydrogen-Based Personal Transportation: Consumer Adoption and Infrastructure Development Including Combined Hydrogen, Heat, and Power, Matthew Mahalik, Argonne National

378

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 collaboration activities. Progress made by the collaboration in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS techniques applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model demonstrated the potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space. Similar results were obtained using a perturbation approach developed by LANL. Benchmark measurements have been successfully conducted at LANL and at RPI using their respective LSDS instruments. The ISU and UNLV collaborative effort is focused on the fabrication and testing of prototype fission chambers lined with ultra-depleted 238U and 232Th, and uranium deposition on a stainless steel disc using spiked U3O8 from room temperature ionic liquid was successful, with improving thickness obtained. In FY2012, the collaboration plans a broad array of activities. PNNL will focus on optimizing its empirical model and minimizing its reliance on calibration data, as well continuing efforts on developing an analytical model. Additional measurements are planned at LANL and RPI. LANL measurements will include a Pu sample, which is expected to provide more counts at longer slowing-down times to help identify discrepancies between experimental data and MCNPX simulations. RPI measurements will include the assay of an entire fresh fuel assembly for the study of self-shielding effects as well as the ability to detect diversion by detecting a missing fuel pin in the fuel assembly. The development of threshold neutron sensors will continue, and UNLV will calibrate existing ultra-depleted uranium deposits at ISU.

Warren, Glen A.; Casella, Andrew M.; Haight, R. C.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Danon, Yaron; Hatchett, D.; Becker, Bjorn; Devlin, M.; Imel, G. R.; Beller, D.; Gavron, A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; O'Donnell, J. M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Estimates of Zircaloy integrity during dry storage of spent nuclear fuel: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analytical and experimental work described in this report is intended to predict the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) fuel rods when the fuel rods are stored dry. The analytical portion considered all failure mechanisms that could be expected to operate under dry storage conditions, including creep rupture, external oxidation stress-corrosion cracking (SCC), fatigue, and clad splitting by UO/sub 2/ oxidation. Existing physically based models were used to predict the probability that LWR fuel rod cladding will fail in 100 years, as a function of the temperature at which the rods are stored. In the experimental portion, SCC tests were conducted on irradiated Zircaloy cladding to determine characteristics under conditions relevant to dry storage. ''Precracked'' and ''smooth'' (with only small naturally occurring flaws) specimens of irradiated cladding were subjected to ''split ring'' tests at initial stresses on the order of the yield stress in a variety of atmospheres containing iodine or cesium/cadmium. Most precracked specimens failed by SCC, and about one-third of smooth specimens irradiated to fluence above 2.5 /times/ 10/sup 24/ n/m/sup 2/ also failed. However, the stresses present in these tests were much higher than those expected in stored fuel cladding; therefore, the experimental results do not necessarily indicate likely SCC problems in dry-storage fuel. 68 refs., 54 figs., 35 tabs.

Miller, A.K.; Brooks, M.; Cheung, T.Y.; Tasooji, A.; Wood, J.C.; Kelm, J.R.; Surette, B.A.; Frost, C.R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, entitled ``Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,`` describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

Badgley, P.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

START Alaska Historical Energy Usage Spreadsheet | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alaska Historical Energy Usage Spreadsheet START Alaska Historical Energy Usage Spreadsheet Communities applying for the DOE Office of Indian Energy Strategic Technical Assistance...

383

C3Bio.org - Usage: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(.jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif) Submit You are here: Home Usage Overview Prior 12 Months Usage: Overview Overview Maps Prior 12 Months By...

384

C3Bio.org - Usage: Maps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(.jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif) Submit You are here: Home Usage Maps Users Currently Online Usage: Maps Overview Maps Users Currently Online...

385

C3Bio.org - Usage: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(.jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif) Submit You are here: Home Usage Overview By Month Usage: Overview Overview Maps Prior 12 Months By Month By...

386

C3Bio.org - Usage: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(.jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif) Submit You are here: Home Usage Overview By Quarter Usage: Overview Overview Maps Prior 12 Months By Month By...

387

C3Bio.org - Usage: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(.jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif) Submit You are here: Home Usage Overview By Fiscal Year Usage: Overview Overview Maps Prior 12 Months By Month...

388

C3Bio.org - Usage: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(.jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif) Submit You are here: Home Usage Overview By Calendar Year Usage: Overview Overview Maps Prior 12 Months By...

389

Memory Usage Considerations on Hopper  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Memory Considerations Memory Considerations Memory Usage Considerations on Edison Edison compute nodes have 64 GB of physical memory (2.67GB per core), but, not all that memory is...

390

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle (FC) Subcommittee of NEAC met February 7-8, 2012 in Washington (Drs. Hoffmann and Juzaitis were unable to attend). While the meeting was originally scheduled to occur after the submission of the President’s FY 2013 budget, the submission was delayed a week; thus, we could have no discussion on balance in the NE program. The Agenda is attached as Appendix A. The main focus of the meeting was on accident tolerant fuels, an important post Fukushima issue, and on issues related to the report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future (BRC) as related to the responsibility for used fuel disposal which was assigned to the FC program with the end of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. In addition we heard an update on the systems study program which is aimed at helping chose the best options for advanced reactors, and possible new study on separation and waste form relevance to used fuel disposal (these two items are only discussed in this section of the report).

Richter, Burton; Chu, Margaret; Hoffman, Darleane; Juzaitis, Ray; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Omberg, Ronald P.; Rempe, Joy L.; Warin, Dominique

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Final Report of Project Nanometer Structures for Fuel Cells and Displays, etc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometer Structures for Fuel Cells and Displays, etc. Qingtechnologies (solar and fuel cells, lithium batteries). Intechnologies (solar and fuel cells, lithium batteries), and

Ji, Qing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2001 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the predominant radiation exposure pathway, direct and scattered radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

Hall, Gregory Graham; Newkirk, Jay Ronald; Borst, Frederick Jon

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2002 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the predominant radiation exposure pathway, direct and scattered radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

Jay R. Newkirk; Frederick J. Borst; Gregory G. Hall

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Liquid-fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports for the quarter ending September 1982 are presented for the following major tasks: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (resource assessment, enhanced recovery); liquid processing (characterization of petroleum, coal liquids, thermodynamics, process technology); utilization; project integration and technology transfer. Feature articles for this quarter are: new laboratory enhances BETC capability in mass spectrometry; and BETC tests on diesel particulate extracts indicate potential health risks. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fuel Retrieval Sub (FRS) Project Decapping Station Performance Test Data Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is to provide the test data report for Decapping Station Performance Testing. These performance tests were full scale and viewed as a continuation of development testing performed earlier (SNF-2710). A prototype decapping station confinement box was tested, along with some special tools required for the process, providing assurance that the fuel handling equipment will operate as designed, allowing for release of the FRS equipment for installation.

THIELGES, J.R.

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

397

Definition: Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usage (Not Monetized) Usage (Not Monetized) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) The functions that provide this benefit eliminate the need to send a line worker or crew to the switch or capacitor locations to operate them eliminate the need for truck rolls to perform diagnosis of equipment condition, and reduce truck rolls for meter reading and measurement purposes. This reduces the fuel consumed by a service vehicle or line truck. The use of plug-in electric vehicles can also lead to this benefit since the electrical energy used by plug-in electric vehicles displaces the equivalent amount of oil.[1] References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition

398

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: cenbio.iee.usp.br/download/publicacoes/SAE_BEST_2010.pdf This paper presents the BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST) project in Brazil, its partners, and the results from the demonstration tests performed in field, as well as the proposals of public policies that were elaborated and are being implemented. The BEST project was implemented in Sao Paulo as well as eight other cities located in Europe and Asia. How to Use This Tool

399

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress accomplished during the quarter ending September 1981 is reported under the following headings: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (reservoir characterization and evaluation, recovery projects, reservoir access, extraction technology, recovery processes and process implementation); liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, and process technology); utilization (energy conversion - adaptive engineering, combustion systems assessment, and heat engines/heat recovery); and project integration and technology transfer. Special reports include: air drilling research; fluid injection in reservoirs; target reservoirs in Permian Basin suitable for CO/sub 2/ flooding; heavy oil technology; and the fate of used motor oil/results of a survey.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety fuels program. Progress report, February 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are: General-Purpose Heat Source Development and Space Nuclear Safety and Fuels. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Maraman, W.J. (comp.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Design of gasifiers to optimize fuel cell systems. Final report, September 1990--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient utilization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, this study was conducted to evaluate the potential of optimizing the integrated catalytic gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation system. ERC in close collaboration with Fluor Daniel (providing engineering design and costing), conducted a detailed system configuration study to evaluate various catalytic gasification/carbonate fuel cell power plant configurations and compare them to present day, as well as emerging, alternate coal-based power plant technologies to assess their competitive position. A Topical Report (1992) was submitted documenting this effort, and the three catalytic gasification case studies are summarized in Appendix A. Results of this study indicate that system efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV) can be achieved by integrating low temperature catalytic gasification with high efficiency carbonate fuel cells. Thermal balance in the gasifier is achieved without oxygen by recycling hydrogen from the fuel cell anode exhaust. A small amount of air is added to the gasifier to minimize hydrogen recycle. In order to validate the assumptions made in the case configurations, experimental studies were performed to determine the reactivity of Illinois No. 6 coal with the gasification catalysts. The reactivity of the catalyzed coal has significant bearing on gasifier sizing and hence system cost and efficiency.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Feasibility study of utilization of degummed soybean oil as a substitute for diesel fuel. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to determine the economic and technological feasibility of producing a diesel oil substitute or extender from soybean oil. Existing technology was reviewed, to determine the minimum modification necessary for production of an acceptable fuel product. Current methods of oil extraction and refining were considered, as well as the products of those processes. The information developed indicated that the degummed soybean oil produced by existing processing plants is theoretically suitable for use as a diesel fuel extender. No modification of process design or equipment is required. This situation is very favorable to early commercialization of degummed soybean oil as a diesel fuel extender during the 1980's. Moreover, a large energy gain is realized when the soybean oil is utilized as fuel. Its heat of combustion is reported as 16,920 Btu per pound, or 130,000 Btu per gallon. Production of soybean oil consumes between 3000 and 5000 Btu per pound or 23,000 and 39,000 Btu per gallon. A resource availability study disclosed that the southeastern region of the United States produces approximately 260 million bushels of soybeans per year. In the same general area, fourteen extraction plants are operating, with a combined annual capacity of approximately 200 million bushels. Thus, regional production is sufficient to support the extraction capacity. Using an average figure of 1.5 gallons of oil per bushel of soybeans gives annual regional oil production of approximately 300 million gallons.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1991--June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump & Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

V1FY 2013 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Jean St-Pierre (Primary Contact), Yunfeng Zhai,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V­1FY 2013 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Jean St-Pierre (Primary applications, 80-kWe (net) integrated transportation fuel cell power systems operating on direct hydrogen-Pierre ­ Hawaii Natural Energy InstituteV.E Fuel Cells / Impurities V­2DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2013

407

Analysis of Laboratory Fuel Cell Technology Status Â… Voltage Degradation - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Jennifer Kurtz (Primary Contact), Keith Wipke, Sam Sprik, Genevieve Saur, Huyen Dinh National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-4061 Email: jennifer.kurtz@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.dog.gov Project Start Date: July 1, 2009 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Conduct an independent assessment to benchmark * state-of-the-art fuel cell durability in a non-proprietary method Leverage analysis experience from the Fuel Cell Electric * Vehicle Learning Demonstration project Collaborate with key fuel cell developers on the analysis

408

Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Research and development of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Phase I final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective during Phase I was to develop a methanol-fueled 10-kW fuel cell power source and evaluate its feasibility for transportation applications. This report documents research on component (fuel cell stack, fuel processor, power source ancillaries and system sensors) development and the 10-kW power source system integration and test. The conceptual design study for a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle was documented in an earlier report (DOE/CH/10435-01) and is summarized herein. Major achievements in the program include development of advanced membrane and thin-film low Pt-loaded electrode assemblies that in reference cell testing with reformate-air reactants yielded performance exceeding the program target (0.7 V at 1000 amps/ft{sup 2}); identification of oxidation catalysts and operating conditions that routinely result in very low CO levels ({le} 10 ppm) in the fuel processor reformate, thus avoiding degradation of the fuel cell stack performance; and successful integrated operation of a 10-kW fuel cell stack on reformate from the fuel processor.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Education Sub-Program Overview - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program IntroductIon The Education sub-program facilitates early market hydrogen and fuel cell deployments and supports future commercialization by providing technically accurate and objective information to key target audiences that can help transform the market (see Table 1). Table 1. Key Target Audiences for the Education Sub-Program target audience Rationale code officials Code officials must be familiar with hydrogen to facilitate the permitting process and local project approval. First Responders Firefighters, as well as law enforcement and emergency medical personnel, must know how to handle potential incidents; their understanding can also facilitate local project approval. Local communities/General Public

411

Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Richard (Rick) E. Rocheleau (Primary Contact), Mitch Ewan Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa 1680 East-West Road, POST 109 Honolulu, HI 96822 Phone: (808) 956-8346 Email: rochelea@hawaii.edu DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805; Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC51-02R021399 A008 Project Start Date: June 29, 2009 Project End Date: December 31, 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Island of Hawaii (Big Island) Install hydrogen fueling station infrastructure at Hawaii * Volcanoes (HAVO) National Park on the Big Island of

412

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Edward C. Heydorn Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. 7201 Hamilton Boulevard Allentown, PA 18195 Phone: (610) 481-7099 Email: heydorec@airproducts.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Jim Alkire Phone: (720) 356-1426 Email: James.Alkire@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-05GO85026 Working Partners/Subcontractors: * University of California Irvine (UCI), Irvine, CA * National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC), Irvine, CA Project Start Date: August 1, 2005 Project End Date: December 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate a cost-effective infrastructure model in

413

Landfill Gas-to-Hydrogen - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 20 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Shannon Baxter-Clemmons (Primary Contact), Russ Keller 1 South Carolina Hydrogen Fuel Cell Alliance P.O. Box 12302 Columbia, SC 29211 Phone: (803) 727-2897 Emails: baxterclemmons@schydrogen.org; russ.keller@ati.org DOE Managers HQ: Pete Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18113 Subcontractor: 1 Advanced Technology International, Charleston, SC Project Start Date: March 1, 2011 Project End Date: January 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Validate that a financially viable business case * exists for a full-scale deployment of commercially

414

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Amgad Elgowainy (Primary Contact), Marianne Mintz and Krishna Reddi Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Phone: (630) 252-3074 Email: aelgowainy@anl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2007 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify cost drivers of current technologies for hydrogen * delivery to early market applications of fuel cells Evaluate role of high-pressure tube-trailers in reducing * hydrogen delivery cost Identify and evaluate benefits of synergies between *

415

Aluminum Hydride - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Jason Graetz (Primary Contact), James Wegrzyn Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Building 815 Upton, NY 11973 Phone: (631) 344-3242 Email: graetz@bnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop onboard vehicle storage systems using aluminum hydride that meets all of DOE's targets for proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles. Produce aluminum hydride material with a hydrogen * storage capacity greater than 9.7% gravimetric (kg-H 2 /kg) and 0.13 kg-H 2 /L volumetric. Develop practical and economical processes for *

416

Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program David L. Block, Director Emeritus Florida Solar Energy Center/University of Central Florida 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922 Phone: (321) 638-1001 Email: block@fsec.ucf.edu DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Greg Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Greg.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-04GO14225 Subcontractors: * EnerFuels, Inc., West Palm Beach, FL * Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL * Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL * SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL * Electrolytic Technologies Corporation, Miami, FL

417

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Row"

418

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2011 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Printable Version 2011 Annual Progress Report II. Hydrogen Production This section of the 2011 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program focuses on hydrogen production. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview, Sara Dillich, DOE A. Distributed Bio-Derived Liquid Production Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming, David King, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, Stefan Czernik, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids Using Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs), Balu Balachandran, Argonne National Laboratory Back to Top B. Biomass Gasification A Novel Slurry-Based Biomass Reforming Process, Sean Emerson, United

419

Microsoft Word - ASME FY08 Fuel Cell Peer Review Report_FINAL.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Meeting Host Organization Technology & Management Services, Inc. Steven T. Ostheim (412) 386-6485 Review Panel AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS Minking K. Chyu, Chair, Peer Review Panel Richard Laudenat, Chair, Peer Review Executive Committee Michael Tinkleman, Director, Research ASME Center for Research and Technology Development (202) 785-7394 Meeting Facilitator and Final Report Ross Brindle, Energetics Incorporated (410) 953-6239 Work Done Under Prime Contract Number DE-AC26-05NT41816 (Subtask 305.01.02.3) FINAL REPORT 2008 STRATEGIC CENTER FOR COAL FUEL CELL PROGRAM PEER REVIEW MEETING Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania April 21-25, 2008 MEETING SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS REPORT José D. Figueroa NETL Project Manager and Meeting Coordinator

420

Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report DOE's Office of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Near-frictionless carbon coatings for spark-ignited direct-injected fuel systems. Final report, January 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an investigation by the Tribology Section of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) into the use of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coatings for spark-ignited, direct-injected (SIDI) engine fuel systems. Direct injection is being pursued in order to improve fuel efficiency and enhance control over, and flexibility of, spark-ignited engines. SIDI technology is being investigated by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) as one route towards meeting both efficiency goals and more stringent emissions standards. Friction and wear of fuel injector and pump parts were identified as issues impeding adoption of SIDI by the OTT workshop on ''Research Needs Related to CIDI and SIDI Fuel Systems'' and the resulting report, Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Argonne's NFC coatings consistently reduced friction and wear in existing and reformulated gasolines. (2) Compared to three commercial DLC coatings, NFC provided the best friction reduction and protection from wear in gasoline and alternative fuels. (3) NFC was successfully deposited on production fuel injectors. (4) Customized wear tests were performed to simulate the operating environment of fuel injectors. (5) Industry standard lubricity test results were consistent with customized wear tests in showing the friction and wear reduction of NFC and the lubricity of fuels. (6) Failure of NFC coatings by tensile crack opening or spallation did not occur, and issues with adhesion to steel substrates were eliminated. (7) This work addressed several of the current research needs of the OAAT SIDI program, as defined by the OTT report Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines.

Hershberger, J.; Ozturk, O.; Ajayi, O. O.; Woodford, J. B.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Vehicles Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on AddThis.com... Fuel Prices As gasoline prices increase, alternative fuels appeal more to vehicle fleet managers and consumers. Like gasoline, alternative fuel prices can fluctuate based on location, time of year, and political climate. Alternative Fuel Price Report

424

Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Maria L. Ghirardi (Primary Contact), Paul W. King, Kathleen Ratcliff and David Mulder National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 384-6312 Email: maria.ghirardi@nrel.gov DOE Manager Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Subcontractors: * Dr. Sergey Kosourov, Institute of Basic Biological Problems, RAS, Pushchino, Russia * Dr. Eric Johnson, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Project Start Date: October 1, 2000 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Primary Objectives

425

National Codes and Standards Coordination - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Carl Rivkin, (Primary Contact), Chad Blake, Robert Burgess, William Buttner, and Matthew Post National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3839 Email: carl.rivkin@nrel.gov DOE Manager Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * CSA, Standards, Cleveland, OH * FP2 Fire Protection Engineering, Golden, CO * GWS Solutions, Tolland, CT * Kelvin Hecht, Avon, CT * MorEvents, Englewood, CO * SAE International (SAE), Warrendale, PA

426

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XV-1 XV-1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program A Aceves, Salvador. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .III.11 Adzic, Radoslav . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V.D.6 Ahluwalia, Rajesh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IV.E.1, V.A.4 Ainscough, Chris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V.A.8 Anton, Don . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IV.D.1 Arif, Muhammad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V.A.6 Atanasoski, Radoslav . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V.D.3 Autrey, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IV.H.16 Ayers, Katherine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II.D.2, II.D.5 B Baxter-Clemmons, Shannon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IX.1, X.4

427

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First Results Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the early implementation experience for the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, the largest fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States. The ZEBA Demonstration group includes five participating transit agencies: AC Transit (lead transit agency), Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Golden Gate Transit (GGT), San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), and San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of LASL are presented. The three programs involved are: general-purpose heat source development; space nuclear safety; and fuels program. Three impact tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of a high temperature reentry pulse and the use of CBCF on impact performance. Additionally, two /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ pellets were encapsulated in Ir-0.3% W for impact testing. Results of the clad development test and vent testing are noted. Results of the environmental tests are summarized. Progress on the Stirling isotope power systems test and the status of the improved MHW tests are indicated. The examination of the impact failure of the iridium shell of MHFT-65 at a fuel pass-through continued. A test plan was written for vibration testing of the assembled light-weight radioisotopic heater unit. Progress on fuel processing is reported.

Maraman, W.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Reactivity initiated accident test series Test RIA 1-4 fuel behavior report. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents and discusses results from the final test in the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test Series, Test RIA 1-4, conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Nine preirradiated fuel rods in a 3 x 3 bundle configuration were subjected to a power burst while at boiling water reactor hot-startup system conditions. The test resulted in estimated axial peak, radial average fuel enthalpies of 234 cal/g UO/sub 2/ on the center rod, 255 cal/g UO/sub 2/ on the side rods, and 277 cal/g UO/sub 2/ on the corner rods. Test RIA 1-4 was conducted to investigate fuel coolability and channel blockage within a bundle of preirradiated rods near the present enthalpy limit of 280 cal/g UO/sub 2/ established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test design and conduct are described, and the bundle and individual rod thermal and mechanical responses are evaluated. Conclusions from this final test and the entire PBF RIA Test Series are presented.

Cook, B.A.; Martinson, Z.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Patterns of stove usage after introduction of an advanced cookstove: the long-term application of household sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Household air pollution generated from solid fuel use for cooking is one of the leading risk factors for ill-health globally. ... However, household usage of these stoves and resulting changes in usage of traditional polluting stoves is not well characterized. ...

Ajay Pillarisetti; Mayur Vaswani; Darby Jack; Kalpana Balakrishnan; Michael N. Bates; Narendra K. Arora; Kirk R. Smith

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

New MEA Materials for Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) Performance, Durability, and Cost - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Fletcher (Primary Contact), Philip Cox University of North Florida (UNF) 1 UNF Drive Jacksonville, FL 32224 Phone: (904) 620-1844 Email: jfletche@UNF.edu DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000475 Subcontractors: * University of Florida, Gainesville, FL * Northeastern University, Boston, MA * Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells, Swindon, UK

432

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fuels Technologies subprogram supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle users with cost-competitive options that enable high fuel economy with low emissions, and contribute to petroleum displacement.

433

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D Progress Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fuels Technologies subprogram supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle users with cost-competitive options that enable high fuel economy with low emissions, and contribute to petroleum displacement.

434

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fuel & Lubricant Technologies subprogram supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle users with cost-competitive options that enable high fuel economy with low emissions, and contribute to petroleum displacement.

435

Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives wer

Hitchcock, David

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

Power Generation from an Integrated Biomass Reformer and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SBIR Phase III) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Quentin Ming (Primary Contact), Patricia Irving InnovaTek, Inc. 3100 George Washington Way, Suite 108 Richland, WA 99354 Phone: (509) 375-1093 Email: ming@innovatek.com DOE Managers HQ: Charles Russomanno Phone: (202) 586-7543 Email: Charles.Russomanno@ee.doe.gov HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0004535 Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Establish the requirements and design for an integrated * fuel cell and fuel processor that will meet the technical and operational needs for distributed energy production. Develop and integrate key system components - *

437

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

438

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2012 Annual Progress Report - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Printable Version 2012 Annual Progress Report II. Hydrogen Production This section of the 2012 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program focuses on hydrogen production. Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview, Sara Dillich, U.S. Department of Energy A. Distributed Bio-Derived Liquid Production Biomass-Derived Liquids Distributed (Aqueous Phase) Reforming, David King, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming, Stefan Czernik, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Back to Top B. Biomass Gasification One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor, Mike Roberts, Gas Technology Institute Back to Top C. Separations Development of Hydrogen Selective Membranes/Modules as Reactors/Separators for Distributed Hydrogen Production, Paul Liu, Media

440

Hydrogen Materials and Components Compatibility - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Aaron Harris (Primary Contact), Brian Somerday, Chris San Marchi Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969 Livermore, CA 94551-0969 Phone: (925) 294-4530 Email: apharri@sandia.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October, 2003 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Complete Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Test * Method for Evaluating Material Compatibility for Compressed Hydrogen Applications - Phase I - Metals (CHMC1) document Issue Sandia report reflecting updated content from * Technical Reference website

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Integrated data base report--1996: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Inventories of most of these materials are reported as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1996, which is September 30, 1996. Commercial SNF and commercial uranium mill tailings inventories are reported on an end-of-calendar year (CY) basis. All SNF and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are SNF, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through FY 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hydrogen Emergency Response Training for First Responders - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

52 52 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Monte R. Elmore Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 902 Battelle Blvd. Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 372-6158 Email: monte.elmore@pnnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * Jennifer Hamilton, California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), Sacramento, CA * Hanford Fire Department, Richland, WA * Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency

444

Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells: Workshop Summary and Action Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report discusses the results of a January 13, 2011, workshop that focused on utilizing biowaste as an energy feedstock and converting this feedstock into heat and/or power using fuel cells. DOD and DOE are collaborating under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to pursue technology-driven solutions that reduce petroleum use, among other objectives. One of the solutions being explored under the MOU is leveraging waste as feedstock for fuel cell applications in fixed and deployed military operations.

445

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, 2013 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fiscal year (FY) 2013 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from May 13-16, 2013, at the Crystal City Marriott and Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

Not Available

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Benchmarking MapReduce Implementations for Application Usage Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementations for Application Usage Scenarios Zachariareal- world application usage scenarios, including data-implementations under different usage scenarios. We link the

Fadika, Zacharia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Operational Readiness Review Final Report for K Basin Fuel Transfer System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for startup of the K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS). The DOE ORR was conducted during the period November 6-18, 2002. The DOE ORR team concluded that the K Basin Fuel Transfer System is ready to start operations, subject to completion and verification of identified pre-start findings. The ORR was conducted in accordance with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) Plan of Action and the Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for K Basin Fuel Transfer System. Review activities consisted of staff interviews, procedure and document reviews, and observations of normal facility operations, operational upset conditions, and an emergency drill. The DOE ORR Team also reviewed and assessed the adequacy of the contractor ORR3 and the RL line management review. The team concurred with the findings and observations identified in these two reports. The DOE ORR for the FTS evaluated the contractor under single-shift operations. Of concern to the ORR Team was that SNF Project management intended to change from a single-shift FTS operation to a two-shift operation shortly after the completion of the DOE ORR. The ORR team did not assess two-shift FTS operations and the ability of the contractor to conduct a smooth transition from shift to shift. However, the DOE ORR team did observe an operational upset drill that was conducted during day shift and carried over into swing shift; during this drill, swing shift was staffed with fewer personnel as would be expected for two-shift operations. The facility was able to adequately respond to the event with the reduced level of staff. The ORR Team was also able to observe a Shift Manager turnover meeting when one shift manager had to be relieved during the middle of the day. The ORR Team did not have the opportunity to observe a shift turnover from one crew to another. The ORR Team has evaluated the risk of not observing this activity and considers the risk to be minimal based on the fact that operating staff are very familiar with the FTS equipment and its procedures, and because existing Conduct of Operations processes and procedures are adequate and implemented. Because the ORR Team has not observed two-shift FTS operations, we recommend that additional RL oversight be provided at the start of two-shift FTS operations to evaluate the adequacy of crew turnovers.

DAVIES, T.H.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Agriculture and Life Sciences Complex Usage Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture and Life Sciences Complex Usage Guidelines General Policies 1. Pursuant to Texas A Sciences Complex Usage Request Form and submit a copy to the building manager, Paul Gregg (phone: 979-777-2766, email: paul.gregg@ag.tamu.edu, office: AGLS 517F). The AGLS-ALCT Usage Request Form can be found at

449

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report I. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fuels that lead to a clean and sustainable energy future. Fuel cell vehicles running on renewable, storage, and delivery with transportation and stationary fuel cell activities. Under the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), the new Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells

450

Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Working to expand the usage of thermoelectric...

451

usage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This one-of-a-kind reference is unmatched in the breadth and scope of its coverage and serves as the primary reference for students and professionals in computer science and communications. The Dictionary feat...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Creativity in IS usage and workgroup performance: The mediating role of ambidextrous usage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Creativity in the use of information systems (IS) is critical to the performance and long-term success of organizations. Building on an organizational ambidexterity perspective, we investigate ambidexterity in IS usage which is defined as the capacity to simultaneously achieve exploitative usage and explorative usage at a workgroup level. This paper seeks to test the relationships among creative process, usage ambidexterity, and group performance. Based on a sample of 55 workgroups, we found that exploitative usage negatively influences usage ambidexterity while explorative usage positively influences it, and that usage ambidexterity positively influences group performance. Moreover, the findings indicate that usage ambidexterity mediates the effect of exploitative and explorative usage on group performance. Overall, the study contributes to greater clarity and a better understanding of how the creative process influences group performance.

Yumei Luo; Cheng Zhang; Yunjie Xu; Hong Ling

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Optical Scatterfield Metrology for Online Catalyst Coating Inspection of PEM (Fuel Cell) Soft Goods - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Eric Stanfield (Primary Contact), Michael Stocker National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 100 Bureau Drive, MS 8211 Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8211 Phone: (301) 975-5102 Email: eric.stanfield@nist.gov, michael.stocker@nist.gov DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421

454

Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual-Mode Operation with Low Degradation - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Eric Tang, Tony Wood, Sofiane Benhaddad, Casey Brown, Hongpeng He, Jeff Nelson, Oliver Grande, Ben Nuttall, Mark Richard, Randy Petri (Primary Contact) Versa Power Systems 10720 Bradford Road #110 Littleton, CO 80127 Phone: (303) 226-0762 Email: randy.petri@versa-power.com DOE Managers HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov

455

Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program. Progress report, April 1 to June 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All research and development on fuel reprocessing in the United States is managed under the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. Technical progress is reported in overview fashion. Conceptual studies for the proposed Breeder Reprocessing Engineering Test (BRET) have continued. Studies to date have confirmed the feasibility of modifying an existing DOE facility at Hanford, Washington. A study to measure the extent of plutonium polymerization during steam-jet transfers of nitric acid solutions indicated polymer would appear only after several successive transfers at temperatures of 75/sup 0/C or higher. Fast-Flux Test Facility fuel was processed for the first time in the Solvent Extraction Test Facility. Studies of krypton release from pulverized sputter-deposited Ni-Y-Kr matrices have shown that the release rate is inversely proportional to the particle radius at 200/sup 0/C. Preparation of the initial 500-g batch of mixed oxide gel-spheres was completed. Fabrication processing at HEDL of mixed oxide gel-spheres (DIPRES process) was initiated. Operational testing of both 8 packs of the centrifugal contactor has been completed. Fabrication of both the prototypical disassembly system and the prototypical shear system has been initiated. Planning for FY 1984 installation and modification work in the integrated equipment list facility was completed. Acceptance tests of the original Integrated Process Demonstration system have been completed. Instrumentation and controls work with the prototype multiwavelength uranium photometer was successful and has been expanded to continuously and simultaneously monitor three process streams (raffinate, aqueous feed, and organic strip) in the secondary extraction cycle. Major efforts of the environmental, safeguards, and waste management areas were directed toward providing data for BRET.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Some of our accomplishments and findings are: The product distribution and reaction mechanisms for pyrolysis of alkylcyclohexanes at 450{degree}C have been investigated in detail. In this report we present results of pyrolysis of cyclohexane and a variety of alkylcyclohexanes in nitrogen atmospheres, along with pseudo-first order rate constants, and possible reaction mechanisms for the origin of major pyrolysis products are presented. Addition of PX-21 activated carbon effectively stops the formation of carbonaceous solids on reactor walls during thermal stressing of JPTS. A review of physical and chemical interactions in supercritical fluids has been completed. Work has begun on thermal stability studies of a second generation of fuel additives, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-l-naphthol, 9,10-phenanthrenediol, phthalan, and 1,2-benzenedimethanol, and with careful selection of the feedstock, it is possible to achieve 85--95% conversion of coal to liquids, with 40--50% of the dichloromethane-soluble products being naphthalenes. (Further hydrogenation of the naphthalenes should produce the desired highly stable decalins.)

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Assessment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Assessment The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) prepared a report, Opportunities for DOD Use of Alternative and Renewable Fuels, on the use and potential use of

458

Factors affecting the usage of intranet: A confirmatory study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extent of intranet implementation and use within individual organizations has significant implications for organizational performance. Previous studies on technology adoption in the workplace suggest that acceptance behavior is influenced by a variety of antecedent factors including individual differences, social influences, beliefs, attitudes, and situational influences. This study reports on an investigation of extended TAM (Technology Acceptance Model) using external factors and subjective norm influencing usage of intranet within organizations. The external factors affecting the perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and usage of intranet include technical support, Web experience, task equivocality, and task interdependence. The subjective norm is the mediating variable and external variables indirectly affect usage of intranet indirectly through their effects on subjective norm. Based on a survey of 333 intranet users from 10 major Korean companies, this study uses a structural equation model to test the research model. The results indicate that usage of intranet is influenced by technical support, Web experience, task equivocality, and perceived ease of use. Technical support and Web experience influences the perceived ease of use. Technical support, task equivocality, and task interdependence have positive effects on the subjective norm. Usage of intranet which is a dependent variable in this model, is influenced by technical support, Web experience task interdependence, and perceived ease of use.

Sangjae Lee; Byung Gon Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Application of Electronic Serial Usage Statistics in a National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional measures of library performance – walk-in visitors, number of users attending presentations, classes, number of individual subscriptions processed, etc. – do not reflect the increased activity and use of library products and services. The Hanford Technical Library is physically removed from the main campus of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and thus necessitates having a robust online presence in order to effectively reach and provide services to library users. Online usage statistics have become vital in convincing Laboratory management to invest funding the library at continuing or increasing levels of demand for library services. E-serial usage statistics in particular give the Hanford Technical Library a myriad of information on user behavior, research trends, collection development, and act as important analytical tools which support resource allocation analysis, reporting, and managerial decision-making. However, there are many problems with publisher and vendor supplied usage statistics and possible solutions are proposed.

Noonan, Christine F.; McBurney, Melissa K.

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

Commercial Building Tenant Energy Usage Aggregation and Privacy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A growing number of building owners are benchmarking their building energy use. This requires the building owner to acquire monthly whole-building energy usage information, which can be challenging for buildings in which individual tenants have their own utility meters and accounts with the utility. Some utilities and utility regulators have turned to aggregation of customer energy use data (CEUD) as a way to give building owners whole-building energy usage data while protecting customer privacy. Meter profile aggregation adds a layer of protection that decreases the risk of revealing CEUD as the number of meters aggregated increases. The report statistically characterizes the similarity between individual energy usage patterns and whole-building totals at various levels of meter aggregation.

Livingston, Olga V.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Anderson, David M.; Wang, Na

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel usage reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electrochemical Reversible Formation of Alane - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Ragaiy Zidan 1 (Primary Contact), Douglas A. Knight 1 , Scott Greenway 2 1 Savannah River National Laboratory 999-2W Room 121 Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Phone: (803) 646-8876 Email: ragaiy.zidan@srnl.doe.gov 2 Greenway Energy DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2006 Project End Date: October 1, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify means for achieving energy efficiency * improvements of over 50%. Perform electrochemical production of alane and alane * adducts in a pressurized electrochemical cell and demonstrate production of α-alane. Demonstrate the formation of alane and the regeneration *

462

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Darlene Steward National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: IDC Energy Insights, Framingham, MA Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify the capacity (kg/day) and capital costs * associated with "Early Commercial" hydrogen stations (defined below) Identify cost metrics for larger numbers of stations and * larger capacities Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

463

Photoelectrochemical Materials: Theory and Modeling - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Muhammad N. Huda (Primary Contact), Yanfa Yan*, Todd Deutsch*, Mowafak M. Al-Jassim* and A. John A. Turner* Department of Physics University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX 76019 Phone: (817) 272-1097 Email: huda@uta.edu *National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5892 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX Project Start Date: September 2009 Project End Date: August 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives For FY 2012, the main goal of this project was to improve materials efficiency by understanding and hence tuning the following by theoretical/computational modeling

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Composite Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Barton Smith (Primary Contact), Barbara J. Frame and Lawrence M. Anovitz Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) P. O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 574-2196 Email: smithdb@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov Start Date: January 2005 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Complete high-pressure cyclic fatigue tests to verify that * a combination of H 2 environment and stress does not adversely affect composite pipeline integrity and service life. Identify the requisite data, provide data, and contribute * to the codification of hydrogen composite pipelines, in

465

State and Local Government Partnership - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Joel M. Rinebold Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT), Inc. 222 Pitkin Street, Suite 101 East Hartford, CT 06108 Phone: (860) 291-8832 Email: Jrinebold@ccat.us DOE Managers HQ: Connie Bezanson Phone: (202) 586-8055 Email: Connie.Bezanson@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-08GO18116 / 003 Project Start Date: September 1, 2008 Project End Date: December 31, 2011 Project Objectives Foster strong relationships among federal, state, and * local government officials, industry, and appropriate stakeholders. Serve as a conduit between the DOE and state and local *

466

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Arun Madan MVSystems, Incorporated (MVS) 500 Corporate Circle, Suite L Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 271-9907 Email: ArunMadan@aol.com or amadan@mvsystemsinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-07GO17105, A00 Subcontractor: University of Hawaii at Manoa (UH), Honolulu, HI Project Start Date: September 1, 2007 Project End Date: December 31, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Work closely with the DOE Working Group on * Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production for optimizing PEC materials and devices. Develop new PEC film materials compatible with high- *

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Component Standard Research and Development - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Robert Burgess (Primary Contact), William Buttner, Matthew Post, Carl Rivkin, Chad Blake National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3823 Email: robert.burgess@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: SAE International, Troy, MI Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Support development of new codes and standards * required for commercialization of hydrogen technologies. Create code language that is based on the latest scientific *

468

Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Stefan Czernik (Primary Contact), Richard French, Michael Penev National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 384-6135 Email: Stefan.Czernik@nrel.gov DOE Manager Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-1623 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Project Start Date: October 1, 2004 Project End Date: September 30, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives By 2012, develop and demonstrate distributed reforming * technology for producing hydrogen from bio-oil at $4.10/ kilogram (kg) purified hydrogen. Demonstrate integrated performance at bench scale * including bio-oil vaporization, partial-oxidation (POX)

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Hydrogen Embrittlement of Structural Steels - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Daniel Dedrick (Primary Contact), Brian Somerday Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969 Livermore, CA 94550 Phone: (925) 294-1552 Email: dededri@sandia.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: January, 2007 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Determine the threshold level of oxygen impurity * concentration required to mitigate accelerated fatigue crack growth of X52 steel in hydrogen at gas pressures up to 3,000 psi (21 MPa) Measure the fatigue crack growth (da/dN vs. * ∆K) relationship at constant H 2 gas pressure in X65 pipeline

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Accelerated Testing Validation - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Rangachary Mukundan 1 (Primary Contact), Rod Borup 1 , John Davey 1 , Roger Lujan 1 , Dennis Torraco 1 , David Langlois 1 , Fernando Garzon 1 , Dusan Spernjak 1 , Joe Fairweather 1 , Sivagaminathan Balasubramanian 2 , Adam Weber 2 , Mike Brady 3 , Karren More 3 , Greg James 4 , Dana Ayotte 4 , and Steve Grot 5 1 Los Alamos National Laboratory MS D429, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 665-8523 Email: Mukundan@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 3 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 4 Ballard Power Systems, Burnaby, BC V5J 5J8 Canada 5 Ion Power, New Castle, DE Project Start Date: Oct 2009

471

Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Donna Heimiller National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Understand the hydrogen production requirements for a * future demand scenario Estimate low-carbon energy resources required to meet * the future scenario demand Compare resource requirements to current consumption * and projected future consumption Determine resource availability geographically and on a *

472

Transport in PEMFC Stacks - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Cortney Mittelsteadt (Primary Contact), Hui Xu, Junqing Ma (GES); John Van Zee, Sirivatch Shimpalee, Visarn Lilavivat (USC); James E. McGrath Myoungbae Lee, Nobuo Hara, Kwan-Soo Lee, Chnng Hyun (VT); Don Conners, Guy Ebbrell (Ballard); Kevin Russell (Tech Etch) Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC 89 Rumford Ave. Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0529 Email: cmittelsteadt@ginerinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000471 Subcontractors: * Tech-Etch, Plymouth, MA * Ballard Material Products, Inc., Lowell, MA

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Development of a portable fuel-cetane-quality monitor. Interim report, Nov 86-Nov 90  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a program sponsored by the U.S. Army Belvoir Research, Development and Engineering Center, researchers at Southwest Research Institute have been developing a new procedure for rating the ignition quality of fuels for diesel engines. The ultimate goal is to develop a new scale (to replace the current cetane scale) and procedure. The preliminary goal, however, is to develop an apparatus and procedure to determine cetane number using ignition delay time as determined in a small constant-volume combustion bomb. The development activities have involved experiments designed to determine the relationship between the various experimental variables, experiments designed to assess the quality of the cetane determinations, and development activities designed to improve or refine the calibration and test procedures. This report is a summary of the findings of these experiments and a discussion of the validity of the techniques for cetane determination.

Ryan, T.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Technology Validation Sub-Program Overview - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program IntroductIon The Technology Validation sub-program demonstrates, tests, and validates hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and uses the results to provide feedback to the Program's research and development (R&D) activities. This year, the sub-program concluded the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration, the principal emphasis of the sub-program over the past decade, which encompassed the co- development and integration of hydrogen infrastructure with hydrogen fuel cell-powered vehicles, allowing industry to assess progress toward technology readiness. In addition, the Technology Validation sub-program completed a project on combined hydrogen, heat, and power (tri-generation or CHHP). Continuing efforts

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