Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The latest trend of turbocharging technologies for emissions compliance and fuel economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recent developments in turbocharging technology play a vital role for engine manufacturers in order to meet the market demand for fuel economy and to comply with local emissions regulations. It is becoming more difficult for an engine manufacturer to decide on the best turbocharging system for their application. Wastegate, variable geometry, two-stage, sequential and turbocompound systems all have their merits and compromises but choosing the best option for each application requires significant knowledge and analysis. This paper provides an overview of different turbocharging systems and its merits and compromises involved in each solution to suit a particular engine application. More emphasis is given to the use of variable geometry turbocharger systems and two stage sequential charging systems because of their ability to provide higher boosting pressure at low engine speeds and better transient response. The introduction of legislation to reduce CO2 emissions is currently driving the passenger car and heavy duty engine market to explore different options of waste heat recovery methods. This paper briefly describes waste heat recovery systems like turbocompound and their potential for fuel economy improvement.

G. Subramanian; M. Jondhale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Trends of petroleum fuels  

SciTech Connect

Trends in properties of motor gasolines for the years 1942 through 1984; diesel fuels for the years 1950 through 1983; aviation fuels for the years 1947 through 1983; and heating oils for the years 1955 through 1984, have been evaluated based upon data contained in surveys prepared and published by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) formerly the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). The surveys for motor gasolines were conducted under a cooperative agreement with the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) and the Bureau of Mines from 1935 through 1948 and in cooperation with the American Petroleum Institute (API) since 1948 for all surveys. The motor gasoline surveys have been published twice annually since 1935 describing the properties of motor gasolines throughout the country. Other surveys prepared in cooperation with API and the Bureau of Mines, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Department of Energy, and currently NIPER were aviation gasolines beginning in 1947, diesel fuels in 1950, aviation turbine fuels in 1951, and heating oils, formerly burner fuel oils, in 1955. Various companies throughout the country obtain samples of motor gasolines from retail outlets and refinery samples for the other surveys, and analyze the samples using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) procedures. The analytical data are sent to the Bartlesville Center for survey preparation and distribution. A summary report has been assembled from data in 83 semiannual surveys for motor gasolines that shows trends throughout the entire era from winter 19

Shelton, E.M.; Woodward, P.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circle of Measuring Automobile Fuel Use, Energy Policy 21. (M. , Dolan, K. , 1993b, Fuel Prices and Economy: Factors1994. New Car Test and Actual Fuel Economy: Yet Another Gap?

Schipper, Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circle of Measuring Automobile Fuel Use, Energy Policy 21. (1995. Determinants of Automobile Energy Use and Energythe baseline evolution of automobile fuel economy in Europe.

Schipper, Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engine itself is more efficient, providing potentially more power for a given average fuel consumption.

Schipper, Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been if the diesel/gasoline new car market shares had beendiesel and gasoline new car fuel economy in 2005 in two important European markets.diesels is in part responsible for an increase in driving compared to what would have obtained if market

Schipper, Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

9

Fuel Consumption and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculating fuel consumption and emissions is a typical offline analysis ... simulations or real trajectory data) and the engine speed (as obtained from gear-shift schemes ... as input and is parameterized by veh...

Martin Treiber; Arne Kesting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited) Trends Since 1751 approximately 337 billion metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these emissions have occurred since the mid 1970s. The 2007 global fossil-fuel carbon emission estimate, 8365 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 1.7% increase from 2006. Globally, liquid and solid fuels accounted for 76.3% of the emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement production in 2007. Combustion of gas fuels (e.g., natural gas) accounted for 18.5% (1551 million metric tons of carbon) of the total emissions from fossil fuels in 2007 and reflects a gradually increasing global utilization of natural gas. Emissions from

11

Low emissions diesel fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas engines are predominately unburned fuel, therefore, the non-methane hydrocarbon fraction of THC exhaust emissions typically trends

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Retrofit Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle Retrofit Emissions Inspection Process to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Retrofit Emissions Inspection Process on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Retrofit Emissions Inspection Process on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Retrofit Emissions Inspection Process on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Retrofit Emissions Inspection Process on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Retrofit Emissions Inspection Process on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Retrofit Emissions Inspection Process on AddThis.com...

15

Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania » Japan Oceania » Japan Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The history of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from Japan is remarkable for the abrupt change that occurred in 1973. With postwar growth at 9.8% per year from 1950 to 1973, total emissions were virtually constant from 1974-1987. From 1987-96, emissions grew 25.3% reaching 329 million metric tons of carbon. Growth during this period was characterized by a return to mid-1970s consumption levels for liquid petroleum products and increased contributions from coal and natural gas use. Since 1996, Japan's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have vacilated and now total 329 million metric tons of carbon in 2008. Based on United Nations energy trade data for 2008, Japan is the world's largest importer of coal (184 million metric tons) and

16

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

17

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

18

Design and Optimization of Future Aircraft for Assessing the Fuel Burn Trends of Commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aircraft R1 Maximum payload at maximum range SFC Engine specific fuel consumption Sref Reference area STADesign and Optimization of Future Aircraft for Assessing the Fuel Burn Trends of Commercial Francisco, CA 94104, U.S.A. Accurately predicting the fuel burn performance and CO2 emissions of future

Alonso, Juan J.

19

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

20

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuel Efficiency and Emissions |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

22

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission or Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on AddThis.com...

23

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on AddThis.com...

24

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations

25

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the states electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

26

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

27

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

28

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Emissions Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section...

29

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Test Requirement to someone by E-mail Emissions Test Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Test Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Test Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Test Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Test Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Test Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Test Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

30

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section...

31

People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asia Asia » People's Republic of China People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends According to reported energy statistics, coal production and use in China has increased ten-fold since the 1960s. As a result, Chinese fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have more than doubled 2000 alone. At 1.92 billion metric tons of carbon in 2008, the People's Republic of China is the world's largest emitter of CO2 due to fossil-fuel use and cement production. Even with the reported decline in Chinese emissions from 1997 to 1999, China's industrial emissions of CO2 have grown phenomenally since 1950, when China stood tenth among nations based on annual fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. From 1970 to 1997, China's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions grew at an annual rate of

32

North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East » North Korea Far East » North Korea North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions for North Korea, or the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, averaged 11.2% growth from 1950-93, reaching 71 million metric tons of carbon. Since 1993 according to published UN energy statistics, fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have declined 70% to 21.4 million metric tons of carbon. As the world's 14th largest producer of coal, it is no surprise North Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions record is dominated by emissions from coal burning. Coal consumption accounted for 93% of the 2008 CO2 emission total. With no natural gas usage, another 3.4% currently comes from liquid petroleum consumption, and the remainder is from cement

33

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

SciTech Connect

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Vehicle Ethanol Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Ethanol Vehicle Emissions When blended with gasoline for use as a vehicle fuel, ethanol can offer some emissions benefits over gasoline, depending on vehicle type, engine

35

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Vehicle Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions When used as a vehicle fuel, biodiesel offers some tailpipe and considerable greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions benefits over conventional

36

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Fuel Cells Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per...

37

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Credits Any state mobile emissions reduction credits program must allow credits for emissions reductions achieved by converting a vehicle to operate on an

38

South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East » South Korea Far East » South Korea South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends South Korea, or the Republic of Korea, is the world's tenth largest emitter of CO2 based on 2008 fossil-fuel consumption and cement production with 139 million metric tons of carbon. From 1946-1997 South Korea experienced phenomenal growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions with a growth rate that averaged 11.5%. Initial growth in emissions was due to coal consumption, which still accounts for 46.9% of South Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. Since the late 1960s oil consumption has been a major source of emissions. South Korea is the world's fifth largest importer of crude oil. Natural gas became a significant source of CO2 for the first time in 1987, as South

39

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool [1] NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool This interactive tool enables the user to look at both total and power sector CO2 emissions from the use of coal, oil, or natural gas, over the period 1990 to 2030. One can use the tool to compare five of the larger CO2 emitters to each other or to overall world emissions. The data are from the

40

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicles » Propane Vehicles » Propane Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Propane Vehicle Emissions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Control Emissions Control Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Control Requirement Heavy-duty diesel vehicles used to perform federally funded state public works contracts must be powered by engines with Level 3 emissions control

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reductions Emissions Reductions Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reductions Grants The Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program (Program) provides incentives to cover the incremental cost of purchasing engines and

43

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

44

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles...

45

Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels This fact sheet provides an overview of the...

46

Russia Federation Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Centrally Planned Europe » Russian Federation Russia Federation Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Since 1992 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from the Russian Federation have dropped 23% to 466 million metric tons of carbon, still the fourth largest emitting country in the world and the largest emitter of the republics comprising the former USSR. Emissions from gas consumption still represent the largest fraction (49.1%) of Russia's emissions and only recently have returned to the 1992 level. Emissions from coal consumption have dropped 25.5% since 1992 and presently account for 26.6% of Russia's emissions. Russia has the largest population of any Eastern European country with a population of 141 million people. From a per capita standpoint, Russia's

47

Recent Trends in Emerging Transportation Fuels and Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several recent trends indicate current developments in energy and transportation fuels. World trade in biofuels is developing in ethanol, wood chips, and vegetable oil / biodiesel with some countries being exp...

B. G. Bunting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Alternative Fuels Market and Policy Trends (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Market forces and policies are increasing opportunities for alternative fuels. There is no one-size-fits-all, catch-all, silver-bullet fuel. States play a critical role in the alternative fuel market and are taking a leading role.

Schroeder, A. N.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

50

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels This calculator currently focuses on electricity for a number of reasons. The public's interest in vehicles fueled by electricity is high, and as a result consumers are interested in better understanding the emissions created when electricity is produced. For vehicles that are fueled solely by electricity, tailpipe emissions are zero, so electricity production accounts for all GHG emissions associated with such vehicles. Finally, GHG emissions from electricity production vary significantly by region, which makes a calculator like this one-which uses regional data instead of national averages-particularly useful. If you want to compare total tailpipe plus fuel production GHG emissions for an electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle to those for a gasoline

51

A Universal Dual-Fuel Controller for OEM/Aftermarket Diesel Engineswith Comprehensive Fuel & Emission Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents a universal dual fuel ratio controller designed to control the fueling and emissions of dual fuel systems

52

Global demographic trends and future carbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...traditional and commercial) Oil and natural gas Crude oil and primary natural gas Electricity Electricity, heat...and commercial sectors (as a substitute for electricity), nuclear...liquid fuels (ethanol), syngas, and hydrogen used by the...

Brian C. O'Neill; Michael Dalton; Regina Fuchs; Leiwen Jiang; Shonali Pachauri; Katarina Zigova

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Title Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Kean, Andrew J., David Littlejohn, George Ban-Weiss, Robert A. Harley, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Melissa M. Lunden Journal Atmospheric Environment Abstract Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 ± 6%, from 640 ± 40 to 400 ± 20 mg kg-1. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

54

Chapter 16 - Fuel Effects on Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The majority of fuels consumed by internal combustion engines (ICE) are fossil fuels, mainly gasoline and diesel fuel. Through the fuels' history, their properties have kept changing because of various reasons, such as crude oil prices, progress in refinery technology, changes in vehicle technology, environmental legislation, and political considerations. The environmental legislation has become the most important factor affecting the requirements of automotive fuels, because of: additional limitations caused by changes in vehicle technology (such as the need of unleaded gasoline for catalyst-equipped vehicles); the growing importance of direct fuel effects (their weighting factor rising sharply as a result of very low emission levels mandated in ecological regulations). Numerous research works have been performed to investigate the fuel composition effects on engine exhaust emissions. The effects of different fuel variables on regulated (CO, HC, NOx, PM) and unregulated (benzene, 1,3-butadiene, aldehydes, and PAH) engine exhaust emissions were investigated in the foregoing and in many other research programs. The accumulated knowledge allows main fuel parameters to be defined affecting pollutants emission and fuel/engine/emissions relationships to be revealed with good agreement between different studies.

Yoram Zvirin; Marcel Gutman; Leonid Tartakovsky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Nitrogen oxides emission trends in Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides from space provide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5 Nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia Abstract Monthly emission estimates present first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric

Haak, Hein

56

Policy Analysis Changing Trends in Sulfur Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global warming, but this warming effect could be partially offset by reductions in the emissions of black , A N D H I R O M A S A U E D A # Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, The University-thirds of Asian SO2. The decline was due to a reduction in industrial coal use, a slow- down of the Chinese

Jacobson, Mark

57

Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC) Activity Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC) Activity 2003 DEER Conference...

58

The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

59

Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance Results of an...

60

Accurate Predictions of Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

on Combustion and Emissions in Engines Using CFD Simulations With Detailed Fuel Chemistry Accurate Predictions of Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions in Engines Using...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The European carbon balance. Part 1: fossil fuel emissions  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed the magnitude, the trends and the uncertainties of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions in the European Union 25 member states (hereafter EU-25), based on emission inventories from energy-use statistics. The stability of emissions during the past decade at EU-25 scale masks decreasing trends in some regions, offset by increasing trends elsewhere. In the recent 4 years, the new Eastern EU-25 member states have experienced an increase in emissions, reversing after a decade-long decreasing trend. Mediterranean and Nordic countries have also experienced a strong acceleration in emissions. In Germany, France and United Kingdom, the stability of emissions is due to the decrease in the industry sector, offset by an increase in the transportation sector. When four different inventories models are compared, we show that the between-models uncertainty is as large as 19% of the mean for EU-25, and even bigger for individual countries. Accurate accounting for fossil CO2 emissions depends on a clear understanding of system boundaries, i.e. emitting activities included in the accounting. We found that the largest source of errors between inventories is the use of distinct systems boundaries (e.g. counting or not bunker fuels, cement manufacturing, nonenergy products). Once these inconsistencies are corrected, the between-models uncertainty can be reduced down to 7% at EU-25 scale. The uncertainty of emissions at smaller spatial scales than the country scale was analyzed by comparing two emission maps based upon distinct economic and demographic activities. A number of spatial and temporal biases have been found among the two maps, indicating a significant increase in uncertainties when increasing the resolution at scales finer than 200 km. At 100km resolution, for example, the uncertainty of regional emissions is estimated to be 60 gCm2 yr1, up to 50% of the mean. The uncertainty on regional fossil-fuel CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere could be reduced by making accurate 14C measurements in atmospheric CO2, and by combining them with transport models.

Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Paris, J. D. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Peylin, Philippe [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Piao, S. L. [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; River, L. [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Levin, I. [University of Heidelberg; Pregger, T. [Universitat Stuttgart; Scholz, Y. [Universitat Stuttgart; Friedrich, R. [Universitat Stuttgart; Schulze, E.-D. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Exergy analysis of combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of a dual-fuel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of compression ignition engines working on a dual fuel mode are investigated numerically and their exergetic efficiencies are determined. The model has been validated with available experimental results. The simulation results show that dual fuel engine combustion and trend of NOx emissions are well predicted by the present model. Parametric study showed improvements in engine performance and an increase in NOx emissions with decreased advanced injection timing of the pilot fuel as well as with increased intake temperature and pilot fuel quantity. The maximum values for energy and exergy are found to be comparable.

Mohamed H. Morsy; Abdelrahman El-Leathy; Arif Hepbasli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NREL: Transportation Research - Emissions and Fuel Economy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions by advancing the development of new fuels and engines that deliver both high efficiency and reduced emissions. Emissions that result in...

64

Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

Pitstick, M.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.  

SciTech Connect

Acid deposition is a serious problem throughout much of Asia. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) have been increasing steadily, as nations strive to increase their levels of economic development. Coal and fuel oil have been the main choices for powering industrial development; and, until recently, only a few countries (notably Japan and Taiwan) had taken significant steps to avert the atmospheric emissions that accompany fuel combustion. This paper discusses trends in emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} that have occurred in Asian countries in the period 1985--1997, using results from the RAINS-ASIA computer model and energy-use trends from the IEA Energy Statistics and Balances database. Emissions of SO{sub 2} in Asia grew from 26.6 Tg in 1985 to 33.7 Tg in 1990 and to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Though SO{sub 2} emissions used to grow as fast as fossil-fuel use, recent limitations on the sulfur content of coal and oil have slowed the growth. The annual-average emissions growth between 1990 and 1997 was only 1.1%, considerably less than the economic growth rate. Emissions of NO{sub x}, on the other hand, continue to grow rapidly, from 14.1 Tg in 1985 to 18.7 Tg in 1990 and 28.5 Tg in 1997, with no signs of abating. Thus, though SO{sub 2} remains the major contributor to acidifying emissions in Asia, the role of NO{sub x}, will become more and more important in the future.

Streets, D. G.; Tsai, N. Y.; Akimoto, H.; Oka, K.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Comparison of Combustion and Emissions of Diesel Fuels and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Comparison of Combustion and Emissions of Diesel Fuels and Oxygenated Fuels in a Modern DI Diesel Engine A Comparison of Combustion and Emissions of Diesel Fuels and Oxygenated...

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School District School District Emissions Reduction Policies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School District Emissions Reduction Policies

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants -  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Emissions Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements -  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fleet Emissions Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Emissions Reduction Requirements - South Coast on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

70

Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect

Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

Eteman, Shahrokh

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Employer Invested Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Employer Invested Emissions Reduction Funding - South Coast on AddThis.com...

72

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Greenhouse Gas State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reduction Strategy on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

73

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mobile Source Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

74

The Effect of Diesel Fuel Properties on Emissions-Restrained...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(varying fuel properties and engine control parameters) were used to optimize fuel consumption subject to emissions and engine performance constraints. deer08kumar.pdf More...

75

Rigorous HDD Emissions Capabilities of Shell GTL Fuel | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GTL Fuel 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deercherillo.pdf More Documents & Publications Verification of Shell GTL Fuel...

76

Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

77

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the diesel engines fuel consumption and emissions doEmissions and Fuel Consumption Model engine manufacturersEmissions and Fuel Consumption Model Connection to engine

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using Model-Based Transient Calibration Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using...

79

Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirements Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirements...

80

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2010 -- Washington D.C. ft007sluder2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Fuel Effects on Emissions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY CONDITIONS HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING...

82

Cold-Start Performance and Emissions Behavior of Alcohol Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions Behavior of Alcohol Fuels in an SIDI Engine Using Transient Hardware-In-Loop Test Meth Cold-Start Performance and Emissions Behavior of Alcohol Fuels in an SIDI Engine...

83

Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This study presents full quantification of biodiesel's impact on emissions and fuel economy with the inclusion of DPF regeneration events.

84

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions to someone by E-mail Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Maintenance & Safety Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions Natural gas burns cleaner than conventional gasoline or diesel due to its

85

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Emissions State Emissions Reductions Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Emissions Reductions Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Emissions Reductions Requirements Washington state must limit greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve the

86

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Emissions Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Emissions Reduction Each full-sized school bus with a Model Year (MY) 1994 or newer engine that transports children in the state must be equipped with specific emissions

87

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Maine has adopted the California motor vehicle emissions standards

88

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Tax Credit An income tax credit is available to individuals who install diesel particulate emissions reduction technology equipment at any truck stop,

89

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Connecticut Low Emission Vehicles II Program requires that all new

90

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emissions School Low Emissions School Bus Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emissions School Bus Grants The Lower-Emission School Bus Program (Program) provides grant funding for

91

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle Standards New vehicles sold or offered for sale in Vermont must meet California emissions and compliance requirements in Title 13 of the California Code of

92

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards New Jersey has adopted California motor vehicle emissions standards as set

93

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Washington adopted the California motor vehicle emission standards in Title

94

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Maryland has adopted the California motor vehicle emission standards in

95

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards California's LEV II exhaust emissions standards apply to Model Year (MY)

96

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emissions Bus Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan As part of a state effort to identify strategies to expand the availability

97

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle Requirement All Model Year (MY) 2007 and later heavy-duty vehicles sold, leased, or

98

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Any new light-duty passenger car, light-duty truck, or medium-duty

99

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Under the Oregon LEV Program, all new passenger cars, light-duty trucks,

100

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Pennsylvania Clean Vehicles Program requires that all new passenger

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management has adopted

102

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Credit An income tax credit is available to individuals who purchase or lease a

103

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Massachusetts LEV Program requires all new passenger cars and

104

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Under the Clean Cars Act of 2008, the Mayor of the District of Columbia

105

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Emissions School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

106

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards All new passenger vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty vehicles

107

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emissions Vehicle Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) Tax Exemption

108

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Promotion Plan

109

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels Exhaust emissions from engines operating in advanced combustion modes such as PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) and HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) are analyzed with an array of analytical tools. Furthermore, emissions from a variety of alternative fuels and mixtures thereof with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels are also measured. In addition to measuring the criteria pollutants nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HCs) are also measured and categorized based on chemistry. These chemical details of the emissions provide important information for optimizing combustion processes to maximize fuel efficiency while minimizing emissions

110

Nanoparticle Emissions from a Heavy-Duty Engine Running on Alternative Diesel Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoparticle Emissions from a Heavy-Duty Engine Running on Alternative Diesel Fuels ... Neat vegetable oils or animal fats are not suitable for high-speed diesel engines, and thus a transesterification process is required to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). ... General trends in size distribution measurements are shown in Figure 1. ...

Juha Heikkil; Annele Virtanen; Topi Rnkk; Jorma Keskinen; Pivi Aakko-Saksa; Timo Murtonen

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum and Emission Reduction Planning Tool on AddThis.com... Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool

112

CO{sub 2} emission calculations and trends  

SciTech Connect

Evidence that the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration has risen during the past several decades is irrefutable. Most of the observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} is believed to result from CO{sub 2} releases from fossil-fuel burning. The United Nations (UN) Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), signed in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992, reflects global concern over the increasing CO{sub 2} concentration and its potential impact on climate. One of the convention`s stated objectives was the ``stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. `` Specifically, the FCCC asked all 154 signing countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions, and it set nonbinding targets for some countries to control emissions by stabilizing them at 1990 levels by the year 2000. Given the importance of CO{sub 2} as a greenhouse gas, the relationship between CO{sub 2} emissions and increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels, and the potential impacts of a greenhouse gas-induced climate change; it is important that comprehensive CO{sub 2} emissions records be compiled, maintained, updated, and documented.

Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

114

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

115

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

116

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Study By October 13, 2013, the Washington Office of Financial Management must

117

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

118

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

119

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wisconsin Reduces Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on AddThis.com... Oct. 2, 2010 Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks

120

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.iea.org/co2highlights/co2highlights.pdf CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Screenshot References: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion[1] Overview "This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2008 selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information" Excel Spreadsheet References ↑ "CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transit Emissions and Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transit Emissions and Energy Reduction Assistance on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

122

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

123

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Low Emission Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Support for Low Support for Low Emission Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Low Emission Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Low Emission Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Low Emission Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Low Emission Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Low Emission Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Low Emission Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Support for Low Emission Vehicles The New Jersey legislature urges the United States Congress and President

124

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants

125

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Voluntary Airport Low Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program

126

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

127

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

128

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Airport Zero Emission Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com...

129

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Deployment Support on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

130

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Incentives and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle Incentives and Technical Training - San Joaquin Valley to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Incentives and Technical Training - San Joaquin Valley on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Incentives and Technical Training - San Joaquin Valley on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Incentives and Technical Training - San Joaquin Valley on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Incentives and Technical Training - San Joaquin Valley on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Incentives and Technical Training - San Joaquin Valley on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low

132

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions Comparisons from Alternative Fuel Buses and DieselEmissions Comparisons from Alternative Fuel Buses and Dieselof Biodiesel as an Alternative Fuel for Current and Future

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

134

Simulations of the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Hybrid Transit Buses over Planned Local Routes  

SciTech Connect

We present simulated fuel economy and emissions city transit buses powered by conventional diesel engines and diesel-hybrid electric powertrains of varying size. Six representative city drive cycles were included in the study. In addition, we included previously published aftertreatment device models for control of CO, HC, NOx, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Our results reveal that bus hybridization can significantly enhance fuel economy by reducing engine idling time, reducing demands for accessory loads, exploiting regenerative braking, and shifting engine operation to speeds and loads with higher fuel efficiency. Increased hybridization also tends to monotonically reduce engine-out emissions, but trends in the tailpipe (post-aftertreatment) emissions involve more complex interactions that significantly depend on motor size and drive cycle details.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement Number 13425)NPBF Effects on PM OxidationNPBF Effects on EGR System Performance Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels:...

136

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ft07sluder.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels:...

137

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs Massachusetts's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation authorized the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy (DTE)* to require certain electricity providers to disclose details on their fuel mix and emissions to end-use customers. In February 1998, the DTE issued final rules requiring competitive suppliers and distribution companies providing standard offer generation service or default generation service to provide this information to customers quarterly and upon request. * In 2007, the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy

138

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Minnesota Department of Commerice In September 2002, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued an order requiring the state's regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers details on the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation. Utilities must provide this information to customers in a standard format twice annually. Utilities may distribute this information to customers electronically. Disclosure information must also be filed with the PUC. In addition, in 2009, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency began to transition to an inventory data management system that consolidates

139

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions with Fuel-Flexible Burners  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

using biomass-derived liquid fuels, such as glycerin or fatty acids, as a substitute for natural gas, thereby reducing energy consumption, lowering greenhouse gas emissions, and...

140

Rigorous HDD Emissions Capabilities of Shell GTL Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rigorous HDD Emissions Capabilities of Shell GTL Fuel Ralph A. Cherrillo & Mary Ann Dahlstrom Shell Global Solutions (US) Inc. Richard H. Clark Shell Global Solutions (UK) 11 th...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Aftertreatment Systems -- DEER Conference 1 6 October 2011 Kevin Barnum Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance DEER 2011 Conference...

142

Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving cycles and interstate roads Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving cycles and...

143

Cold-Start Performance and Emissions Behavior of Alcohol Fuels...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Behavior of Alcohol Fuels in an SIDI Engine Using Transient Hardware-In-Loop Test Methods Andrew Ickes & Thomas Wallner Argonne National Laboratory 17 th Directions in...

144

Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel Aaron Williams, Jonathan Burton, Xin He and Robert L. McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 5,...

145

A fast method for updating global fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide a fast and efficient method for calculating global annual mean carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels by combining data from an established data set with BP annual statistics. Using this method it is possible to retrieve an updated estimate of global CO2 emissions six months after the actual emissions occurred. Using this data set we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions have increased by over 40% from 1990 to 2008 with an annual average increase of 3.7% over the five-year period 2003?2007. In 2008 the growth rate in the fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions was smaller than in the preceding five years, but it was still over 2%. Global mean carbon dioxide emissions in 2008 were 8.8?GtC? yr?1. For the latter part of the last century emissions of carbon dioxide have been greater from oil than from coal. However during the last few years this situation has changed. The recent strong increase in fossil fuel CO2 emissions is mainly driven by an increase in emissions from coal, whereas emissions from oil and gas to a large degree follow the trend from the 1990s.

G Myhre; K Alterskj?r; D Lowe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Influence of Mixing and Fuel Composition on Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixing and Fuel Composition Mixing and Fuel Composition on Emissions * Lean premixed combustion is effective for emission reduction More sensitive to perturbations including fuel gas composition variability * UC Irvine developed model relating fuel/air mixing and fuel composition to emissions Altering fuel distribution is a strategy to accommodate fuel composition changes * Results were used by 3 OEM's, 1 combustion technology developer and 1 user to help make decisions on how to handle the impact of LNG on combustor stability, and in the case of California installations, on how to respond to regulatory issues * As LNG is used in increasing quantities from more sources the variability of fuel gas should be more widespread, and manufacturers are likely to use this data in redesigning

147

PCR+ in Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 PCR+ in Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research MARCH 2002 Prepared by H. T. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrollton, Illinois R. W. Crawford RWCrawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm

148

Reducing fishing vessel fuel consumption and NOX emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a growing concern with the impact of marine operations on the environment. This requires reducing fuel consumption and vessel pollution during operation. On-board computers and satellite communications will enable the operator to reduce fuel consumption and NOX emissions during vessel operations. This paper presents the results of a study on this problem and how such an on-board system could be implemented to reduce fuel consumption and engine NOX emissions.

Robert Latorre

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.007_V2012 world map Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals Year Annex B Countries Non Annex B Countries Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) 1990 3894 90 2111 46 1991 3801 94 2299 38 1992 3750 109 2263 44 1993 3685 107 2339 48 1994 3656 107 2469 54 1995 3681 110 2570 59 1996 3704 111 2657 72 1997 3727 114 2737 74 1998 3746 118 2698 82 1999 3678 124 2718 90 2000 3725 130 2821 90 2001 3781 120 2936 92 2002 3764 128 3013 94 2003 3853 123 3347 98 2004 3888 135 3683 107 2005 3933 142 3926 106

150

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors for production of coal products -- patent fuel, cokeoven coke,coke oven gas, blast furnace gas and briquettes (BKB) --

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fact that the diesel engines fuel consumption and emissionsDiesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model Connection to engineDiesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model unit; 5) engine-

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel Fuel: Trade-off between NOx, Particulate Emission, and Fuel Consumption of a Heavy Duty Engine.

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Emissions Disclosure and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider DC Public Service Commission Under regulations adopted by the D.C. Public Service Commission, all electricity suppliers and electricity companies operating in the District of Columbia must report to the Commission every six months the fuel mix of electricity sold and the emissions produced. The fuel mix report must be in a format similar to the information provided by the PJM Environmental Information Services (PJM EIS). Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclosed every six months on

154

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Effects of Bioethanol-Blended Diesel Fuel on Combustion and Emission Reduction Characteristics in a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Sungdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Korea ... As a fuel for compression engines, bioethanol-blended diesel fuels have some different trends on the exhaust emission characteristics according to the engine load. ... The paper begins with an introduction of general information on the nature of emissions of exhaust gases, including the toxicity and causes of emissions for both spark-ignition and diesel engines. ...

Su Han Park; Junepyo Cha; Chang Sik Lee

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a more elaborate model on berth allocation considering fuel consumption than before, and overcome the nonlinear complexity by casting it as a mixed integer second order cone programming model. Furthermore, we conduct the vessel emission (in sailing periods) calculation with the widely-used emission factors. Besides, vessel emissions in mooring periods are also analyzed through a post-optimization phase on waiting time. Experimental results demonstrate that the new berth allocation strategy, reflected by the proposed model, is competent to significantly reduce fuel consumption and vessel emissions, while simultaneously retaining the service level of the terminal.

Yuquan Du; Qiushuang Chen; Xiongwen Quan; Lei Long; Richard Y.K. Fung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Virginia Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission Virginia's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation. Legislation in 2007 and 2008 related to Electric Utility Regulation amended the restructuring laws, but still require emissions and fuel mix disclosure. Information must be provided to customers and to the Virginia State Corporation Commission (SCC) at least once annually. If any portion of this information is unavailable, the electricity provider must file a report

158

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Michigan Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Michigan Public Service Commission Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh) of electric generation. Electric suppliers must provide this information to customers twice annually in a standardized, uniform format. The Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC) staff must calculate the regional electricity generation and environmental characteristics and make it available to be used by the state's generation providers. The web site above describes the

159

ORNL Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)  

SciTech Connect

This video highlights the Vehicle Research Laboratory's capabilities at the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC). FEERC is a Department of Energy user facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

None

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

160

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION Prepared For: California to Tank, Criteria Pollutants, Multi-media impacts, EMFAC #12;#12;vii Table of Contents Acknowledgements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus Preprint Robb Barnitt and Jeff Gonder To be presented at the SAE 2011 World Congress...

162

ORNL Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This video highlights the Vehicle Research Laboratory's capabilities at the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC). FEERC is a Department of Energy user facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and competitive retail electric service providers of retail electric generation service must provide this information to their customers in a standard format several times per year. The Ohio Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) adopted rules in 2000 to implement this policy; the rules have been amended subsequently. There are separate rules for electric utilities providing a standard offer for retail

164

Exhaust and evaporative emissions from gasohol-type fuels  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was conducted at the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville (Okla.) Energy Technology Center in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency to determine the characteristics of gasohol-type fuels with respect to exhaust and evaporative emissions. Five fuels, 2 gasolines (reference and commercial unleaded) and 3 gasohols (90% gasoline/10% ethanol) were tested in a fleet of 10 late-model automobiles. Six were equipped with oxidation catalysts and 4 were equipped with three-way catalysts. The results obtained from the 1978 Federal test procedure indicate that the addition of ethanol to the base gasoline, whether it is a reference fuel (Indolene) or a commercial fuel, has measurable effects on exhaust and evaporative emissions. However, on the average, the magnitude of these effects was generally within the 1978 emission standards established by the EPA. More specifically, the addition of ethanol, in the case of vehicles with oxidation catalysts, decreased hydrocarbons by an average of 27%, decreased carbon monoxide by 43%, decreased volumetric fuel economy by 3%, and increased oxides of nitrogen by 16%. Evaporative emissions were increased by 40%. In the case of vehicles with three-way catalysts, the addition of ethanol to the base fuel, on the average, decreased carbon monoxide by 7%, decreased fuel economy by 5%, increased hydrocarbons by 12%, increased oxides of nitrogen by 7%, and increased evaporative emissions by 49%.

Naman, T.M.; Allsup, J.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Pollutant Emissions from Gasoline Combustion. 1. Dependence on Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutant Emissions from Gasoline Combustion. 1. Dependence on Fuel Structural Functionalities H O fractions of gasoline fuels, the Utah Surrogate Mechanisms is extended to include submecha- nisms of gasoline surrogate compounds using a set of mechanism generation techniques. The mechanism yields very good

Utah, University of

166

The Effect of Diesel Fuel Properties on Emissions-Restrained Fuel Economy at Mid-Load Conditions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statistical models developed from designed esperiments (varying fuel properties and engine control parameters) were used to optimize fuel consumption subject to emissions and engine performance constraints.

167

Trends and inferred emissions of atmospheric high molecular weight perfluorocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric observations and atmospheric observation-based global emission estimates are presented for the five high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C 4 F 1 0 ), dodecafluoropentane (C5 F1 2 ), ...

Ivy, Diane Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effect of biodiesel fuels on diesel engine emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The call for the use of biofuels which is being made by most governments following international energy policies is presently finding some resistance from car and components manufacturing companies, private users and local administrations. This opposition makes it more difficult to reach the targets of increased shares of use of biofuels in internal combustion engines. One of the reasons for this resistance is a certain lack of knowledge about the effect of biofuels on engine emissions. This paper collects and analyzes the body of work written mainly in scientific journals about diesel engine emissions when using biodiesel fuels as opposed to conventional diesel fuels. Since the basis for comparison is to maintain engine performance, the first section is dedicated to the effect of biodiesel fuel on engine power, fuel consumption and thermal efficiency. The highest consensus lies in an increase in fuel consumption in approximate proportion to the loss of heating value. In the subsequent sections, the engine emissions from biodiesel and diesel fuels are compared, paying special attention to the most concerning emissions: nitric oxides and particulate matter, the latter not only in mass and composition but also in size distributions. In this case the highest consensus was found in the sharp reduction in particulate emissions.

Magn Lapuerta; Octavio Armas; Jos Rodrguez-Fernndez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Maryland Public Service Commission Maryland's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation. Emissions data must be expressed in terms of pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh). This information must be provided to customers every six months and annually to the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC). Past reports are available in Case No. 8738 through the [http://webapp.psc.state.md.us/Intranet/Casenum/caseform_new.cfm? PSC's

170

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas 5% less efficient than diesel, assuming same trendNatural gas buses are assumed to follow the same improvement trendNatural Gas Oil Products Solid Fuels Unlike primary energy, CO 2 emissions trends

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Emissions from ethanol- and LPG-fueled vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the United States. Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the United States for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the United States, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing U.S. interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat-ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles, and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG, will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat-ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural impacts from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG as compared with other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat-ethanol-fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG-fueled vehicles.

Pitstick, M.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fossil Fuels Without CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oxygen, or by steam reforming of the fuel to yield...coal beds contain methane adsorbed on...oxygen, or by steam reforming of the...coal beds contain methane adsorbed on...to coal-bed methane production, these...

E. A. Parson; D. W. Keith

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

173

Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document: ft007_sluder_2013_o.pdfTechnology Area: Fuels and LubricantsPresenter: Scott SluderPresenting Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)Presentation date: Thursday, May 16,...

174

Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

but re-focused each year to address current DOE and industry needs. - FY12 start: Fuel & Lubes GDI PM - FY10 start: Lean-Ethanol LNC - FY09 start: Biodiesel-based Na - FY08...

175

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009 Agency/Company /Organization: European Environment Agency Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Maps Website: www.eea.europa.eu/publications/eea_report_2009_9 Country: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Ireland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

176

Trend in Global Black Carbon Emissions from 1960 to 2007  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black carbon (BC) warms the Earth system by absorbing sunlight and emitting infrared radiation, and by decreasing the ice/snow albedo. ... (2, 3) Therefore, any efforts to reduce BC emission can lead to the dual benefit of slowing down global warming and of protecting human health. ... This work measured PM (EFPM) and EC (EFEC) EF for 9 crop residues and 5 coals in actual rural cooking and coal stoves using the C mass balance method. ...

Rong Wang; Shu Tao; Huizhong Shen; Ye Huang; Han Chen; Yves Balkanski; Olivier Boucher; Philippe Ciais; Guofeng Shen; Wei Li; Yanyan Zhang; Yuanchen Chen; Nan Lin; Shu Su; Bengang Li; Junfeng Liu; Wenxin Liu

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

The influence of fuel composition on the combustion and emission characteristics of natural gas fueled engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As global energy demand rises, natural gas (NG) plays an important strategic role in energy supply. Natural gas is the cleanest fossil fuel that has been investigated extensively for use in spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the research on the effects of natural gas composition on combustion and emission characteristics of natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) and reports the most achievements obtained by researchers in this field. It has been reported that the engine performance and emission are greatly affected by varying compositions of natural gas. The most important NG fuel property is the Wobbe number (WN). Generally, it was agreed by researchers that the fuels with higher hydrocarbons, higher WN, and higher energy content exhibited better fuel economy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions were also increased for gases with higher levels of higher WN, while total hydrocarbons (THCs), carbon monoxide (CO), showed some reductions for these gases. On the other hand, particulate matter (PM) emissions did not show any fuel effects. Moreover, adding of small fractions of higher alkanes, such as ethane and propane, significantly improved ignition qualities of natural gas engines. The results presented provide a good insight for researchers to pursue their future research on natural gas fueled ICEs.

Amir-Hasan Kakaee; Amin Paykani; Mostafa Ghajar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Can alternative car fuels reduce greenhouse gas emissions?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been controversy in the published literature regarding the scope for alternative fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in passenger transport. This paper aims to resolve this question in an Australian context, and, where possible, to calculate the costs of emission reductions. Fossil-fuel-based alternatives give either marginal or uncertain reductions. Ethanol from sugar cane, the most promising biomass fuel, has high costs per tonne of CO2 reduction, and, when other trace gases are considered, shows no definite improvement over petrol. Electric vehicles, if deployed today in Australia, would exacerbate greenhouse warming. Only if an alternative new energy source such as wind power generated 15% or more of total electricity would emission reductions occur compared to equivalent petrol-fuelled cars.

P. Moriarty

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.transportation.anl.gov/modeling_simulation/AirCred/index.html

180

Performance and emissions of a dual fuel operated diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vegetable oil and its esters (biodiesel) are the renewable alternative fuels that can be used as a substitute for diesel in the diesel engines. The vegetable oil fuelled diesel engine results in lower efficiency and higher smoke emission. Hence in this work, an attempt has been made to use inedible and under utilised mahua oil (MO) as a substitute for diesel by fumigating liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) along with the air. A single cylinder diesel engine was modified to work in dual fuel mode by suitable retrofitting. The MO was injected into the cylinder using a fuel pump and LPG was fumigated along with the air. In MO + LPG dual fuel mode, 9% increase in brake thermal efficiency and 35% reduction in smoke emission of the engine were observed as compared to the sole fuel mode with MO. Also, the engine performance characteristics in MO + LPG dual fuel mode are close to sole fuel mode with diesel. From this work, it is concluded that LPG can be fumigated along with the air to increase the performance of MO fuelled agricultural diesel engine.

N. Kapilan; R.P. Reddy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

White Pine Emission Trends of Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes After Acute Ozone Exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Pine Emission Trends of Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes After Acute Ozone Exposure Daniel M of White Pine (Pinus strobus) specimens located at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). To measure terpene production, dynamic branch enclosures were simultaneously positioned on White Pine

Collins, Gary S.

182

IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS  

SciTech Connect

As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by weight [6]. The potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

Boehman, Andre L.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fossil Fuels Without CO2 Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...develop a zero-emission electric plant that exploits...moderate marginal cost. In electric plants, even present...decentralized sources as vehicles, home furnaces, or...participate. Unlike the electric sector, the required...sequestrationa tax rebate or creation...

E. A. Parson; D. W. Keith

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

184

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?1 distribution of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

CO2 EMISSION CALCULATIONS AND TRENDS Thomas A. Boden and Gregg Marland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMISSION CALCULATIONS AND TRENDS EMISSION CALCULATIONS AND TRENDS Thomas A. Boden and Gregg Marland Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-6335 Robert J. Andres Institute of Northern Engineering School of Engineering University of Alaska-Fairbanks Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5900 ABSTRACT FEB 05 ZS3 OSTI The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE- ACO5-840R21400. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so. for U.S. Government purposes." This paper describes the compilation, calculation, and availability of the most comprehensive CO2 emissions database currently available. The database offers global, regional, and national annual

186

Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deerbonadies.pdf More Documents & Publications Application of a Diesel Fuel...

187

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ? ?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend1 ? ?)? i + ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect toSeries RegulationofGHGemissionsfromtransportation

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Low Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation - A Progress Report Low Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation - A Progress Report 2003...

190

Diesel Particle Filter and Fuel Effects on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel Particle Filter and Fuel Effects on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Emissions ... Gaseous and Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines at Idle and under Load: Comparison of Biodiesel Blend and Ultralow Sulfur Diesel Fuels ...

Matthew A. Ratcliff; A. John Dane; Aaron Williams; John Ireland; Jon Luecke; Robert L. McCormick; Kent J. Voorhees

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions APPROACH On-board diesel fuel reformation is being evaluated as an alternative to urea SCR to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions...

192

Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award August 19, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis Developed jointly...

193

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

194

Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Factsheet summarizing Univ. of Alabama project to save energy and reduce emissions with fuel-flexible burners

195

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Since greenhouse gases are a global concern, rather than a local concern as are some kinds of effluents, one must compare the entire lifecycle of nuclear power to alternative technologies for generating electricity. A recent critical analysis by Sovacool (2008) gives a clearer picture. "It should be noted that nuclear power is not directly emitting greenhouse gas emissions, but rather that lifecycle emissions occur through plant construction, operation, uranium mining and milling, and plant decommissioning." "[N]uclear energy is in no way 'carbon free' or 'emissions free,' even though it is much better (from purely a carbon-equivalent emissions standpoint) than coal, oil, and natural gas electricity generators, but worse than renewable and small scale distributed generators" (Sovacool 2008). According to Sovacool, at an estimated 66 g CO2 equivalent per kilowatt-hour (gCO2e/kWh), nuclear power emits 15 times less CO2 per unit electricity generated than unscrubbed coal generation (at 1050 gCO2e/kWh), but 7 times more than the best renewable, wind (at 9 gCO2e/kWh). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2009) has long recognized CO2 emissions in its regulations concerning the environmental impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. In Table S-3 of 10 CFR 51.51(b), NRC lists a 1000-MW(electric) nuclear plant as releasing as much CO2 as a 45-MW(e) coal plant. A large share of the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle is due to the energy consumption to enrich uranium by the gaseous diffusion process. A switch to either gas centrifugation or laser isotope separation would dramatically reduce the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Strom, Daniel J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Historic patterns of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuels: Implications for stabilization of emissions  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Historic Patterns of CO{sub 2} Emissions from Fossil Fuels: Implications for Stabilization of Emissions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

Andres, R. J.; Marland, G.

1994-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

198

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Emissions Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program

199

Incorporating the Effect of Price Changes on CO2-Equivalent Emissions From Alternative-Fuel Lifecycles: Scoping the Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions from Alternative Fuel Lifecycles: Scoping theEMSSIONS FROM ALTERNATIVE-FUEL LIFECYCLES: SCOPING THEACRONYMS and TERMS AF = alternative fuel AFL = alternative-

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Emissions and fuel consumption characteristics of an HCNG-fueled heavy-duty engine at idle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The idle performance of an 11-L, 6-cylinder engine equipped with a turbocharger and an intercooler was investigated for both compressed natural gas (CNG) and hydrogen-blended CNG (HCNG) fuels. HCNG, composed of 70% CNG and 30% hydrogen in volume, was used not only because it ensured a sufficient travel distance for each fueling, but also because it was the optimal blending rate to satisfy EURO-6 emission regulation according to the authors' previous studies. The engine test results demonstrate that the use of HCNG enhanced idle combustion stability and extended the lean operational limit from excess air ratio (?)=1.5 (CNG) to 1.6. A decrease of more than 25% in the fuel consumption rate was achieved in HCNG idle operations compared to CNG. Total hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions decreased when fueled with HCNG at idle because of the low carbon content and enhanced combustion characteristics. In particular, despite hydrogen enrichment, less nitrogen oxides (NOx) were emitted with HCNG operations because the amount of fuel supplied for a stable idle was lower than with CNG operations, which eventually induced lower peak in-cylinder combustion temperature. This low HCNG fuel quantity in idle condition also induced a continuous decrease in \\{NOx\\} emissions with an increase in ?. The idle engine test results also indicate that cold-start performance can deteriorate owing to low exhaust gas temperature, when fueled with HCNG. Therefore, potential solutions were discussed, including combustion strategies such as retardation of spark ignition timing combined with leaner air/fuel ratios.

Sunyoup Lee; Changgi Kim; Young Choi; Gihun Lim; Cheolwoong Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Optimized Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized Fuel Injector Design Optimized Fuel Injector Design This project includes fundamental research and engineering development of low NOx burners and reburning fuel injectors. The team of Reaction Engineering International (REI), the University of Utah, Brown University and DB Riley, Inc., will develop fundamental information on low NOx burners. The work has two phases. In the first phase, the University of Utah will examine two-phase mixing and near-field behavior of coal injectors using a 15-million Btu/hr bench-scale furnace, Brown University will examine char deactivation and effectiveness of reburning, and REI will develop a comprehensive burner model using the data produced by the University of Utah and Brown University. In the second phase, an optimized injector design will be tested at the 100-million Btu/hr Riley Coal Burner Test Facility. It is anticipated that this work will provide improved hardware designs and computer simulation models for reduced NOx emissions and minimized carbon loss.

202

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels. Let p denote the fuel price, q denote the quantitya carbon tax, domestic fuel price increases, and domesticbiofuel mandate on domestic fuel price, fuel, h dq t d ? dp

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

security, renewable energy, bio- fuel, carbon tax, mandate,and taxpayer cost of bio- fuel excise tax credits dwarf the

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Engine performance and emissions from the combustion of low-temperature Fischer??Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel and biodiesel rapeseed methyl ester blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of oxygenated biodiesel (rapeseed methyl ester (RME)) improves the engine-out particulate matter, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, while the low-temperature Fischer??Tropsch synthetic paraffinic diesel fuel improves engine-out NOx, CO, hydrocarbon and particulate matter emissions. Blending synthetic diesel (SD) fuel with oxygenated biodiesel could unlock potential performance synergies in the fuel properties (e.g. O2 content in RME and high cetane number of the synthetic fuels) of such blends and benefit engine performance and emissions. The combustion of synthetic diesel fuel/RME blend, named synthetic diesel B50, has shown similar combustion characteristics to diesel fuel, while simultaneous improvements in engine efficiency and smoke-NOx trade-off were achieved by taking advantage of the fuel's properties. The engine thermal efficiency was dependent on the fuel type, and followed the general trend: synthetic diesel > SDB50 > diesel > RME. Therefore, it has been shown that the design of a synthetic fuel with properties similar to the fuel blends presented in this work could improve engine-out NOx, smoke and hydrocarbon emissions and maintain or improve engine performance.

Kampanart Theinnoi; Athanasios Tsolakis; Sathaporn Chuepeng; Andrew P.E. York; Roger F. Cracknell; Richard H. Clark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Emissions Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section...

206

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions from Hybrid Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Benefits & Considerations

207

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid and Zero Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on AddThis.com...

208

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

209

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Plug-In Hybrid and Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on AddThis.com...

210

"Performance, Emission and Particle distribution of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Xibin Wang "Performance, Emission and Particle distribution of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends" Abstract : Combustion, performance and emission were studied for DI diesel engine fuelled with DMM/diesel fuel blends for DMM content from 0 to 50%. Results showed that, for diesel engine with fuel

211

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

order for the low carbon fuel standard, 2012. URL http://mediated e?ects of low carbon fuel policies. AgBioForum, 15(Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? American

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Effects of Fuel Injection Timing on Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel?Propane Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effects of Fuel Injection Timing on Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel?Propane Blends ... State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, China, and College of Vehicle & Motive Power Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, 471003, China ... It is the third most widely used vehicle fuel behind the gasoline and diesel fuels.1 Diesel fuel has been widely used in internal combustion engines due to its high thermal efficiency and low CO2 emission. ...

Zhihao Ma; Zuohua Huang; Chongxiao Li; Xinbin Wang; Haiyan Miao

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Assessing GHG Emissions, Ecological Footprint, and Water Linkage for Different Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing GHG Emissions, Ecological Footprint, and Water Linkage for Different Fuels ... Currently, transport is highly dependent on fossil fuels and responsible for about 23% of world energy-related GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions. ... Ethanol from sugar cane and corn emerges as an alternative for gasoline in order to mitigate GHG emissions. ...

Mauro F. Chavez-Rodriguez; Silvia A. Nebra

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Impact of fuel price and emissions on inventory policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of changes in fuel prices and the imposition of a carbon tax on emissions from transport on shipment lot sizes and supply chain costs. An analysis is done to show that increases in fuel prices should be dealt with differently than other costs. Further, a function to calculate future fuel prices has been developed. This function has been used to calculate transport cost in the future. The EOQ models have been modified to include increasing transport cost and a carbon tax to demonstrate its impact on various inventory policies. Due to increases in fuel prices, the cost of every subsequent order will also increase, thus resulting in an increase of average order cost for all the shipments in a production cycle. Organizations that have their vendors in relatively close proximity will be at an advantageous position in managing their supply chain costs more effectively in the future. On the other hand, organizations that have invested heavily in global supply chains will need to re-examine their supply chain strategy to overcome cost challenges. This research presents a new challenge for supply chains/logistics management strategies for organizations with global supply chains.

Amulya Gurtu; Mohamad Y. Jaber; Cory Searcy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Carbon dioxide emission reduction using molten carbonate fuel cell systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The contribution of the molten carbonate fuel cell system (MCFCs) to carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction in power application is analyzed. \\{MCFCs\\} can separate and concentrate CO2 emitted from traditional thermal power plants (PPs) without reducing the plant's overall energy efficiency. \\{MCFCs\\} can also be used by itself as an effective CO2 separator or concentrator by managing the anode gas stream to increase the heat utilization of the system. The CO2 separated and concentrated by \\{MCFCs\\} is most effectively captured by condensation. \\{MCFCs\\} is currently used as a CO2 separator only to a limited extent due to its high cost and relatively small scale operation. However, \\{MCFCs\\} will substantially contribute to reduce CO2 emissions in power generation applications in the near future.

Jung-Ho Wee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

SUPPLEMENT 1 The procedure for calculating the SOx emission factor from fuel sulphur content is given  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is given below. The units are given in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) SC in parenthesis. SFOC = Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (g/kWh) CC = Carbon content of fuel (mass-%) M(C) = MolarSUPPLEMENT 1 The procedure for calculating the SOx emission factor from fuel sulphur content

Meskhidze, Nicholas

217

Benefits of Water-Fuel Emulsion on Automotive Diesel Exhaust Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water fuel emulsion is widely used to control pollutant emissions in large and medium diesel engines. The application of this fuel to small automotive engines has been limited by the emulsion stability and eco...

K. Lombaert; L. Le Moyne; P. Guibert

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus 2010 DOE Vehicle...

219

Effect of idling on fuel consumption and emissions of a diesel engine fueled by Jatropha biodiesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An engine running at low load and low rated speed is said to be subject to high idling conditions, a mode which represents one of the major problems currently the transport industry is facing. During this time, the engine can not work at peak operating temperature. This leads to incomplete combustion and emissions level increase due to having fuel residues in the exhaust. Also, idling results in increase in fuel consumption. The purpose of this study is to evaluate fuel consumption and emissions parameters under high idling conditions when diesel blended with Jatropha curcas biodiesel is used to operate a diesel engine. Although biodieseldiesel blends decrease carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions, they increase nitrogen oxides emissions in high idling modes. Compared to pure diesel fuel, fuel consumption also increases under all high idling conditions for biodieseldiesel blends, with a further increase occurring as blend percentage rises.

S.M. Ashrafur Rahman; H.H. Masjuki; M.A. Kalam; M.J. Abedin; A. Sanjid; S. Imtenan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Emissions and fuel economy of a prechamber diesel engine with natural gas dual fuelling  

SciTech Connect

A four-cylinder turbocharged prechamber diesel engine (Caterpillar 3304) was operated with natural gas and pilot diesel fuel ignition over a wide range of load and speed. Measurements were made of fuel consumption and the emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and the oxides of nitrogen. Improvements in fuel economy and emissions were found to be affected by the diesel fuel-gas fraction, and by air restriction and fuel injection timing. Boundaries of unstable, inefficient and knocking operation were defined and the importance of gas-air equivalance ratio was demonstrated in its effect on economy, emissions and stability of operation.

Ding, X.; Hill, P.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Quantifying Avoided Fuel Use and Emissions from Solar Photovoltaic Generation in the Western United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantifying Avoided Fuel Use and Emissions from Solar Photovoltaic Generation in the Western United States ... National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd, Golden, Colorado 80401 ...

Paul Denholm; Robert M. Margolis; James M. Milford

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

Minimising cold start fuel consumption and emissions from a gasoline fuelled engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several constrained optimisation problems are considered, in which different tailpipe emissions regulations are the constraints under which the fuel consumption is minimised. The solutions of (more)

Andrianov, Denis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

An experimental study of emission and combustion characteristics of marine diesel engine with fuel pump malfunctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Presented paper shows the results of the laboratory study on the relation between the chosen malfunctions of a fuel pump and the exhaust gas composition of the marine engine. The object of research is a laboratory four-stroke diesel engine, operated at a constant speed. During the research over 50 parameters were measured with technical condition of the engine recognized as working properly and with simulated fuel pump malfunctions. Considered malfunctions are: fuel injection timing delay and two sets of fuel leakages in the fuel pump of one engine cylinder. The results of laboratory research confirm that fuel injection timing delay and fuel leakage in the fuel pump cause relatively small changes in thermodynamic parameters of the engine. Changes of absolute values are so small they may be omitted by marine engines operators. The measuring of the exhaust gas composition shows markedly affection with simulated malfunctions of the fuel pump. Engine operation with delayed fuel injection timing in one cylinder indicates CO2 emission increase and \\{NOx\\} emission decreases. CO emission increases only at high the engine loads. Fuel leakage in the fuel pump causes changes in CO emission, the increase of CO2 emission and the decrease of \\{NOx\\} emission.

Jerzy Kowalski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

NOx Emissions of Alternative Diesel Fuels:? A Comparative Analysis of Biodiesel and FT Diesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the diesel injection and combustion processes in an effort to better understand the differences in NOx emissions between biodiesel, Fischer?Tropsch (FT) diesel, and their blends with a conventional diesel fuel. Emissions studies were ...

James P. Szybist; Stephen R. Kirby; Andr L. Boehman

2005-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Emissions tests of in-use heavy-duty vehicles showed that, natural gas- and propane-fueled vehicles have high emissions of NH3 and CO, compared to diesel vehicles, while meeting certification requirements

226

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the extra emissions that are generated from manufacturing the material used to make CNG tanks); they can amount tc more than 2% of the emissions from 32 the fuel production and...

227

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

annual generation by fuel type. .of total annual generation by fuel type. Other Renewablesof annual estimates of total generation by fuel type and

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Emission Control Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1990. "lhe Economicsof Alternative Fuel Use: Subsfitt~/ingMcOartland. 1990. "Alternative Fuels for Pollution Control:Policy Levers for Alternative Fuels: Costs, Energy Security,

Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel; Olmstead, Janis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effect of Fuel Injection Timing on the Emissions of a Direct-Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Fueled with Canola Oil Methyl Ester?Diesel Fuel Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(3, 4) A lot of researchers have reported that using biodiesel as a fuel in diesel engines causes a diminution in harmful exhaust emissions as well as equivalent engine performance with diesel fuel. ... Engine tests have been carried out with the aim of obtaining comparative measures of torque, power, specific fuel consumption and emissions such as CO, smoke d. and NOx to evaluate and compute the behavior of the diesel engine running on the above-mentioned fuels. ... Ma, Z.; Huang, Z. H.; Li, C.; Wang, X. B.; Miao, H.Effects of fuel injection timing on combustion and emission characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with diesel?propane blends Energy Fuels 2007, 21 ( 3) 1504 1510 ...

Cenk Sayin; Metin Gumus; Mustafa Canakci

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions ... Center of Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409, United States ... Growing concern over emissions from increased airport operations has resulted in a need to assess the impact of aviation related activities on local air quality in and around airports, and to develop strategies to mitigate these effects. ...

Prem Lobo; Lucas Rye; Paul I. Williams; Simon Christie; Ilona Uryga-Bugajska; Christopher W. Wilson; Donald E. Hagen; Philip D. Whitefield; Simon Blakey; Hugh Coe; David Raper; Mohamed Pourkashanian

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

231

Reducing CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Emissions From Fossil Fuel Power Plants Scott M. Klara - National Energy Technology Laboratory EPGA's 3 rd Annual Power Generation Conference October 16-17, 2002 Hershey, Pennsylvania EPGA - SMK - 10/17/02 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned/operated * Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY 02 budget of $750 million National Energy Technology Laboratory EPGA - SMK - 10/17/02 * Diverse research portfolio - 60 external projects - Onsite focus area * Strong industry support - 40% cost share * Portfolio funding $100M 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2003 2003 Budget (Million $) Fiscal Year Senate House Administration Request Carbon Sequestration: A Dynamic Program Separation & Capture From Power Plants Plays Key Role

232

LOW NOx EMISSIONS IN A FUEL FLEXIBLE GAS TURBINE  

SciTech Connect

In alignment with Vision 21 goals, a study is presented here on the technical and economic potential for developing a gas turbine combustor that is capable of generating less that 2 ppm NOx emissions, firing on either coal synthesis gas or natural gas, and being implemented on new and existing systems. The proposed solution involves controlling the quantity of H2 contained in the fuel. The presence of H2 leads to increased flame stability such that the combustor can be operated at lower temperatures and produce less thermal NOx. Coal gas composition would be modified using a water gas shift converter, and natural gas units would implement a catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) reactor to convert part of the natural gas feed to a syngas before fed back into the combustor. While both systems demonstrated technical merit, the economics involved in implementing such a system are marginal at best. Therefore, Praxair has decided not to pursue the technology any further at this time.

Raymond Drnevich; James Meagher; Vasilis Papavassiliou; Troy Raybold; Peter Stuttaford; Leonard Switzer; Lee Rosen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Land Use Change from Jatropha Curcas-Based Jet Fuel in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Land Use Change from Jatropha Curcas-Based Jet Fuel in Brazil ... Life cycle GHG emissions of biojet fuel derived from Jatropha curcas is quantified based on empirical data from Brazilian producers accounting for land-use change. ... This is the methodology adopted by the European Community in its current Renewable Energy Directive (40). ...

Robert E. Bailis; Jennifer E. Baka

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

ORNL/TM-2002/16 PCR+ in Diesel Fuels and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORNL/TM-2002/16 PCR+ in Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research MARCH 2002 Prepared by H. T. Mc Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased. #12;ORNL/TM-2002/16 PCR+ IN DIESEL FUELS AND EMISSIONS RESEARCH H. T. McAdams AccaMath Services

235

Fuel-Neutral Studies of PM Transportation Emissions  

SciTech Connect

New gasoline engine technologies such as Spark Ignition Direct Injection (SIDI), Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDICI), and Reaction Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) offer the possibility of dramatically increasing the fuel efficiency of future vehicles. One drawback to these advanced engines is that they have the potential to produce higher levels of exhaust particulates than current Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engines. Regulation of engine particulate emissions in Europe is moving from mass-based standards toward number-based standards. Due to growing health concerns surrounding nano-aerosols, it is likely that similar standards will eventually be applied in the United States. This would place more emphasis on the reliable removal of smaller particles, which make up the vast majority of the particulates generated on a number basis. While Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) have become standard, different filter systems would likely be required for advanced gasoline vehicles, due to factors such as differing particulate properties and higher exhaust temperatures. High exhaust temperatures can limit the accumulation of a soot cake, which performs most of the actual filtration in a typical DPF system.

Stewart, Mark L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Howden, Ken

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Vehicle-emission characteristics using mechanically emulsified alcohol/diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect

A light-duty diesel vehicle fueled with an emulsified alcohol/diesel fuel was operated under cyclic mode. Emission and fuel economy measurements were taken during vehicle operation. The test results showed the volumetric fuel economy decreased slightly. Carbon monoxide emissions increased slightly, and oxides of nitrogen showed no significant change. Particulate emissions were reduced slightly, and the particulate extractables increased slightly. The environmental effect of these data cancel each other resulting in no significant changes in the total release of biological activity into the environment.

Allsup, J.R.; Seizinger, D.E.; Cox, F.W.; Brook, A.L.; McClellan, R.O.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Vehicle air-conditioning can significantly impact fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric vehicles and reduce electric vehicle range. In addition, a new US emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure, has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the US. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. Current air-conditioning systems can reduce the fuel economy of high fuel-economy vehicles by about 50% and reduce the fuel economy of today's mid-sized vehicles by more than 20% while increasing NOx by nearly 80% and CO by 70%.

Farrington, R.; Rugh, J.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

239

Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary: The California Climate Action Registry, which was initially established in 2000 and began operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for recording annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the Registry is to assist California businesses and organizations in their efforts to inventory and document emissions in order to establish a baseline and to document early actions to increase energy efficiency and decrease GHG emissions. The State of California has committed to use its ''best efforts'' to ensure that entities that establish GHG emissions baselines and register their emissions will receive ''appropriate consideration under any future international, federal, or state regulatory scheme relating to greenhouse gas emissions.'' Reporting of GHG emissions involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and indirect emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is consider ed to be an indirect GHG emission and is required to be included in the entity's report. Registry participants include businesses, non-profit organizations, municipalities, state agencies, and other entities. Participants are required to register the GHG emissions of all operations in California, and are encouraged to report nationwide. For the first three years of participation, the Registry only requires the reporting of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, although participants are encouraged to report the remaining five Kyoto Protocol GHGs (CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, and SF6). After three years, reporting of all six Kyoto GHG emissions is required. The enabling legislation for the Registry (SB 527) requires total GHG emissions to be registered and requires reporting of ''industry-specific metrics'' once such metrics have been adopted by the Registry. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) was asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) related to the Registry in three areas: (1) assessing the availability and usefulness of industry-specific metrics, (2) evaluating various methods for establishing baselines for calculating GHG emissions reductions related to specific actions taken by Registry participants, and (3) establishing methods for calculating electricity CO2 emission factors. The third area of research was completed in 2002 and is documented in Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the California Electric Power Sector (Marnay et al., 2002). This report documents our findings related to the first areas of research. For the first area of research, the overall objective was to evaluate the metrics, such as emissions per economic unit or emissions per unit of production that can be used to report GHG emissions trends for potential Registry participants. This research began with an effort to identify methodologies, benchmarking programs, inventories, protocols, and registries that u se industry-specific metrics to track trends in energy use or GHG emissions in order to determine what types of metrics have already been developed. The next step in developing industry-specific metrics was to assess the availability of data needed to determine metric development priorities. Berkeley Lab also determined the relative importance of different potential Registry participant categories in order to asses s the availability of sectoral or industry-specific metrics and then identified industry-specific metrics in use around the world. While a plethora of metrics was identified, no one metric that adequately tracks trends in GHG emissions while maintaining confidentiality of data was identified. As a result of this review, Berkeley Lab recommends the development of a GHG intensity index as a new metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends.Such an index could provide an industry-specific metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends to accurately reflect year to year changes while protecting proprietary data. This GHG intensity index changes

Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy management of HEV to optimize fuel consumption and pollutant emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVEC'12 Energy management of HEV to optimize fuel consumption and pollutant emissions Pierre Michel, several energy management strategies are proposed to optimize jointly the fuel consumption and pollutant-line strategy are given. Keywords: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV), energy management, pollution, fuel consumption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Influence of solid fuel on the carbon-monoxide and nitrogen-oxide emissions on sintering  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory and industrial research now underway at the sintering plant of AO Mittal Steel Temirtau is focusing on the preparation of fuel of optimal granulometric composition, the replacement of coke fines, and the adaptation of fuel-input technology so as to reduce fuel consumption and toxic emissions without loss of sinter quality.

M.F. Vitushchenko; N.L. Tatarkin; A.I. Kuznetsov; A.E. Vilkov [AO Mittal Steel Temirtau, Temirtau (Kazakhstan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Assessment of the use of oxygenated fuels on emissions and performance of a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Requirements as torque, power, specific fuel consumption and emitted compounds are highly influenced by the chemical composition of the fuel being burned. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the use of oxygenated fuels on emissions of NOx, CO, HC, CO2 and particle number and size distribution (11.5diesel engine coupled to a dynamometer bench was used, where three types of fuels were employed, B5 (diesel with 5% of biodiesel); B5E6 (ternary composition containing 89% diesel, 5% of biodiesel and 6% of ethanol); and B100 (100% of biodiesel). The performance of a diesel engine was also evaluated to see the impact of the oxygenated fuels in this kind of engine. The use of ethanol with high latent heat of vaporization and low cetane number added to the binary blend (B5) shown an increase in the HC emissions and a reduction in \\{NOx\\} emissions when compared to B5. The use of pure biodiesel (B100) with high oxygen content showed a reduction in the HC emissions, but presented the highest emissions for both \\{NOx\\} and particle number of smaller diameter among the studied fuels. The use of more oxygenated fuels reduced the power output and increased the fuel consumption, but the exergy analysis showed that the energy efficiency of these fuels could be considered similar to the B5 fuel.

Llian Lefol Nani Guarieiro; Egdio Teixeira de Almeida Guerreiro; Keize Katiane dos Santos Amparo; Victor Bonfim Manera; Ana Carla D. Regis; Aldenor Gomes Santos; Vitor P. Ferreira; Danilo J. Leo; Ednildo A. Torres; Jailson B. de Andrade

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Carbon dioxide emission index as a mean for assessing fuel quality  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide emission index, defined as the amount of CO{sub 2} released per unit of energy value, was used to rate gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The direct utilization of natural gas is the most efficient option. The conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas for production of liquid fuels represents a significant decrease in fuel value of the former. The fuel value of liquids, such as gasoline, diesel oil, etc. is lower than that of natural gas. Blending gasoline with ethanol obtained either from bio-mass or via synthesis may decrease fuel value of the blend when CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the production of ethanol are included in total emissions. The introduction of liquid fuels produced by pyrolysis and liquefaction of biomass would result in the increase in the CO{sub 2} emissions. The CO{sub 2} emissions from the utilization of coal and petroleum coke are much higher than those from gaseous and liquid fuels. However, for petroleum coke, this is offset by the high value gaseous and liquid fuels that are simultaneously produced during coking. Conversion of low value fuels such as coal and petroleum coke to a high value chemicals via synthesis gas should be assessed as means for replacing natural gas and making it available for fuel applications.

Furimsky, E. [IMAF Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Influence of Biodiesel Addition to Fischer?Tropsch Fuel on Diesel Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zhu, R.; Wang, X.; Miao, H.; Huang, Z.; Gao, J.; Jiang, D.Performance and Emission Characteristics of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends Energy Fuels 2009, 23, 286 293 ... Results showed that, without changing the fuel supply system and the combustion system of a diesel engine, when using blended fuel with increased DMM percentage, break-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) is higher for a smaller lower heating value of DMM, while thermal efficiency increases a little. ... To investigate influences of fuel design on regulated and non-regulated emissions of heavy-duty diesel engines, a Mercedes-Benz OM 906 Euro 3 engine was run with common diesel fuel (DF), first- and second-generation alternative fuels (Gas-to-liq. ...

Md. Nurun Nabi; Johan Einar Hustad

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters  

SciTech Connect

A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Multivariate analysis of exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect

Particulate and gaseous exhaust emission phases from running 10 diesel fuels on two makes of heavy-duty diesel engines were analyzed with respect to 63 chemical descriptors. Measurements for one of the fuels were also made in the presence of an exhaust aftertreatment device. The variables included 28 polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), regulated pollutants (CO, HC, NO{sub x}, particles), and 19 other organic and inorganic exhaust emission components. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied for the statistical exploration of the obtained data. In addition, relationships between chemical (12 variables) and physical (12 variables) parameters of the fuels to the exhaust emissions were derived using partial least squares (PLS) regression. Both PCA and PLS models were derived for the engine makes separately. The PCA showed that the most descriptive exhaust emission factors from these diesel fuels included fluoranthene as a representative of PAC, the regulated pollutants, sulfates, methylated pyrenes, and monoaromatics. Exhaust emissions were significantly decreased in the presence of an exhaust aftertreatment device. Both engine makes exhibited similar patterns of exhaust emissions. Discrepancies were observed for the exhaust emissions of CO{sub 2} and oil-derived soluble organic fractions, owing to differences in engine design. The PLS analysis showed a good correlation of exhaust emission of the regulated pollutants and PAC with the contents of PAC in the fuels and the fuel aromaticity. 41 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Sjoegren, M.; Ulf, R.; Li, H.; Westerholm, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

250

Space-based observations of NO2: Trends in anthropogenic emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and soilcombustion) and natural (lightning, soil microbial processes, biomass

Russell, Ashley Ray

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effect of GTL Diesel Fuels on Emissions and Engine Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: DaimlerChrysler Research and Technology

252

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adam R. 2008. Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energyshale gas, tight oil, oil shale, and tar (bitumen) sands. In

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

254

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

255

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

256

Investigation of the Performance and Emission Characteristics of Biodiesel Fuel Containing Butanol under the Conditions of Diesel Engine Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(17) However, emissions of engines fueled with multicomponent fuels containing fossil diesel, butanol, and rapeseed oil butyl/methyl esters have not been tested. ... Break specific fuel consumption when engine is fuelled with fossil diesel fuel (n = 1500 min?1). ... For all cases, engine torque was retained the same by adjusting fueling rate. ...

Sergejus Lebedevas; Galina Lebedeva; Egle Sendzikiene; Violeta Makareviciene

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

Spatial Relationships of Sector-Specific Fossil-fuel CO2 Emissions in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of the spatial distribution of sector-specific fossil fuel CO2 emissions provides strategic information to public and private decision-makers on climate change mitigation options and can provide critical constraints to carbon budget studies being performed at the national to urban scales. This study analyzes the spatial distribution and spatial drivers of total and sectoral fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the state and county levels in the United States. The spatial patterns of absolute versus per capita fossil fuel CO2 emissions differ substantially and these differences are sector-specific. Area-based sources such as those in the residential and commercial sectors are driven by a combination of population and surface temperature with per capita emissions largest in the northern latitudes and continental interior. Emission sources associated with large individual manufacturing or electricity producing facilities are heterogeneously distributed in both absolute and per capita metrics. The relationship between surface temperature and sectoral emissions suggests that the increased electricity consumption due to space cooling requirements under a warmer climate may outweigh the savings generated by lessened space heating. Spatial cluster analysis of fossil fuel CO2 emissions confirms that counties with high (low) CO2 emissions tend to be clustered close to other counties with high (low) CO2 emissions and some of the spatial clustering extends to multi-state spatial domains. This is particularly true for the residential and transportation sectors, suggesting that emissions mitigation policy might best be approached from the regional or multi-state perspective. Our findings underscore the potential for geographically focused, sector-specific emissions mitigation strategies and the importance of accurate spatial distribution of emitting sources when combined with atmospheric monitoring via aircraft, satellite and in situ measurements. Keywords: Fossil-fuel; Carbon dioxide emissions; Sectoral; Spatial cluster; Emissions mitigation policy

Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emissions from the Combustion of Alternative Fuels in a Gas Turbine Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

? Centre of Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409, United States ... Within the aviation sector, the development and certification of alternative drop-in fuels are progressing at a rapid pace: a standard specification for aviation fuel containing synthesized hydrocarbons was approved by ASTM in 2009,(4) Hydrogenated esters and fatty acids (HEFA), also often referred to as hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ), qualified as a 50/50 blend with petroleum Jet A-1 in 2011,(4) and the Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (CAAFI) anticipate fully synthetic FischerTropsch (FT) fuel to qualify in 2012. ... Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions ...

Simon Christie; David Raper; David S. Lee; Paul I. Williams; Lucas Rye; Simon Blakey; Chris W. Wilson; Prem Lobo; Donald Hagen; Philip D. Whitefield

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

259

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

260

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Investigation of the effects of renewable diesel fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A study was undertaken to investigate renewable fuels in a compression-ignition internal combustion engine. The focus of this study was the effect of newly developed renewable fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions. Eight fuels were investigated, and they include diesel, jet fuel, a traditional biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester: FAME), and five next generation biofuels. These five fuels were derived using a two-step process: hydrolysis of the oil into fatty acids (if necessary) and then a thermo-catalytic process to remove the oxygen via a decarboxylation reaction. The fuels included a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (DCFA), a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids with varying amounts of H2 used during the deoxygenation process (DCFAH), a continuous deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (CDCFA), fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid (DLA), and a third reaction to isomerize the products of the deoxygenated canola derived fatty acid alkanes (IPCF). Diesel, jet fuel, and biodiesel (FAME) have been used as benchmarks for comparing with the newer renewable fuels. The results of the experiments show slightly lower mechanical efficiency but better brake specific fuel consumption for the new renewable fuels. Results from combustion show shorter ignition delays for most of the renewable (deoxygenated) fuels with the exception of fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid. Combustion results also show lower peak in-cylinder pressures, reduced rate of increase in cylinder pressure, and lower heat release rates for the renewable fuels. Emission results show an increase in hydrocarbon emissions for renewable deoxygenated fuels, but a general decrease in all other emissions including NOx, greenhouse gases, and soot. Results also demonstrate that isomers of the alkanes resulting from the deoxygenation of the canola derived fatty acids could be a potential replacement to conventional fossil diesel and biodiesel based on the experiments in this work.

Dolanimi Ogunkoya; William L. Roberts; Tiegang Fang; Nirajan Thapaliya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Performance and emissions of a diesel tractor engine fueled with marine diesel and soybean methyl ester  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel that is cleaner than petrodiesel. Biodiesel can be used directly as fuel for a diesel engine without having to modify the engine system. It has the major advantages of having high biodegradability, excellent lubricity and no sulfur content. This paper presents the results of investigations carried out in studying the fuel properties of soybean methyl ester (SME) and its blend with marine diesel fuel from 5%, 20% and 50% blends by volume and in running a diesel engine with these fuels. The results indicate that the use of biodiesel produces lower smoke opacity (up to 74%), but higher brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) (up to 12%) compared to marine fuel (MF). The measured carbon monoxide (CO) emissions of B5 and B100 fuels were found to be 3% and 52% lower than that of the MF, respectively.

B. Gokalp; E. Buyukkaya; H.S. Soyhan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Interactions Among Emissions, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate Change: Implications for Future Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions Among Emissions, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate Change: Implications for Future emissions, atmospheric chemistry, and climate, we have conducted a series of simulations on 120-year time emissions and different assumptions for chemistry and climate model parameters. To specifically identify

264

Comparative Study of Hybrid Powertrains on Fuel Saving, Emissions, and Component Energy Loss in HD Trucks  

SciTech Connect

We compared parallel and series hybrid powertrains on fuel economy, component energy loss, and emissions control in Class 8 trucks over both city and highway driving. A comprehensive set of component models describing battery energy, engine fuel efficiency, emissions control, and power demand interactions for heavy duty (HD) hybrids has been integrated with parallel and series hybrid Class 8 trucks in order to identify the technical barriers of these hybrid powertrain technologies. The results show that series hybrid is absolutely negative for fuel economy benefit of long-haul trucks due to an efficiency penalty associated with the dual-step conversions of energy (i.e. mechanical to electric to mechanical). The current parallel hybrid technology combined with 50% auxiliary load reduction could elevate 5-7% fuel economy of long-haul trucks, but a profound improvement of long-haul truck fuel economy requires additional innovative technologies for reducing aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance losses. The simulated emissions control indicates that hybrid trucks reduce more CO and HC emissions than conventional trucks. The simulated results further indicate that the catalyzed DPF played an important role in CO oxidations. Limited NH3 emissions could be slipped from the Urea SCR, but the average NH3 emissions are below 20 ppm. Meanwhile our estimations show 1.5-1.9% of equivalent fuel-cost penalty due to urea consumption in the simulated SCR cases.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Developed jointly by Da Vinci Emissions Services Ltd., Cummins Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil (DAFIO) technology uses a fiber optic probe to obtain real-time measurements of oil in an operating engine to quantify the fuel dissolved in the lubricant oil.

266

Economic and emissions impacts of renewable fuel goals for aviation in the US*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted 1 October 2013 Keywords: Aviation Biofuels Climate change Emissions abatement a b s t r a c t The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel that meeting the aviation biofuel goal in 2020 will require an implicit subsidy from airlines to bio- fuel

267

Operation of Marine Diesel Engines on Biogenic Fuels: Modification of Emissions and Resulting Climate Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO2, NOx, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference ...

Andreas Petzold; Peter Lauer; Uwe Fritsche; Jan Hasselbach; Michael Lichtenstern; Hans Schlager; Fritz Fleischer

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Economic, Energy, and GHG Emissions Impacts of Proposed 20172025 Vehicle Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic, Energy, and GHG Emissions Impacts of Proposed 2017­2025 Vehicle Fuel Economy of the Marine Biology Laboratory (MBL) at Woods Hole, and by short- and long-term visitors to the Program-2025 Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards in the United States Valerie J. Karplus* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract

269

NMOG Emissions Characterization and Estimation for Vehicles Using Ethanol-Blended Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol is a biofuel commonly used in gasoline blends to displace petroleum consumption; its utilization is on the rise in the United States, spurred by the biofuel utilization mandates put in place by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the statutory responsibility to implement the EISA mandates through the promulgation of the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA has historically mandated an emissions certification fuel specification that calls for ethanol-free fuel, except for the certification of flex-fuel vehicles. However, since the U.S. gasoline marketplace is now virtually saturated with E10, some organizations have suggested that inclusion of ethanol in emissions certification fuels would be appropriate. The test methodologies and calculations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations for gasoline-fueled vehicles have been developed with the presumption that the certification fuel does not contain ethanol; thus, a number of technical issues would require resolution before such a change could be accomplished. This report makes use of the considerable data gathered during the mid-level blends testing program to investigate one such issue: estimation of non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. The data reported in this paper were gathered from over 600 cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) tests conducted on 68 vehicles representing 21 models from model year 2000 to 2009. Most of the vehicles were certified to the Tier-2 emissions standard, but several older Tier-1 and national low emissions vehicle program (NLEV) vehicles were also included in the study. Exhaust speciation shows that ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde dominate the oxygenated species emissions when ethanol is blended into the test fuel. A set of correlations were developed that are derived from the measured non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions and the ethanol blend level in the fuel. These correlations were applied to the measured NMHC emissions from the mid-level ethanol blends testing program and the results compared against the measured NMOG emissions. The results show that the composite FTP NMOG emissions estimate has an error of 0.0015 g/mile {+-}0.0074 for 95% of the test results. Estimates for the individual phases of the FTP are also presented with similar error levels. A limited number of tests conducted using the LA92, US06, and highway fuel economy test cycles show that the FTP correlation also holds reasonably well for these cycles, though the error level relative to the measured NMOG value increases for NMOG emissions less than 0.010 g/mile.

Sluder, Scott [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emission in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities conducted for the project The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimized Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel under COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-07NT43271, which are as outlined in the STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated March 2007 and in the supplemental SOPO dated October 2010. The project objective was to develop and demonstrate an internal combustion engine that is optimized for E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) fuel operation to achieve substantially improved fuel economy while operating with E85 fuel and that is also production viable in the near- to medium-term. The key engine technology selected for research and development was turbocharging, which is known to improve fuel economy thru downsizing and is in particular capable of exploiting ethanol fuels characteristics of high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. The engine further integrated synergistic efficiency improving technologies of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), direct fuel injection and dual continuously variable intake and exhaust cam phasers. On the vehicle level, fuel economy was furthered thru powertrain system optimization by mating a state-of-the-art six-speed automatic transmission to the engine. In order to achieve the projects objective of near- to medium-term production viability, it was essential to develop the engine to be flex-fuel capable of operating with fuels ranging from E0 (0% ethanol and 100% gasoline) to E85 and to use three-way type of catalyst technology for exhaust aftertreatment. Within these scopes, various technologies were developed through systems approach to focus on ways to help accelerate catalyst light-off. Significant amount of development took place during the course of the project within General Motors, LLC. Many prototype flex-fuel engines were designed, built and developed with various hardware configurations selected to achieve the project goals. Several flex-fuel demonstration vehicles were designed and built for carrying out calibration development and final testing to quantify the technology merits. Based on the extensive test results collected from dynamometer and vehicle testing, the fuel economy benefits of cooled EGR from the intended level of turbocharger technology were quantified. When combined with turbo downsizing, the FE benefits are considered large enough for E0 fuel as well as for E85 fuel to warrant further development of the technology beyond the current proof-of-concept level to a level that can meet production driveability quality and durability requirements in order to meet customers expectations. Cold-start cart test results from the emissions segment of the project were positive, confirming the assumption of faster thermal response of turbo exhaust system for emissions reductions for both E0 and E85 fuels. Vehicle emissions test results directionally correlated to the cold-start cart findings. The limited number of test runs did demonstrate the potentials of meeting stringent emission standards, however, they did not comprehend the factors such as hardware variability and long-term durability, 3 which are essential for mass production to satisfy customers expectations. It is therefore recommended, moving forward, durability concerns over turbocharger, EGR system and aftertreatment system, which would likely impact production viability, should be addressed. The data moreover suggested that further FE increase is likely with turbocharger technology advancement.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy and emissions intensity of unconventional production are at best a lower bound, and current projections of future

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fact #817: February 17, 2014 Conventional and Alternative Fuel Price Trends from 2000 to 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Retail prices for most transportation fuels have been highly volatile over the past 13 years. The figure below shows quarterly price fluctuations for select fuel types from 2000 to 2013. Gasoline,...

273

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

understood and accounted for, they can be introduced at higher blending levels. * Non-petroleum based fuels are relatively new and not fully understood. * Current vehicles are...

274

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ft007sluder2011...

275

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adam R. 2008. Converting Oil Shale to Liquid Fuels: Energyshale gas, tight oil, oil shale, and tar (bitumen) sands. Inunconventional (tar sands or shale oil) being more energy

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands. Environ.6 Forecasts of Canadian oil production published in 2006 andPetroleum Fuels The oil production chain is similar to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of the FFC energy intensity parameters. The FFCand c as the energy intensity of fuel production, defined asrepresenting the energy intensity and material losses at

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Low-Emission Engine and Fuel Technology for Motorcycle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research is to apply an adaptive fuel injection control algorithm on a motorcycle engine and evaluate its performance. A highly nonlinear (more)

Chen, Chung-ying

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Dual Fuel Diesel Engine Operation Using H2. Effect on Particulate Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dual Fuel Diesel Engine Operation Using H2. ... School of Engineering, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom, Universidad de Castilla?La Mancha, Edificio Politecnico, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Avda. ... In diesel engines, the reduction of particulate emissions must be achieved in conjunction with the reduction of NOx emissions. ...

A. Tsolakis; J. J. Hernandez; A. Megaritis; M. Crampton

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

280

Comparison of Real-World Fuel Use and Emissions for Dump Trucks Fueled with B20 Biodiesel Versus Petroleum Diesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Versus Petroleum Diesel By H. Christopher Frey, Ph.D. Professor Department of Civil, Construction-world in-use on-road emissions of selected diesel vehicles, fueled with B20 biodiesel and petroleum diesel was tested for one day on B20 biodiesel and for one day on petroleum diesel. On average, there were 4.5 duty

Frey, H. Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Life Cycle Inventory Energy Consumption and Emissions for Biodiesel versus Petroleum Diesel Fueled Construction Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Inventory Energy Consumption and Emissions for Biodiesel versus Petroleum Diesel Fueled Construction Vehicles ... In general, LCI emissions of HC and CO are lower if NSPS-compliant soyoil plants are used. ... The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a methodology for characterizing at high resolution the energy use and emissions of a plug-in parallel-hybrid diesel-electric school bus (PHSB) to support assessments of sensitivity to driving cycles and ... ...

Shih-Hao Pang; H. Christopher Frey; William J. Rasdorf

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Htfiffi m'* Effects of Alternative Fuels on Vehicle Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the atmosphere. For many r.ears, the primary vehicie fuels used have been gasoline and diesel fuels. These iuels: gasoline, gasoline-ethanol l'rlends, diesel, biodiesel blends, LPG lquefied petroleurn gas) ancl CNG for gasoline, and at lorv concentrzrtiofls c?]11 be used r.vithout r-eilcle rnodiilcadons. Ethiurol can

283

Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This research and development efforts produced low-emission burner technology capable of operating on natural gas as well as crude glycerin and/or fatty acids generated in biodiesel plants. The research was conducted in three stages (1) Concept definition leading to the design and development of a small laboratory scale burner, (2) Scale-up to prototype burner design and development, and (3) Technology demonstration with field vefiication. The burner design relies upon the Flow Blurring (FB) fuel injection based on aerodynamically creating two-phase flow near the injector exit. The fuel tube and discharge orifice both of inside diameter D are separated by gap H. For H < 0.25D, the atomizing air bubbles into liquid fuel to create a two-phase flow near the tip of the fuel tube. Pressurized two-phase fuel-air mixture exits through the discharge orifice, which results in expansion and breakup of air bubbles yielding a spray with fine droplets. First, low-emission combustion of diesel, biodiesel and straight VO (soybean oil) was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine sprays for these fuels with significantly different physical properties. Visual images for these baseline experiments conducted with heat release rate (HRR) of about 8 kW illustrate clean blue flames indicating premixed combustion for all three fuels. Radial profiles of the product gas temperature at the combustor exit overlap each other signifying that the combustion efficiency is independent of the fuel. At the combustor exit, the NOx emissions are within the measurement uncertainties, while CO emissions are slightly higher for straight VO as compared to diesel and biodiesel. Considering the large variations in physical and chemical properties of fuels considered, the small differences observed in CO and NOx emissions show promise for fuel-flexible, clean combustion systems. FB injector has proven to be very effective in atomizing fuels with very different physical properties, and it offers a path forward to utilize both fossil and alternative liquid fuels in the same combustion system. In particular, experiments show that straight VO can be cleanly combusted without the need for chemical processing or preheating steps, which can result in significant economic and environmental benefits. Next, low-emission combustion of glycerol/methane was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine droplets of highly viscous glycerol. Heat released from methane combustion further improves glycerol pre-vaporization and thus its clean combustion. Methane addition results in an intensified reaction zone with locally high temperatures near the injector exit. Reduction in methane flow rate elongates the reaction zone, which leads to higher CO emissions and lower NOx emissions. Similarly, higher air to liquid (ALR) mass ratio improves atomization and fuel pre-vaporization and shifts the flame closer to the injector exit. In spite of these internal variations, all fuel mixes of glycerol with methane produced similar CO and NOx emissions at the combustor exit. Results show that FB concept provides low emissions with the flexibility to utilize gaseous and highly viscous liquid fuels, straight VO and glycerol, without preheating or preprocessing the fuels. Following these initial experiments in quartz combustor, we demonstrated that glycerol combustion can be stably sustained in a metal combustor. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements in glycerol/methane flames resulted in flow-weighted Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of 35 to 40 ?m, depending upon the methane percentage. This study verified that lab-scale dual-fuel burner using FB injector can successfully atomize and combust glycerol and presumably other highly viscous liquid fuels at relatively low HRR (<10 kW). For industrial applications, a scaled-up glycerol burner design thus seemed feasible.

Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Experimental Study of Diesel Fuel Effects on Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Performance and Pollutant Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Study of Diesel Fuel Effects on Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Performance and Pollutant Emissions ... The test fuels indicate variable hydrocarbon composition and physical and chemical properties, and they were prepared under a European Union research program aiming to identify future fuel formulations for use in modern DI diesel engines. ... 1,2,4-9,13,14,16,17,24-26 In general, there is an interrelation between the molecular structure (paraffins, olefins, napthenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons), the chemical properties (cetane number, ignition point, etc.), and the physical properties (density, viscosity, surface tension, etc.) of the diesel fuel. ...

Theodoros C. Zannis; Dimitrios T. Hountalas; Roussos G. Papagiannakis

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

unregulated pollutants beyond 2010 APBF-DEC Structure DOE, EPA, additive companies, automobile manufacturers, engine manufacturers, energy companies, emission control mfrs.,...

286

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

characterization with single-cylinder test engines, guided by industry Barrier: Lack of cost-effective emission control Objective: Seek to shorten development time of filtration...

287

Fuel consumption and emissions of hybrid diesel applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GM Powertrain Europe and the Politecnico di Torino have experimentally assessed the potentialities in terms of fuel consumption reduction and the challenges in terms of ... 1.9 l four-cylinder in-line diesel engine

Prof.-Dr. Andrea Emilio Catania; Prof.-Dr. Ezio Spessa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Effect of Operating Conditions on SO2 and NOx Emissions in Oxy-Fuel Mini-CFB Combustion Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic CO2 production is caused primarily by fossil fuel combustion. In consequence, it is increasingly necessary to find ways to reduce these emissions when fossil fuel is used. CO2 capture and storage (C...

L. Jia; Y. Tan; E. J. Anthony

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems- A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A complete vehicle fuel-cycle analysis, commonly called a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis that examines the use and emissions associated with fuel production (or well-to-tank [WTT]) activities and energy use and emissions associated with vehicle operation (or tank-to-wheels [TTW]) activities.

290

The implications of using hydrocarbon fuels to generate electricity for hydrogen fuel powered automobiles on electrical capital, hydrocarbon consumption, and anthropogenic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers some of the impacts of adopting hydrogen fuel cell powered electric automobiles in the US. The change will need significant adjustments to the electrical generation industry including additional capital and hydrocarbon fuel consumption as well as impacting anthropogenic greenhouse emissions. Examining the use of three fuels to generate hydrogen fuels, using three production methods, distributed in three geographic scenarios, we determine that while the change reduces anthropogenic greenhouse emissions with minimal additional electrical generation capital expenditures, it accelerates the use of natural gas. Electrolysis provides a sustainable, longer-term solution, but requires more capital investment in electrical generation and yields an increase in anthropogenic greenhouse emissions.

Derek Tittle; Jingwen Qu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

292

Exhaust Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of a Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol?Diesel Fuel Blends at Different Injection Timings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exhaust Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of a Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol?Diesel Fuel Blends at Different Injection Timings ... Because of their fuel economy and high reliability, compression-ignition (CI) engines known as diesel engines have been penetrating a number of markets around the world. ...

Mustafa Canakci; Cenk Sayin; Metin Gumus

2008-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planned request for FY15 - 200K Barriers addressed for enabling of high-efficiency engine technology: B. Lack of cost-effective emission control C. Lack of modeling capability...

294

Converting CO2 emissions and hydrogen into methanol vehicle fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are new possibilities for transforming the ecological position of the metal-producing industries by utilizing their green-house gas emissions with electrolytically produced hydrogen to generate methanol ...

Bragi rnason; Thorsteinn I. Sigfsson

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Impact of fuel and injection system on particle emissions from a GDI engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent years, particulate emissions from the gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine, especially the ultrafine particulates, have become a subject of concern. In this study, the impact of fuel (gasoline versus ethanol) and injection system (injection pressure and injector condition) on particle emissions was investigated in a single cylinder spray-guided GDI research engine, under the operating conditions of stoichiometric air/fuel ratio, 1500rpm engine speed and 3.58.5bar IMEP. The results show that, in a spray guided GDI engine, ethanol combustion yields much lower particle mass (PM) but higher particle number (PN) emissions, compared to gasoline. Depending on the fuel used, the PM and PN emissions respond differently to injection pressure and injector condition. For gasoline, the injection system has a significant impact on the PM and PN emissions. High injection pressure and clean injector condition are both essential for low particle emissions. Compared to gasoline, the particle emissions from ethanol combustion is less sensitive to the injection system, due to its higher volatility and diffusive combustion which produces less soot. Furthermore, a PM and PN trade-off was observed when using gasoline and ethanol, and when using high injection pressures.

Chongming Wang; Hongming Xu; Jose Martin Herreros; Jianxin Wang; Roger Cracknell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia emission trends Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Satellite Observations of Tropospheric Ammonia Mark W.Shephard, Karen E. Cady-Pereira, Vivienne H.Payne Summary: differences likely driven by uncertainty in emissions...

297

Investigation of Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine with Oxygenated Fuels and Thermal Barrier Coating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine with Oxygenated Fuels and Thermal Barrier Coating ... Exhaust gas emissions from diesel engines have become a serious problem to the researchers; therefore, a method of reduction of gas emission is needed. ... Their results show that the engine can achieve ultra-low emission without fundamental change to the combustion system. ...

P. Ramu; C. G. Saravanan

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Case Study of the Emissions from a Heavy-Oil-Fueled Hungarian Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Case Study of the Emissions from a Heavy-Oil-Fueled Hungarian Power Plant ... More than 50% of the electric power in Hungary is produced by fossil-fuel-burning power plants. ... 15 The concentration of the pollutant at a location is described by an explicit function in Descartes coordinate system, where the origin is the source; the direction of the abscissa is the same as the wind direction. ...

Jnos Osn; Szabina Trk; Jen Fekete; Anders Rindby

2000-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

299

K-infinite trends with burnup, enrichment, and cooling time for BWR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the work performed by ORNL for the Yucca Mountain project (YMP) M and O contractor, Framatome Cogema Fuels. The goal of this work was to obtain k{sub inf} values for infinite arrays of flooded boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies as a function of various burnup/enrichment and cooling-time combinations. These scenarios simulate expected limiting criticality loading conditions (for a given assembly type) for drift emplacements in a repository. Upon consultation with the YMP staff, a Quad Cities BWR fuel assembly was selected as a baseline assembly. This design consists of seven axial enrichment zones, three of which contain natural uranium oxide. No attempt was made to find a bounding or even typical assembly design due to the wide variety in fuel assembly designs necessary for consideration. The current work concentrates on establishing a baseline analysis, along with a small number of sensitivity studies which can be expected later if desired. As a result of similar studies of this nature, several effects are known to be important in the determination of the final k{sub inf} for spent fuel in a cask-like geometry. For a given enrichment there is an optimal burnup: for lower burnups, excess energy (and corresponding excess reactivity) is present in the fuel assembly; for larger burnups, the assembly is overburned and essentially driven by neighboring fuel assemblies. The majority of the burnup/enrichment scenarios included in this study were for some near-optimum burnup/enrichment combinations as determined from Energy Information Administration (EIA) data. Several calculations were performed for under- and over-burned fuel to show these effects.

Broadhead, B.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels & Infrastructure Fuels & Infrastructure All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 49 results Fuel Trends - Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Average Retail Fuel Prices in the U.S. Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Trend of alternative and traditional motor fuel prices from 2000-2013 Last update December 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-eaiva6 Consumption of Natural Gas in the U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Berth and quay-crane allocation problem considering fuel consumption and emissions from vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Resolving the berth and quay-crane allocation problem improves the efficiency of seaside operations by optimally allocating berthing spaces and quay cranes to vessels, typically by considering a vessels sailing speed and arrival time at a port as constant parameters, while ignoring the impact of arrival times on fuel consumption and emissions when sailing. This work applied a novel nonlinear multi-objective mixed-integer programming model that considered a vessels fuel consumption and emissions, and then transformed this model into a second-order mixed-integer cone programming model to solve the problems computational intractability. Furthermore, the impact of number of allocated quay cranes on port operational cost, and a vessels fuel consumption and emissions was analyzed. Additionally, a vessels emissions while moored are also calculated based on wait time. Experimental results demonstrate that the new berth and quay-crane allocation strategy with a vessels arrival time as a decision variable can significantly improve vessels fuel consumption and emissions, the air quality around ports and utilization of berths and quay cranes without reducing service quality.

Qing-Mi Hu; Zhi-Hua Hu; Yuquan Du

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluation of Fuel Properties of Butanol?Biodiesel?Diesel Blends and Their Impact on Engine Performance and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Values of specific fuel consumption of engine when fueled with different blends and pure diesel at different speeds are shown in Figure 4. ... Chandra, R.; Kumar, R. Fuel properties of some stable alcohol?diesel microemulsions for their use in compression ignition engines Energy Fuels 2007, 21, 3410 3414 ... Liu, B.; Huang, Z.; Miao, H.; Di, Y.; Jiang, D.; Zeng, K. Combustion and emissions of a DI diesel engine fuelled with diesel?oxygenate blends Fuel 2008, 87, 2691 2697 ...

Rakhi N. Mehta; Mousumi Chakraborty; Pinakeswar Mahanta; Parimal A. Parikh

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Effect of Gas-to-Liquid Diesel Fuels on Combustion Characteristics, Engine Emissions, and Exhaust Gas Fuel Reforming. Comparative Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

School of Engineering, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, U.K., Shell Global Solutions, Cheshire Innovation Park, Chester CH1 3SH, U.K., Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Design, Brunel University, West London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, U.K., and Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Blount's Court, Sonning Common, Reading RG4 9NH, U.K. ... Clearly, the general trend is toward higher efficiency engines and improved fuel economy, something that puts current technology spark ignition (SI) engines in a relatively weak position compared to compression ignition (CI) engines. ... As the diesel engine used in this study was equipped with a pump-line-nozzle-type fuel injection system, all the observed effects may not apply to common rail or unit injection equipped engines. ...

A. Abu-Jrai; A. Tsolakis; K. Theinnoi; R. Cracknell; A. Megaritis; M. L. Wyszynski; S. E. Golunski

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Operating with In-Cylinder Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blending  

SciTech Connect

Advanced combustion regimes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer benefits of reduced nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, these combustion strategies often generate higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. In addition, aldehydes and ketone emissions can increase in these modes. In this study, the engine-out emissions of a compression-ignition engine operating in a fuel reactivity- controlled PCCI combustion mode using in-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuel have been characterized. The work was performed on a 1.9-liter, 4-cylinder diesel engine outfitted with a port fuel injection system to deliver gasoline to the engine. The engine was operated at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) with the ratio of gasoline to diesel fuel that gave the highest engine efficiency and lowest emissions. Engine-out emissions for aldehydes, ketones and PM were compared with emissions from conventional diesel combustion. Sampling and analysis was carried out following micro-tunnel dilution of the exhaust. Particle geometric mean diameter, number-size distribution, and total number concentration were measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For the particle mass measurements, samples were collected on Teflon-coated quartz-fiber filters and analyzed gravimetrically. Gaseous aldehydes and ketones were sampled using dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid phase extraction cartridges and the extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In addition, emissions after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) were also measured to investigate the destruction of CO, HC and formaldehydes by the catalyst.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Emissions Characteristics of a Turbine Engine and Research Combustor Burning a Fischer?Tropsch Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GTL and CTL technologies were discovered in Germany in the mid-1910s and further developed in 1923 by German scientists Drs. ... The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Fuels Branch of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/PRTG) established a collaborative research and development program in 2000 to study and demonstrate clean aviation fuels as part of the DOE Ultra Clean Transportation Fuels Initiative. ... 21 Gaseous emissions were quantified using an MKS MultiGas 2030 Fourier-transform infrared based gas analyzer and a flame ionization detector based total hydrocarbon analyzer. ...

Edwin Corporan; Matthew J. DeWitt; Vincent Belovich; Robert Pawlik; Amy C. Lynch; James R. Gord; Terrence R. Meyer

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cold Temperature and Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Speciated Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Diesel Trucks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions testing was conducted on a chassis dynamometer at two ambient temperatures (?7 and 22 C) operating on two fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel and 20% soy biodiesel blend) over three driving cycles: cold start, warm start and heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving cycle. ... Different 2007+ aftertreatment technologies involving catalyst regeneration led to significant modifications of VOC emissions that were compound-specific and highly dependent on test conditions. ... However, emissions of other toxic partial combustion products such as carbonyls were not reduced in the modern diesel vehicles tested. ...

Ingrid J. George; Michael D. Hays; Richard Snow; James Faircloth; Barbara J. George; Thomas Long; Richard W. Baldauf

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

A diesel engine study of conventional and alternative diesel and jet fuels: Ignition and emissions characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Measurements of ignition delay, CO and NO emissions, and fuel consumption were carried out in a light-duty single-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine for operation with petroleum and alternative hydroprocessed and FischerTropsch diesel and jet fuels. Ignition measurements carried out for a fixed engine speed and injection timing quantify the decrease in in-cylinder ignition delay with increasing derived cetane number (DCN) over a range of DCN relevant to diesel engine operation (DCN=4080) and show no discernible dependence of ignition delay on other fuel properties. Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) was found to decrease with increasing DCN with strong correlation due to a reduction in ignition time for fixed-injection-timed operation. Brake specific CO emissions were also found to decrease with increasing DCN due to increased time provided for CO burn out due to earlier ignition. Brake specific NO emissions were found to decrease with increasing hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratio, due to the lower peak combustion temperatures and thermal \\{NOx\\} occurring for fuels with higher H/C.

Sandeep Gowdagiri; Xander M. Cesari; Mingdi Huang; Matthew A. Oehlschlaeger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Comparison of propane and methane performance and emissions in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine  

SciTech Connect

With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

Project Information Form Project Title Reducing Truck Emissions and Improving Truck Fuel Economy via ITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

each agency or organization) US DOT $90,000 Total Project Cost $90,000 Agency ID or Contract NumberProject Information Form Project Title Reducing Truck Emissions and Improving Truck Fuel Economy Project Currently trucks are viewed as any other vehicle in traffic management Currently trucks are viewed

California at Davis, University of

310

Berth and quay-crane allocation problem considering fuel consumption and emissions from vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resolving the berth and quay-crane allocation problem improves the efficiency of seaside operations by optimally allocating berthing spaces and quay cranes to vessels, typically by considering a vessel's sailing speed and arrival time at a port as constant ... Keywords: Berth and quay crane allocation problem, Emission, Fuel consumption, Nonlinear optimization, Second-order cone programming

Qing-Mi Hu, Zhi-Hua Hu, Yuquan Du

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Emission Reduction Using RTP Green Fuel in Industry Facilities: A Life Cycle Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scenario analyses were also conducted to determine responses to model assumptions including different biomass feedstocks, feedstock transport mode and distance, and geographical locations of the pyrolysis process. ... The savings of GHG emissions compared to fossil heavy fuel oil is greater than 80% for all of these biomass feedstocks. ...

Jiqing Fan; David Shonnard; Tom Kalnes; Monique Streff; Geoff Hopkins

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

312

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel, or about 46,200 BTUs of diesel fuel per mile. 4.1.8BTU/bbl 3575 g/gal Diesel fuel 106 BTU/gal 106 BTU/bbl 3192gasoline or diesel vehicles (g/106-BTU) E NMOG = emissions

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc.

314

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

315

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Reduction in NOx Emission Trends over China: Regional and Seasonal Variations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 2. Total national import and export in China,(58) and monthly average tropospheric NO2 VCDs over China during 20052010. ... Power plants, petroleum industries, iron and steel industries were regulated due to their high-energy consumption and pollutant emissions. ...

Dasa Gu; Yuhang Wang; Charles Smeltzer; Zhen Liu

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Trends Trends All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 9 results Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Average Retail Fuel Prices in the U.S. Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Trend of alternative and traditional motor fuel prices from 2000-2013 Last update December 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-eaiva6 Consumption of Natural Gas in the U.S. Generated_thumb20130810-31804-eaiva6

318

A note on Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Du et al. [Du, Y., Chen, Q., Quan, X., Long, L., Fung, R.Y.K., 2011. Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions. Transportation Research Part E 47, 10211037] dealt with a berth allocation problem incorporating ship fuel consumption minimization. To address the difficulty posed by the power function between fuel consumption rate and sailing speed, they formulated a tractable mixed-integer second-order cone programming model. We propose two quadratic outer approximation approaches that can handle general fuel consumption rate functions more efficiently. In the static quadratic outer approximation approach, the approximation lines are generated a priori. In the dynamic quadratic outer approximation approach, the approximation lines are generated dynamically. Numerical experiments demonstrate the advantages of the two approaches.

Shuaian Wang; Qiang Meng; Zhiyuan Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3 and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development and validation of a simple strategy-based technique using four engine parameters to minimize emissions and fuel consumption

320

Effect of Bioethanol Blended Diesel Fuel and Engine Load on Spray, Combustion, and Emissions Characteristics in a Compression Ignition Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Yan et al.(8) investigated the combustion and emission characteristics of diesel engines fueled with ethanoldiesel blended fuel in a single cylinder diesel engine. ... Figure 11 shows the indicated specific fuel consumption (ISFC) characteristics of dieselbioethanol blended fuels at various engine loads. ... Tests on the engine fuelled with diesel only were made, and the performance evaluated to form a basis for comparison for those of ethanol-diesel dual fuelling. ...

Su Han Park; In Mo Youn; Yunsung Lim; Chang Sik Lee

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Studies on dual fuel engine performance and exhaust emission analysis by response surface methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this present study a five factor three level Box-Behnken response surface design was used to study the effect of five independent variables such as diesel (40%100%) ethanol (0%-30%) pongamia oil methyl ester (POME) (0%30%) compressed natural gas (CNG) (0%20%) and load of the engine (0%100%) on the performance (brake thermal efficiency brake specific fuel consumption and exhaust gas temperature) and emission characteristics (carbon mono-oxide (CO) carbon dioxides (CO2) unburnt hydrocarbon oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and smoke) of a single cylinder four stroke water cooled diesel engine converted to dual fuel system. It was operated with either diesel fuel or blend with CNG using an electronically controlled solenoid actuated valve mechanism. The experimental results showed that all the process variables have significant effect on the engine performance. The emission characteristics (CO CO2 NOX and Smoke) were significantly lower than the diesel fuel emissions. From the experimental results second order polynomial models were developed to predict the response variables. The optimal conditions were determined and it was found to be: Diesel 70% Ethanol 15% POME 15% CNG 10% and load 50% respectively with a desirability value of 0.894.

R. Senthilraja; V. Sivakumar; J. Prakash Maran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value

McDonald, R.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Impact of Sugarcane Renewable Fuel on In-Use Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions from a Marine Vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In-use emissions aboard a Stalwart class vessel, the T/S State of Michigan, were measured from a four-stroke marine diesel generator operating on two fuels: ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and ULSD mixed with Amyris renewable diesel (S33; 33% by volume) produced from sugarcane feedstocks with 67% by volume ULSD. ... A model 6V92TA Detroit Diesel Corporation diesel engine (9.0 L) was fueled on blends of 10, 20, 30 and 40% soydiesel-diesel fuel. ... Fueling with biodiesel/diesel fuel blends reduced particulate matter (PM), total hydrocarbons (THC) and CO, while increasing NOx. ...

Nicholas R. Gysel; Robert L. Russell; William A. Welch; David R. Cocker; III; Sujit Ghosh

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting iron ore to metallic iron nodules. Various types of coals including a bio-coal produced though torrefaction can result in production of NRI at reduced GHG levels. The process results coupled with earlier already reported developments indicate that this process technique should be evaluated at the next level in order to develop parameter information for full scale process design. Implementation of the process to full commercialization will require a full cost production analysis and comparison to other reduction technologies and iron production alternatives. The technical results verify that high quality NRI can be produced under various operating conditions at the pilot level.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

SciTech Connect

Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

326

NETL: News Release - Fuel Cells to Advance Zero-Emissions Energy in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 17, 2003 September 17, 2003 Fuel Cells to Advance Zero-Emissions Energy in Tomorrow's Economy R&D on Key Components, Diagnostics, Modeling Gets $5.4 Million Boost with 10 New DOE Research Grants WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced a new phase of fuel-cell research designed to hasten the wider availability of zero-emissions energy. The 10 Department of Energy (DOE) research grants, totaling $4.2 million, will be matched by another $1.2 million from university and private sector participants for research aimed at resolving obstacles to fuel-cell use. "The President's Hydrogen and Climate Initiatives envision fuel cells playing a prominent role in the economy and everyday life," Secretary Abraham said, "For that to occur, we have to reduce the costs of fuel cell acquisition and use. These projects address the most important priorities identified by industry and researchers, and were chosen for their technological impact and high potential for overall success."

327

Performance and Emissions of a Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Diesel/Oxygenate Blends for Various Fuel Delivery Advance Angles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China ... In the application of pure oxygenated fuels, Fleisch et al.,1 Kapus and Ofner,2 and Sorenson and Mikkelsen3 have studied dimethyl ether (DME) in a modified diesel engine, and their results showed that the engine could achieve ultralow-emission prospects without a fundamental change in combustion systems. ... Although some previous work has revealed the characteristics of diesel/ethanol blends in a compression ignition engine (Satge de Caro et al.,14 Ali et al.15), there, however, is still much work that needs to be done in regard to the application of diesel/methanol blends in compression ignition engines, especially in clarifying the basic combustion and emission. ...

Zuohua Huang; Hongbing Lu; Deming Jiang; Ke Zeng; Bing Liu; Junqiang Zhang; Xibin Wang

2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effects of the blends containing low ratios of alternative fuels on the performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to experimentally investigate the effects of blends containing various alternative fuels and diesel fuel on the performance and emissions of a diesel engine. The considered parameters are brake power, specific fuel consumption and thermal efficiency as well as carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide emissions. Blends of biodiesel, ethanol, methanol and vegetable oil with diesel fuel, each containing 15% alternative fuel in volume, were prepared. Then, these blends were tested in a naturally aspirated, direct injection diesel engine. The test results obtained with these blends were compared with those obtained with diesel fuel. It was found that the tested blends yielded usually different performance and emission characteristics compared to diesel fuel. The biodiesel blend resulted in performance parameters very close to those obtained in the use of diesel fuel. Ethanol and methanol blends yielded lower brake power, while they resulted in higher specific fuel consumption and lower carbon monoxide emissions. On the other hand, the vegetable oil blend yielded lower carbon monoxide emissions, while it caused only slight changes in the performance parameters.

Murat Karabektas; Gokhan Ergen; Murat Hosoz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel use and CO2 emissions, has resulted in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel, combined with the expanded demand for biofuels, will result in higher food prices, since less land by using biofuels (vegetable oils). But the use of biofuels may not reduce CO2 emissions, even when

330

Effect of Injection Pressure on the Combustion, Performance, and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol-blended Diesel Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Injection Pressure on the Combustion, Performance, and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol-blended Diesel Fuel ... Recently, the use of diesel engines has increased by virtue of their low fuel consumption and high efficiencies. ... Tests on the engine fuelled with diesel only were made, and the performance evaluated to form a basis for comparison for those of ethanol-diesel dual fuelling. ...

Mustafa Canakci; Cenk Sayin; Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Ali Turkcan

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Emissions All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 3 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-53z5da Carbon Intensity of Alternative Fuels in California Heavy-Duty Vehicles Generated_thumb20130810-31804-53z5da California Low Carbon Fuel Program's assessment of lifecycle GHG emissions from alternative fuels Last update March 2011 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1b2rnlz

332

Performance and Emissions of Direct Injection Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel Fuel Containing Dissolved Methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, People's Republic of China ... soot and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solns., one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liq. ... (16)?Heywood, J. B. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals; McGraw-Hill:? New York, 1988. ...

Junqiang Zhang; Deming Jiang; Zuohua Huang; Xibin Wang; Qi Wei

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method for control of NOx emission from combustors using fuel dilution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of controlling NOx emission from combustors. The method involves the controlled addition of a diluent such as nitrogen or water vapor, to a base fuel to reduce the flame temperature, thereby reducing NOx production. At the same time, a gas capable of enhancing flame stability and improving low temperature combustion characteristics, such as hydrogen, is added to the fuel mixture. The base fuel can be natural gas for use in industrial and power generation gas turbines and other burners. However, the method described herein is equally applicable to other common fuels such as coal gas, biomass-derived fuels and other common hydrocarbon fuels. The unique combustion characteristics associated with the use of hydrogen, particularly faster flame speed, higher reaction rates, and increased resistance to fluid-mechanical strain, alter the burner combustion characteristics sufficiently to allow operation at the desired lower temperature conditions resulting from diluent addition, without the onset of unstable combustion that can arise at lower combustor operating temperatures.

Schefer, Robert W. (Alamo, CA); Keller, Jay O (Oakland, CA)

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2012 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2009. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

335

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2013 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2010. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

336

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2011 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of del 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2008. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric del 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

337

Table 2. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,,,," Shares " "State","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas ","Total","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas" "Alabama",67.81545193,35.95576449,28.97505976,132.7462762,0.5108651925,0.2708608145,0.218273993 "Alaska",1.364880388,19.58916888,17.77313443,38.72718369,0.03524347131,0.5058247724,0.4589317562 "Arizona",43.2377726,34.82066125,17.85460129,95.91303514,0.4508018387,0.3630440972,0.1861540641 "Arkansas",27.72445786,23.82768621,14.56726112,66.11940519,0.4193089424,0.3603735717,0.2203174859 "California",5.157135123,241.2575077,123.3955377,369.8101805,0.01394535736,0.6523820067,0.3336726359

338

Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. (Telephone: 412.776.4970; E-mail: publications@sae.org)

339

Emission characteristics of GTL fuel as an alternative to conventional marine gas oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study examine the gaseous, smoke and particulate matter emission characteristics of a turbocharged heavy-duty diesel engine operated on conventional marine gas oil and gas-to-liquid FischerTropsch fuel under modes of propulsion and generator operation. The gas-to-liquid showed average reductions up to 19% in nitrogen oxides, 25% in carbon monoxide, 4% in carbon dioxide and 30% in smoke with slight increase in unburned hydrocarbon emissions. Particulate number concentrations for gas-to-liquid were up to 21% higher, whereas particulates mass showed a 16% decrease at medium and high loads, while increasing by 1215% under lower load conditions. Very low aromatic content of gas-to-liquid fuel and nearly zero sulfur level are responsible for particulate reduction.

Sergey Ushakov; Nadine G.M. Halvorsen; Harald Valland; Dag H. Williksen; Vilmar sy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Index (click to jump links) Carbon Dioxide Emissions Emissions from Electricity Generation Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 115. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1990-2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2002 to 2025, to 8,142 million metric tons (Figure 115). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year from 2002 to 2025. Carbon dioxide emissions in the residential sector, including emissions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Vehicle Manufacturer's Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of octane rating 4 EPA report 420-R-13-011 "Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through 2013" Technology is evolving rapidly...

342

Evaluation of coal-derived liquids as boiler fuels. Volume 3. Emissions test results. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A combustion demonstration using six coal-derived fuels was conducted on a utility boiler located at the plant, Sweatt Electric Generating Station of Mississippi Power Company, in Meridian, Mississippi. Volume 1, of a 5 volume report, contains a comprehensive report of the whole test program - see abstract of Volume 1 for a detailed abstract of the whole program. Volume 3 contains detailed emissions testing results. 41 figs., 6 tabs. (LTN)

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effect of Fuel Injection Pressure on a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Nonvolatile Particle Emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Fuel Injection Pressure on a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Nonvolatile Particle Emission ... (4, 9, 10) Recently, we have found nonvolatile core particles in the exhaust of heavy-duty diesel vehicles and engines also at high load conditions. ... On the basis of the thermodynamic behavior, particle core material has been inferred to be solid in room temperature,(4, 6, 10) but the character of the particles in general is still an open question. ...

Tero Lhde; Topi Rnkk; Matti Happonen; Christer Sderstrm; Annele Virtanen; Anu Solla; Matti Kyt; Dieter Rothe; Jorma Keskinen

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Spark ignition engine control strategies for minimising cold start fuel consumption under cumulative tailpipe emissions constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposes a methodology for minimising the fuel consumption of a gasoline fuelled vehicle during cold starting. It first takes a validated dynamic model of an engine and its aftertreatment reported in a previous study (Andrianov, Brear, & Manzie, 2012) to identify optimised engine control strategies using iterative dynamic programming. This is demonstrated on a family of optimisation problems, in which fuel consumption is minimised subject to different tailpipe emissions constraints and exhaust system designs. Potential benefits of using multi-parameter optimisation, involving spark timing, airfuel ratio and cam timing, are quantified. Single switching control policies are then proposed that perform close to the optimised strategies obtained from the dynamic programming but which require far less computational effort.

D.I. Andrianov; C. Manzie; M.J. Brear

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Low emissions combustor development for an industrial gas turbine to utilize LCV fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

Advanced coal-based power generation systems such as the British Coal Topping Cycle offer the potential for high-efficiency electricity generation with minimum environmental impact. An important component of the Topping cycle program is the gas turbine, for which development of a combustion system to burn low calorific value coal derived fuel gas, at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,260 C (2,300 F), with minimum pollutant emissions, is a key R and D issue. A phased combustor development program is underway burning low calorific value fuel gas (3.6--4.1 MJ/m[sup 3]) with low emissions, particularly NO[sub x] derived from fuel-bound nitrogen. The first phase of the combustor development program has now been completed using a generic tubo-annular, prototype combustor design. Tests were carried out at combustor loading and Mach numbers considerably greater than the initial design values. Combustor performance at these conditions was encouraging. The second phase of the program is currently in progress. This will assess, initially, an improved variant of the prototype combustor operating at conditions selected to represent a particular medium sized industrial gas turbine. This combustor will also be capable of operating using natural gas as an auxiliary fuel, to suite the start-up procedure for the Topping Cycle. The paper presents the Phase 1 test program results for the prototype combustor. Design of the modified combustor for Phase 2 of the development program is discussed, together with preliminary combustor performance results.

Kelsall, G.J.; Smith, M.A. (British Coal Corp., Glos (United Kingdom). Coal Research Establishment); Cannon, M.F. (European Gas Turbines Ltd., Lincoln (United Kingdom). Aero and Technology Products)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND FUEL CONSUMPTION FOR DIESEL - POWERED NONROAD FORKLIFT ENGINES ,AND FUEL CONSUMPTION FOR DIESEL - POWERED NONROAD FORKLIFT ENGINES ,

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effect of in-cylinder liquid fuel films on engine-out unburned hydrocarbon emissions for SI engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly all of the hydrocarbon emissions from a modern gasoline-fueled vehicle occur when the engine is first started. One important contributing factor to this is the fact that, during this time, temperatures throughout ...

Costanzo, Vincent S. (Vincent Stanley), 1979-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

New Automobile Regulations: Double the Fuel Economy, Half the CO2 Emissions, and Even Automakers Like It  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead-Time: The Case of US Automobile Greenhouse Gas EmissionNew Automobile Regulations Double the Fuel Economy, Half thephysics of the modern automobile involve an uphill battle to

Lutsey, Nic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development and Validation of a NOx Emission Testing Setup for a Diesel Engine, Fueled with Bio-Diesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increasing concerns related to long term availability of petroleum-based fuels and the emissions from diesel-powered vehicles have given rise to a growing search for (more)

Kohli, Dhruv

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Assessment of the influence of different cooling system configurations on engine warm-up, emissions and fuel consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the major goals of engine designers is the reduction of fuel consumption and pollutant emissions while keeping or even improving engine performance. In recent years, different technical ... have been inves...

A. J. Torregrosa; A. Broatch; P. Olmeda

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

State-By-State Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuel Use in the United States 19602000  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time series of fossil fuel carbon emissions from 19602000 for each of the U.S. states and the District of Columbia are presented and discussed. Comparison of the nationally summarized results with other natio...

T. J. Blasing; Christine Broniak

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Exhaust emissions and mutagenic effects of diesel fuel, biodiesel and biodiesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The replacement of petroleum-derived fuels by renewable biogenic fuels has become of worldwide interest with the environmental effects being scientifically investigated. Biodiesel has been proven to be a suitable alternative to petrodiesel and blending up to 20% biodiesel with petrodiesel is policy promoted in the USA and the EU. To investigate the influence of blends on the exhaust emissions and possible health effects, we performed a series of studies with several engines (Euro 0, III and IV) using blends of rapeseed-derived biodiesel and petrodiesel. Regulated and non-regulated exhaust compounds were measured and their mutagenic effects were determined using the Bacterial Reverse Mutation Assay (Ames-Test) according to OECD Guideline 471. Exhaust emissions of blends were approximately linearly dependent on the blend composition, particularly when considering regulated emissions. However, a negative effect of blends was observed with respect to mutagenicity of the exhaust emissions. In detail, an increase of the mutagenic potential was found for blends with the maximum observed for B20. From this point of view, B20 must be considered as a critical blend when petrodiesel and biodiesel are used as binary mixtures.

Olaf Schrder; Jrgen Bnger; Axel Munack; Gerhard Knothe; Jrgen Krahl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Elephant in the Room: Dealing with Carbon Emissions from Synthetic Transportation Fuels Production  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide (CO2), produced by conversion of hydrocarbons to energy, primarily via fossil fuel combustion, is one of the most ubiquitous and significant greenhouse gases (GHGs). Concerns over climate change precipitated by rising atmospheric GHG concentrations have prompted many industrialized nations to begin adopting limits on emissions to inhibit increases in atmospheric CO2 levels. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change states as a key goal the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 at a level that prevents dangerous anthropogenic interference with the planets climate systems. This will require sharply reducing emissions growth rates in developing nations, and reducing CO2 emissions in the industrialized world to half current rates in the next 50 years. And ultimately, stabilization will require that annual emissions drop to almost zero.Recently, there has been interest in producing synthetic transportation fuels via coal-to-liquids (CTL) production, particularly in countries where there is an abundant supply of domestic coal, including the United States. This paper provides an overview of the current state of CTL technologies and deployment, a discussion of costs and technical requirements for mitigating the CO2 impacts associated with a CTL facility, and the challenges facing the CTL industry as it moves toward maturity.

Parker, Graham B.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

354

Testing hybrid electric vehicle emissions and fuel economy at the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge  

SciTech Connect

From June 12--20, 1994, an engineering design competition called the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Challenge was held in Southfield, Michigan. This collegiate-level competition, which involved 36 colleges and universities from across North America, challenged the teams to build a superior HEV. One component of this comprehensive competition was the emissions event. Special HEV testing procedures were developed for the competition to find vehicle emissions and correct for battery state-of-charge while fitting into event time constraints. Although there were some problems with a newly-developed data acquisition system, they were able to get a full profile of the best performing vehicles as well as other vehicles that represent typical levels of performance from the rest of the field. This paper will explain the novel test procedures, present the emissions and fuel economy results, and provide analysis of second-by-second data for several vehicles.

Duoba, M.; Quong, S.; LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.P.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Performance and Emissions of a Compression-Ignition Engine Fueled with Dimethyl Ether and Rapeseed Oil Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sorenson and Mikkelsen2 had studied DME in a modified diesel engine, and their results showed that the engine could achieve ultralow-emission prospects without a fundamental change in combustion systems. ... Meanwhile, these parameters are compared with those of pure diesel fuel in order to clarify the effect of blends on the combustion and emission of engines (a CI engine cannot run for much longer of a period with pure DME fuel, so a comparison is only made with pure diesel fuel). ... Moreover, owing to the lower calorific value of the blend compared to diesel fuel, the fuel supply amount per cycle for blend operation is enlarged by increasing the plunger stroke of the fuel pump in order to make the power and torque output of the blends approach those of the corresponding diesel engine. ...

Wang Ying; Zhou Longbao

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

Comparison Study of SPEA2+, SPEA2, and NSGA-II in Diesel Engine Emissions and Fuel Economy Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison Study of SPEA2+, SPEA2, and NSGA-II in Diesel Engine Emissions and Fuel Economy Problem@mail.doshisha.ac.jp Abstract- Recently, the technology that can control NOx and Soot values of diesel engines by changing between fuel economy and NOx values. Therefore, the diesel engines that can change their characteristics

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

357

Dioxin and trace metal emissions from combustion of carbonized RDF slurry fuels  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the U.S. generated approximately 209 million tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), with 61% landfilled, 24% recycled, and 15% processed through Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC). In order to divert a larger portion of this generated MSW from landfills, MWC will have to play a growing role in MSW disposal. However, recently promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for MWC will add an additional financial burden, through mandated emission reductions and air pollution control technologies, to an already financially pressured MWC marketplace. In the past, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), a solid fuel produced from MSW, has been fired in industrial and coal boilers as an alternative means of MWC. While lower sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions provided the impetus, firing RDF in industrial and coal boilers frequently suffered from several disadvantages including increased solids handling, increased excess air requirements, increased air emissions, increased slag formation in the boiler, and higher fly ash resistivity. This paper summarizes the latest emissions and combustion tests with the carbonized RDF slurry fuel. With EnerTech`s SlurryCarb{trademark} process, a pumpable slurry of RDF is continuously pressurized with a pump to between 1200 and 2500 psi. The RDF slurry is pressurized above the saturated steam curve to maintain a liquid state when the slurry is heated to approximately 480-660{degrees}F. Slurry pressure and temperature then are maintained for less than 30 minutes in plug-flow reactors. At this temperature and pressure, oxygen functional groups in the molecular structure of the RDF are split off as carbon dioxide gas. This evolved carbon dioxide gas comprises a significant weight percentage of the feed RDF, but only a minimal percentage of the heating value.

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Fisher, M. [American Plastics Council, Washington, DC (United States); Singhania, A. [American Plastics Council/Amoco Chemicals, Alpharetta, GA (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Mathematical modeling for the performance and emission parameters of dual fuel diesel engine using hydrogen as secondary fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, mathematical models were developed to correlate the brake thermal efficiency, un-burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxides and oxides of nitrogen by varying engine parameters like Load and Gaseous (H2) fuel substitution. The developed models can be used to predict the important performance and emission parameters for diesel-hydrogen operation in various combinations at different loads within the experimental domain. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied for developing the models using the techniques of design of experiments and multi linear regression analysis. General factorial design was used to plan the experiments. Second order response surface models were found to be the most suitable in the present work. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the experimental results at 95% confidence level revealed that the developed models are significant. Comparison of experimental output with those predicted by the developed models showed close proximity having high correlation coefficients R2 for the various response variables.

A.E. Dhole; R.B. Yarasu; D.B. Lata; S.S. Baraskar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

basis (e.g. , to remove bunker fuels, cement production,+ imports ?exports ? bunkers ? non ? fuel uses ? stockMarland and Rotty, 1984). Bunker fuels are fuels used in

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nitrogen Oxides, Sulphur Trioxide and Mercury Emissions during Oxy-Fuel Fluidized Bed Combustion of Victorian Brown Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates, for the first time, the NOX, N2O, SO3 and Hg emissions from combustion of a Victorian brown coal in a 10 kWth fluidized bed unit under oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Compared to air combustion, lower NOX emissions and higher N2O ...

Bithi Roy; Luguang Chen; Sankar Bhattacharya

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fuel comsumption of heavy-duty trucks : potential effect of future technologies for improving energy efficiency and emission.  

SciTech Connect

The results of an analysis of heavy-duty truck (Classes 2b through 8) technologies conducted to support the Energy Information Administration's long-term projections for energy use are summarized. Several technology options that have the potential to improve the fuel economy and emissions characteristics of heavy-duty trucks are included in the analysis. The technologies are grouped as those that enhance fuel economy and those that improve emissions. Each technology's potential impact on the fuel economy of heavy-duty trucks is estimated. A rough cost projection is also presented. The extent of technology penetration is estimated on the basis of truck data analyses and technical judgment.

Saricks, C. L.; Vyas, A. D.; Stodolsky, F.; Maples, J. D.; Energy Systems; USDOE

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to policy makers such as fuel price, GHG emission (bothdimensions, namely, fuel price, GHG emissions and marketa FGIS results in higher fuel price, lower fuel consumption,

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition,  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Digg

364

Zero Emission Power Plants Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. (SWPC) is engaged in the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stationary power systems. SWPC has combined DOE Developmental funds with commercial customer funding to establish a record of successful SOFC field demonstration power systems of increasing size. SWPC will soon deploy the first unit of a newly developed 250 kWe Combined Heat Power System. It will generate electrical power at greater than 45% electrical efficiency. The SWPC SOFC power systems are equipped to operate on lower number hydrocarbon fuels such as pipeline natural gas, which is desulfurized within the SOFC power system. Because the system operates with a relatively high electrical efficiency, the CO2 emissions, {approx}1.0 lb CO2/ kW-hr, are low. Within the SOFC module the desulfurized fuel is utilized electrochemically and oxidized below the temperature for NOx generation. Therefore the NOx and SOx emissions for the SOFC power generation system are near negligible. The byproducts of the power generation from hydrocarbon fuels that are released into the environment are CO2 and water vapor. This forward looking DOE sponsored Vision 21 program is supporting the development of methods to capture and sequester the CO2, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system. To accomplish this, SWPC is developing a SOFC module design, to be demonstrated in operating hardware, that will maintain separation of the fuel cell anode gas, consisting of H2, CO, H2O and CO2, from the vitiated air. That anode gas, the depleted fuel stream, containing less than 18% (H2 + CO), will be directed to an Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) Afterburner that is being developed by Praxair, Inc.. The OTM is supplied air and the depleted fuel. The OTM will selectively transport oxygen across the membrane to oxidize the remaining H2 and CO. The water vapor is then condensed from the totally 1.5.DOC oxidized fuel stream exiting the afterburner, leaving only the CO2 in gaseous form. That CO2 can then be compressed and sequestered, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system operating on hydrocarbon fuel that adds only water vapor to the environment. Praxair has been developing oxygen separation systems based on dense walled, mixed electronic, oxygen ion conducting ceramics for a number of years. The oxygen separation membranes find applications in syngas production, high purity oxygen production and gas purification. In the SOFC afterburner application the chemical potential difference between the high temperature SOFC depleted fuel gas and the supplied air provides the driving force for oxygen transport. This permeated oxygen subsequently combusts the residual fuel in the SOFC exhaust. A number of experiments have been carried out in which simulated SOFC depleted fuel gas compositions and air have been supplied to either side of single OTM tubes in laboratory-scale reactors. The ceramic tubes are sealed into high temperature metallic housings which precludes mixing of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel and air streams. In early tests, although complete oxidation of the residual CO and H2 in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel was achieved, membrane performance degraded over time. The source of degradation was found to be contaminants in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream. Following removal of the contaminants, stable membrane performance has subsequently been demonstrated. In an ongoing test, the dried afterburner exhaust composition has been found to be stable at 99.2% CO2, 0.4% N2 and 0.6%O2 after 350 hours online. Discussion of these results is presented. A test of a longer, commercial demonstration size tube was performed in the SWPC test facility. A similar contamination of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream occurred and the performance degraded over time. A second test is being prepared. Siemens Westinghouse and Praxair are collaborating on the preliminary design of an OTM equipped Afterburner demonstration unit. The intent is to test the afterburner in conjunction with a reduced size SOFC test module that has the anode gas separati

Shockling, Larry A.; Huang, Keqin; Gilboy, Thomas E. (Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation); Christie, G. Maxwell; Raybold, Troy M. (Praxair, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

365

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: Second Results Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 new fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. The first results report was published in August 2011, describing operation of these new FCEBs from September 2010 through May 2011. New results in this report provide an update through April 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Third Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published two previous reports, in August 2011 and July 2012, describing operation of these buses. New results in this report provide an update covering eight months through October 2013.

Eudy, L.; Post, M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Experimental investigation of regulated and unregulated emissions from a diesel engine fueled with ultralow-sulfur diesel fuel blended with ethanol and dodecanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted on a four-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine using ultralow-sulfur diesel as the main fuel, ethanol as the oxygenate additive and dodecanol as the solvent, to investigate the regulated and unregulated emissions of the engine under five engine loads at an engine speed of 1800revmin?1. Blended fuels containing 6.1%, 12.2%, 18.2% and 24.2% by volume of ethanol, corresponding to 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% by mass of oxygen in the blended fuel, were used. The results indicate that with an increase in ethanol in the fuel, the brake specific fuel consumption becomes higher while there is little change in the brake thermal efficiency. Regarding the regulated emissions, HC and CO increase significantly at low engine load but might decrease at high engine load, \\{NOx\\} emission slightly decreases at low engine load but slightly increases at high engine load, while particulate mass decreases significantly at high engine load. For the unregulated gaseous emissions, unburned ethanol and acetaldehyde increase but formaldehyde, ethene, ethyne, 1,3-butadiene and BTX (benzene, toluene and xylene) in general decrease, especially at high engine load. A diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) is found to reduce significantly most of the pollutants, including the air toxics.

C.S. Cheung; Yage Di; Zuohua Huang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Dual-fuel natural gas/diesel engines: Technology, performance, and emissions. Topical report, February 1993-November 1994  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of current dual-fuel natural gas/diesel engine design, performance, and emissions was conducted. The most pressing technological problems associated with dual-fuel engine use were identified along with potential solutions. It was concluded that dual-fuel engines can achieve low NOx and particulate emissions while retaining fuel-efficiency and BMEP levels comparable to those of diesel engines. The investigation also examined the potential economic impact of dual-fuel engines in diesel-electric locomotives, marine vessels, farm equipment, construction, mining, and industrial equipment, and stand-alone electricity generation systems. Recommendations for further additional funding to support research, development, and demonstration in these applications were then presented.

Turner, S.H.; Weaver, C.S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. land use water use CO2 emissions radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Minimizing fuel emissions by optimizing vessel schedules in liner shipping with uncertain port times  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the problem of designing an optimal vessel schedule in the liner shipping route to minimize the total expected fuel consumption (and emissions) considering uncertain port times and frequency requirements on the liner schedule. The general optimal scheduling problem is formulated and tackled by simulation-based stochastic approximation methods. For special cases subject to the constraint of 100% service level, we prove the convexity and continuous differentiability of the objective function. Structural properties of the optimal schedule under certain conditions are obtained with useful managerial insights regarding the impact of port uncertainties. Case studies are given to illustrate the results.

Xiangtong Qi; Dong-Ping Song

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First Results Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the early implementation experience for the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, the largest fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States. The ZEBA Demonstration group includes five participating transit agencies: AC Transit (lead transit agency), Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Golden Gate Transit (GGT), San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), and San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Putting policy in drive : coordinating measures to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The challenges of energy security and climate change have prompted efforts to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions in light-duty vehicles within the United States. Failures in the market for lower rates of fuel ...

Evans, Christopher W. (Christopher William)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

TRENDS: METHANE EMISSIONS - INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of the total direct radiative forcing of long-lived greenhouse gases (2.45 Of the total direct radiative forcing of long-lived greenhouse gases (2.45 Wm-2), almost 20% is attributable to methane (CH4), according to the 1995 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 1995). Since the mid-1700s, the atmospheric concentration of methane has increased by about 145% (IPCC 1995). Thus, an understanding of the various sources of methane is important. Atmospheric methane is produced both from natural sources (e.g., wetlands) and from human activities (see global methane cycle, from Professor W.S. Reeburgh at the University of California Irvine). Total sources of methane to the atmosphere for the period 1980-1990 were about 535 (range of 410-660) Tg (1 Teragram = 1 million metric tons) CH4 per year, of which 160 (110-210) Tg CH4/yr were from natural sources and 375 (300-450) Tg CH4/yr

374

Part-load performance and emissions of a spark ignition engine fueled with RON95 and RON97 gasoline: Technical viewpoint on Malaysias fuel price debate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to world crude oil price hike in the recent years, many countries have experienced increase in gasoline price. In Malaysia, where gasoline are sold in two grades; RON95 and RON97, and fuel price are regulated by the government, gasoline price have been gradually increased since 2009. Price rise for RON97 is more significant. By 2014, its per liter price is 38% more than that of RON95. This has resulted in escalated dissatisfaction among the mass. People argued they were denied from using a better fuel (RON97). In order to evaluate the claim, there is a need to investigate engine response to these two gasoline grades. The effect of gasoline RON95 and RON97 on performance and exhaust emissions in spark ignition engine was investigated on a representative engine: 1.6L, 4-cylinder Mitsubishi 4G92 engine with CR 11:1. The engine was run at constant speed between 1500 and 3500rpm with 500rpm increment at various part-load conditions. The original engine ECU, a hydraulic dynamometer and control, a combustion analyzer and an exhaust gas analyzer were used to determine engine performance, cylinder pressure and emissions. Results showed that RON95 produced higher engine performance for all part-load conditions within the speed range. RON95 produced on average 4.4% higher brake torque, brake power, brake mean effective pressure as compared to RON97. The difference in engine performance was more significant at higher engine speed and loads. Cylinder pressure and ROHR were evaluated and correlated with engine output. With RON95, the engine produces 2.3% higher fuel conversion efficiency on average but RON97 was advantageous with 2.3% lower brake specific fuel consumption throughout all load condition. In terms of exhaust emissions, RON95 produced 7.7% lower \\{NOx\\} emission but higher CO2, CO and HC emissions by 7.9%, 36.9% and 20.3% respectively. Higher octane rating of gasoline may not necessarily beneficial on engine power, fuel economy and emissions of polluting gases. Even though there is some advantage using RON97 in terms of emission reduction of CO2, CO and HC, the 38% higher price and higher \\{NOx\\} emission is more expensive in the long run. Therefore using RON95 is economically better and environmentally friendlier. The findings provide some techno-economic evaluation on the fuel price debate that surround the Malaysias population in the recent years. The increased of fuel price may have limited their ability to use higher octane gasoline but it did not negatively affecting the users as they perceive.

Taib Iskandar Mohamad; Heoy Geok How

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we used Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model to assess the life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of four soybean-derived fuels: biodiesel fuel produced via transesterification, two renewable diesel fuels (I and II) produced from different hydrogenation processes, and renewable gasoline produced from catalytic cracking. Five approaches were employed to allocate the coproducts: a displacement approach; two allocation approaches, one based on the energy value and the other based on the market value; and two hybrid approaches that integrated the displacement and allocation methods. The relative rankings of soybean-based fuels in terms of energy and environmental impacts were different under the different approaches, and the reasons were analyzed. Results from the five allocation approaches showed that although the production and combustion of soybean-based fuels might increase total energy use, they could have significant benefits in reducing fossil energy use (>52%), petroleum use (>88%), and GHG emissions (>57%) relative to petroleum fuels. This study emphasized the importance of the methods used to deal with coproduct issues and provided a comprehensive solution for conducting a life-cycle assessment of fuel pathways with multiple coproducts.

Huo, H.; Wang, M.; Bloyd, C.; Putsche, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06 06 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t L e s s d e p e n d e n c e o n f o r e i g n o i l t o d a y, a n d t r a n s i t i o n t o a p e t r o l e u m - f r e e , e m i s s i o n s - f r e e v e h i c l e t o m o r r o w . F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m AdvAnced combustion, emission controls, HeAltH impActs, And Fuels merit review And peer evAluAtion Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 2006 Dear Colleague: This document summarizes the comments provided by the Review Panel for the FY 2006 Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Combustion, Emission Controls, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, the "ACE Review," held on May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The raw evaluations and comments of the panel were provided (with reviewers' names deleted) to the presenters in early June and were used by national laboratory

377

Effects of Magnetic Field on Fuel Consumption and Exhaust Emissions in Two-Stroke Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy of permanent magnets was used in this research for the treatment of vehicle fuel (Iraqi gasoline), to reducing consumption, as well as reducing the emission of certain pollutants rates. The experiments in current research comprise the using of permanent magnets with different intensity (2000, 4000, 6000, 9000) Gauss, which installed on the fuel line of the two-stroke engine, and study its impact on gasoline consumption, as well as exhaust gases. For the purpose of comparing the results necessitated the search for experiments without the use of magnets. The overall performance and exhaust emission tests showed a good result, where the rate of reduction in gasoline consumption ranges between (9-14) %, and the higher the value of a reduction in the rate of 14% was obtained using field intensity 6000 Gauss as well as the intensity 9000 Gauss. It was found that the percentages of exhaust gas components (CO, HC) were decreased by 30%, 40% respectively, but CO2 percentage increased up to 10%. Absorption Spectrum of infrared and ultraviolet radiation showed a change in physical and chemical properties in the structure of gasoline molecules under the influence of the magnetic field. Surface tension of gasoline exposed to different intensities of magnetic field was measured and compared with these without magnetization.

Ali S. Faris; Saadi K. Al-Naseri; Nather Jamal; Raed Isse; Mezher Abed; Zainab Fouad; Akeel Kazim; Nihad Reheem; Ali Chaloob; Hazim Mohammad; Hayder Jasim; Jaafar Sadeq; Ali Salim; Aws Abas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

SciTech Connect

U.S. natural gas composition is expected to be more variable in the future. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Unconventional gas supplies, like coal-bed methane, are also expected to grow. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from existing domestic natural gas supplies. To allow the greatest use of gas supplies, end-use equipment should be able to accommodate the widest possible gas composition. For this reason, the effect of gas composition on combustion behavior is of interest. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 589K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx emissions. These results vary from data reported in the literature for some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

D. Straub; D. Ferguson; K. Casleton; G. Richards

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Likewise, it is expected that changes to the domestic gas supply may also introduce changes in natural gas composition. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from conventional domestic natural gas supplies. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 588 K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx or CO emissions. These results are different from data collected on some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences will be described.

Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State & Alt Fuel Providers State & Alt Fuel Providers All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 6 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ch454p AFV Acquisitions by Regulated Fleets (by Fleet Type) Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ch454p Trend of S&FP AFV acquisitions by fleet type from 1992-2010 Last update May 2011 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-14nv4j5 AFV Acquisitions by Regulated Fleets (by Fuel Type)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

various data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption forvarious data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption foras international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% of

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% ofOf the distillate fuel consumed by all marine vessels, weresidual fuel oil from international marine travel. However,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Effects of Fuel Distribution, Velocity Distribution, and Fuel Composition on Static and Dynamic Instabilities and NOx Emissions in Lean Premixed Combustors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distribution, and Fuel Composition on Static and Dynamic Instabilities and NO x Emissions in Lean Premixed Combustors Principal Investigator: Domenic A. Santavicca SCIES Project 03-01-SR109 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (7/01/03, 36 month duration) $403,777 Total Contract Value ($403,777 DOE) * Lower Emissions * Improved Static and Dynamic Stability * Fuel Versatility * Improved Design Methodology UTSR Workshop,10-18-05,DAS Gas Turbine Technology Needs * to determine the effect of combustor operating conditions on the static and dynamic stability characteristics of lean premixed combustors operating on natural gas and coal-derived syngas fuels * to develop a methodology for predicting the effect of

384

Reducing Emissions of Persistent Organic Pollutants from a Diesel Engine by Fueling with Water-Containing Butanol Diesel Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An increasing energy demand and environmental pollution has motivated a search for bio-fuels, such as bio-diesels(1, 2) and bio-alcohols,(3, 4) that can be used as alternative fuels for diesel engines. ... In general, both bio-diesel and bio-alcohols, such as ethanol and butanol, have the advantages of higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and lower emissions of particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbons (HC). ... Diesel Engine and Test Cycle ...

Yu-Cheng Chang; Wen-Jhy Lee; Hsi-Hsien Yang; Lin-Chi Wang; Jau-Huai Lu; Ying I. Tsai; Man-Ting Cheng; Li-Hao Young; Chia-Jui Chiang

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

An experimental study of the effect of a homogeneous combustion catalyst on fuel consumption and smoke emission in a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the influence of a ferrous picrate based homogeneous combustion catalyst on fuel consumption and smoke emission of a laboratory diesel engine. The catalyst used in this study was supplied by Fuel Technology Pty. Ltd. The fuel consumption and smoke emission were measured as a function of engine load, speed and catalyst dosing ratio. The brake specific fuel consumption and smoke emission decreased as the dosing ratio of the catalyst doped in the diesel fuel increased. At the catalyst dosing ratio of 1:3200, the brake specific fuel consumption was reduced by from 2.1% to 2.7% and the smoke emission was reduced by from 6.7% to 26.2% at the full engine load at speeds from 2600rpm to 3400rpm. The results also indicated that the potential of the fuel saving seems to be greater when the engine was run under light load.

Mingming Zhu; Yu Ma; Dongke Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Compression ignition engine performance and emission evaluation of industrial oilseed biofuel feedstocks camelina, carinata, and pennycress across three fuel pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Industrial oilseeds camelina (Camelina sativa L.), carinata (Brassica carinata), and pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) offer great potential as biofuel feedstocks due to their non-food nature and positive agronomic attributes. This research focused on compression ignition (CI) engine performance and emissions of these industrial oilseeds as compared to both traditional feedstocks and petroleum diesel. A John Deere 4.5L test engine was used to evaluate these oils using three fuel pathways (triglyceride blends, biodiesel, and renewable diesel). This engine research represents the first direct comparison of these new biofuel feedstocks to each other and to conventional sources. For some industrial oilseed feedstock and fuel pathway combinations, this study also represents the first engine performance data available. The results were promising, with camelina, carinata, and pennycress engine performance very similar to the traditional oils for each fuel pathway. Fuel consumption, thermal efficiency, and emissions were all were typical as compared to traditional oilseed feedstocks. Average brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) for the industrial oilseed biofuels was within 1.3% of the conventional oilseed biofuels for each fuel type. Initial research with triglyceride blends (TGB), formed by blending straight vegetable oil with gasoline, indicate it may be an ideal fuel pathway for farm-scale fuel production, and was compatible with a direct injection CI engine without modification. TGB had lower fuel consumption and a higher thermal efficiency than biodiesel for each feedstock tested. For several categories, TGB performed similar to petroleum diesel. TGB volumetric bsfc was only 1.9% higher than the petroleum runs. TGB combustion characteristics were similar to biodiesel. Biodiesel runs had several emission benefits such as reductions in carbon monoxide (CO), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH20) emissions as compared to TGB runs. The renewable diesels had petroleum-like engine performance and combustion characteristics, while still maintaining some of the benefits of biodiesel such as reduced CO emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions were also 6% lower for renewable diesel runs than petroleum. Both crude and refined oil was used as feedstock, and did not significantly affect engine performance or emissions in a modern CI engine.

A.C. Drenth; D.B. Olsen; P.E. Cabot; J.J. Johnson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, \\{PAHs\\} and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

Jingxian Wang; Wenzhong Wu; Bernhard Henkelmann; Li You; Antonius Kettrup; Karl-Werner Schramm

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Trend analysis from 1970 to 2008 and model evaluation of EDGARv4 global gridded anthropogenic mercury emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) provides a time-series of man-made emissions of greenhouse gases and short-lived atmospheric pollutants from 1970 to 2008. Mercury is included in EDGARv4.tox1, ...

Muntean, Marilena

389

Evaluation of the Impacts of Biodiesel and Second Generation Biofuels on NOx Emissions for CARB Diesel Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

McCormick, R. L.; Graboski, M. S.; Alleman, T. L.; Herring, A. M.; Tyson, K. S.Impact of Biodiesel Source Material and Chemical Structure on Emissions of Criteria Pollutants from a Heavy-Duty Engine Environ. ... McCormick, Robert L.; Graboski, Michael S.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Herring, Andrew M.; Tyson, K. Shaine ... McCormick, R.; Alvarez, J.; Graboski, M.; Tyson, K.Fuel Additive and Blending Approaches to Reducing NOx Emissions from Biodiesel SAE Tech. ...

Maryam Hajbabaei; Kent C. Johnson; Robert A. Okamoto; Alexander Mitchell; Marcie Pullman; Thomas D. Durbin

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

390

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with ultra low-NO{sub X} burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Physico-chemical characteristics of eight different biomass fuels and comparison of combustion and emission results in a small scale multi-fuel boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study describes the results from the investigation of 7 different biomass fuel types produced on a farm, and a commercial grade wood pellet, for their physical, chemical, thermo-gravimetric and combustion properties. Three types of short rotation coppice (SRC) willow, two species of conifers, forest residues (brash), commercially produced wood-pellets and a chop harvested energy grass crop Miscanthus giganteus spp., (elephant grass) were investigated. Significant differences (pCombustion tests in a 120kW multi-fuel boiler revealed differences, some significant, in the maximum output, energy conversion efficiency, gaseous emission profiles and ash residues produced from the fuels. It was concluded that some of the combustion results could be directly correlated with the inherent properties of the different fuels. Ash production and gaseous emissions were the aspects of performance that were clearly and significantly different though effects on energy outputs were more varied and less consistent. The standard wood pellet fuel returned the best overall performance and miscanthus produced the largest amount of total ash and clinker after combustion in the boiler.

E.G.A. Forbes; D.L. Easson; G.A. Lyons; W.C. McRoberts

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Air- Vehicle Air- Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range Preprint September 2000 * NREL/CP-540-28960 R. Farrington and J. Rugh To Be Presented at the Earth Technologies Forum Washington, D.C. October 31, 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

394

Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:42am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Once a Federal agency has identified its most important mobile greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources overall, it can work with individual sites to determine vehicle usage and refueling trends. Agencies can compare the results of this analysis to internal standards and requirements to identify GHG mitigation opportunities for assets that are underperforming or underutilized. Two examples of this type of analysis focus on: Alternative fuel consumption Vehicle utilization. Figure 1 - An image of a vertical, stacked bar chart titled 'Alternative Fuel Use in AFVs.' The frequency data axis is labeled 'Gallons of Gasoline Equivalent' with a scale of 0-1,400,000 in increments of 200,000. The stacked bar labeled 'CNG Dual Fuel Vehicles' shows CNG from 0-300,000 gallons and Gasoline from 300,000-800,000 gallons. The stacked bar labeled 'E-85 Flex Fuel Vehicles' shows E85 from 0-1,000,000 gallons and Gasoline from 1,000,000-1,250,000 gallons.

395

Power, Efficiency, and Emissions Optimization of a Single Cylinder Direct-Injected Diesel Engine for Testing of Alternative Fuels through Heat Release Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power, Efficiency, and Emissions Optimization of a Single Cylinder Direct-Injected Diesel Engine for Testing of Alternative Fuels through Heat Release Modeling BY Jonathan Michael Stearns Mattson Submitted to the graduate degree program..., Efficiency, and Emissions Optimization of a Single Cylinder Direct-Injected Diesel Engine for Testing of Alternative Fuels through Heat Release Modeling BY Jonathan Michael Stearns Mattson...

Mattson, Jonathan Michael Stearns

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion ... In this investigation, electrostatic precipitator fractional collection efficiency and trace metal emissions were determined experimentally at a 66 MW biomass-fueled bubbling fluidized-bed combustion plant. ... The solid fuel combustion-generated particle emissions typically consist of two types of particles:? fine particles approximately 0.1?1 ?m in diameter that are formed from the ash-forming species that are volatilized during combustion and residual ash particles larger than 1 ?m in diameter that are formed from mineral impurities in the fuels (4). ...

Terttaliisa Lind; Jouni Hokkinen; Jorma K. Jokiniemi; Sanna Saarikoski; Risto Hillamo

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effects of diesel injection pressure on the performance and emissions of a HD common-rail diesel engine fueled with diesel/methanol dual fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The diesel/methanol dual fuel (DMDF) combustion mode was conducted on a turbo-charged, inter-cooling diesel engine with 6-cylinder for the heavy duty (HD) vehicle. In DMDF mode, methanol is injected into the intake port to form lean air/methanol premixed mixture, and then ignited by the direct-injected diesel fuel in cylinder. This study is aimed to investigate the effect of diesel injection pressure on the characteristics of performance and exhaust emissions from the engine with common-rail fuel system. The experimental results show that at low injection pressure, the IMEP of DMDF mode is lower than that of pure diesel combustion (D) mode. COVIEMP of DMDF mode firstly decreases and then increases with increasing injection pressure, and it remains under 2.1% for all the tests. It is found that the combustion duration in DMDF mode becomes shorter, the maximum cylinder pressure and the peak heat release rate increase, and CA50 gets close to the top dead center as the injection pressure increases. BSFC of DMDF mode decreases with the increase of injection pressure, and is lower than that of D mode for injection pressure over 115MPa. Both of NOX and smoke emissions are reduced in DMDF mode. But smoke decreases and NOX increases as the diesel injection pressure increases in DMDF mode. DMDF generates lower NO and CO2 emissions, while produces higher HC, CO, andNO2 emissions compared to D mode. As the diesel injection pressure increases, CO and HC emissions are decreased, however, CO2 and NO2 emissions are slightly increased.

Junheng Liu; Anren Yao; Chunde Yao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Neural Network Approach for the Correlation of Exhaust Emissions from a Diesel Engine with Diesel Fuel Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National Technical University of Athens, Department of Chemical Engineering, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Athens 157 80, Greece ... The emissions from diesel engines have been drastically reduced during the last 30 years as a result of significant improvement in engine technology and modification of diesel fuel. ... First principles models are using fundamental equations, which have been developed by analyzing the physical insight of the systems. ...

D. Karonis; E. Lois; F. Zannikos; A. Alexandridis; H. Sarimveis

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the building/street scale for a large US city  

SciTech Connect

In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system and contribute to quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. Called the Hestia Project, this research effort is the first to use bottom-up methods to quantify all fossil fuel CO2 emissions down to the scale of individual buildings, road segments, and industrial/electricity production facilities on an hourly basis for an entire urban landscape. a large city (Indianapolis, Indiana USA). Here, we describe the methods used to quantify the on-site fossil fuel CO2 emissions across the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. This effort combines a series of datasets and simulation tools such as a building energy simulation model, traffic data, power production reporting and local air pollution reporting. The system is general enough to be applied to any large U.S. city and holds tremendous potential as a key component of a carbon monitoring system in addition to enabling efficient greenhouse gas mitigation and planning. We compare our estimate of fossil fuel emissions from natural gas to consumption data provided by the local gas utility. At the zip code level, we achieve a bias adjusted pearson r correlation value of 0.92 (p<0.001).

Gurney, Kevin R.; Razlivanov, I.; Song, Yang; Zhou, Yuyu; Benes, Bedrich; Abdul- Massih, Michel

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels ... Hill, J.; Nelson, E.; Tilman, D.; Polasky, S.; Tiffany, D. Environmental, Economic, and Energetic Costs and Benefits of Biodiesel and Ethanol Biofuels Proc. ...

Hong Huo; Michael Wang; Cary Bloyd; Vicky Putsche

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

402

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 110. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2003 and 2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2003 to 2025, to 8,062 million metric tons (Figure 110). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year. New carbon dioxide mitigation programs, more rapid improvements in technology, or more rapid adoption of voluntary programs could result in lower emissions levels than projected here.

403

ZERO EMISSION POWER PLANTS USING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS AND OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

Over 16,700 hours of operational experience was gained for the Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) elements of the proposed SOFC/OTM zero-emission power generation concept. It was repeatedly demonstrated that OTMs with no additional oxidation catalysts were able to completely oxidize the remaining depleted fuel in a simulated SOFC anode exhaust at an O{sub 2} flux that met initial targets. In such cases, neither residual CO nor H{sub 2} were detected to the limits of the gas chromatograph (<10 ppm). Dried OTM afterburner exhaust streams contained up to 99.5% CO{sub 2}. Oxygen flux through modified OTMs was double or even triple that of the standard OTMs used for the majority of testing purposes. Both the standard and modified membranes in laboratory-scale and demonstration-sized formats exhibited stable performance over extended periods (2300 to 3500 hours or 3 to 5 months). Reactor contaminants, were determined to negatively impact OTM performance stability. A method of preventing OTM performance degradation was developed and proven to be effective. Information concerning OTM and seal reliability over extended periods and through various chemical and thermal shocks and cycles was also obtained. These findings were used to develop several conceptual designs for pilot (10 kWe) and commercial-scale (250 kWe) SOFC/OTM zero emission power generation systems.

G. Maxwell Christie; Troy M. Raybold

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

404

Improving gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine efficiency and emissions with hydrogen from exhaust gas fuel reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exhaust gas fuel reforming has been identified as a thermochemical energy recovery technology with potential to improve gasoline engine efficiency, and thereby reduce CO2 in addition to other gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions. The principle relies on achieving energy recovery from the hot exhaust stream by endothermic catalytic reforming of gasoline and a fraction of the engine exhaust gas. The hydrogen-rich reformate has higher enthalpy than the gasoline fed to the reformer and is recirculated to the intake manifold, i.e. reformed exhaust gas recirculation (REGR). The REGR system was simulated by supplying hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO) into a conventional EGR system. The hydrogen and CO concentrations in the REGR stream were selected to be achievable in practice at typical gasoline exhaust temperatures. Emphasis was placed on comparing REGR to the baseline gasoline engine, and also to conventional EGR. The results demonstrate the potential of REGR to simultaneously increase thermal efficiency, reduce gaseous emissions and decrease PM formation.

Daniel Fennell; Jose Herreros; Athanasios Tsolakis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

97 BTUs of refinery energy per BTU of dieseland hydrogen) per BTU of diesel produced, depending onof refinery energy per BTU of diesel fuel In the real world

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel?Diethyl Adipate Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The advantage of a diesel engine compared with a gasoline engine is the fuel economy benefits; however, the high NOx and smoke emissions still remain the main obstacles for the increasing application of diesel engines with the increasing concerns for environmental protection and implementation of more stringent exhaust gas regulations, thus further reduction in engine emissions becomes one of major tasks in engine development. ... In the application of pure oxygenated fuels, Fleisch et al.,1 Kapus et al.,2 and Sorenson et al.3 have studied dimethyl ether (DME) in the modified diesel engine, and their results showed that the engine could achieve ultralow emission prospects without fundamental change in combustion systems. ... Murayama, T.; Zheng, M.; Chikahisa, T. Simultaneous reduction of smoke and NOx from a DI diesel engine with EGR and dimethyl carbonate; SAE paper 952518, Society of Automotive Engineers:? Warrendale, PA, 1995. ...

Yi Ren; Zuohua Huang; Haiyan Miao; Deming Jiang; Ke Zeng; Bing Liu; Xibin Wang

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Impact of Fuel Properties on Light-Duty Engine Performance and Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Describes the effects of seven fuels with significantly different fuel properties on a state-of-the-art light-duty diesel engine. Cetane numbers range between 26 and 76 for the investigated fuels.

408

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of residual fuel oil are identical in the inventory and inCARB SEDS inventory fuel use Residual fuel oil Distillatein their oil and gas extraction processes. In its inventory,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Potential for Reduction of Exhaust Emissions in a Common-Rail Direct-Injection Diesel Engine by Fueling with FischerTropsch Diesel Fuel Synthesized from Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the constant speed/varying load test modes, the use of CFT also resulted in a general reduction of regulated emissions. ... (5, 6) Moreover, FT diesel fuels can be used in contemporary diesel engines without any modification and with a negligible or weak improvement of engine efficiency. ... Liu, Z.; Shi, S.; Li, Y.Coal liquefaction technologiesDevelopment in China and challenges in chemical reaction engineering Chem. ...

Chonglin Song; Guohong Gong; Jinou Song; Gang Lv; Xiaofeng Cao; Lidong Liu; Yiqiang Pei

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effect of Oxygenated Fuel on Combustion and Emissions in a Light-Duty Turbo Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of fuel oxygen content on soot reduction in diesel engines is well-known. ... Fuel consumption was determined by weighing the fuel at the beginning and end of each test mode or each fuel blend through a Sartorius precision scale, with an accuracy of 2 g. ... studies on effects of oxygenated fuels in conjunction with single and split fuel injections were conducted at high and low loads on a Caterpillar SCOTE DI diesel engine. ...

Juhun Song; Kraipat Cheenkachorn; Jinguo Wang; Joseph Perez; Andr L. Boehman; Philip John Young; Francis J. Waller

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fuel...

412

Effects of bio-diesel fuel blends on the performance and emissions of diesel engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study presents an experimental investigation into the effects of running biodiesel fuel blends on conventional diesel engines. Bio fuels provide a way to produce (more)

Bastiani, Sergio.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Alternatives to Diesel Fuel in California - Fuel Cycle Energy and Emission Effects of Possible Replacements Due to the TAC Diesel Particulate Decision  

SciTech Connect

Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression ignition by spark ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, ressionignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOx emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM10 reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated.

Christopher L. Saraicks; Donald M. Rote; Frank Stodolsky; James J. Eberhardt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LDV. However, Ford (Wallington, 1996), the EIA (Emissions ofautomobile air conditioners (Wallington, 1996) . As a resultsystems is not detectable (Wallington, 1996) . Therefore, I

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Stations Alternative Fueling Stations All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 13 results Arra-thumb ARRA Electrification Projects Arra-thumb Last update November 2012 View Map Graph Biofuelsatlas BioFuels Atlas Biofuelsatlas BioFuels Atlas is an interactive map for comparing biomass feedstocks and biofuels by location. This tool helps users select from and apply biomass data layers to a map, as well as query and download biofuels and feedstock

416

Efficiency and emissions of a spark ignition engine fueled with synthetic gases obtained from catalytic decomposition of biogas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the tests developed in a naturally aspirated spark ignition engine, intended for installation in vehicles, fueled with synthetic gases obtained from catalytic decomposition of biogas. The experimental tests were carried out at three equivalence ratios and different speeds and loads. Two synthetic blends were used and the results were compared with those of gasoline and methane. Efficiency and emissions were calculated for the different fuels under the same operation conditions and it was found that at lean equivalence ratios, brake thermal efficiency with synthetic gases approached to the traditional fuels and even improved it at ?=0.7. BSCO2 emissions increased due to the CO2 content of the gaseous blends. While CO increased at stoichiometric conditions, it decreased at lean conditions because the H2 contained in synthetic gases improved combustion at these conditions. BSHC measured were very low with synthetic gases because of the low content of methane in blends. The change in the fraction of H2 and CO2 of the synthetic blends led to quite different results in BSNOx. Syngas 1 \\{BSNOx\\} emissions were the lowest of all fuels, while syngas 2 \\{BSNOx\\} were the highest because of its high H2 fraction.

J. Arroyo; F. Moreno; M. Muoz; C. Monn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number Emissions (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Start of injection can improve environmental performance of fuel-efficient gasoline direct injection engines.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

From Sulfur Dioxide to Greenhouse Gases: Trends and Events Shaping Future Emissions Trading Programs in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The success of the United States sulfur dioxide (SO2...) trading program has led to worldwide interest in emissions trading. The program has become a model for ... a theoretical option discussed only by economist...

Joseph Kruger

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Alternative fuels for low emissions and improved performance in CI and heavy duty engines  

SciTech Connect

Contents include: Limited durability of the diesel engine with a dual-fuel system on neat sunflower oil; Analysis and testing of a high-pressure micro-compressor; Spark-assisted alcohol operation in a low heat rejection engine; Combustion improvement of heavy-duty methanol engine by using autoignition system; Clean Fleet Alternative Fuels demonstration project; Vehicle fuel economy -- the Clean Fleet Alternative Fuels project; Safety and occupational hygiene results -- Clean Fleet Alternative Fuels project; Vehicle reliability and maintenance -- Clean Fleet Alternative Fuels project; Flammability tests of alcohol/gasoline vapors; Flame luminosity enhancement of neat methanol fuel by non-aromatic hydrocarbon additives; and more.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Zhai, H., H.C. Frey, N.M. Rouphail, G.A. Gonalves, and T.L. Farias, "Fuel Consumption and Emissions Comparisons between Ethanol 85 and Gasoline Fuels for Flexible Fuel Vehicles," Paper No. 2007-AWMA-444, Proceedings, 100th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Alternative Fuel Data Center (AFDC) of the U.S. Department of Energy.4 Carbon dioxide (CO2), CO, and nitricZhai, H., H.C. Frey, N.M. Rouphail, G.A. Gonçalves, and T.L. Farias, "Fuel Consumption and Emissions Comparisons between Ethanol 85 and Gasoline Fuels for Flexible Fuel Vehicles," Paper No. 2007-AWMA

Frey, H. Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Coordinated EV Adoption: Double-Digit Reductions in Emissions and Fuel Use for $40/Vehicle-Year  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Eastern Interconnection comprises six regions, each of which are modeled separately in this study: Florida Reliability Coordinating Council (FRCC), Southeast Electric Reliability Council (SERC), Reliability First Corporation (RFC), Southwest Power Pool (SPP), and United States portions of Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) and Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC). ... The linking of CV fuel efficiency standards with EV adoption rates does provide flexibility in meeting the standard and may also support development and adoption of EV technologies. ... using COPERT software: 167112 TJ of fossil fuel energy, 12213 kton of CO2 emission and 141 kton of CO, 20 kton of HC, 46 kton of NOx and 3 kton of PM. ...

Dong Gu Choi; Frank Kreikebaum; Valerie M. Thomas; Deepak Divan

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

422

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Petroleum Use Reduction Petroleum Use Reduction All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 4 results Generated_thumb20131211-30676-7w9hmt Clean Cities Cumulative Petroleum Savings Generated_thumb20131211-30676-7w9hmt Trend of displacement by all fuel and technology types from 1994-2012 Last update December 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20131211-30676-1y0adz7 Clean Cities Petroleum Savings by AFV Type

424

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFVs and HEVs AFVs and HEVs All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 21 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ch454p AFV Acquisitions by Regulated Fleets (by Fleet Type) Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ch454p Trend of S&FP AFV acquisitions by fleet type from 1992-2010 Last update May 2011 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-14nv4j5 AFV Acquisitions by Regulated Fleets (by Fuel Type)

425

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Cities Clean Cities All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 10 results Petroleum Use Reduction - Generated_thumb20131211-30676-7w9hmt Clean Cities Cumulative Petroleum Savings Generated_thumb20131211-30676-7w9hmt Trend of displacement by all fuel and technology types from 1994-2012 Last update December 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20131211-30676-1y0adz7 Clean Cities Petroleum Savings by AFV Type

426

ULTRA-LOW SULFUR REDUCTION EMISSION CONTROL DEVICE/DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-BOARD FUEL SULFUR TRAP  

SciTech Connect

Honeywell is actively working on a 3-year program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an ''on-vehicle'' desulfurization fuel filter for heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NO{sub x} adsorbers. The NO{sub x} adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and ''2007-Rule'' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters will also be examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. It is anticipated that the technology developed for heavy-duty applications will be applicable to light-duty as well. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consists of four phases. Phase I will focus on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II we will concentrate on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III will study life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV will focus on efficacy and life testing and component integration. The project team will include a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson Matthey), a CIDI engine manufacturer (Mack Trucks Inc.), a filter recycler (American Wastes Industries), and a low-sulfur fuel supplier (Equilon, a joint venture between Shell and Texaco).

Ron Rohrbach; Gary Zulauf; Tim Gavin

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assessment of free-rotating air swirling device to reduce SI engine emissions and improve fuel economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Claims are furnished in several patents that swirling the intake air in SI engines can improve fuel economy and reduce environmental impact. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a free rotating air swirling device (FRASD) installed in the air intake hose on the overall performance and emission characteristics of an SI engine. FRASDs with three vane angles were tested; 6, 9 and 12 degrees. The baseline engine was tested without FRASD at selected loads. Then, the engine was tested at the same loads with each FRASD and results were compared with the baseline engine. Experiments show that all tested FRASDs exhibit some degree of enhancement in the overall performance and reduction in exhaust emissions. It was found that enhancement greatly depends on the engine operating condition in addition to the FRASD vane angle. Specifically, best enhancement in performance and highest reduction in emissions was observed with the 9-degrees which reduced specific fuel consumption by 12%, hydrocarbon (HC) emissions by 20% and carbon monoxide emissions by 12%. Suggestions are made to modify the FRASD design to magnify its impact on engine performance.

Raed Kafafy; Sharzali Che Mat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effect of the Addition of Diglyme in Diesel Fuel on Combustion and Emissions in a Compression?Ignition Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the application of pure oxygenated fuels, Fleisch et al.,1 Kapus et al.,2 and Sorenson et al.3 have studied dimethyl ether (DME) in the modified diesel engine, and their results showed that the engine could achieve ultralow emission prospects without fundamental changes in combustion systems. ... 16 Mitsuo et al.17 investigated the effects of DGM on engine exhaust emissions in three different diesel engines. ... (18)?Heywood, J. B. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals; McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1988. ...

Yi Ren; Zuohua Huang; Haiyan Miao; Deming Jiang; Ke Zeng; Bing Liu; Xibin Wang

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and CO, compared to diesel vehicles, while meeting certification requirements deer11johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Emissions Control...

430

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

\\{NOx\\} emission characteristics of fluidized bed combustion in atmospheres rich in oxygen and water vapor for high-nitrogen fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study examines the influence of water vapor in combustion atmosphere on \\{NOx\\} emission from oxygen-enriched combustion of air-dried distilled spirit lees and its char in a laboratory fluidized bed of 760mm high and 68mm in inner diameter. Steam was added into the fluidizing gas to vary the vapor content in the combustion atmosphere. At a combustion temperature of 950C and a steam-to-fuel mass ratio (S/F) of 0.5, the presence of water vapor reduced the \\{NOx\\} concentration in the flue gas for low O2 contents (?30vol.%) in the combustion agent but increased the \\{NOx\\} emission for high O2 contents (?40vol.%). The possible causes were clarified for this shift from suppression to promotion of fuel-N conversion into \\{NOx\\} with raising O2 concentration in the combustion agent. Varying temperature from 850C to 1150C resulted in a peak conversion of fuel-N to \\{NOx\\} in the temperature range of 9501050C for all the tested O2 concentrations. Increasing the O2 concentration tended to lower the critical temperature corresponding to such a peak fuel-N conversion. Testing results also suggested that the presence of excessive water vapor in the combustion atmosphere would inhibit the release of fuel-N in the devolatilization stage and promote the formation of some reducing gases. In addition to the anticipated diluting effect, the steam addition also shortened the reaction time for homogeneous and heterogeneous \\{NOx\\} reduction by the reducing gases and char. It is postulated that the formation of OH radicals at high O2 content and high temperature could cause the observed increase in the \\{NOx\\} emission.

Chuanqiang Zhu; Shuyuan Liu; Huan Liu; Juan Yang; Xiaoxing Liu; Guangwen Xu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Quantification of Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions on the Building/Street Scale for a Large U.S. City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system, and contribute to quantitatively based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. ... Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor species to atmospheric fine particulate matter with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. ...

Kevin R. Gurney; Igor Razlivanov; Yang Song; Yuyu Zhou; Bedrich Benes; Michel Abdul-Massih

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.  

SciTech Connect

The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin 15, Ireland

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel and Lubricant Effects on Emissions Control Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fuel and...

436

Viability of waste-based cooking fuels for Developing countries : combustion emissions and field feasibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass-derived cooking fuels are used by three billion people worldwide. The drawbacks of such fuels, typically wood or wood-derived charcoal, include health hazards, negative environmental effects, and perpetuation of ...

Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residual fuel oil, petroleum coke, and waste and other oil)residual fuel oil, petroleum coke, and waste and other oil22 CHP plants. For petroleum coke, CALEB only reports final

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Emissions and efficiency of agricultural diesels using low-proof ethanol as supplement fuel. [Tractor engines  

SciTech Connect

Experimental investigations were made to evaluate the potential of using low-proof ethanol to supplement diesel fuel in agricultural engines. Fumigation, mechanical emulsification, and chemical emulsifiers were used to introduce a significant amount of alcohol with diesel fuel for engine operation. A total of five diesel tractor engines were tested using each of the fuel systems. Exhaust products and fuel usage were determined at various engine speed/load conditions. 5 references, 12 figures, 14 tables.

Allsup, J.R.; Clingenpeel, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Characterization of Particulate Emissions from GDI Engine Combustion with Alcohol-blended Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis showed that gasoline direct injection engine particulates from alcohol-blended fuels are significantly different in morphology and nanostructures

440

Reaction Profiles during Exhaust-Assisted Reforming of Diesel Engine Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction Profiles during Exhaust-Assisted Reforming of Diesel Engine Fuels ... The reforming efficiency was dependent on the fuel type and followed the general trend of bioethanol > rapeseed methyl ester > low-sulfur diesel fuel. ... The use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in diesel engines reduces nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions but results in an increased release of smoke and particulate matter (PM), as well as higher fuel consumption. ...

A. Tsolakis; A. Megaritis; S. E. Golunski

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Market Vehicle Market All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 6 results Biofuelsatlas BioFuels Atlas Biofuelsatlas BioFuels Atlas is an interactive map for comparing biomass feedstocks and biofuels by location. This tool helps users select from and apply biomass data layers to a map, as well as query and download biofuels and feedstock data. The state zoom function summarizes state energy use and infrastructure for traditional and bioenergy power, fuels, and resources.

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 17 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-ue59qa Advanced Fuels RFS2 Mandates and Consumption Generated_thumb20130810-31804-ue59qa Last update August 2012 View Graph Graph Download Data Biofuelsatlas BioFuels Atlas Biofuelsatlas BioFuels Atlas is an interactive map for comparing biomass feedstocks and biofuels by location. This tool helps users select from and apply biomass

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Consumption and Efficiency Consumption and Efficiency All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 13 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ox6tpc Average Annual Fuel Use of Major Vehicle Categories Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ox6tpc Comparison of fuel use, miles traveled, and fuel economy among vehicle types Last update April 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-ufdolp Average Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled of Major Vehicle Categories

444

From carbon to light: a new framework for estimating greenhouse gas emissions reductions from replacing fuel-based lighting with LED systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is considerable well-intended, yet wishful anticipation about reducing greenhouse gas emissions by replacing fuel-based lighting in the developing world with grid-independent light-emitting diode (LED) lighting

Evan Mills; Arne Jacobson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Recent trends in atmospheric methyl bromide: analysis of post-Montreal Protocol variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003) caution that their bio- fuel emission estimates couldthe Yevich and Logan (2003) bio- fuel emissions to CH 3 Br

Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S; Montzka, S. A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics of gas to liquid (GTL) fuels and its blends with diesel and bio-diesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Crude oil price hikes, energy security concerns and environmental drivers have turned the focus to alternative fuels. Gas to liquid (GTL) diesel is regarded as a promising alternative diesel fuel, considering the adeptness to use directly as a diesel fuel or in blends with petroleum-derived diesel or bio-diesel. GTL fuel derived from FischerTropsch synthesis is of distinctly different characteristics than fossil diesel fuel due to its paraffinic nature, virtually zero sulfur, low aromatic contents and very high cetane number. GTL fuel is referred to as a clean fuel for its inherent ability to reduce engine exhaust emission even with blends of diesel and bio-diesel. This paper illustrates feasibility of GTL fuel in context of comparative fuel properties with conventional diesel and bio-diesels. This review also describes the technical attributes of GTL and its blends with diesel and bio-diesel focusing their impact on engine performance and emission characteristics on the basis of the previous research works. It can introduce an efficacious guideline to devise several blends of alternative fuels, further the development of engine performance and constrain exhaust emission to cope with the relentless efforts to manufacture efficient and environment friendly powertrains.

H. Sajjad; H.H. Masjuki; M. Varman; M.A. Kalam; M.I. Arbab; S. Imtenan; S.M. Ashrafur Rahman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Simulating Study of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions Control  

SciTech Connect

We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models to simulate the impact of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty (LD) diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results indicate that utilizing PCCI combustion significantly reduces fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions for the conventional diesel-powered vehicle with NOx and particulate emissions controls. These benefits result from a favorable engine speed-load distribution over the cycle combined with a corresponding reduction in the need to regenerate the LNT and DPF. However, the current PCCI technology appears to offer less potential benefit for diesel HEVs equipped with similar emissions controls. This is because PCCI can only be activated over a relatively small part of the drive cycle. Thus we conclude that future utilization of PCCI in diesel HEVs will require significant extension of the available speed-load range for PCCI and revision of current HEV engine management strategies before significant benefits can be realized.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Accurate Predictions of Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions in Engines Using CFD Simulations With Detailed Fuel Chemistry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Accurate fuel models with hundreds of species in advanced CFD with reasonable simulation times. Reaction workbench used for surrogate blend formulation and model reduction. FORTE CFD used for HCCI and LTC diesel engine and validated for PRF-ethanol and diesel

450

Combustion and emission characteristics of a turbocharged diesel engine using high premixed ratio of methanol and diesel fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combustion and emission characteristics of a dual fuel diesel engine with high premixed ratio of methanol (PRm) were investigated. Experiments were performed on a 6-cylinder turbocharged, inter-cooling diesel engine. Methanol was injected through the intake port and ignited by direct injected diesel in the cylinder, the maximum \\{PRm\\} was over 70%. The experimental results showed that with high PRm, the maximum in-cylinder pressure increased from medium to high engine load but varied little or even decreased at low engine speed and load. High \\{PRm\\} prolonged the ignition delay but shortened the combustion duration and decreased the in-cylinder gas temperature at ignition timing. Hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde emissions and the proportion of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in nitrogen oxides (NOX) increased significantly with the increase of \\{PRm\\} while NOX and dry soot emissions were significantly reduced, which meant the trade-off relationship between NOX and soot emissions disappeared. The increased HC, CO and formaldehyde emissions could be effectively reduced by diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) when the exhaust gas temperature reached the light off temperature of the DOC. After DOC, the NO2 proportion in NOX was greatly reduced to less than that of baseline engine at methanol premixed mode but increased slightly at pure diesel mode. The maximum \\{PRm\\} was confined by in-cylinder pressure at high engine speed and load. But at low engine speed and load, it was confined by the high emissions of HC, CO and formaldehyde even after DOC.

Lijiang Wei; Chunde Yao; Quangang Wang; Wang Pan; Guopeng Han

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas fueled school bus: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work conducted under Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Project 03-6871, ``Development of an Ultra-Safe and Low-Emission Dedicated Alternative Fuel School Bus.`` The project was sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Subcontract No. ZCF-5-13519-01. This report documents Phase 3 -- Integration and Phase 4 -- Demonstration and serves as the final report for this project. Phase 1 -- Systems Design and Phase 2 -- Prototype Hardware Development were documented in NREL publications TP-425-7609 and TP-425-2 1081, respectively. Several significant areas of work are summarized in this report. Integration of the engine technologies developed under Phase 2 into a production Deere 8.1-L, spark-ignition compressed natural gas engine is detailed, including information on the engine and control system modifications that were made. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions results verifying the ultra-low emissions output of this engine are also included. The informal project goal of producing oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions less than or equal to 1.0 g/bhp-hr over the FTP heavy-duty engine cycle was attained. In addition, a test run that resulted in less than one half of the Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle limit for NO{sub x} plus non-methane hydrocarbons was obtained. These results were for engine-out (no catalyst) emissions. Results using a catalyst produced very low formaldehyde emissions and virtually zero carbon monoxide and particulate matter emissions. Following these excellent results, a duplicate engine was assembled and integrated into the prototype ultra-safe school bus, the Envirobus 2000. Many of the new and modified subsystems developed during this project for the engine are considered strong candidates for inclusion into the production Deere 8.1-L gas engine in the near future.

Kubesh, J.T. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

453

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving Patterns Driving Patterns All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 9 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1cr1wpv Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled in the U.S. Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1cr1wpv Trend of Vehicle-Miles Traveled in the U.S. from 1970-2013 Last update April 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-pe0nga Average Vehicle Trip Length by Purpose Generated_thumb20130810-31804-pe0nga

454

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 2 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-cpho29 Truck Stop Electrification Sites Generated_thumb20130810-31804-cpho29 Trend of TSE sites by state from 2006-2012 Last update November 2012 View Graph Graph Download Data Map_thumbnail Truckstop Electrification Facilities Map_thumbnail Last update May 2013 View Graph Graph Truck Stop Electrification Sites

455

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Program Program All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 3 results Cc-coalitions-thumb Clean Cities Coalitions Cc-coalitions-thumb Last update December 2012 View Image Graph Generated_thumb20130810-31804-vrlv1v Clean Cities Funding Generated_thumb20130810-31804-vrlv1v Trend of budgets, stakeholder grants, and matching funds from 1998-2010 Last update December 2012 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1374mkv

456

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents a next generation model-based engine controller that incorporates real-time fuel efficiency optimization and tested under fully transient engine and vehicle operating conditions.

457

Light-Duty Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Drive Cycle Fuel Economy and Emissions Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Vehicle systems simulations using experimental data demonstrate improved modeled fuel economy of 15% for passenger vehicles solely from powertrain efficiency relative to a 2009 PFI gasoline baseline.

458

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

general, the soy-based, animal-based and renewable diesel fuels were tested over UDDS, FTP and 50 mph Cruise cycles,

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Cost-effective policy instruments for greenhouse gas emission reduction and fossil fuel substitution through bioenergy production in Austria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation and security of energy supply are important targets of Austrian energy policy. Bioenergy production based on resources from agriculture and forestry is an important option for attaining these targets. To increase the share of bioenergy in the energy supply, supporting policy instruments are necessary. The cost-effectiveness of these instruments in attaining policy targets depends on the availability of bioenergy technologies. Advanced technologies such as second-generation biofuels, biomass gasification for power production, and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) will likely change the performance of policy instruments. This article assesses the cost-effectiveness of energy policy instruments, considering new bioenergy technologies for the year 2030, with respect to greenhouse gas emission (GHG) reduction and fossil fuel substitution. Instruments that directly subsidize bioenergy are compared with instruments that aim at reducing GHG emissions. A spatially explicit modeling approach is used to account for biomass supply and energy distribution costs in Austria. Results indicate that a carbon tax performs cost-effectively with respect to both policy targets if BECCS is not available. However, the availability of BECCS creates a trade-off between GHG emission reduction and fossil fuel substitution. Biofuel blending obligations are costly in terms of attaining the policy targets.

Johannes Schmidt; Sylvain Leduc; Erik Dotzauer; Erwin Schmid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Reduced Turbine Emissions Using Hydrogen-Enriched Fuels R.W. Schefer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-blended methane and air were studied to evaluate the potential improvements in flame stability as hydrogen replaces methane as the primary fuel component. INTRODUCTION The development of advanced combustion value fuels containing significant hydrogen are often produced as a by-product in Coal- Gasification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel trends emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Trends Online Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contributing Investigators Contributing Investigators Atmospheric Trace Gas Concentrations Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Isotope Records Atmospheric Methane Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide Atmospheric Hydrogen Other Atmospheric Trace Gases Related atmospheric trace gas, carbon isotope, radionuclide, and aerosol data Greenhouse Gas Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values from Fossil-Fuel Consumption in the U.S.A. Estimates of Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emitted for Each State in the U.S.A. and the District of Columbia Related carbon dioxide emissions data Methane Emissions Carbon Flux from Land-Cover Change Related data on carbon flux from changes in land use and land cover Climate Temperature Clouds Related climate data

462

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 an